* Posts by Jess

1026 posts • joined 17 Jul 2007

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WhatsApp is to hand your phone number to Facebook

Jess
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Re: Moving over to telegram

I'm sure there are easier ways to get my contact list - googlemail for one. So that isn't an issue to me, however I looked up Signal but it appears it suffers from the same limitations as whatsapp, single device and iOS, Android only.

I like telegram because of the multiple device support and the support for Windows, Mac, Linux and there's even a BlackBerry client.

But thanks for the info, I was unaware of Signal previously.

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Jess
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Moving over to telegram

I am planning to stop using whatsapp (unless they allow it to be moved to SD card to reduce its footprint) when they drop support for Nokia and BB phones. (Since it will cut off my mum, my brother and one of my best friends.) I have been advocating Telegram to all my contacts.

Though as far as I can tell telegram isn't likely to happen on Symbian, so it looks like ICQ might be the best replacement.

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Paper mountain, hidden Brexit: How'd you say immigration control would work?

Jess
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Re: Afghans.

They won't be losing any rights. In fact if the economy doesn't tank enough that we don't need to replace all the EU migrant workers, they will find it far easier to get their friends and family over. (They will be on a level pegging with Europeans, who probably won't want to come over anyway.)

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Jess
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Re: what about 'non-eu' workers in UK?? eg ######, indian, japanese, etc..??

As far as I can tell this is the current rules for EU workers, so if they have been here 3 years when article 50 is started, then they will have been here 5 years before the rules change.

If they don't qualify then they will obviously hit the earn £35K after 5 years or you're out rule.

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Jess
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I'm just curious how this controlling our borders sits with leaving the RoI/NI border as it is.

How do you stop EEA nationals with freedom of movement entering the UK? How do you stop goods travelling to and from the free market?

Or do you leave NI in the EEA and move the border controls to Great Britain? (Not sure how well that would go down). But if you leave NI in the EEA, then Scotland will justifiably demand the same. So then you'd need border controls between England and Scotland. (What would they do, move the borders and re-use Hadrian's wall?)

Of course any part of the UK remaining within the EEA would result in a shift of corporates to the remaining part.

That is why I am pretty sure we won't actually be leaving the EEA. And to be fair there is no mandate to do that. The question asked was about the UK leaving the EU. (Not breaking up or leaving the EEA).

Leaving the EEA would certainly wreck the UK as a nation. Financially and its unity. Returning to the EFTA and keeping our EEA membership certainly wouldn't do much bad to the economy, and may not even break the UK up.

We really need a better referendum that addresses these issues, and not rely on a 13:14 ratio where the two possible leave options were not differentiated, and the benefits of one and the consequences of the other were presented.

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Google killing app format used only by The 1%

Jess
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You can trust Google to support their new ideas..

.. as much as you can trust Microsoft to support non-x86 family processors.

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New UK trade deals would not compensate for loss of single market membership

Jess
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Re: In July unemployment was down (after Brexit)

Brexit hasn't happened yet. It is at least 2 1/2 years away, if it happens at all.

There are only 2 viable options for the position outside the EU.

Remain within the EEA (presumably by rejoining the EFTA). I believe that were we to pursue an off the shelf agreement then it would be relatively easy to achieve, as long as we don't try to gain exemptions from too many of the responsibilities of EEA membership. From a business perspective this would maintain the status quo, and everything would return to normal just as soon as it starts looking to be decided. The rest of the EEA would not be stupid enough to prevent this. However if we start asking for a special deal it won't happen. (The Swiss have been trying for years and are still effectively regular EEA members.) The EU would be insane to allow it, because it would undermine the whole thing.

The other option is WTO memberships, I believe the result of this will lots of EU headquarters and EU centric manufacturing relocating to remain within the free market. It would also mean lots of EU firms upping their orders from UK firms so they have a big inventory for when it becomes troublesome to purchase from the UK. These two factors will cause a pre-Brexit boom. Lots of contractors will be needed to help relocate. (Once it is over there will be a nasty shock for the UK.)

An interesting point is the delays to article 50 will put the next election very close to the actual leaving date. Which would mean the temporary positive effects would still be there, benefiting the current administration's chances.

