* Posts by Andrew Norton

235 posts • joined 31 Aug 2007

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Pirate Bay towed to oldpiratebay.org

Andrew Norton
Alien

This is an area I've studied for a while, and I don't mean 'poked around on Google for the last few months in my spare time'.

At the time Napster came out, I was working for my uncle's record company in the Greater London area, as a copyright enforcer (part time, basically keeping my ears open for his songs at places and making sure the likes of PRS were crediting his songs, as well as looking for performers selling their own versions out of a bag), and so I remember trying to push him towards MP3's. He resisted, didn't 'get' why anyone would be interested, especially because of the lower sound quality. He 'got' technology (he was also big into Steel, used to supply Toyota with much of their steel in the 80s) but didn't see it as anything but a fad. His contemporaries, however, tended to have a bigger problem. Control.

As a small label, he was 'left out' of much of the stuff. He was never told which stores would count for chart sales that week for instance, and he'd get last-minute notice of 'music industry' events, which meant he never had the ability to even change things in the industry, because it was always a fait accompli.

The music industry is, and has been for many decades, about 'control'. from the 50s on, music bosses understood that they could shape the population through music, make trends, break them, even spawn movements. It's hard to relinquish that sort of control. It becomes somewhat of a god complex. So when you see yourself as 'masters of culture', it's incredibly hard to disabuse yourself of that, and recognise that your time has passed, and you're now just selling a digital commodity, and your overall place isn't what it was. They're also afraid that any kind of acknowledgement of that, will devalue their prestige in the eyes of others, even though record bosses aren't the mythical creatures of wonder they believe themselves to be, and haven't been considered such for decades.

Happens somewhat in TV and movies now as well. A year or two later I was working on a TV show in the US for a Viacom channel. I was the only non-US crew member (based in Liverpool) and since it was a competition, part of my role was to sell it to people in the UK to get them to take part. I worked for the competition, which was televised by the channel, produced by a 3rd party production company. The issues I had just getting clearances to play episodes of the show to interested gatherings was incredible, because I wasn't a Viacom employee, and so was not under THEIR control, despite my only purpose being to promote the show and make the next season even better.

And it's not that uncommon a story in general. When the 08 recession happened and a lot of well-to-do middle class people lost their jobs, many people carried on as before, trying to keep up the veneer, and project an aura of 'no change', eating through their savings, and then loading themselves up in debt, just so people won't think times have changed and everything's all good.

But as anyone in a stormy area knows, trees die and rot from the inside out, and look strong and healthy until they're blown over, causing massive damage, because they rot from the inside out. We have no 'tree surgeons' to clear out the dead wood in the content market however.

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Andrew Norton

Re: Somebody tell the police

Exactly.

You wouldn't believe the number of people that have told me 'but it's up see CR or EE or <other TLD>, even on the TF pieces in question which specifically state the opposite.

Doesn't help when most 'news orgs' don't bother to do any kind of checking and mislead people.

And even the isohunt.to (NOT affiliated at all with Gary Fung or the old ISOhunt site) version has amusing screwups, like the audio of my annual panel discussions on law, technology, and the internet (this year we had the EFF as lead guests, last year Chris Soghoian of the ACLU, and in 2012, Bruce Schneier), which are classified as 'adult'. (The only panels we don't record are the adult ones). No real danger of the torrents dying though, they're all on Mininova as well (yes, it still exists)

This past week of ultracrepidarianism about torrent sites has just about driven me crazy though.

Andrew "K`Tetch" Norton

Torrentfreak community manager

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Blackpool hotel 'fines' couple £100 for crap TripAdvisor review

Andrew Norton

Ta, did a 15th anniversary panel with some of the builders (including Grant Imhara) back at the end of August, and it brought back a lot of memories.

There should be a writeup of it at Servo, and a video on Youtube soon.

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Andrew Norton

well, I did an event (Sci fi con) in the Imperial hotel in 2000 (in fact, 14 years ago this coming weekend)

Not only were hte hotel rooms badly cleaned, their facility rooms were not set up - they hadn't bothered. they 'lost' some of our event reservations (so Dave [Vader] Prowse had to get a room at the hotel next door), and to cap it off, the hotel staff started stealing from the [locked] dealers room overnight.

