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* Posts by Jeffrey Nonken

195 posts • joined 3 Sep 2007

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T-Mobile US lobs sueball at Huawei: Claims Chinese giant stole robot tech

Jeffrey Nonken

Assuming T-Mobile isn't outright lying, it seems pretty cut and dried to me: Huawei signed a contract and then violated the contract. Companies allow others to rent their equipment all the time without expecting the renters to steal the parts and make off with the technology, and nobody considers it remarkable, and NDAs are pretty common. I've signed a few myself.

Noise about "they must have expected something because they put cameras up" is a red herring; when most companies put security cameras on expensive equipment people don't call it "entrapment", they call it "insurance premium reduction."

Part 2 is a bit less simple: how much should Huawei pay for this breach of contract? T-Mobile is naturally going to high-ball the number in the hopes that it doesn't get whittled down to nothing. It's up to the courts to come up with a final figure, right after they decide if there was a contract breach in the first place. It's what they're for, after all.

My only connection to T-Mobile is as a formerly loyal customer, now a pissed off ex-customer.

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US Copyright Office rules that monkeys CAN'T claim copyright over their selfies

Jeffrey Nonken

"Photographer can't cash in on primate pics"

Balderdash. Stuff and nonsense. The copyright office is not saying that the photographer cannot sell the photos nor gain from them in some fashion. They are only saying that he can't copyright the picture, and therefore has no monopoly. He cannot prevent anybody from using the photos and cannot require those who do to compensate him.

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Password manager LastPass goes titsup: Users LOCKED OUT

Jeffrey Nonken

KeePass + BTSync FTW

That is all.

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Why hackers won't be able to hijack your next flight - the facts

Jeffrey Nonken
Headmaster

Re: We don't need no stinkin' backups

"I deal with database backups - and restores - all of the time." ... "The point is, unless you test your backups, they are useless. How do they know if these backup systems are working if you never use them?"

Airplane backup systems aren't like the systems you're used to in that they're constantly running in parallel. These aren't offline backups; they're a separate set of instruments that are working at the same time as the computerized versions. A glance will tell you if the standby instruments are operational, and standard pre-flight checks also require they all be working.

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In the Land of the Free, Home of the Brave ... you can legally carrier unlock your own phone

Jeffrey Nonken
Meh

Yeah. Our wonderful Congress is looking out for us by putting band-aids on bad laws rather than... I dunno, say, fixing those laws?

Well, at least it's better than nothing.

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Marc Andreessen: Edward Snowden is a 'textbook traitor'

Jeffrey Nonken

Shoot first, then call what you hit the target

If you define "Traitor" as "Edward Snowden", then yes, Edward Snowden is a textbook traitor. Which is pretty much what Mr. Andreessen is doing by metaphorically using Mr. Snowden's photo as the definition.

Then there are those of us in the real world and don't redefine words to mean whatever supports our latest madness. If you use the actual dictionary definition -- or, better yet, the US Constitution's definition -- it may not be so simple.

"Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort."

(I'm not claiming that the Constitution's definition is necessarily superior to that of a dictionary. It's just that it's the definition that Snowden should be prosecuted (or not) over, and would be if our government weren't being run by a bunch of [string of expletives deleted], seeing as how Mr. Snowden performed his actions as a US citizen.)

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US Supreme Court supremo rakes Aereo lawman in oral arguments

Jeffrey Nonken

"Your technological model is based solely on circumventing legal prohibitions that you don't want to comply with," Roberts told Aereo attorney David Frederick, reports Deadline Hollywood. "There's no reason for you to have 10,000 dime-sized antennas except to get around the Copyright Act."

Balderdash. Technologically it's nonsense, but the entire nonsensical effort was made solely to try to fit into existing laws. If making an effort to stay within the limits of the law is obviously an attempt to circumvent the law, then our entire legal system is a sick, sadistic joke. Either it's legal or it isn't, and there's no excuse for trying to argue that it's illegal because it's legal.