Apparently the civil service is evaluating both these options (but not the breakup of the UK, interestingly).

However given the promises about the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland that have been made, I really can't see that an WTO arrangement is possible.

If we are not part of the free market, then at the very least it must be a customs border. Otherwise it is a wide open backdoor in and out of the free market. The EEA could not allow this.

If we want to 'control our borders' ie EU citizens (since we control everyone else), then a passport border would be needed. Otherwise any EU citizen could come legitimately to the RoI, and then into the UK.

So it would appear that this promise, a non-EEA arrangement and an intact UK are mutually incompatible. (You can have any two).

I think we will remain in the EEA. (And to be fair if only one in every 25 leave voters voted based on the Norway model, then the majority of the UK wish to remain in the EEA).

If that happens none of the doom and gloom will come to pass, and I think that business is hoping the same and deferring decisions to pull out. (But they are also deferring investments too.)

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Jess
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Re: legitimate democratic outcome

A margin of one in fifty when so many lies were told is legitimate?

Whether leave meant moving back to the EFTA or quitting the whole thing was never made clear.

The Norway model was often quoted. So if that is what over 1 in 25 leave voters wanted, then there is no mandate to leave the EEA.

Dragging Scotland and NI out against their wishes is democratic?

The only sensible way forward is another referendum for England and Wales giving three choices.

Remain in the EU

Move to the EFTA

Leave the EU and the EEA

It should be preferential and made clear that should the result be other than remain, then the other parts of the UK will get to decide whether they wish to join us.

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Jess
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Re: This country is called "Great Britain"

er no.

Great Britain refers to the union of Scotland and Britain (England and Wales). i.e the whole Island.

The likely outcome of Brexit is this union being broken, meaning 'Britain' will return to meaning England and Wales rather than being an abbreviation for Great Britain.

So the BR in Brexit would be literally Britain.

Brexit would take the Great out of Great Britain and end the United Kingdom.

However it would seem likely to me that were it to be a reversal of our 1970s move from the EFTA to the EEC, then Scotland and NI might accept it and the UK might continue.

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Jess
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Re: Germans are going to stand idly by....

What choice do they have? Our currency has already dropped, meaning their cars will cost more, if we are outside the single market, it is our government that will set import tariffs.

Of course the choice they do have is to make it easy for currently UK based businesses such as multinationals' European HQs to move to Germany and remain within the EU. (Relocation allowances, special deals for UK nationals who wish to retain their positions, etc.)

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Windows Phone dives into irrelevant-like-BlackBerry territory

Jess
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Re: The reason it has died a death

I would think the way Microsoft bribed Nokia to kill Symbian didn't help. All the Nokia Symbian users I knew are now either Android users or still clinging on.

However moving that chunk of the market from Symbian (no royalties) to Android (royalties) proved that the outcome was win-win.

Win winning would have been a win. All those royalties were a win.

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Blackberry beats the vendors it trails, finishes Quadrooter patches

Jess
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Re: BlackBerry should be congratulated for keeping their promises.

For once.

Where is BB 10 on the Playbook?

I was also unimpressed by the list of things that my Q5 could not do that the 9700 could. (Although BB10 was otherwise a great platform, it was just very unfinished).

Things that spring to mind that annoyed me.

Scheduled power on/off. (Result; the power button on the Q5 is now well dodgy)

wifi calling. (UMA on 9700, not so important now because of bria)

Ability to choose 2G only (I used to travel through an area where 3G was totally unreliable, the old BB was fine, switched to 2G. The new one, useless there).

There were lots more when I first got the device, each new version of BB10 knocked a few more off the list.

I was waiting until the list got sufficiently short to invest in a Passport to replace the Q5.

No way am I spending hundreds on an Android Phone. Apple is too locked down. So basically I have decided I won't have a personal smartphone any more.

End result; Q5 replaced with £60 Chinese 10" phablet (which was intended to be a stop gap, but is actually so good, I'm sticking with it.)

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Brexit Britain: HP Sauce vs BBC.co.uk – choices that defined voters

Jess
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Re: paying import duty on it then...

