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* Posts by Al Jones

447 posts • joined 28 Aug 2007

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Indie ISP to Netflix: Give it a rest about 'net neutrality' – and get your checkbook out

Al Jones

Re: @Al Jones

Netflix is helping Lariat.net by providing content that is enticing enough that people want to sign up to Lariat.net so that they can get access to Netflix. The money that that new user pays splits about 80-20 in Lariat.nets favor.

There's no question that delivery of broadband to more widely dispersed populations, further from exchange points has different economies than delivering service in denser urban environments. But as I said, that's Lariat.net's business model, not Netflix's business model.

By the way, I should have pointed out that I don't even have a Netflix subscription.

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Al Jones

Let me get this straight. Customers are asking Lariat whether Lariat will give them decent access to Netflix in exchange for paying a monthly subscription that is probably considerably more than the customer is paying Netflix, and it's Netflix's fault that the answer is no?

It's not clear whether Mr Glass is losing customers because they're switching to other ISPs that can deliver what he can't, or whether he's the only game in town, and he's complaining that his users can't get decent Netflix access because the population of Wyoming is too spread out to get decent bandwidth cheaply. But Netflix business model is working for Netflix - it doesn't have to work for lariat.net

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Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS

Al Jones

Oldest Bug

The LZO bug may had been sitting there for 20 years, but there's no indication that someone discovered it 20 years ago, and didn't tell anyone about it so that it could be fixed.

There's no comparison with a known critical bug that was not revealed to the people that could fix it.

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Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade

Al Jones

Re: firefox ESR updated too

Years ago I discovered that I could use a Firefox Extension to put my tabs down the left hand side of the screen. I can see the full title for 30-odd tabs at a time, and on a 1920x1080 screen, the one thing I'm not short of is room for a 2 inch column of tabs.

I've never made the switch to putting my Windows taskbar on the side of the screen, but for browsers, this single feature has made Firefox so "sticky" that there's no moving away from it. My only reaction to "Tabs on Top" is Why?

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There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES

Al Jones

Re: Another breakthrough from the centre for establishing the obvious.

A country with a population of 300 million that absolutely refuses to broadcast any "foreign muck" on the mainstream channels*. They'll buy in a series and re-make it, but they won't broadcast the original. You can understand their reluctance with something like Taggart, for instance, that even some BBC viewers might have needed subtitles for, but when it comes to "police procedurals", for example, there are plenty of BBC and ITV series that would more than hold their own against their US equivalents, but they will never be seen on US TV, except on PBS stations. Even "niche"channels like the Food Channel won't show the likes of the Great British Bake Off, even though there's nothing in it that would be a turn-off for that channels typical audience.

It's a level of chauvinism that even the French can't aspire to!

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YES: Scotland declares independence ... from the dot co dot uk empire

Al Jones

Re: Now how about a .wales, .sixcounties and .england as well?

Some of the locals call it the 6 counties.

If you were to include the 300,000 "Ulstermen" who live in the 3 Ulster counties in the Republic, you might find that Ulster, like the man from Del Monte, says Yes!

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Al Jones

Re: Now how about a .wales, .northernireland and .england as well?

"58% against independence and 47% for"

Are you expecting some people to be voting early and voting often?

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Al Jones

Re: Scotland using English tld?

.alba might be a bit confusing for those who have encountered the phrase "Perfidious Albion".

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Amazon France routes around free shipping ban with €0.01 charge

Al Jones

Re: Booksellers do deserve protection

"Online selling, however, has done more to protect niche publishing. "

I'm not sure that I'd agree with that. For a start, Amazon is pretty useless at categorizing books (apparently, it doesn't need to be good at it, because it has made zero effort to improve it's search engine). So finding that niche is often harder on Amazon, than in a bookstore (especially a specialist bookstore that deals with that particular niche).

And in the case of France, French language publishing is also a (fairly large) niche - protecting French Bookstores may also be a factor in protecting French language publishing over the long term.

Amazon has certainly made self-publishing easier, which is definitely advantageous for certain types of non-fiction niches, as well as for fiction, where a certain gold-rush mentality exists, with lots of stuff thrown out there with the hope (or for the more deluded, the expectation) of wealth and fame.

But there's no curation, which makes finding the worthwhile stuff harder.