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Those NSA 'reforms' in full: El Reg translates US Prez Obama's pledges

Jeffrey Nonken

"...FISC is notorious for not turning down requests for investigations – but at least there's some oversight involved, as opposed to the current situation where it's a free-for-all."

Sounds like classic Dilbert!

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Top patent troll sues US regulators for interfering with its business

Jeffrey Nonken

First Amendment? As if.

This isn't a free speech issue. Their first amendment claim is part of a shotgun approach, where they're just throwing a bunch of legal arguments against the wall to see what sticks. (OK, sorry, mixing my metaphors.) Freedom of speech doesn't mean you can say anything you want to anybody you want at any time you want with zero consequences, and it's not blanket permission to do whatever you want.

And, ignoring the validity of the patent claim for the moment, this isn't actually a patent issue. Manufacturing and selling a product that infringes on somebody else's patent is a patent violation. Using such a product is not. The end users are not liable for the patent violation. The fact that MPHJ is bypassing the manufacturer and suing the end users is a pretty clear sign that they're just a bully threatening to beat up kids for their lunch money.

Of course, the fact that they're a non-practicing entity with nothing but a large patent portfolio and making all their money by suing the crap out of anybody they can was a pretty big clue, too.

East Texas, whatever other flaws or virtues it may have, is a typical venue for such suits because they have a track record of favoring the trolls.

MHO. IANAL. YMMV.

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Is that you, HAL? No, it's NEIL: Google, US Navy pour money into 'associative' AI brain

Jeffrey Nonken
Headmaster

Obvious to humans?

Only obvious to humans who have learned these things. At 3yo I doubt I'd ever heard of a savannah or the stock market. And were he told an airplane had a nose, my 3yo self would likely imagine a real flesh-and-blood human nose, complete with nostrils, attached to the front. It's easy to dismiss learned facts as "obvious to anybody" when in fact they're only obvious if you know them.

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Noisy qubits destroy data in order to save it

Jeffrey Nonken
Boffin

Destroying data in order to save it?

Been there, done that. See "core memory".

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Moto's DIY smartphone Ara to be 3D PRINTED in exclusive new deal

Jeffrey Nonken
FAIL

Right-o then

Closed is the new open.

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Android mobes outsell iPhones, but Apple gets MORE PROFIT THAN ALL

Jeffrey Nonken
Meh

Re: Premium market

Actually, I bought this refurb 3Gs because I needed a decent phone but I'm on a budget, and it was cheap enough for me to afford. I never wanted an iPhone, and there's plenty I don't like about it, but I've not regretted the purchase. It's kind of grown on me.

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London plod plonks, er, pull request on EasyDNS

Jeffrey Nonken

Re: This is nothing new

@Sir Runcible Spoon:

"I mean, if I use my car in a ram-raid, and my the insurance company is making money from me using that car 'they are receiving proceeds from a crime when that car is used for "illegal" purposes"

Oooh! I know this one! Also the money the DMV (or whatever appropriate motor vehicle authority applies) receives for registering the vehicle is also tainted. As is then whatever percentage of the salary or other compensation the clerk received for processing the application. And when the clerk spends that money, not only the money but the goods received are also tainted. Then the store uses that money to buy stock, or pay its employees...

Once money is tainted, it is contaminated for all eternity. It cannot be used again but must be destroyed. Oh wait, the destruction would mean the component molecules will eventually be used to make something else and contaminate that. Even if you throw it into the sun, the resulting burst of sunlight will be tainted as well... we must make a place to store all contaminated money and goods where it cannot be retrieved, re-used or in any way re-enter any cycle of life or manufacture.

Ridiculous? Of course. But at what point does this chain go from reasonable to ridiculous? Right at the start, or just wherever the authorities find it convenient for the buck to stop?

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On International Woman's Day we remember Grace Hopper

Jeffrey Nonken
Thumb Up

My father claims to have attended one of her classes, and described the bits of wire she carried around.

I know. Nobody cares. But it is a personal connection for me, if indirect. Only two degrees.

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White House comes out in favor of legal mobe unlocking

Jeffrey Nonken
Big Brother

"And if you have paid for your mobile device, and aren't bound by a service agreement or other obligation..."