But Ms May has promised that there will be no border controls between the Republic of Ireland (part of the EU and a country we have personal freedom of movement with that predates the EU) and Northern Ireland.

So assuming that the EU don't notice this wide open back door to the free market, and there are no customs borders between the two British Isles as a result, then tariff free HP sauce is still going to be possible. (Of course quite how they expect to stop European people taking exactly the same route, and meeting the promise to control our borders, I haven't quite figured out.)

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Facebook to forcefeed you web ads, whether you like it or not: Ad blocker? Get the Zuck out!

Jess
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noscript + https://mbasic.facebook.com/

The only ads I see are suggested posts.

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Email proves UK boffins axed from EU research in Brexit aftermath

Jess
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Re: Reads like the Breixteers got at least a single fact right, care to share that one with us ?

Wasn't the one about the fish true?

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Jess
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Re: we'd just have to direct the same amount of our previous EU membership fees into it

Except all that is going to the NHS surely?

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Jess
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Re: we've seen a 20% increase in revenue since the vote

Hardly surprising is it?

All sorts of businesses will benefit during the transition, initially due to the currency, (but eventually that will become the norm as the increased costs find their way through.)

As the actual exit comes nearer, people will be taking their last chance to get goods and services before everything gets more complex.

Visitors who want to come one day will come before we leave rather than after, because things will be more complex after.

Lots of EU headquarters will relocate back to the EU, creating work.

Of course after it actually happens the economy will take a hit, but that will most likely be after the next election with the current government being re-elected on the strength of the temporary boom.

Could this be one reason for the procrastination over article 50? Aligning the next election to arrive just before the pain arrives?

(Note all this assumes leaving the EEA. If that doesn't happen, then everything will quickly return to normal once it is actually decided.)

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Windows 10 Anniversary Update is borking boxen everywhere

Jess
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I tried edge after the update and it went direct to malware.

It was completely locked with the standard popup (and a nice BSOD within a window).

The fix was to launch a new window immediately on starting the browser, then the exploited window could be closed.

Presumably it must have remembered an old page, which was subsequently hacked. (I don't use edge often, it will be even less often, now).

It took me a while to be happy that system wasn't compromised elsewhere.

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BBC detector vans are back to spy on your home Wi-Fi – if you can believe it

Jess
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Re: ECHR is not part of the EU.

Not part of it, but it is a requirement for membership, (and of the EEA too.)

So if May is prepared to decimate our economy (and probably break up the UK) to get Britain* out of them both (which she apparently didn't want) why would she then not take us out of the ECHR (which reportedly she does want)?

* The word Britain not being used as an abbreviation of Great Britain, but to mean England and Wales.

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Cortana expelled from Windows 10's new school editions

Jess
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I'm torn.

On one hand, removing features with an upgrade is totally out of order.

On the other hand, it sounds great, I want the same to happen to my Win 10 pro

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UK membership of Council of Europe has implications for data protection after Brexit

Jess
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Re: The EU may not allow the UK to join the EFTA, because reducing the pain..

I believe they are pragmatic enough that they would go with an off the shelf EEA/EFTA deal. It would have the benefit of business pretty much as usual and preserve the rights of their citizens. It would also have the benefit of retaining our economy in the bloc, while getting rid of our government's whiny disruptive presence.

Am I the only Brit who is embarrassed by our government constantly asking for special deals, while the rest just get on with it?

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Jess
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Brexit means Brexit

But what does that actually mean?

The question asked only mentioned the EU, it made no mention of any other European organisation.

Since originally joining the then EEC involved leaving the EFTA, a reasonable interpretation would be rejoining the EFTA, which would be a means to remain in the EEA.

If we remain in the EEA then it is pretty much business as usual (except for farmers, fishermen and UK based EU funded projects, but the latter .)

Leaving the EEA is what would make our economy go TITSUP.

I have also noticed a lot of post referendum promises that would seem to be impossible without remaining in the EEA (some could alternatively be met by the breakup of the UK).

The NI-Eire border being the most obvious one. (If the UK left the EEA it would become a customs border, because there would be no free trade agreement, so how could it be completely open? i.e passports won't be needed, but goods would need to be checked.)

