* Posts by DrXym

3666 posts • joined 18 Jul 2007

Google throws a 180 on its plans for Dart language

DrXym
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Re: Kind of too late now

"Nothing to do with the writers of Actionscript and Typescript being in the standards group for ECMA???"

So you mean this was all a conspiracy and a mere 12 years later they sprung the steel trap shut?

More likely it was to do with the general craptitude of JS in browsers at the time and concerns about implementing a new radical version of it while still supporting older versions.

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DrXym
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Kind of too late now

Google spooked devs as soon as they started talking of separate runtimes and integration into Chrome. I'm sure many developers had flashbacks to the days of VBScript where Microsoft tried to fragment the web by shoving their own scripting language in their own browser.

Ironically Microsoft seems to be the winner this time around with Typescript. Typescript is a compiler that outputs JS but adds keywords for classes, static typing and modules. So it's familiar to JS (and Actionscript) devs while still adding useful functionality.

I don't rate JS or TS much as a language (binding and scope rules are a minefield) but sometimes pragmatism trumps idealism. TS has mature tools, thousands of definition files for calling popular JS libraries and has become a mainstay in many projects.

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'Why don't you buy from foreign sites?' asks Commish, snapping on the gloves

DrXym
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Visit websites and it becomes all too obvious

In this order:

1) The site doesn't post to international addresses, even in the EU

2) Or if it does, the cost of P&P is silly expensive

3) Or the address details doesn't let you enter a foreign address

4) Or there is a problem processing the payment.

Ironically for small items it's often easier to order stuff from Hong Kong than it is from somewhere else in the EU.

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700,000 beautiful women do the bidding of one Twitter-scamming man

DrXym
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Re: diet pills

Herbalife is an MLM that sells supplements. It means members have set up thousands of virtually identical sites selling essentially the same horribly overpriced products, and frequently shill these wares and suppress criticism of them. I would not be surprised ifthem probably take it up a notch and spam too.

Herbalife isn't exactly an innocent in all this. It has a long history of legal brushes with the law and comparisons to pyramid schemes. The difference being how much money a person makes from selling product to actual end customers as opposed to how much they make from recruiting their own downline (and cajoling them to buy their own product).

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DrXym
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Sadly the internet is filled with this crap

There are a number of MLMs (barely legal pyramid schemes) and food supplement spammers who peddle crap like African mango, mangosteen, acai berries, raspberry ketone, green coffee etc.

They have no qualms about lying about the efficacy of this stuff (zero), or it its health benefits (zero) because there is a rich seam of gullible and desperate people who'll buy it at vastly inflated prices. It's rich pickings. Some people really do think that eating a few pills of dust cancels out cakes and biscuits.

It doesn't help that the US food and drug administration is emasculated - supplements have to be proven to cause harm, rather than proven to do good which means snake oil and quackery rules the day. As long as producers don't claim their products cure cancer or some other tangible illness they can slather all kinds of vague beneficial claims over their products and website and they don't have prove any of them.

The most depressing part about all of the above is that even "trusted" retailers like Walgreens, Amazon, Walmart, CVS are in on the act and peddle this shit and even own brand versions. Visiting a US pharmacy is thoroughly depressing.

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Ford: Our latest car gizmo will CHOKE OFF your FUEL if you're speeding

DrXym
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"limit sign was on the motorway, slip-road, or adjacent road so kept on reminding me that I should be doing 30 on the motorway."

And this of course will be one of a multitude of problems that self drive cars would face too - green light says go, oops wrong green light, crunch. Or the graffiti / shaded / unlit / part covered signed means car thinks it's still 70MPH instead of 50MPH oops speeding ticket.

It would probably be better if the car had a satnav or wireless link which inferred the speed limit from the prevailing traffic flow and then used the distance between the car in front and behind to adjust that to the local conditions.