And if you are, then it's contractual, which is already covered by separate law and doesn't require lame-ass copyright law extensions brought about by regulatory capture.

The only reason for locking a phone in the first place is vendor lock-in, which is what you do when you're too stupid and selfish to understand how customer loyalty works.

It's the last refuge of the incompetent.

Anyway, while I'm glad to see that the White House has managed to pull its head out for a little while, it would be even nicer if it did something a bit more proactive. So far it's just smoke.

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Keyboard, you're not my type

Jeffrey Nonken
Joke

If you really want to go overboard then get one of the £300 Topre based ones that pretty much fellate you whilst you are typing.

I have to ask. How would that work in the case that one were of the female persuasion?

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Watching Olympics at work? How to avoid a £1k telly-tax fine

Jeffrey Nonken
Coat

Probably already been mentioned, but...

...long extension cord for your car charger. Less convenient than the aforementioned UPS but probably cheaper. :)

The US is SO much better. All we have to do is wade through 55 minutes of commercials for an hour show, and those 5 minutes of actual programming are free! Go us.

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Samsung preps anti-iPhone 5 lawsuit before it's even out

Jeffrey Nonken

This just in: Apple sues Microsoft because they have employees, too!

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Moms stand firm against antenna madness

Jeffrey Nonken
FAIL

Ummmmm

... Let's see. Poor coverage causes poor reception. Poor reception induces your cell phone to boost its signal. This reduces battery life and... Oh!... increases the radiation levels surrounding the cell phone.

I don't know how wide a proximity that affects (that is, other people in the same room) but your kids are going to grow up without parents because you died of cancer before you reached 40. Because that cell phone in your pocket is blasting its signal into your hip at full power. Could be doing interesting things to your potential future children, too. Congratulations.

Why isn't there a tin-foil hat icon? This needs one of those.

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Consumer Reports: 'We were wrong about the iPhone 4'

Jeffrey Nonken
Headmaster

Duct tape and ariels

Actually, according to some sources, duct tape was not invented for taping ducts. In fact, it's not very good for taping ducts. I know -- I've tried. Totally and completely useless for taping air conditioning ducting, for example; it falls off in about 10 minutes.

There's some disagreement about its origin but some claim that it was called "duck tape" because of its resemblance to cotton duck, which is a type of fabric.

No waterfowl need apply. But the point is that there's no unquestionable source proving that "duck tape" is incorrect.

As for "ariels", try "aerials" instead. If you're going to split hairs about spelling, first make sure you have your ducts all in a row. Er, I mean ducks.

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EMC sells Retrospect to Sonic

Jeffrey Nonken
Thumb Up

Retrospect rocks!

It's a nice, clean way to automate your backups. I've been using it for years. Finally switched to removable hard drives as my backup medium when my 5th tape drive died -- DDS3 is so last century.

The key here is "automated". People are lazy, only the most dedicated (or paranoid) will regularly run backups by hand. By automating the system you get to set it up once, then just monitor and tweak it once in a while, swapping media every so often.

Retrospect does well for this.

What's more is that it's cross-platform. I can (and have) backed up Windows, Mac, and Linux clients from the same server. I just wish they'd cut prices a bit on their multi-system licensing. Raising prices sounds like a great way to make more profit, but in the long run it may just lose you customers. And aside from creating CDs and packaging (which is dirt cheap) it's not like the software is a finite resource. Make it cheap enough and hobbyists will buy it in droves, not to mention small businesses.

I was disappointed when I heard that Retrospect 8 was canceled and EMC was talking about dropping it altogether. I'm glad it's still around, and hope that Sonic will do something with it besides let it collect dust.

Anyway, enough babbling! MHO, YMMV.

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Alt rock diva's nude snap 'leaked' to tweetosphere

Jeffrey Nonken
Joke

Pics or it didn't happen!

... Oh wait, never mind.

:)

Nice little titties. Thanks.