Of course it could mean the whole UK leaves united or not at all. (And to be pedantic, Britain only refers to England, Scotland and Wales. And even more pedantically, it can mean simply England and Wales, i.e if it is not used as an abbreviation for Great Britain.)

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Remix chomps Marshmallow, updates its Android for PCs

Jess
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Be nice if it actually worked

I just downloaded the iso and tried booting a Dell XPS laptop that works fine on Windows (including 64 bit 10) fine on ubuntu/mint and fine on regular android x86.

It just hung on the splash screen.

Great.

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What's Brexit? How Tech UK tore up its plans after June 23

Jess
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Re: EEA membership

"Perhaps you may have a point. I just fail to see how the UK continuing to pay for access to the EU, even more bureaucracy for our business people (think import/export paperwork), potentially the same deal vis-a-vis immigration, and absolutely no say in euro rules; could be seen as an improvement to matters"

Are you sure being in the EEA would mean more paperwork? That would defeat the point of a free market.

The gross amount would be lower, (hopefully) the net amount would be similar to the present situation. The difference is instead of having urban regeneration schemes and scientists funded by the tyrants at the EU, we would be able choose to spend that money on the NHS or tax cuts for the rich.

We wouldn't be bound by as many laws as present. And the English and Welsh people obviously believe that we can trust our own government with those needing replacing. Contrary to popular belief EEA members do get consulted on those EU laws that they will need to abide by, however they do not get the final decision. However, since we are mostly represented by UKIP MEPs I don't see this as any change.

Given that our government keeps watering down or vetoing laws on the environment or regulating banks and such, the EU will be far better off without us having the disproportionate influence Thatcher negotiated for us.

Since the people have decided that the UK government will better represent their interests than the EU government, then my opinion is that England and Wales should return to the EFTA and remain in the EEA. The peoples of Scotland, Gibraltar and NI should be given the choice as to whether they wish to join England and Wales or not. And if their preference is Europe rather than England (which I would think sensible), then England and Wales could quit the UK and no article 50 would be needed. (So you might have Britain = England and Wales, UK = united kingdom of Scotland, Northern Ireland and Gibraltar, which would solve the UK/Britain/GB problem on drop down menus)

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Oh dear, Vodafone: Sales dip in UK

Jess
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Re: They won't leave the UK.

Of course they won't. They will simply downgrade their headquarters to a regional office. As will any other multinational with an HQ here and a bigger market in the EEA than the uk. Obviously subject to brexit referring to the EEA rather than the EU. (If brexit means rejoin the EFTA and remaining in the EEA then the whole thing is a storm in a teacup, if it means WTO rules, then we will see the predicted problems.)

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BlackBerry chief: We don't have to make phones to make phones

Jess
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reinventing the very expensive wheel

Seems very strange to abandon your secure partially android compatible platform (especially when each release improved the compatibility) to try and fix android.

I have given up with smartphones now. The Q5 will never be complete. (Just like the N8).

I now have a 10 inch tablet phone, which I only carry when I am expecting a call (or want to use as a tablet of course)

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New phones rumoured as BlackBerry cans BB10 production

Jess
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Personally I would prefer BB10 on a cheap rebadged phone

Rather than Android on an expensive phone.

I've given up with smartphones now.

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Prominent Brit law firm instructed to block Brexit Article 50 trigger

Jess
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Re: The Spanish economy would not survive throwing out 300,000 £ spending Brits.

No, what they would do is to make it too expensive for the poorer 40-60%

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Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware goes FULL SCREEN in final push

Jess
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Re: It's fine

Yes, yes and WTF? It's scarcely any different to mint. That's why I quite like it. I'm already prepared to jump to mint as soon as they do something I really don't like.

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Jess
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Re: Your Mac's what?

Since "Mac's" is actually an abbreviation of Macintoshes, I don't believe it is incorrect.

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Fear and Brexit in Tech City: Digital 'elite' are having a nervous breakdown

Jess
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Re: The current plan does not matter

> Nope, we have up to 2 years to invoke Article 500

We can do that when we like. (Assuming 500 is a typo)

> and the renegotiation can take 2 years more

After two years we are out on WTO rules if nothing else has been agreed.