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Plucky Rockall adventurer prepares to leave islet

Al Jones

Re: "British Antarctic Survey"

How long has that windmill been up there???

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FCC commish: We don't need no steenkin' net neutrality rules

Al Jones

"Broadband providers would be expected to report on every aspect of their practices and services, including metrics like jitter and packet corruption, which are unlikely to be meaningful to the average consumer," the Republican duo assert.

"Expensive and burdensome reports that add no measurable consumer benefit are exactly the type of regulatory overreach that cost-benefit analysis is meant to prevent."

I can assure you that the average consumer wouldn't be able to make head nor tail of the regulatory reports that the Pharma, AgriFood, Auto, and Power Generation industries are required to file, but that's certainly not an argument that we don't need to regulate these industries.

(I deliberately left out the Financial industry, because they don't even understand the reports that they file).

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Dodgy Google, Yahoo! SSL certs nuked in Windows – finally

Al Jones

Re: Something needs to be changed in how certificates are trusted.

That auditing idea might pick up "honest mistakes" (!) but if a CA was deliberately generating bogus certs, then they presumably would deliberately exclude that particular cert from a self-published audit list of certs, so you might end up with a false sense of security, if people were actually depending on this type of auditability of CAs.

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Verizon points more fingers at Netflix: It's YOUR pals slowing data

Al Jones

Netflix isn't delivering their service over an ADSL connection in Zimbabwe - the congestion isn't occurring at the Netflix servers, it's occurring at the gateways where Verizon connects to the rest of the internet.

Verizon customers aren't paying Verizon $50/month to access Verizon's webmail servers, they're paying to get access to, and download content on Netflix, Youtube, Facebook and other 3rd party content, and they are typically consuming far, far more content/bandwidth than they are sending out.

(On a side note, Verizon's own website for paying my FiOS bill only is unquestionably the slowest, clunkiest website that I have to deal with on a regular basis - it's not hard for me to believe that Verizon are simply not capable of running an ISP efficently).

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Presto! After Supreme Court loss, Aereo says it's a cable company now

Al Jones

Being allowed to replace the original broadcast ads would be particularly interesting if they replaced the constant 3 minute ad-breaks with 1 second ad-breaks for programs that were recorded to be watched later. Their potential demographic would probably pay more for such a service, if Aereo could pull it off, than they could earn by placing their own ads in the stream.

$10/month with traditional ads, $15 with "blip" ads!

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Silent Circle takes on Skype, Viber, mobile telcos with crypto-VoIP

Al Jones

Re: Where the packets pass..

"which should be possible outside of funky NAT'ed networks"

You mean like the ones that a lot of mobile carriers still provide?

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Apple rats on Google to FTC: You thought WE were in-app-ropriate?

Al Jones

Re: It is pretty sad

It's pretty sad that you think that the FTC didn't know about Google.

Didn't you consider that maybe the information about the Apple lawyers e-mail makes for a nice juicy headline, even if the FTC were already investigating Google.

No wonder journalists get away with so much, when readers lap this stuff up!

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When PR backfires: Google 'forgets' BBC TV man's banker blog post

Al Jones

Re: How is this Google's fault?

The ECJ ruling says that people in the EU have a "right to be forgotten". Google has a responsibility to respect that right, and EU citizens shouldn't have to go to court to exercise that right, once the right has been established. The Court is there to adjudicate in cases where there is disagreement about the implementation, but bouncing every single request to the court by default would clearly be an abuse.

For example, newspapers know that people have a right to their good name, and they won't publish information that they recognize would be libelous. Sometimes they get it wrong, sometimes the object of an article thinks that they got it wrong and the courts have to make a decision, but most of the time peoples rights are respected without requiring court intervention.

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DISPLAY DESTRUCTION D'OH! Teardown cracks Surface Pro 3 screen

Al Jones

Re: This is a scam!

It's not so much that people are quite happy to replace stuff, as that the cost of labour means that an hour of a technicians time will cost a substantial fraction of what it would cost to just buy a replacement - and if one component has worn-out/been damaged, maybe another component will need to be replaced shorty after you pay for the first repair.

Given the pace of change in a lot of consumer electronics, buying new instead of repairing also means new features, better specs as well as the all important "shiny, shiny!!" factor (and a new warranty, to boot!)