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Top security firm: Default Windows 7 less secure than Vista

Jeffrey Nonken
Thumb Down

Nagging isn't security

Some of us don't consider nagging three extra times before renaming a file to actually be better security. It's just the ILLUSION of better security, and Top Security Firm seems to have been hypnotized into believing the illusion.

It also doesn't add to security to nag people so incessantly that they get into the habit of reflexively answering "Yes" to every prompt just so they can get things done. I wonder if this report took that into account?

... Not that I have any love for Windows 7. I just dislike it fractionally less than I dislike Vista.

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Ofcom talks to spook firm on filesharing snoop plan

Jeffrey Nonken
Flame

Let's help those industries beat up their own customers

"...new laws designed to protect the music, film and software industries."

Um, and why do they need protecting? They've proven quite able to beat up customers and cheat artists on their own.

Or are we protecting them from their own reactionary stupidity? I'm not sure I need my tax dollars being spent on that. "Adapt or die" is for everybody, not just the dinosaurs.

(Though in this case it's not my own tax dollars that would be spent, seeing as how I live in the U.S. of A. Consider it a metaphorical statement.)

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Facebook revises privacy policy

Jeffrey Nonken
Headmaster

Grammar Nazi here

"...and with who they share this information with."

Um, try: "...and with whom they share this information."

A philosophical question: does calling myself a Grammar Nazi in a comment invoke Godwin's Law? O_o

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French cheer on €11.6m heist security guard

Jeffrey Nonken
Headmaster

@Wilkinson et. al.

Read The Fine Article. It said he'd emptied his accounts (and his apartment) PRIOR to the heist. That means "before". So, no, he didn't rip off 11.6m and then pause to do anything.

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Microsoft sees no silver lining in Sidekick server snafu

Jeffrey Nonken
Thumb Down

@Ben Ruset

I happen to like the Sidekick, and until a few days ago I was considering buying an LX. I miss a lot of nice features on my old SKII, starting with the keyboard.

And for the record, I haven't been 13 for 38 years and some months.

Just because you don't find value in something doesn't mean nobody else should either. Thinking otherwise is just arrogant presumption.

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Google strips Pirate Bay homepage from search results

Jeffrey Nonken
Pirate

Oh deary me

How ever am I going to find thepiratebay.org now?

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Facebook kills 'Kill Obama' poll

Jeffrey Nonken
Stop

Over-reaction? No. Not really.

The Secret Service are required to treat ANY death threats to the President as potentially serious.

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Flickr!: Now! with! added! Yahoo!

Jeffrey Nonken
Headmaster

@censored

That's spelling, not grammar. Though you might be able to make a case for punctuation.

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Duff DAB, megamogs and ass-assassins: Your thoughts

Jeffrey Nonken
Headmaster

@Simon Dummett

And it happens on humans, too. Then there are those who through birth defects or accident have fewer than the norm. However, the NORM for cats is to have five claws up front, four in back, per paw.

Otherwise the real number is "indeterminate". "If not... well, they have some indeterminate number of claws, naught or more - and know how to use them" just somehow doesn't have the same impact.

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Intel pledges 'big leap' in integrated graphics performance

Jeffrey Nonken
Joke

@The elephant in the room

Because shopping mall names in South Philly just don't have the same ring.

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Australia mulls botnet takedown scheme

Jeffrey Nonken
Grenade

Gnnnn!

People: It's "viruses", not "virii", fer cryin' out loud!

http://linuxmafia.com/~rick/faq/plural-of-virus.html

http://ancienthistory.about.com/cs/latinlearning/f/virusplural.htm

http://homepages.tesco.net/~J.deBoynePollard/FGA/plural-of-virus.html

...and many others.

*grinds teeth in frustration*

And BTW it's "waive", not "wave". Sorry, this one's not intended to be a rant, just thought I'd mention it.

@Michael C: You know, buying a virus scanner subscription is not the only way to secure a system. And it's not the only way to clean up an infection. In fact, installing a virus scanner after-the-fact is generally useless for any virus worth a damn.

Wiping a system clean and re-installing the OS is VERY affective at removing a virus and does not require a purchase. How do you take a screenshot of that?