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Jess
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Re: free movement is by and large what brexiteers voted against.

So what?

The question was whether the UK should remain in the EU or not. No mention of the EEA.

Since 48% obviously supported freedom of movement/EEA membership because that is part of EU membership, it means that if less than 24 in 25 exit voters support leaving the EEA then there is no mandate to leave the EEA.

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Brexit government pledge sought to keep EU-backed UK science alive

Jess
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Re:But more for them than us, since we run a £50-100bn a year trade deficit with the EU.

They won't be able to assume that will carry on because of the drop in the Pound vs the Euro.

Also quite a bit of that may relocate back to the EU.

I think the EU will suddenly decide the Crimean Plebiscite was valid and they can be friends with Russia again, and they'll take up the slack.

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Brexit: More cash for mobile operators or consumers? Pick one

Jess
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Re: I am for leave because I am pro Europe

Basically you think our government are wrecking the EU, and it would be better off without us?

Then they wouldn't have to settle for watered down laws that help Cameron's mates, at the expense of ordinary citizens.

However that ignores the risk of a chain reaction and the whole thing fragmenting.

That would put us back in the old situation of Euro-squabbles escalating, which the EU has managed to do a fine job of preventing.

And a few years down the line someone will probably try to unify Europe again, by the old methods.

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Jess
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Re: unelected bureaucrats in Brussels

Please don't play the BS democracy card.

Despite voting in every General Election since I was old enough, my vote has NEVER counted to elect anyone who votes on my laws.

However my Euro MP votes do.

So how would I get more democracy by losing the latter?

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Brexit: UK gov would probably lay out tax plans in post-'leave' vote emergency budget

Jess
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Re: scratch a Brexiter it turns out they're also a climate change denier

On the upside, Brexit would be good for the environment.

Britain is the country that keeps vetoing and watering down EU environment regulations.

Currently there are 28 Countries with compromised regulations. After Brexit there would be only one.

It would be good for the environment, just not ours.

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Jess
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Re: that MEP you like has almost zero power

Still more representation than I personally get from voting in Westminster Elections.

So therefore I totally dismiss all sovereignty arguments as completely irrelevant.

However there are much more important reasons to stay.

Freedom of movement and the fact that the EU prevents the national bickering between countries escalating into something more serious are the primary ones.

If we end up in the EEA, that would be fine, and the irony of the position we would be in being exactly what the UKIP falsely claim we are in currently would amuse me.

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Jess
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Re:Scots Nats should campaign for Brexit as that is the only way to gain their stated goals.

That wouldn't work. (Unless they campaigned for the English to vote leave and the Scots to vote remain.)

The only way the validity of their recent plebiscite would be undermined is if they UK as a whole votes to leave, but Scotland votes remain, and the vote is higher than the vote to remain in the UK. (Which seems likely at present.)

Anyone voting to leave in Scotland would be voting for the whole UK to leave intact.

Anyone voting to stay is voting for the whole UK to stay.

A solid vote to stay in Scotland but an overall UK leave vote would undermine the referendum, because of a material change.

They would then have to be asked if they wish to be an independent state within the EU, or to remain in the UK but leave the EU. (Or alternatively, PM Boris could send the tanks in, of course.)

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Jess
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You can't make any accurate predictions,

because we don't know how it will pan out.

We don't know if the UK will survive intact.

We don't know if we will be in the EEA or not.

(If we were to be, then Brexit wouldn't really bother me.)

Will we get a deal at all?

Will the EU actively help businesses to relocate to remain within the EU?

Will it be Cameron or Boris negotiating?

Will there be a snap general election?

Will the rest of the world spring to our rescue, or take advantage of our situation?

It seems to me about as good a move as Nokia ditching their own systems for Windows. We could all see it was a likely train wreck, but they still did it.

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Jess
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Re: "stay" in EU and keep the £, neither of which were remotely possible.

Actually they both were.

Of course they would keep the pound, have you never seen Scottish bank notes? The question really was whether both versions would be linked. When Southern Ireland left the UK, its pounds were linked to ours for decades. Even to the extent of having the same size coins.