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Microsoft sniffs around Xiaomi Mi 4 smarties with Windows 10

DrXym
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Kind of pointless with ARM

I can see massive potential for a Windows 10 phone running an Intel chipset. If Microsoft is telling the truth and unifying their product lines then its entirely possible that a phone could become a full desktop if you dock it. That's an awesome concept. They're really not far off already with Windows 8.1 which runs on cheap tablets so it's basically the phone stack and the ability to switch modes that's missing.

But if it's just ARM then it suffers the same problem as RT - lack of apps, a useless desktop and little reason for choosing it over another phone OS. Windows Phone isn't bad, but a handset running ARM will still be left out compared to handsets running Intel so it will still end up being sidelined.

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German court slaps down Uber's ride-sharing app

DrXym
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Nothing to stop Uber operating in Germany and elsewhere

They just have to abide by the laws and standards that all their competition must follow. It doesn't stop them from making money.

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Apple's portable power podule patent promises paroxysms of fanboi joy

DrXym
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What is patentable here?

Fuel cell rechargers have existed for a long time and I'm sure they're plastered with patents.

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My self-driving cars may lead to human driver ban, says Tesla's Musk

DrXym
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Re: Not a problem solved

"That's a bold claim."

No it isn't.

"It's far more likely to do it reliably and regularly than a human. It will take statistically proven decisions, and it will do that from a much broader array of sensing inputs than a human could."

The problem is that the things you encounter during a drive are far from regular.

"I struggle with seeing how people who work in computing could see this as unsolvable. "

It's called experience. See aforementioned voice recognition. Or OCR. Or AI. Or robotics. All began with lofty claims and then it turns out turning the analog world into something a computer understands turns out to be damned hard.

"It's simply an engineering problem - the right inputs processed at the right time, matched against a statistically driven decision tree. How is any of that impossible?"

Not one problem, an infinite set of problems, many of which are intractible.

Here's some trivial problems your hypothetical self drive car would encounter:

- The lights are out at the crossroads ahead. Does your car know how to negotiate the crossroads in a safe way which gives gives priority to other drivers according to the time they arrived and prevailing traffic? Can it establish basic signals to other drivers to indicate intent. Or does it just nudge out like an asshole and hope for the best? Or does it annoy the driver by giving up? How does it know to give up? Naturally it would have to do the right thing however many lanes, rights of way, trucks, buses, bicycles, motorbikes and cars (self drive and otherwise) there were.

- A man is standing in the road by the traffic lights. A police man. How does your car know to obey his signals instead of the traffic lights?

- A man is standing in the road by the traffic lights directing traffic. This man is a loony. How does your car know NOT to obey his signals instead of the lights?

- A big truck ahead is stopped and a guy hops out to halt traffic each way so the truck can reverse into some entrance. How far away does your car stop from this? How does it know not to try and overtake this obstacle?

- Your car encounters a stationary bus in your lane. Is the bus broken down? Is the bus stopped at a bus stop or stopped at lights? If it's stopped at a bus stop how long is it likely to be there picking up passengers? When if ever is it safe to pull into the oncoming lane to overtake this obstacle?

- The road has a big pot hole in it. Can your car see this? Can it see it when it's filled with water? Or does it just smash straight through it?

- A road is closed and there is a diversion in place. Does your car follow the signs or just keep driving until it falls into a hole the council just dug?

- You're going up a country lane. 50m ahead you see an oncoming car. Does your car know it has to pull into the verge NOW because there is no verge ahead?

- Your car goes into place with terrible radio coverage, or no GPS like a tunnel, underground carpark or simply a built up area. What does it do? Dead reckoning? Revert to the driver? What?

I could go on but the point is there are too many variables, particularly in urban / country environments for it possibly to do the right thing all of the time. If it's constantly nagging the driver to intervene because it doesn't know what to do then it will become annoying and useless. I expect that even when it does appear in closed loop environments that there will still be some guy in a booth there to remotely extricate the car if it gets confused or confounded by something.