We even changed the A1 standee sign on an easle at the front door to say 'welcome to the Imperial Hotel, prepare to be robbed'.

Oh and my old mate Mike Sheard (RIP mate) said 'did the staff all go to Grange Hill?' before turning to Dave and saying 'you should choke the Manager, he makes me look like a competent admiral'.

No wonder it stopped being used for party conferences. (and I was doubly irritated at having to stay up the full 72 hours of the event, having JUST flown back from two weeks of 20 hour shifts filming BattleBots in Vegas for Comedy Central - just meaning driving to Blackpool from Gatwick stopping home in Liverpool just long enough to swap suitcases)

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'Open source just means big companies can steal your code.' O RLY?

Andrew Norton

Re: @ Andrew Norton

Cheers :-)

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Andrew Norton

I never get downvoted, but that's because all my posts go straight into moderation, and then get 'rejected' it seems (I've even had one approved, then the next day it was rejected)

BTW, as someone who was on the show in question, i can say that while it was the stated name of the points, in reality it was fantasy. The producers decided the winners (often ahead of time) then edited the matches to suit. There was even once instance where they edited two matches that took place 2 weeks apart into one. And one really amusing and notable instance where they'd made the deals about merchandising&appearance deals about who was going to win, only for it to be COMPLETELY the other way, and so they had to make up a new rule to disqualify the winner and get the one they wanted to win to win.

There's a reason it was listed as 'childrens entertainment show' rather than 'gameshow',and that was it. Which is why I took my participation to the US events, which were open competitions, and didn't have an arena which quite literally had the structural rigidity and protection of a telephone box.

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Shuddit, Obama! Here in Blighty, we ISPs have net neutrality nailed

Andrew Norton

Re: UK isn't so brilliant

You give 4 examples that were just like where I used to live in the US. I had a choice of two providers when I moved in there in 2006 - hughsnet satellite internet ($200/month for 8Mbit) or AT&T DSL ($55/month for 6/0.5Mbit DSL)

When I moved out in the summer (partly because Nominet had revealed my home address, and harassment from JHammond supporters was starting) my choices were... exactly the same, at the same price. Oh, except you could also get Verizon LTE service for the last 12 months, it was only $50/2Gig of data....

It was a comcast area, the whole county was, but Comcast hadn't bothered to lay a single wire in the county (a metro Atlanta county, with a significant film industry presence). In 07 AT&T techs told me they were going to upgrade their systems to fiber for U-verse, they had the fiber waiting and just waiting for the dig permits.

Then comcast announced they weren't going to lay anything, but weren't going to give up their 'franchise', so AT&T never had to bother, so they didn't. The only difference was they stopped calling it broadband in 2010, because even the top tier package (which I had) didn't meet FCC minimum standards for broadband (4/1 Mbit)

Now I've moved, I've got two choices. Charter [cable], and Windstream [DSL]. My price is a bit lower, and my speed is a bit better, but it's still slow compared to everyone else for the money -$45 for 60/4Mbit cable.

And that's because there's no real competition here, AT ALL

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Remember that tale of a fired accountant who blamed Comcast? It's kinda true, says telco

Andrew Norton

Re: About recording calls.

"This call may be recorded" - it can be viewed that that is granting permission, in that you MAY do that.

And if they're recording the calls, they can't object to you doing it.

That's the long and short of it (had a fun time in Federal court last year listening to two lawyers argue on that).

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Huawei prez: A one-speed internet is bad for everyone

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Copyright thieves' cyberlockers slurp MILLIONS from honest creators, study finds

Andrew Norton
Devil

Forgot the other half of the report

You didn't mention that while it was for the "Digital citizens Alliance" (a nice astroturfing group) the other company involved (and who wrote the report) is none other than 'NetNames' (who share equal billing with DCA). for those that don't know, NetNames is more of a corporate oriented version of Web Sheriff, and describe themselves as "Leaders in online brand protection and domain name strategy, assisting global brands to Search-Find-Stop brand abuse online."

The 'findings 'then are totally predictable. Also wouldn't surprise me if this report had a little backdoor funding from PIPCU, as their last report basically justified the extra-judicial actions of PIPCU.

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Microsoft ropes in Opera Mini as default Nokia dumbphone browser

Andrew Norton

Re: MSN at the Opera

you must be from Sweden then.