Throwing away a system and buying a new one is just as effective and doesn't require the purchase of anti-virus software.

There's also ClamAV.

I find it interesting that your scheme considers proof of the effort to be superior to the actual effort of cleaning up. Beware of unintended consequences, my friend: people WILL game the system. Adding more rules to prevent it will just make a mess of things. Apply the KISS principle here: if you can detect an infection, you can detect when it's been cleaned up. Giving people an "A" for effort is all very friendly but doesn't solve any problems, because the infection is still there, and it complicates the situation by requiring elaborate methods for providing proof and locks out some very effective eradication methods. If the customer wipes out his OS and starts over, and his infection goes away and he stops spamming or botnetting or whatever, by your scheme you would continue to charge him!

What if he decides never to acknowledge your E-mail? He gets a free ride.

It's also a very elaborate scheme for making the ISP keep detailed logs, provide hands-on analysis, notify, verify, and so on.

I think your heart's in the right place but I think you're over-thinking this one. By bending over backwards to give the individual the benefit of the doubt you've put a tremendous amount of effort on the ISP and made it impossible to employ. Don't be so concerned about the rights of the individual that you forget the rights of the community.

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Japan gets to grips with train-grope websites

Jeffrey Nonken
Alert

Bear traps.

'Nuff said.

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Lawsuit seeks to tag WGA nagware as spyware

Jeffrey Nonken
FAIL

@Pain In Arse

"I have WGA running on 3 computers here and to be fair it is invisible to me, even when running off the net. Its not like it was disabling my computer or bugging me for clicks. It seems to me that to sue over it you have to prove some kind of harm. Probably that's why those suits are going nowhere."

Yet another person with the arrogance to assume that if something works for HIM, the problems 30 million other people have cannot possibly be significant.

Hey, guess what? MY notebook battery hasn't blown up. All you folks missing limbs and suffering third degree burns are just whining about nothing.

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Bank of America demands thumbprint from armless bloke

Jeffrey Nonken
Coat

Enough 'armless jokes...

...They don't have a leg to stand on.

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Police drop case against admin over animal rights comments

Jeffrey Nonken
Headmaster

@Hate2Register

Boy have you got the wrong end of THIS stick.

What you've just told everybody, in essence, is that once a crime has been committed you think it's OK to arrest and question anybody, anybody at all, that you think might have possibly committed the crime, even if there's no evidence. "I think that guy did it, he looks shifty. Let's arrest him and impound everything he owns."

What's that sound? Oh, it's the sound of habeas corpus flushing down the toilet.

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Swedish bloke attempts lactation

Jeffrey Nonken
Thumb Down

@lionel baden

"but why on earth would he try and destroy the Best excuse not to get up in the middle of the night !!!!"

How's that? I used to get up and bring the baby in for her. What excuse would that be, again? Oh, "I'm too friggin' lazy and selfish to help you raise this child." THAT one.

P.S. The use of four exclamation marks is obviously the sign of a sick mind. You should get help for that.

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Illinois bright spark sparks car inferno

Jeffrey Nonken
Flame

@William Claude Dukenfield

"He says, "It's OK" and touches both eletrodes together sending a shower of sparks into the air in front of his face. He could have quite nicely killed himself in front of me."

By swallowing the battery, maybe. Unless UK car batteries produce a much higher voltage than those here in the US, there's not enough to hurt him.

Yes, I know, it's current that kills, not voltage. If you apply Ohm's law you'll see that for a given resistance, the lower the voltage, the lower the current. 12v isn't enough to kill you. It's not enough to hurt you. You can hold one terminal in each hand all day and not feel a tingle, except the part where your arms go numb from staying in an awkward position too long.

If UK car batteries run at 96v, though, there certainly is a danger. 48v not so much though you might feel it. Maybe if your hands are wet. Skin resistance varies and I haven't done the numbers but I think 48v wouldn't be more than uncomfortable. Maybe somebody will correct me if I've got that one wrong.