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DrXym
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Not a problem solved

Self drive is not a problem solved. There are so many variables that can occur during a normal journey (particularly in urban environments) that a self drive car cannot possibly arrive at the correct solution every time.

It'll end up like voice recognition. Even if it gets things right 90% of the time, that remaining 10% will be so annoying that people will turn it off or only use it in places where it works well. It's trivial to envisage situations where self drive would utterly screw things up or do something annoying for the driver, other road users or pedestrians.

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Microsoft announces Windows 10 and Azure for humanity's implacable IoT foes

DrXym
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Re: Yeah right

"Like we are going to open up our ATM communications to the cloud."

ATMs basically operate in the cloud already - you ask for money, the ATM asks the central bank computer to authorise the transaction and you get your money. The ATM is a sophisticated but basically dumb front end to the bank already.

Of course the bank owns that cloud so that's where the issue lies here. Banks aren't in a million years let their data be stored on someone else's machine unless it satisifies a million and one regulatory and security issues.

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BBC gives naked computers to kids (hmm, code for something?)

DrXym
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I don't see the purpose of this

Okay, getting kids to program is a good thing. But kids will need a computer to program this board, so why not let them program on the computer and forget about the board altogether? There are some pretty good sites for doing this already - scratch, codeproject etc. Even the BBC has some decent browser based programming apps.

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Pi(e) Day of the Century is upon us! Time to celebrate 3/14/15 in style, surely?

DrXym
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Re: My vote ratio is approaching Pi

Thanks for the thumbs down - pulling me towards Pi instead of away

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DrXym
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My vote ratio is approaching Pi

From my profile - "In total, your posts have been upvoted 8716 times and downvoted 2742 times."

Sadly I'm still a little out but I'm trying to get closer by employing irrational and circular logic.

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Minecraft debuts new block – one that blocks Java crapware, that is

DrXym
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Bizarre story

Lots of apps bundle their own JRE which is basically just a few folders including the version of Java they need. Minecraft used to not bother doing this and now they do. It probably solves some QA / administration headaches to have people using the same tried and tested version of Java powering the experience.

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Linux kernel devs adopt Bill and Ted's excellent code of conduct

DrXym
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"Which OS is that, then?"

Any OS which was built around the most robust operating system kernel ever.

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Chewier than a slice of Pi: MIPS Creator CI20 development board

DrXym
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Re: Media Center

"Then make one. I'm sure you could detect a button push and trigger shutdown."

So I can't comment on a shortcoming in a device that prevents it functioning well in a certain role unless I produce a workaround that solves my personal need but doesn't do anything for anyone else?

Why not just accept it'd be nicer if it had a soft power button built into it.

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DrXym
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Re: Media Center

The Pi could do with a proper soft power button to be properly useful as a media centre. At present you have to shut the OS down and pull the plug or turn the power off. A soft power could do the shutdown automatically and put it in a low power state.

The new Pi is likely fast and useful enough in other regards to power a UI and video playback.

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Oi. APPLE fanboi! You with the $10k and pocket on fire! Fancy a WATCH?

DrXym
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Re: Hmm...$10,000...

I had an awesome Casio watch at school - clock, date / time, alarm clock, stop watch, timer AND calculator. And a battery which lasted years. This was over 3 decades ago.

Anyway, Casio have a G-shock watch which probably qualifies as the only smart watch to be worth a damn at this time. It has low power bluetooth and an app for phones that can make it vibrate and display a text message and other than that it's just a fancy LCD watch. So the battery lasts ages.

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DrXym
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Whatever the price it'll be too much

It's shiny. It says Apple. It's a prestige object. I'm sure the general public will weigh up the practical benefits of owning such a smart watch (few) and the disadvantages (many) and buy it anyway.

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Uber XXXs itself out of South Korea

DrXym
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Very noble of them

"Here use our platform. This is for completely altruistic reasons and certainly not so we can shut out the competition and skim our cut from the top of every fare."