Only in Sweden was he called the Norwegian Chef, everywhere else in the world he's the Swedish Chef

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What FTC lawsuit? T-Mobile US touts 10GB, $100 family-of-4 plan

Andrew Norton

Re: agree...

"Although my phone will pickup ATT when it cannot get T-mobile, which is strange, as they have no means to charge me!!"

Sure they do. Your phone isn't anonymous, AT&T just bill T-mob at a massive rate for roaming, and T-Mob adds a bit more on for being disloyal.

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Andrew Norton

All they need to do now is expand their coverage so people can actually use it.

I'm on Verizon, and even in this backwards area of Georgia, in a town of 270, I have a 4G connection. Friend has T-Mobile, and lives in Marietta, in a pretty urban area, has trouble keeping a signal; in the greater metro Atlanta area, she has signal at interstates and US highways only, most of the time.

Until they actually start covering areas, it won't matter how great their plans are.

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Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold

Andrew Norton

Re: bunch of tw@ts

Indeed Andrew, it goes in cycles though, as you well know.

Of course, there could be another possibility. In 2009 I was running Pirate Parties International for the 9 months leading up to the election, This time around we'd had a completely useless German (he's a LOTUS NOTES EVANGELIST for Zarquons sake!) who was kicked out a month before to be replaced by a Belgian and a Hungarian. Not enough time to overcome the damage, and they weren't me anyway.

The other, more prosaic explanation had something to do with the major Swedish Media refusing to cover the party AT ALL, leaving them off predictions, and polls (but including some parties who have been around longer, and won no seats, and still didn't this time) So a significant percentage of the Swedish Population thought they weren't running before they got to the polls (and if you don't select a pirate party ballot you don't cast a vote for them).

Personally, this year, I have been more focused on getting the US party (and it's composite state parties) running. It's the long game...

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Andrew Norton

Re: bunch of tw@ts

possibly.

NONE of these so-called 'evidence' systems have ever had a single independent quality or accuracy analysis. And we all know from experience just how accurate these bots are at actually finding (and complaining) about what their claiming.

So yes, it's quite possible.

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Pirate Party runs aground in European Parliamentary elections

Andrew Norton
Pirate

Guessing Simon's not from UK

"The UK's three Pirate candidates got nowhere near Reda's vote: they appear to have collectively won fewer than 10,000 votes, or just 0.05 per cent of those cast."

Which would be a valid statement if the election was a national PR system. It's not. It's a regional constituency. As they were only on the ballot in the North West region, giving their votes in context to people they couldn't possibly get votes from is.... misleading.

The reality was 0.49%.

There were also local elections the same day and in Manchester, Pirate Party leader Loz Kaye got 3.75% (in a single seat, first past the post election, which is traditionally harder on small parties) All parties have complained about just how big the NW constituency is and judging by reactions on twitter after the announcements, the lower vote is probably down to just not being able to reach everyone.

Matches with down in Vassell ward, in Lambeth where another Pirate candidate was on the local ballot, and despite running a 'snap campaign' (last month or two only) managed 1.6%

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'No representation without taxation!' urges venerable tech VC

Andrew Norton

Re: Payroll taxes = Income taxes

"It's like Nancy Pelosi saying, "We have to pass it before we can tell you what's in it." "

ARRGGH. One of my pet peeves is the misquoting and misunderstanding around this.

Read it in context, then understand that what she's saying is WHAT IS IN THE CONSTITUTION.

She was asked what would be in the final bill, she doesn't know. You know why? Because until it's gone through the House (where she is) and the Senate, we won't know what's in the final bill. We couldn't look at the effects of the bill until we have the final bill, thanks to Amendments. Especially as the bill in question had an Olympic swimming pool load of proposed amendments.

So, you have to pass the bill [out of the house] to know what's in it [for the senate]. Please hand back your citizenship, and your voting privileges, until you've read the Constitution, and passed a citizenship test, is that better?

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No, pesky lawyers, particle colliders WON'T destroy the Earth

Andrew Norton

Whatever you do, don't tell them that the Muon1 Distributed Particle Accelerator Design project moved to Brookhaven from RAL back in November. that's part of designing a Muon collider, which would be a much higher energy system than the LHC

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Sabu wasn't the only FBI mole in LulzSec, suggest leaked docs

Andrew Norton

Re: Credible sources?