Those sparks, now, are impressive. I always love watching movies where they torture the hero with electric shocks, and show you how nasty it is by first stroking the wires together to make those lovely sparks. THAT is high current through a near-zero-ohm connection, and said hero won't feel a damned thing unless they apply it to his tongue. Or other mucous membranes. Normally they don't show that because the other mucous membranes are X-rated. Well, not the nostrils.

The biggest dangers in hooking two car batteries together are 1) sparks igniting battery vapors (or fuel) and 2) exploding batteries or burning out circuits from hooking them together wrong. Hook up the ground last and hook it to the chassis. Make sure you know which terminal is grounded.

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Spanish boy racer cuffed for snapping self on mobe

Jeffrey Nonken
Troll

@grumpy

"A side note: I wonder if ADHD carries the evolutionary advantage for the species that it used to? Maybe we should see the genes for it quietly disappear within the next 50 generations or so. I'm already looking forward to it... :-)"

Good idea, breed creativity right out of the gene pool.

Looking forward to it? You should probably hold your breath while you're waiting. Please.

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Feds break Apple's code of App Store silence

Jeffrey Nonken
Joke

@amanfrommars

Are you off your meds? I almost understood that.

:)

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Snow Leopard arrives with meow, not a roar

Jeffrey Nonken
Headmaster

@G-HAM 2000

Isn't that a tautology?

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Office 2010 to come loaded with WGA's bastard child

Jeffrey Nonken
Alert

You're hurting Microsoft when you pirate <MS product>

Ummmmmmmmm no. You're really not.

Every unauthorized copy of Windows et al. that is running is one less copy of Linux et al. This means exposure, market penetration, acceptance. Microsoft isn't paying for these copies. They aren't directly making money, either, but if Windows were impossible to copy then chances are most of the people currently using illicit copies would find something else. If enough people get used to Something Else, Microsoft will start to lose market share. This "each pirated copy represents a lost sale and therefore the world owes us 74 quadrillion dollars" is utter balderdash.

Microsoft would rather you ran an unlicensed copy of one of their products than a free anything else. Period. All this WGA stuff is noise and smoke so they can claim they're trying to protect themselves. If they ever make it uncrackable they'll be shooting themselves in the foot, slitting their own throat, and cutting their nose off despite their face all at the same time. And any other self-destructive cliches you can think of. And if I'm wrong, well then Microsoft is a lot stupider than I think they are.

@Greg J Preece

"Oh, and we're English here. Quit putting the letter "s" where a "c" should be."

Ummmmmmmm. "We" are not English. "We" are from various places. One of those places is England. I personally grew up in Pennsylvania, which you may know is in the USA. Over here, for better or worse, we spell "license" with an S. Sorry if that offends you, but it certainly wasn't my doing. If multi-culturalism bothers you perhaps you could find a forum that only accepts native Brits. There you'll be safe and warm from people who Don't Do Things The Same Way You Do.

We drive on the wrong side of the road, eat with our fork in the wrong hand, and have funny names for things like "trash can" instead of "dust bin". (It's amazing we manage to survive.) I wouldn't consider our spelling idiosyncrasies to be our greatest flaw.

Cope.

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Minister attacks drunken topless lovelies with tangler-bazooka

Jeffrey Nonken
Grenade

ooh, nice

Let's see... a former boss owned an Arneson, basically a jet engine-driven screw on a catamaran hull. My wife and I got a ride in it once; we were cruising at 120 MPH (193 KPH if I did that right) and the rooster tail was, oh... hell, there's a picture (though not of us) here: http://gallery.nonken.net/jeff_misc/9507_G We went from one end of Folsom Lake to the other in two minutes flat.

OK, now. Toss your tangled web over that and get it caught in the screw. One of two things is likely to happen:

1) The freakin' jet engine -- and I am not exaggerating, the whine was killer even with the ear protection -- will laugh like hell at your pretentious pathetic attempt and shred it like cheese.