I imagine there are probably some football fans reading who wish their TVs had developed a fault in the weeks before the World Cup so that they would have had an excuse to replace it, rather than repair it!

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Al Jones

Re: Why bother making things so thin?

Fragile? A screen that cracks when it's being pried apart isn't necessarily fragile - it's being taken way outside it's design specifications.

If you wanted to replace the screen because it had cracked, then it wouldn't really matter that you'd probably break the screen by removing it from the case - it's already broken! (Though if you want to replace the battery, and you have to remove the screen to do that, you might have a point!)

In real life, you probably won't be able to replace the screen, because there won't be spare screens available to replace it with! That's already the case for many such devices, unless they have iDevice or Galaxy style market penetration.

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EE in giant VoLTE-face as it tries voice calls over Wi-Fi... again

Al Jones

Re: UMA/SignalBoost

UMA on T-Mobile has been very helpful with spotty coverage over the years, though it doesn't seem to like some wifi routers.

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Al Jones

Re: No roaming because of 999/112

What I don't get is why they think that a phone belonging to a user living in Liverpool, for example, can use WiFi calling in Calais, without confusing 999/112, but won't be able to do it 20 miles further away in Calais?

It's obviously about preventing people bypassing roaming charges.

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That's no plane wreck, that's a Google Wi-Fi balloon

Al Jones

Re: Spectrum

That must be some impressive WiFi receiver technology on those balloons, if it can pick up domestic 802.11/b/g/n transmissions at the altitudes it's operating from!

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Apple SOLDERS memory into new 'budget' iMac

Al Jones

Re: Macs in Landfill

At the bottom of www.dell.co.uk, there's a link called Corporate Responsibility - it includes exactly the sort of information that you found on the Apple site. HP goes for the rather more whale-song label of "Living Progress", also found at the bottom of the home page.

Even Lenovo has a "Social Responsibility" link at the bottom of the home page.

Of course, they're probably all just copying Apple....

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Al Jones

Re: Bad Precedent

You mean like the Dell Inspiron 23 5000 Series Touch with a faster 4th gen, 4-core i5 CPU, a larger 23" 1920 x 1080 touch screen, 8GB of RAM and 1TB drive for £699?

http://www.dell.com/uk/p/inspiron-23-5348-aio/pd?oc=cd53403&model_id=inspiron-23-5348-aio

There is no precedent here - Apple are not the first, and won't be the last, to build machines like this. And like Apple, Dell feels that there are customers that will pay a price premium for this form factor compared to a more "standard" mini-tower and screen (though in this day and age, an SFF box with VGA and HDMI/Displayport and 6-8 USB ports is probably more than adequate for 95% of users).

I also see that Dell seems to have standardized on 8GB for the default configuration these days, even for "value" systems. Only 6 months ago, they were charging a ridiculous premium to upgrade the standard 4GB configuration to 8GB.

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Microsoft, insurance giant hitched to pitch home automation

Al Jones

Re: Wasn't there an "Almost Human" episode...

Maybe that's probably why they cancelled that show? (Pity - as chewing-gum for the eyes goes, it wasn't bad).

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EU probe into Apple's taxes: It's NOT to do with double-Dutch-Irish anything sandwiches

Al Jones

Re: There'll never be a good solution for tax shenanigans.

"However, if Apple are keeping their profits overseas as a result of these shenanigans, the shareholders don't benefit because the money isn't brought home to be distributed as a dividend."

Dividends? Where have you been for the last couple of decades?

Nobody invests in Amazon/Google/Apple for the dividend, the "return" is expected to come from buying low and selling high.

Apple didn't pay ANY dividends between 1995 and 2012, though since then it has been paying about $3/share per quarter - say $12 over two years. In the same time period the share price has increased by between $40 and $60 (it was $60 last week, it's only $40 this afternoon).

Amazon and Google have never declared a dividend, as far as I know.

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BOFH: On the contrary, we LOVE rebranding here at the IT dept

Al Jones

Re: Rebranding

I was sure that the old cattle prod would play a prominent part in today's episode when I saw the reference to rebranding in the title!