Considering Hammond plead guilty to it, I'd say it's probably true (despite a week earlier his lawyer claiming on TV that he came in afterwards, and had nothing to do with it, despite being convicted in 06 for... hacking a political website and stealing 5000 credit card numbers and planned to make charges on)

I dealt with Hammond 2006-2010, and he was quite boastful of his actions (he boasted to me of his mob-action on the chicago olympic announcement that same night). Probably why he got the max, with the gloating and smirking during sentencing.

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The ULTIMATE cuppa showdown: And the winner is...

Andrew Norton

I use Tetley English blend (I'm in the US) but before I moved here I was a strong supporter of pyramid bags (and still get them on occasion when I get homesick and go to the British import store)

Anyway, what's it say about me that I use a thermal mug, and have it brew for 6-8 hours? Of course the mug is a little larger than a normal mug (its 64fl oz (1.9l) but that and a splash of 2% (semi-skim) and its a wonderful thing.

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Stratfor email, credit-card hacker Hammond thrown in cooler for 10 YEARS

Andrew Norton

Re: Innocent reading?

no.

They were an information and analysis company. That also had a private investigation sideline.

A lot were people who had just subscribed to an analysis feed. You know, like a daily digest.

Seriously, the level of ignorance by those trying to justify things is staggering.

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

Andrew Norton

Re: Andrew Norton Ten years of Lulz for him!

He IS an agressive bullying person.

He's also tracked down and stormed in (as part of a group) on a guy in a restaurant because he didn't like his beliefs.

He's also torched stuff in Chicago when they lost their Olympic bid, just to cause more trouble for the city council.

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Andrew Norton

no more than his usual pronouncement "snitches get stitches"

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Andrew Norton

Re: Ten years of Lulz for him!

Fresh meat? He's already done a bunch of time inside. Not just these 20 months on remand, he was also in prison for a similar offense in 06.

He is pretty seperated from reality though, and I say that as someone that dealt with him before he went to prison for the Protest warrior, as well as when he came out until he went into hiding to do this.

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Fukushima fearmongers: It's YOUR FAULT Japan DUMPED CO2 targets

Andrew Norton

Wow, now he's a Former Fuel Pool nuclear engineer? He changes his job title more than most MP's

Let's give him his real title shall we? 'Nuclear Engineer 72-76' perhaps? Or Perhaps "Anti-nuclear spokesman for hire 1979-present'.

He's a well known anti-nuclear activist, often hired to be an expert by like-minded groups. He's not a 'former fuel pool engineer' though. You have anyone credible, such as people who don't make their living demonising and exagerating nuclear power/safety?

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Anonymous claims Parliament Wi-Fi hack during London protest

Andrew Norton
Facepalm

oh dear

And yet again Anonymous makes any kind of rational work in this area impossible, by making loud, brash, statements that they think gets them press. Sure it does, while also fostering and nurturing the very misunderstandings and fears that have been at the root of EVERY policy decision Anonymous claims to hate.

is it 'doing it for the lulz', or is it 'doing it so we always have something to whine about', or is it 'doing it because we're paid to provide a pretext and these muppets will go along with anything that sounds revolution-y'?

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Thought you didn't need to show ID in the UK? Wrong

Andrew Norton

Re: Humph!

Sorry Don, I'm mid-30s and get ID's all the time, because people think I'm 14-15.

Which REALLY annoys my 17yo, because she never get's ID'd

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Your kids' chances of becoming programmers? ZERO

Andrew Norton

Re: 6809

Indeed. I used mine from when I got it (second hand) in 86, until I moved to the states 10 years ago. used DRS to run all my businesses, had the floppy, boxes of tapes, and even went to the last dragon store (above a shop in Valetta, Malta) in the early 90s to pick up more stuff.

Heady days...

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Oh noes! New 'CRISIS DISASTER' at Fukushima! Oh wait, it's nothing. Again

Andrew Norton
Boffin

Re: Radiation Superstition

They need regular servicing, and people fall. They're big huge things without much else around them, and people will drive into them.