2) Your net is tougher than hell and it actually stops the screw. All that torque has to go somewhere. Let's see. Hmm. In my mind's eye I see... the engine turns one way, the back end of the boat turns the other, the hull shatters, the passengers and various parts of the boat go flying in various directions (but still with a rather impressive horizontal vector in the original direction). I can practically guarantee no survivors and the corpses may not even arrive in one piece each. Any nearby boats will be in great danger. I don't want to predict any Hollywood-style explosions but what happens when several gallons of kerosene get tossed on the water with that screaming hot engine that's still trying to come apart. ... Unless it's already come apart, dumping burning fuel and shrapnel.

I'm sure glad this is non-lethal, hmm? Let's talk "unintended consequences" here.

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Amazon sued for sending 1984 down Orwellian memory hole

Jeffrey Nonken
FAIL

smells like DRM

This is why I don't buy DRM-laden content like this. Oh, I get the occasional DVD, but I own the disc and there are ways to decrypt the content. You can't suddenly cause my player to stop being able to play it.

If I want a copy of 1984 I'll just go buy a paper copy. Oh wait, I already own one. Never mind.

@etabeta: pehaps, but you do still have the choice to buy it in hardcopy.

Just for the record: I'm not in any way condoning Amazon's actions. Quite the contrary, I consider it reprehensible and hope they lose the lawsuit. I'm merely expressing that I don't trust DRM or those who would wield control over content I've legally acquired; this is an example of why. (Anybody remember DIVX? And I don't mean the CODEC.) And I think electronic books are a great idea. Just not DRM-laden electronic books.

Since it's marginally on-topic I'm going to toss in a link to one of my favorite non-DRM-laden sources of free electronic science fiction books: http://www.baen.com/library

Enjoy.

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Swedish lesbians suck sperm banks dry

Jeffrey Nonken
Megaphone

Amazing

...and the stereotypes run rampant. Amazing the human race can survive with so much stupidity.

Amazing that people still think other people choose their sexuality. Oh yes, I want to be shunned, ridiculed, beaten, possibly killed, and in greater danger of contracting a debilitating terminal disease. I want to be in a relationship that the government doesn't recognize so I don't get the same benefits, refused for any rights or privileges a married het couple might get. I like being put down and considered sick. I'm happy about the fact that I can't have children without medical intervention.

But at least I know how to decorate, and I've got a killer wardrobe! Yeah! Woo hoo!

All lesbians are ugly? Boy are you barking up the wrong tree. Go to any match site and do a search for "women seeking women". (I know you won't, it would destroy your little fantasy.) Of course you won't find all of them attractive, but you won't find all the straight women attractive either. (Funny thing, that.) Then again, it depends on what you consider attractive. If your criterion for "attractive" is "must be Angelina Jolie" then you're bound to be disappointed. There just aren't enough of her to go around.

Megaphone because no matter how loudly it's shouted, the truth doesn't seem to get through. There is none so deaf etc.

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Street View snooptrike stalks Siena

Jeffrey Nonken
FAIL

Bicyclists etc.

I live in Davis, CA, one of the most bike-friendly cities in the U.S.

I've got issues with all sorts. I see pedestrians walking into intersections without bothering to look. I've nearly been run over by an automobile (as a pedestrian) when I clearly had the light and he clearly didn't. I've seen bicyclists riding on sidewalks when there were perfectly good bike lanes, and joggers seem to think that because they aren't walking, they're bicyclists (or automobiles). I know a guy who ended up in the hospital because he rounded a corner at speed on his bike and didn't see the jogger with his dog until too late. Wham! I don't get it. Why jog in the street? Too good for the sidewalk are you? Enjoy being a nuisance? Think you're being a rebel because you're breaking a traffic law and getting away with it?

Saw some poor lady on a bike get nailed once by a car door. The kid was working on the door hinges or something, he was inside ducked down with the door shut. Suddenly sat up and swung the door open and she went right into it. Kid never actually said anything to the effect but I got the feeling he was sullen and resentful. How DARE this lady be riding her bike in the bike lane when he needed to do car repair/ Sheesh. (She was OK but a bit shaken up, I gave her a ride.)