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Ireland accused of giving Apple 'selective advantage'

Al Jones

The smear is obviously working

There is absolutely no evidence that Ireland has offered Apple favourable tax rulings - both the Revenue Commissioners in Ireland and Apple insist that there are no special tax deals for Apple - the same rules apply to Apple as apply to any other company. But Brussels will take 12-18 months to investigate this, meanwhile leaving a cloud over the whole issue. The consistency and predictability of Ireland's tax code has been a factor in Ireland's FDI strategy, and a long drawn out investigation that will probably fail to find anything doesn't help.

Ireland's rules on "tax residency" for companies are based on where the company is managed from, rather than where it is incorporated - this means that some of Apple's subsiduaries aren't tax-resident anywhere, because even though they are owned and managed from Cupertino, the US doesn't consider them tax resident there because they are incorporated in Ireland. Ireland has recently changed it's laws so that any company that is incorporated in Ireland that isn't tax resident somewhere else will be considered tax resident in Ireland - presumably there was a LOT of lobbying to prevent the US government introducing a law that would have allowed to pick up these "state-less" companies, but in the long run, these US companies are going to come under more pressure to pay taxes to the IRS than to EU governments - indeed, if anything, the more they end up paying to EU Governments, the more unhappy the US will be about not getting its share!

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We're ALL Winston Smith now - and our common enemy is the Big Brother State

Al Jones

Maybe it's just me, but "the government" couldn't piggy-back on big-data's surveillance if that surveillance wasn't so pervasive. I'm far more concerned about the implications of higher health-insurance premiums because big data has developed a profile that fits some high-risk category (analysis of my spending patterns, or cell-phone location information showing where I eat or socialize). I'm more concerned that a future potential employer will pass me over for a job because they've bought a "job-candidate-profile" score from some spin-off that analyzes my social network footprint and decides that I have too many or too few of the right kind of friends, and has nothing to do with my technical skills or otherwise. These are commercially driven invasions of my privacy that aren't "opt-in". Different attitudes to privacy might mean that EU citizens would have some degree of protection from this type of thing, but if there's a way to monetize it, US citizens will definitely be subject to this type of profiling.

Even in the ultra-partisan political environment of the US currently, "the Government" doesn't care about me, and just doesn't have any incentive to slice and dice the data to get at me. Yeah, the knowledge that spending a lot of time looking for certain topics on the internet is going to raise flags has a chilling effect, but that was true before the internet too. But so far, the sort of "social control" that people seem to be afraid of doesn't come from deep-data analysis - Kansas gets Creationists on the local school boards, Colorado votes for pot, Arizona votes for a Cactus Curtain largely by very broad brush "old media" campaigns.

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DOCX disaster recovery: How I rescued my wife from XM-HELL

Al Jones

Re: Something very wrong here.

If this error was as common as corrupt BBC Basic programs (and, to be fair, corrupt Speccie, C64 and Amstrad CPC64 programs), then no doubt there'd be a number of tools out there to fix it.

But it's not that common a problem. Without taking away from the time and effort Trevor put into figuring out how to actually open up the file and fix it, the process is relatively straightforward, and it just needs an XML parser with a slightly different focus (highlighting the hanging tag) to make it easier, but the problem doesn't crop up often enough that the people with the necessary skills have been motivated to write code that will make it easier to fix this type of problem when it does crop.

I kinda knew somewhere in the dusty recesses that an OOXML file was just a .zip file, and Trevor's description of the process that he used will probably mean that I'll remember that fact if I'm ever motivated enough to try to recover data from a corrupt OOXML file, but I'll probably end up trying whatever XML parsers I have to hand at that time, rather than remembering which ones worked best for him.

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Piketty thinks the 1% should cough up 80%. Discuss

Al Jones

Re: Not sure I agree

Congratulations - you have just undermined the very point that the author is trying to make - that State Pensions (Social Security in USAian) should be treated as wealth.

Your example of using your own private 401K as collateral against a loan disproves Worstalls argument - try taking a loan out against your future Social Security income, and see how it works out. You wouldn't be able to do it on the same terms that you can with your 401K, so even if (for example) your 401k ended up providing exactly the same income as you will eventually get from Social Security, it would be wrong to count your Social Security as part of your current "wealth", though the author says that it should be.

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Comcast exec says wired broadband customers should pay-as-they-go

Al Jones

Re: Here's what Comcast is saying as of 8 April:

So you can save $5 by going from a 300GB cap to a 5GB cap which means that Comcast are only putting a value of 1.7c on those GB, but if you go over 5GB, you'll be charged $1 per GB.