More importantly, when it's icy, they can throw a chunk of ice hard enough to go through a roof at a distance of a mile, or parts of the blade through a roof at 3 miles.

Oh, and then there's the biggest killer - FIRE.

If it's too windy, they have to be stopped. they are braked to a stop and locked down. Sometimes the brake fails, or is applied too late or not at all, and the friction makes the unit catch fire. Good luck putting that out - they usually don't bother, and try to deal with the flaming bits flying off to stop it spreading. Sometimes that doesn't work, and at least one turbine fire caused a wildfire that destroyed an area of Australian national park roughly the same size as the fukushima exclusion zone at it's peak.

There's been over 300 accidents just in 2011 and 2012, 26 of them fatal, just one accident in Brazil last year (where a bus crashed into a section of turbine) killed 17, (that's more than half the count of Chernobyl, and... 17 more than Fukushima, the only two level 7 nuclear events) and I bet you've never heard of it, I hadn't.

Reuters video - http://www.reuters.com/resources_v2/flash/video_embed.swf?videoId=231891110&edition=BETAUS

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Comcast court docs show Prenda copyright trolls seeded smut then sued

Andrew Norton

"They can't hear the phones when El Reg calls.

The noise of the shredders is quite loud. Give them a day or two to get rid of the backlog."

Er, they've already had a week (the subpoena was filed as evidence last Wednesday)

Since then, there's been a lot more going on just in this case, including requests to seal, the transcript of the July 2nd hearing being released, AND in a bit, deposition is due to start of the Plaintiff's representative.

Oh, and a few days ago, Comcast sent a DMCA nastygram over reprinting the PACER evidence filing.

It's a real fun case.

Andrew

Pirate Party "freetard", and defense expert in this case

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Hammond pleads guilty to Stratfor hack: 'It's a relief'

Andrew Norton

Re: The American Judicial System

wasn't he still on probation from his last 'hacking conviction' (where he broke into the protest warrior website and stole 30,000 credit card numbers) when he did some of this. Might have been why.

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Andrew Norton
Pint

Ever dealt with him?

About what I expected from him.

Had long dealings with him just before he went away for his first credit card theft conviction, then more when he came out (including some CFAA violations when on probation for said sentence). Wish I had contacted his probation officer now.

his core though, is credit cards. He can try and spin things any way he wants, but at the end of the day, he's a petty thief trying to clothe himself with the respectability of an activist.

As for what he did to warrant solitary, you might not be aware of the number of violent offenses he's already been convicted of in the past.

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What freetard are you: Justified, transgressor or just honest?

Andrew Norton
WTF?

Re: Concert spending

"With "copyfighters" it's all about choosing the evidence to back up your prejudice. You must reject all evidence that doesn't."

While 'copyrighters' don't have any evidence to back up their claims, and thus just make it up. They just reject all evidence.

Come on Andrew, this isn't a new issue. If every 'chicken little' prophecy of the damage of 'piracy' was true, and evidentially based, they'd have gone bankrupt a dozen times over by now. Kinda reminds me of the meetings/conferences I had to go to when I was a copyright infringement investigator for a UK record label in the late 90s.

And who can forget the lovely slapping down the IPO gave to industry claims with a request that claims be made WITH EVIDENCE (http://www.ipo.gov.uk/consult-2011-copyright-evidence.pdf), thanks to the Hargreaves review's call that policy be evidentially made, not lobbyist made.

You know, like that 'democratically mandated' law you mentioned, which got a major boost (and mired in 'wash up') after the head of UMG has a private meeting with Darth Mandy and feeds him a load of lies ('revenue down by half this year' - actually was up slightly)

By the way, I didn't notice any source for the 'under 10k/15k earnings figures on page 2. However, I *DO* recall a similar figure and claim being used by Fergal Sharkey a few years back (also unsubstantiated) to push for the 20 year EU extension of copyright terms for recorded music. Is that where you got it from, or has there been some 'evidence' behind it too?