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Filthy – but sadly frothy – five door fun: Ford Focus 1.5 Zetec

DrXym
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I hate bad usability in cars

I used to drive a Nissan Almera which had a central dash with buttons numbered 1 to 6. Two buttons either side set the mode for what they did. If you were in radio mode they changed the radio station. If you were in air conditioning mode they controlled the fan speed. This meant at any given time there was a 50% chance they were in the wrong mode and it screwed up the action. Such a stupid system may have saved Nissan £1 for a couple of extra buttons and caused untold confusion and frustration for me.

IMO every basic function in the cabin space should be controlled with a button, dial or switch which are grouped sensibly with the most important functions closest to the driver's line of sight. If there is a computer / tablet interface, save it for the extraneous stuff. And make damned sure that it is predictable and navigable with only the briefest of glances.

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Litecoin-mining code found in BitTorrent app, freeloaders hit the roof

DrXym
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Whatever happened to uTorrent

I remember the first few versions which were lean and mean little clients for downloading. Then I used an update and it was laden down with crapware in the installer and ads in the client. Yeah they've got to make money but there is a line between making money and being obnoxious.

Anyway there are free and open source clients for this sort of thing - deluge is quite good although the GTK widgets look a bit weird on WIndows.

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Choc Factory splatters 51 bugs, Mozilla bumps cert checker

DrXym
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Re: I wish they'd fix the trust model

Yes there are problems but look at how it is now.

If I run a site and want secure communication I have to apply for and usually pay some nonentity to issue me with a "signed" cert. Not just once but every year. I don't gain anything from this process and neither do my visitors. It's just a tax on security to make a scary popup go away and to deter casual evil doers.

I should be able to roll my own cert. I could register the fingerprint with a lighthouse site if I wanted some protection from MITM attacks. Or I could get other sites to sign my key. e.g. maybe Amazon offers a key signing service for affiliates. Or I might know some other site owners and have a key signing party. Or I could pay a CA. Or all of those things according to my needs.

The more signatories the better of course but even none is protection from eavesdroppers.

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DrXym
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I wish they'd fix the trust model

Most root CA signatures aren't worth a damn for security or trust. My browser has several hundred root certs and I haven't a clue who most of them are, how seriously they take security or what "trust" they could possibly bestow on some random site. We already know some root CAs have been compromised or are compliant with their national government.

So why do we rely on them? Why in most cases do sites pay money and expend time / effort for a cert which does nothing buy make a scary icon go away?

I would FAR more trust a site if in addition to, or instead of a CA their cert was signed by their business partners, their competitors, their local chamber of commerce, their trade associations etc. So I go to Amazon and their site is signed by Google, Visa, Mastercard, Barnes & Noble, Microsoft, Mozilla etc. Recognizable names. It would also be far more secure - it only takes one root CA to be compromised and start issuing bogus certs. But if browsers cached certs and site certs had more than one signature, then it would be more harder to compromise them. The browser could warn you if a cert's fingerprint changed or signatories had disappeared.

A web of trust basically. It doesn't stop a site getting their cert signed by a CA and in some cases it still makes sense. But a web of trust model would be far more suitable for a lot of sites. And let sites use unsigned keys. It might not prevent man in the middle but it's still better than plaintext (which doesn't stop MITM either) and browsers could still store fingerprints to warn of changes.

If browsers can produce a new HTTP/2.0 or HTML 5, or EME or a raft of other things, then why not fix the broken trust model. Give sites a choice. They can still pay $$$ for a cert, or they can build a web of trust. Or both. Or nothing. It still more secure than what we have right now.

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Nokia boss smashes net neutrality activists

DrXym
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Re: Preposterous

"Why should connected cars be discriminated against on the information highway? "

They're not. It's a stupid analogy by some bigwig attempting to justify why net neutrality is somehow evil. They might as well have complained asking why factory safety systems have to contend with Netflix services. The answer of course is they don't and they never have. Safety critical stuff can run on a closed network or a network separate from other networks where its performance can be guaranteed. And if cars are ever automated then I assume that someone will buy out a chunk of radio spectrum or launch a bunch of satellites to ensure exactly that.