Nice margins, if you can get them!

Only a tiny fraction of an end users bill pays for actual bandwidth - a user downloading 250GB a month doesn't cost Comcast $10 more to service than a user downloading 5GB a month. Even if the average user went from say 50GB a month to 150GB a month, Comcast's actual costs wouldn't increase by $10 per user per month.

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Al Jones

Re: Perversely, I thought metering was sane.

Someone IS paying to ship Netflix's bits - the "eyeballs who are being charged $60 a month by Comcast to connect to their $8 a month Netflix account!

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Oh GREAT: Your factory can Heartbleed out

Al Jones

Re: POS systems were Internet facing as well.

Would you prefer if Siemens had said "we're not going to bother releasing patches to our software that is vulnerable to the heartbleed flaw, because only an idiot would make their SCADA systems internet facing".

There's a known vulnerability in some of the libraries that they use in their SCADA software. They've released a patch. The only head-scratcher is why anyone would think that they shouldn't have bothered!

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Revoke, reissue, invalidate: Stat! Security bods scramble to plug up Heartbleed

Al Jones

Re: sounds familiar

Do you know when the bug was identified? You don't think OpenSSL.org released an updated version at the same time as they announced the vulnerability because it only took them 20 minutes to figure out and release an upgrade, do you?

In other words, we DID have to wait for the owners of openSSL to fix the bug before we found out about it, and could protect ourselves from the impact.

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Al Jones

Re: sounds familiar

What makes you think that this bug was found by someone trawling through the code? Codenomicon (heartbleed.com) claims to have independently discovered this bug while working on their own security testing tools, rather than by poring over the source code. I haven't seen any explanation of how Neel Mehta of Google Security discovered it, but I'd be pretty surprised if it was by reviewing the code.

It's far more likely that the presence of this sort of bug will be identified by the behavior of the compiled code than by careful examination of the uncompiled source code. And the outcome of responsible disclosure, where the parties responsible for the code (and major vendors) are notified and allowed to fix (and hopefully do some recursion testing) before the world and her dog are notified will not be much different whether the problem is in a closed source or an open source product.

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Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed

Al Jones

Re: Scrambling to fix OpenSSL bug ..

Unless OpenSSL plans to magically install the update for me and test, update and replace any potentially compromised devices and or certificates, (and write the reports for managements explaining the how and the why of the problem, and what was done about it), the mere existence of a fix doesn't mean that system administrators aren't scrambling to react to this issue.

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Al Jones

Re: Already patched...

Which version of OpenSSL does Microsoft use?

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Al Jones

Re: How to update your router

Some consumer routers use 10.x.y.z addresses too.

I was going to suggest using the Javascript function myIpAddress() that can be used in Proxy Auto Config files to define which proxy server should be used depending on which subnet a user is on, but it doesn't seem to be accessible when used in a script embedded in a page - no doubt allowing a webpage to have access to that sort of information would be used for nusiance value far more often than it would be used to create helpful tools like pointing the user at their routers home page.

Having said all that, for most non-technical users, looking at the label on their router for a name and model number and then searching for "name model default IP address" is probably going to be the simplest approach.

They might even end up at http://www.routeripaddress.com/routers/ which seems to have already gathered much of this information, and the default username and passwords for a lot of consumer hardware.

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Nothing's as SCARY as an overly aggressive SOFTWARE PIMP

Al Jones

Re: Form and Function

Nowadays, most computers have sound cards (very much an expensive optional extra when Windows 95 came out). Having multiple sound-tracks running at the same time is a lot more distracting than having multiple video windows, so most media players default to only running a single instance - it's not a bug, it's a feature!

If you want to display multiple videos at once in Windows, open up VLC, go to Tools, Preferences and uncheck "Allow only one instance" and "Use only one instance when started from file manager". (Why two options? So that you can have multiple widows open when you deliberately right-click and select Open With, but no accidental multiple videos running when you double-click on a video).

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White House blasts Samsung for tweeting Obama-Ortiz selfie

Al Jones

It's not about "personal data" - it's about a marketing campaign using the Presidents image. We all know that Obama pushed hard to be allowed keep his Blackberry when first elected to the office, but it would have been inappropriate if Blackberry had run an ad campaign based on that.