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'No discernible increase in piracy' from DRM-free e-books

Andrew Norton
Thumb Down

Re: No surprise here - It is DRM that increases piracy

Hmm, odd. I've been known to do a book or two. My wifehas worked in the publishing field for YEARS, most recently doing the graphics and preflighting books for a number of publishers (including textbooks from the likes of Oxford university press, MIT, etc)

eBooks are easier in a lot of ways, if nothing else there's less worry about inks, etc. and they don't have to wait for a printmatch to be printed, sent back etc.

ebooks take maybe 2/3 the work of a print version. Now if they're going to do a print copy too, they have to do all the steps as well, but combined it's maybe 105% the work of doing a print-only.

This is of course, the experiences of the middle-man company who gets the raw manuscripts and images, and outputs either a finished ebook file(s) or sends the print order to the printer of choice.

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Judge hands copyright troll an epic smack-down

Andrew Norton
Thumb Down

Re: The scum fleecing the dumb

"First off, I don't think Prenda actually prosectuted anyone for copyright infringement, so none of its targets have been found guilty in a court of law. I believe that once a defendant started to put up a defence, they backed off. (Sorry, can't find the source for this right now)"

Wrong.

I know of at least one case where they went for it, and got a default judgement. Of cours,e less than a week later, the defendant had got his stuff together, hired an attorney and filed a response and a request to re-open the case. That was 2 months ago. Then Prenda decided to drop the suit (after getting a default win, just after the March hearing, and before the judge ruled on re-opening) so there was a sanctions motion filed. that's still ongoing, with the prenda lawyer firing any and all personal attacks on the defendants lawyer possible. The latest document there should be filed today

*disclaimer* I've been working with said defense lawyer.

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Google Chrome slips web fix to addicts suffering net withdrawal

Andrew Norton
Trollface

Re: ok, so ...

Use Opera?

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Seattle drinking den bans Google Glass geeks

Andrew Norton

Re: @ Lars G - Or... more likely ...

Is this the story you're talking about

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/07/18/mcdonalds_computer_vision_spectacles_attack/

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Megaupload outed file-sharers to Feds months before Dotcom raid

Andrew Norton
Boffin

Funny John, the story's spent the weekend (and the previous week) doing the rounds.

What you seem to have missed is that the files the DoJ used to get the warrants the NZ anti-terror squad used for the raid, was based on files not being taken down that CARPATHIA had been told to not touch, because of a warrant for the Ninjavideo case. Now, the DoJ had responded saying 'we never told MU not to delete it, we only talked to Carp, so when MU didn't download the files and were aware of it, it wasn't us that told them. Completely missing that carp told MU about the service of court orders they got from the DOJ.

So, on one hand, had MU deleted the files, they would have been prosecuted for tampering in an investigation and destruction of evidence. When they didn't touch them, they got this. DoJ wanted to have it both ways. It's really not that hard to grasp, especially as the DoJ's filings over the past week have basically confirmed the story.

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Swartz prosecutor: We only pushed for 'six months' in the cooler

Andrew Norton

She wasn't going to recomend 6 months; so not even her husband believes her. I say that because earlier this week, he (an IBM exec) launched a tirade on twitter about it (http://blogs.bostonmagazine.com/boston_daily/2013/01/15/carmen-ortizs-husband-twitter-aaron-swartz/), saying the PLEABARGAIN was for 6 months. When he turned it down, then Ortiz said they'd push for 7, which matches the rest of the claims.

Oh, and the INITIAL indictment was for 35 years max, with just the 5 charges "wire fraud; unauthorized access to a protected computer system; reckless damage to a protected computer system; aiding and abetting; criminal forfeiture"

Ortiz added more charges recently, upping it to 13 charges, and 50+ years max.

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Zuck on that! Instagram loses HALF its hipsters in a month

Andrew Norton

Re: Wydenism in the UK: "Wydening" the Loopholes...

How is your horse doing?

Don't have a horse for everyday transport? You use a car? Do you keep to below 4mph (2mph in cities) and have a man with a red flag/lamp walking in front to warn others?

You don't?

But in driving a car you've enabled tech oligarchs to get their filthy paws on other peoples livlihoods and lives, and effected their property and labor and effort (which is labor).

BTW, since when is 'effort' rewardable?

And your argument is based on one premise - that you just 'saying' you did a dilligent search is good enough. Whatcha going to do when they say 'prove it'? At which point you're straight back to regular old 'infringing'.

Your outrage is based on a misreading of the law, expressed in a Daily Mail style outpouring of moral indignation.