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DrXym
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Preposterous

There is no reason that "connected cars" need share the same network as someone streaming from Netflix. Indeed there is an extremely good reasons that would be a bad idea even without net neutrality.

Indeed, net neutrality doesn't stop ISPs from selling different speed, different contention, different download limit services even from the same service. What it DOES prevent them doing is gimping Amazon's streaming service because Hulu paid them a bunch of money to favour theirs. Or similar scenarios.

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Oracle's piping hot new pot of Java takes out the trash (faster)

DrXym
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"Hopefully it collects itself and deletes....Java is horrible, bloated and insecure mess."

Java in a browser is (or has been insecure). Java running from a service or command line is no more or less secure than any other compiled or interpreted language / runtime.

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£280k Kickstarter camera trigger campaign crashes and burns

DrXym
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Fools, money etc.

I'm sure there are some projects which are altruistic, charitable or otherwise worthy of funding but why does anyone fund a commercial product without receiving a stake of the profits?

Paying up front for some paltry discount off the final product is a terrible deal. The product doesn't exist and might not exist for months or years. It might never exist or be nothing like what was promised. Other products may appear which are better or cheaper.

What is the point of this? It's bad enough to pay for beta quality products but products that don't exist at all? Crazy.

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Have it all: BlackBerry to port crown jewels to iPhone, Android

DrXym
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Re: Should have made Android handsets in the first place

"Perhaps BB have already investigated and decided that Android just can't be hardened to BB standards. I would believe that."

I wouldn't because it's nonsense. If that were their opinion then why put an android layer in there at all?

Anyway Samsung has KNOX for Android so its clearly feasible to security harden Linux. In fact BB is already very chummy with Samsung to the point that I could see the things ending up in a buyout and BB becoming a brand of Samsung running over Android anyway.

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DrXym
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Re: Should have made Android handsets in the first place

"Only if they can reproduce the BB10 UI"

I see no issue with that.

The issue at present is they're basically maintaining two operating systems - their BB10 native OS which gets little love and an Android emulation layer which is basically all of the userland Android with thunks.

What's the point of this complexity? None. They could do the UI over android. They could security harden the kernel and do all the stuff which BB is known for but without all the overhead. And they'd sell a lot more phones.

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DrXym
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Should have made Android handsets in the first place

Blackberry already port and maintain an Android compatibility layer in BB10 because there are so few native apps. They might as well just go the whole hog and be running proper Android. They can still harden it, and skin it and use security / business friendliness as their unique selling point. But at least then people will be interested in buying it.

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Bradley Horowitz on ailing Google+: Islands in the stream, that is what we are ...

DrXym
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I don't see the point for it

Facebook and Google+ are basically the same thing - a wall to post stuff on and (assuming you're interested) follow other people and see their posts in aggregate form. The problem for G+ is that Facebook got there first and it doesn't really have a differentiator. It's just another social wannabe with a fraction of the content.

It also copies the most annoying and evil aspects of Facebook. It nags you to provide more personal info. It nags you to connect to people "you may know". It nags you to join groups. It doesn't provide options to stop nagging you. It throws the switch on all the security / privacy settings and ensures the settings are deliberately vague or confusing so you're never quite sure if you are secure or not.

If G+ were NOT evil, or had a simple to control privacy, or if it acted more like a traditional home page where I could add feeds and other things of interest then I might use it. But as it is, it's just an intrusive bore.

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Elon Musk plans to plonk urban Hyperloop subsonic tube on California

DrXym
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Re: Let's see how testing goes before coming to any conclusions

"Let's think about loading. With hyperloop the passengers will have to strap in, so that takes, what, ten minutes at least? Think how long it takes to load a 737... So that's one departure every ten minutes at best. I think they're planning something like 20 passengers per vehicle, so it's 120 people per hour."

Theme parks manage to process thousands of people on rides with more stringent passenger safety measures than this shuttle is likely to require.