And we have a lot of soft curbs here. Lots of cars parked with one side up on the sidewalk. Or parked across the sidewalk in their driveways. Hey, I don't mind walking in the street when there's a perfectly good sidewalk there that I can't use because somebody is being selfish, but hey, there are people here with kids in strollers, not to mention people in wheelchairs.

You know what it is? It's not bicyclists, or drivers, or pedestrians, or joggers, or motorcyclists, scooter drivers, nor even skateboarders. It's people. Go anywhere, pick a group of people, and you'll find some are unaware, unenlightened, ignorant, or just plain assholes.

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Microsoft airbrushes anti-Apple ad

Jeffrey Nonken
Thumb Up

MacBook trackpad and other stories

This is the best trackpad I've ever used. Two-finger tap to right-click, two-finger movement to scroll. I love it.

The feature isn't to everybody's taste and I still prefer a mouse but if I need to use a trackpad, this is how I like it.

MHO. YMMV.

As for the ad:

I think it's silly of Microsoft to be comparing themselves to Apple. When you're number 2, you try to show how much better your product is than number 1. That's natural and quite right. But when you're number 1 you shouldn't be comparing yourself to number 2. Why should you? You're already the top dog! Making direct comparisons does two things: one, it calls attention to your competitor. Two, it gets some people wondering what you're so afraid of?

As for all the hate:

Who cares? Each of us has his own priorities and will buy what he (or she) needs or wants based on those priorities. Period. Why do people hate other people based on the fact that they made different choices? Are they afraid that invalidates their own choices? What are you afraid of? If somebody sneers at your choice just laugh at their ignorance and say it fills your needs. If you feel tempted to sneer at their choice just remember they didn't have the same needs to fill.

There are things I don't like about my MacBook, but overall I like it. Best laptop I've ever owned. Two-and-a-half years old and going strong. Both magsafe adapters still in good condition. (I bought a spare once when I was traveling. Yes, I only bought it because I left the other one home, but I'm glad I have it, very handy.)

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To the Moon - with extreme engineering

Jeffrey Nonken
Boffin

Update: Message from Dad

I promised to ask my father about his involvement. Here's his reply:

Stand back - you pushed an ancient button....

The Launch Guidance System computer was attached to a complex GE radar system

built in Syracuse NY, The system used transceivers (receivers and

transmitters) riding on the rocket being guided. The GE Radar did Direct

Tracking of the position of the rocket in spherical coordinates (Range:

distance: Elevation: angle; and azimuth: angle). To provide redundancy and

further accuracy, it also had a doppler radar system (a relative of the radar

used by highway control to catch speeders) that measured speed in three axes,

rather than position in three axes. These measurements were transmitted to our

computer, which translated these six measurements into deduced actual position

and speed along its trajectory, and then computed what steering commands to

send up to the missile. This steered the Launching rocket (mostly an Atlas

Missile) with a payload on top, into an earth orbit.

In the case of the Ranger launches being discussed in this article, the

combination being launched was an Atlas Missile with an Agena spacecraft

sitting on top. When the Atlas has inserted the assembly into earth orbit, it

detached and fell into the ocean, and the Agena injected the remaining

assembly into a moon orbit, with the Ranger spacecraft on its top. the Ranger

Spacecraft then does all of the stuff described in the article.

Atlas Agena combination was used for many different missions, with our ground

guidance system guiding the first approximately five minutes it took to inject

into earth orbit, and then sending the agena a set of precise data about where

it was going how fast in what direction. Based on that baseline data, the

Inertial Guidance system in the Agena could initiate its job of further guidance.

We also guided Thor Missiles as Launch vehicles (for Gemini, for example). In

addition to Agena Spacecraft we later carried Centaur spacecraft on top.

For some Gemini launches we launched a Thor with the Gemini manned spacecraft

on top, and then switched over to launch an Atlas Agena to rendezvous with the

Gemini 90 minutes later.

For other launches, that we didn't guide, we did "Range Safety" by tracking

the launch to assure that it was going where it should, and keeping a range

safety officer apprised of how it was doing. We never caused a failure or

even delayed a launch. Being transistorized, we were more reliable than all

those vacuum tubes around us.

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