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Andrew Norton

Re: Heartening

"How in the hell do these MPs and business cronies of theirs think they can just co-opt individual artistic property rights? "

Er, they don't? Possibly because it's not quite as Andrew says...

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Bob Dylan's new album is 'Copyright Extension Collection'

Andrew Norton

Actually, the original writers died before it was even copyrighted.

IIRc, the tune was written by one sister in 1896, for a tune called 'good morning to you'. Then another sister came up with the birthday words a bit later.

In/around 1930, a THIRD sister copyrighted the song, after the other two were dead. It's her grandson that gets a significant portion of those royalties.

Of course, other evidence points to the copyright claims these days not being valid, so who knows.... noone wants to test it in court.

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TVShack's Richard O'Dwyer sent home with £20,000 fine

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Hurricane Sandy blows US pirate-pestering plan into 2013

Andrew Norton
Pirate

I noticed you forgot to mention the UK legislation only passed because a backroom meeting between Mandy and UMG got Mandy to support things by lying to him, which led to it being a 3-line whip item during washup and still barely passed. And there's still lots of problems.

Or that this CCI system has other problems, like the 'independent review' not actually being all that independent; or the underlying assumptions the system uses have started to be destroyed when actually tried in court.

Why not?

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One week left before US faces clamp down on piracy

Andrew Norton
FAIL

Re: Legitimate usage

Actually we don't. We have the most popular movies each week, but that's a ranking within the set movies, and has no relevance to the overall prevalence of files as a whole.

And TPB's top100 is also NOTORIOUSLY inaccurate, because like all such lists, it relies on scrapes. Scrapes are incredibly easy to fake. In fact, it was one of the things that really undermined that university study that AFACT paid for for the IInet trial, since the study selected only one site's 'top list' to get the figure of '97% infringing' figure they touted, ending up with a lot of fake torrents (put to sucker in downloaders into jumping on faked/trojaned files or monitored swarms)

Andrew Norton

TorrentFreak.com Senior Researcher

(also AT&T customer)

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Is lightspeed really a limit?

Andrew Norton
Boffin

bleh

"The surprising outcome: with just two assumptions"

I stopped reading then.

I don't think much of the assumptions made. I can make two assumptions and give a whole different graph (although, I'll admit, I only play part-time with neutrinos as I design particle accelerators in my spare time) but this article smacks of 'having an interview and needing to get some use of it'

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Made for each other: liquid nitrogen and 1,500 ping-pong balls

Andrew Norton

Re: Lessons you remember

We had similar after a 1st year class on the reactivity series.

half the class nicked either magnesium ribbon, or in one case, a chunk of calcium.

Next class was swimming, and guess where all the stuff ended up...

Yep the bottom of the school swimming pool

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Andrew Norton
Boffin

Not a patch on salthouse

I was lucky to attend one of Dr John Salthouse's lectures at Salford Uni in 98. He's been described as a pyromanic with a chemistry degree and I'd concur. Even my school's department head was in awe and he was also a pyro (and the my school left one lab unrefurbished for him, on the basis of it having survived that teachers experiments since the 60s, it would carry on - notably a 3rd floor room, with windows on 3 sides and it's own fire escape)

I'm not saying some of the bangs were loud, but we were in the biggest lecture theatre at Salford's chem dept, and one bang broke a ceiling tile and dropped it (right at the back, up the aisle from the bang, clearly an acoustic concentration with the aisle funneling and the back wall echo) an impressive feat I'm sure you'll agree. Sometimes I wonder if I should have done Chemistry, instead of Robotics as my degree subject....

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Neil Gaiman’s saucy pop wife agrees to pay her musicians in money

Andrew Norton
Thumb Down

"I like Amanda Palmer, but I was with the musicians on this one"

Er.... which ones?

The ones who were happy to do it, and didn't have a problem? Or the not-musicians who saw 'she got money, ergo she must give money'?

It was a free and open choice. It's not like anyone was being forced to participate for free, you know, with contracts and stuff. Or being told they were being paid, and then stiffed.

I notice that whole 'bit' was taken out. Kinda like how people are queueing up for Britains got no talent, and guess who's raking in the money? Where's the protests about that? After all, they're dangling the prospect of money up front, while Amanda was clear 'beer+hugs' up front.

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