Samsung's Selfie campaign may be a lot more informal than a megabucks Madison Ave advertising blitz, but it's still using the President's image to sell phones, and that's a bit out of line.

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BEHOLD the HOLY GRAIL of TECH: The REVERSIBLE USB plug

Al Jones

Re: Blackberry Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

Yeah, because the black on black plastic moulding is so much easier to see/interpret than the teeth sticking out of the bottom side of a MicroUSB plug.

Not.

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Move over Microsoft: RealNetworks has a GOOGLE problem

Al Jones

Back in the day

Way, way back, in the early 90's, when RealAudio first showed up, it was an excellent solution to the problem of big .au (uLaw) or .WAV files - it actually became possible to stream audio in real time over a slow dialup link, and for the first couple of years the player wasn't the bloated PITA that it eventually became.

RealAudio would never have become an object of hate if it hadn't been good enough to be adopted as the defacto standard in the first place. If they had managed to curb their greed, and hadn't adopted the sort of tactics that so many users absolutely hated, they might have made something of themselves, though Glaser would probably argue that they wouldn't have survived this long.

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TV scraper Aereo pulled off air in six US states after tellyco court injunction victory

Al Jones

Re: Beer analogy

How is it any harder for the TV auditors to measure an Aereo user than it is another other viewer of free OTA broadcasts?

If anything, it's actually easier to audit Aereo users viewing habits than it is to audit OTA viewers generally.

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Why 2014 might just be the year of the Google Chromebook

Al Jones

Re: Now its possible to see why Dell went private

Dell has a manufacturing pipeline that is more tightly connected to consumer demand than anyone else. So when it throws out something new to the market, it sometimes encounters a tepid response, because the people who normally buy Dell weren't looking for that device, and the people who were looking for that device don't usually look to Dell for their toys, and Dell moves on to other things - you can't "Stack 'em High and Sell 'em Cheap" if they aren't selling.

It'll be interesting to see whether Dell stays the course with the BayTrail Windows tablets - they've even started to advertise them on TV, and the 32GB version of the Dell venue Pro 8 is currenly at #24 on Amazon's Sales Rank for Tablets, and #74 for Eletronics over all,

(It's behind 14 different versions of Kindle, 2 iPads, the Nexus 7, the Samsung Galaxy Tab 3, the Surface RT, 3 android tablets that retail for < $80, and a Foscam (?? On the tablet list? WTF, Amazon?)

14 different Kindles! Talk about market fragmentation!

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Al Jones

Re: Don't think so.

@nematoad - The same old bollox about MS killing netbooks. It was the netbook manufacturers who pleaded with MS to give them "loss leader XP" because they couldn't make any money selling netbooks with Linux on them.

If there was a market for linux based netbooks, chinese factories would have been churning them out, just as they are currently churning out no-name android tablets. They didn't churn out linux-based netbooks because the market just didn't exist.

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Linksys's über-hackable WRT wireless router REBORN with 802.11ac

Al Jones

@Grogan "First of all, it is the WRT54GL"

The original version of the WRT54G was the basis for DD-WRT and OpenWRT. The model was pretty popular for it's day, so Linksys made new versions, with different (cheaper) hardware, but kept the same box and name. This caused enough of a backlash from people who were spending a little extra to buy a Linksys router so that they could use DD-WRT, only to find the the new versions were incompatible, that Linksys introduced the WRT54GL (at a small price premium) to address the concerns of those customers who were buying the hardware so that they could run their own software on it.

Over the years, Linksys used 5 or 6 different versions of Broadcom chipsets, and for version 7.0 of the WRT54G, they switched to an Artheros chipset. All without changing the name of the thing they were selling.

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Your kids' chances of becoming programmers? ZERO

Al Jones

Re: So fix it!

VBScript is available by default in Windows too (though there's no GOTO in VBScript, so your 2 liner becomes a 3 liner, with a Do or While loop around the wscript.echo "Hello World!" statement)

What you can't easily do with VBScript at the command line that you could do with BASIC 25 years ago is move the cursor around the screen (though you can run your script in a web page if you want to write your own version of Snake).

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Dead PC market? In the UK? NEVER

Al Jones

235K desktops in the quarter, about a million a year. Just how many people do you think are building their own systems these days? If it's more than 3% or 4% I'd be surprised, and that doesn't take account of the laptops, where DIY hardly exists.

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