So I don't see it follows that it's going to be slower, particularly since they could scale with parallel tracks and scheduling to put people with the same destination on the same shuttle. They could even scale the service according to demand, adding more shuttles in at peak periods. It's like one glorified bin pack - it could designed to ensure an efficient throughput according to the expected demands on the system.

It doesn't mean it's going to be queueless and it's entirely hypothetical how it would work in a developed system. I imagine the first hyperloop systems will be fairly rudimentary with a limited number of destinations and many of the problems will require a real system to manifest themselves.

I'd add that boarding is just one of many delays encountered with air travel - slogging to the airport, checkin, security, boarding and the disembarkation and more slogging at the other side. A hyperloop could potentially deliver people to or close to the actual centre of a city. Look at the Eurostar as an example of this - the train is slower than a plane but it actually to where people want to go and so is faster and more convenient than a plane.

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Visa: One million bonks a month for Europeans from next year

DrXym
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Hardly surprising

Many modern cards have contactless payment chips anyway so what's the point?

You wave the card and the payment happens. Conversely you wave the phone and F-all happens. So you turn the phone on, unlock it, swipe around a bit looking for the payment app, discover you've lost connectivity with the payment service and have been logged off, screw around enabling it, enter your login again etc. etc.

I would find it more useful if I could wave the card against a phone to get a balance statement or similar and use the card to pay when I'm in a queue.

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LinkedIn values your privacy at ONE WHOLE LOUSY DOLLAR

DrXym
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Re: Once again

This is LinkedIn you're talking about here.

It started off as a neat thing to keep track of people you worked with or went to school with. Then it was monetized and now it's just a cattle market. You're the cattle to be poked, prodded and inspected by anyone who pays LinkedIn to look at your info. Job agents, sales people, you name it.

I'm plagued by job agents to the extent I've unlinked the lot of them and restricted my privacy settings as much as I can. They think nothing of doing a skill search and indiscriminately spamming everyone who matches. The same job might result in multiple spams, none of which I've solicited. At least by unlinking they have to use one of their precious InMails if they want to contact me.

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So long, Lenovo, and no thanks for all the super-creepy Superfish

DrXym
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Stop lying Lenovo

"Superfish was previously included on some consumer notebook products shipped in a short window between September and December to help customers potentially discover interesting products while shopping,"

Er no Lenovo. It was included because you sought to profit by inflicting crapware / adware / spyware on your customers. You're not alone in doing this - vendors like HP, Dell etc. preinstall crap because a substantial percentage of users will never remove it. You just took it one sleazy step further.

It's very simple to fix. Do not install anything except Windows. If you absolutely must, put some programs in a single folder and allow people to electively install them. It's not hard.

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Linux clockpocalypse in 2038 is looming and there's no 'serious plan'

DrXym
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I really don't see the big deal

Redefine time_t as 64-bits. As it is already in some configurations.

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The Order: 1886 – Round Table gaming's all right on the knight

DrXym
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I don't mind QTEs

But they have to be used in moderation and the rest of the game should be something really special to justify them when they do turn up. I think the Order's problem is they focussed too much on the presentation and not enough on the actual content. Anyone paying to the preview footage would have probably guessed this already but it's still a shame.

Neither the XB1 or PS4 has produced a smash exclusive title yet which is kind of surprising. Both have tried (Ryse, Titanfall, Driveclub, LBP3 etc.) but nothing has quite gotten it right yet.

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Amazon's delivery drones SHOT DOWN by new FAA rules

DrXym
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Re: It was a stupid idea to begin with

Well that's a pretty lame analogy. I don't recall from history books about the Wright brothers testing their aircraft over populated urban centres.

Secondly we're not talking of just one drone, or two or even 10. Potentially there could be hundreds or thousands of flights per day buzzing around at relatively low altitude. It is quite obvious and inevitable that they would be smashing into buildings, hitting birds, becoming entangled with phone / electric wires, hitting masts, getting tipped by wind / rain, getting shot down, getting hacked / jammed, operator error and suffering more mundane technical issues.