The EU would not have wanted to lose territory and citizens. It would not have been in the remainder of the UK's interests to have it on the outside. Any technicalities would have been sorted out.

And if we wanted them to stay in the EU, we could easily have managed the situation. (Dissolve the union, so that either we were all out or none out.)

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Jess
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Re: MEPs make the laws

I will take it lightly because of the following.

I have voted in every election I was able in the last 34 years.

Never has my vote contributed to any MP who votes on the laws my country makes.

However in the EU elections it has.

Therefore I get more representation with the EU than without it.

I don't see any reform in the direction of more democracy and accountability coming from Westminster in the foreseeable future.

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Jess
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Re: can't agree how they would leave, then the UK couldn't leave.

"If the UK was to reach the end of the two year period specified by Article 50 without

having reached an agreement, and if any of the 27 other Member States vetoed an extension

of this period, this would lead to the UK leaving the EU with no immediate replacement

agreed, without any protection under EU law for the rights of UK business to trade on a

preferential basis with Europe or the EU’s free trade agreement partners, UK citizens to live

and work in Europe, or UK travellers to move about freely in Europe."

ref: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/504216/The_process_for_withdrawing_from_the_EU_print_ready.pdf

And grudges, it would be easier to ask which countries haven't. The whole point of the EU was to set aside all the historical garbage that has caused problems of varying degrees in the past. If we pull out, especially since it will cause them some damage, it will resurface.

The most obvious one is Spain, with Gibraltar.

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Jess
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Re: Norwegian option

Large contribution to the EU budget with nothing in return. Requirement to enact the majority of EU rules and laws without any veto or voting rights. Freedom of movement, with less opt outs than EU members.

I can see the Brexiteers loving that.

On the upside, Britain is usually the country vetoing or watering down good laws. (Protection for steel, anti-corruption powers, etc.)

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Jess
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Re: MEPs make the laws

No. They vote on the laws. They don't propose them.

That is one thing that could seriously do with changing,

But it's certainly not a good enough reason to leave.

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Jess
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Re:.can't agree how they would leave, then the UK couldn't leave.

No. If that happens after 2 years we are out with no agreements.

My guess is the only way such negotiations would go smoothly are if either:

1. We go for Norway style EEA membership.

2. Scotland votes to stay in the EU, and subsequently to quit the UK and the negotiations include sorting this out (The Auld Alliance would help this I think.)

Otherwise I would predict stalling by any nations holding a grudge against us.

I also predict EU compensation for any businesses who move to remain within the EU.

So for all us contractors out there there will be two years of solid work, before the bottom falls out of the market.

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Jess
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Re: 'or be effectively locked out of the US market.' - so how does that work?

I think it refers to free expansion of the market, not what we already have.

Poorly worded, I grant you.

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Jess
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Re: Norwegian option

The Norway option is in reality pretty much what the Brexiteers claim our situation is at present.

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Jess
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Re: Russia is currently under sanctions

I think this is why Putin will be pleased to see us quit.

We won't be able to afford to keep the sanctions, if we don't leave the 2 year negotiation period with an agreement. (And the period can only be extended with unanimous support, somewhat unlikely I think)

Anyone else reckon that all the old historical disagreements will come back to haunt us during this period?

My guess is Spain will block everything unless we give them Gibraltar.

Time to start learning Russian seriously, I think.

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Windows 10 free upgrade offer ends on July 29th

Jess
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If MS really want to force it on everyone..

They could issue a new service pack for windows 7 that is the 10 core with a Windows 7 shell. They could then drop support for Regular 7 very quickly.

However I suspect they will probably drop Skype support for Windows 7, or something similar.

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Google is the EU Remain campaign's secret weapon

Jess
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Evens out the bias from other media

and even beer mats.

(It occurs to me that a certain pub chain who specialise in undercutting the prices of others would not be disadvantaged much if the average Brit's spending power was decimated. They would just inherit the customers from more expensive pubs. The end of cheap booze runs would not hurt them either. And if it were a little harder to go to Euro matches in person, then their pubs would be fuller on those match days.)

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