I could see the benefit of unmanned drones distributing tonnes of cargo between centres over mostly unpopulated areas (or areas they could route around). Basically small jets with no pilot. But not smaller drones over urban centres.

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DrXym
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It was a stupid idea to begin with

I doubt the drone has the range or endurance to fly very far so why not just send somebody out in a van on a delivery route? Same difference except of course it would be far cheaper for customers and there wouldn't be drones falling out of the sky.

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Apple Watch 'didn't work on HAIRY FANBOIS, was stripped of sensor tech'

DrXym
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People will still buy them

The Apple Watch will be hamstrung by the same limitations as other smart watches - a screen that turns off, a battery that barely lasts a day, proprietary functionality which requires an phone, and most importantly a lack of reason for being. And it'll undoubtedly cost a lot more too.

I'm sure it will still sell extraordinarily well putting paid to the idea that people in general have any sense.

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Windows 10 to give passwords the finger and dangle dongles

DrXym
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A fingerprint would be broken down into a biometric description which would then be hashed. Assuming there was enough uniqueness in this description the hash would no more or less secure than a strong password. Both would depend on the database properly salting the hash though to make it difficult to reverse lookup.

Of course the one disadvantage of a print is you can't change it. So if thieves did grab your print they could happily unlock all your devices and accounts that used it. Biometrics that capture more than the print, e.g. blood vessels are probably more secure. It would also be desirable to use 2-factor authentication so that to log on you must supply your print (something you have) and type a pin (something you know).

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Got an Android Wear gizmo? Yeah, you and '719,999 other people'

DrXym
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Re: "the Apple Watch will offer leading energy efficiency"

I doubt the Apple iWatch will be any different in terms of power draw to any other "smart" watch that insists on packing a CPU & OLED display into the form factor. People will be lucky if it lasts 30 hours between charges and probably less than that.

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DrXym
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Re: Apple who?

Hololens might gain some popularity as a console / PC gaming peripheral or for people who want to watch movies at home or certain job roles (e.g. order fulfillment in a warehouse).

But do you really think you'll ever see people taking to the gym, or walking around in public with them? If not you haven't been paying attention to the whole Google Glass debacle. Hololens may as well have "twat" written on it for the effect it conveys on the wearer. Walking around with one of these in public is an invitation to be punched in the face and/or have it stolen.

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Cortana to form CIRCLE OF LIFE in Windows 10

DrXym
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It's so soothing

You don't even feel the personal data being sucked out of you.

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Samsung: Our TVs? SPYING on you? HA HA! Whee! Just a JOKE of course

DrXym
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Re: Is this at all surprising?

"Bitrotten - not so sure. "

Smart TVs have been a thing for 5 or 6 years now. If you look at the ones which have been knocking around for 3 years (for example) and note how crap they are - that's your TV 3 years hence. And 3 years is generous because I expect most people keep their TV for as long as it works or a new standard appears. The lifecycle of apps and OSes doesn't fit the lifecycle of a television.

Services get discontinued (e.g. LoveFilm, Blockbuster) or functionality is added to other platforms but not yours, or your TV doesn't get popular new apps at all. Or support ceases and security holes (opened by all that smartness) go unpatched.

At least if the smartness was in a box then you could get rid of the box or move it to a bedroom. When it's baked into the TV, you're stuck with it.

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DrXym
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Is this at all surprising?

It is not surprising at all that a TV with voice recognition will send audio off to be recognized. I expect there is an option to disable it. A better option is don't buy smart TVs in the first place - all that functionality will be bitrotten in a few years any way.

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Bitcoin trade biz MyCoin goes dark, investors fear $387 MEEELLION lost

DrXym
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Re: "We're not quite sure how that'll work"

Bitcoin is the ponzi. Buying contracts on a ponzi seems like a double dose of stupid.

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