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* Posts by J. Cook

329 posts • joined 16 Jul 2007

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NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14

J. Cook
Flame

Re: D(HE)LL?

It will also signal the return of the console app, which I personally loathe and despise. "oh, this window runs a web server instance; if it's closed the web server will stop, so don't ever close that window." Isn't that why M$ ships an IIS instance with *every* OS since xp? (yes, you can install a lightweight IIS instance on XP and above, it's just not installed by default.)

I can see a reason for it if that's all the machine ever does and only a handful of people ever monitor it and if it's intended for a small business type of installation, but it's annoying and (at least in our environment) requires a dedicated service account set up to run it for most larger companies or ones that have tight security requirements.

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It's a boxless, super-flash, hyper-converged world: But what'll we do for BULK STORAGE?

J. Cook

I work in one of those industries with a large amount of regulatory oversight/overhead.

We have to run our own infrastructure, largely because of the regulatory oversight; the auditors and agency likes it when we can point out a particular server/storage shelf/device and say "yes sir/madam, the data for [app] resides right there." We at least do get the budget to run it at least, which makes a hardware geek such as myself happy to play with new shiny devices every couple years. :) However, we've heavily invested in what vmware likes calling a private cloud. we rarely add physical servers for an app; it's always another cluster node for the virtualized server space we have. Same with storage, although we are just starting to get into the multiple tiering, if only because we didn't really see a good reason to keep 5+ TB of user documents on super fast sas drives. :) (hell, if I could figure out a way to shoehorn in near-line storage or automated archiving of unused files to a tape or MO jukebox that our filer could talk to on demand, I'd do it in a heart beat.)

As far as keeping data in an off-site cloud that's run by someone else? that's pretty far forward looking for our company. We did just get approval finally to keep our off-site backups for [heavily regulated application] on media other than tape, so that gives you an idea of just how slow it is to get things approved. (we've been using disk to disk and off-site replication for the non-regulated stuff for the better part of two years, and it's made life so very much nicer in that respect.)

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Cisco promises Lync link for its UC kit and collaborationware

J. Cook
Trollface

I was going to say: even though cisco helps write some of the standards, it only follows them when it's profitable for them.

Their SIP phones are ok, but getting them to play with anything *but* call manager is an exercise in hair pulling.

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Recommendations for private cloud software...

J. Cook
FAIL

The prodigal poster returneth...

All:

Apologies for being... less than responsive. (it's been an insane 6 months here; the icon is appropriate on my part.)

The company I'm researching this for is, in fact, based in the US. (sort of; it's owned by a native american tribe, so technically, it's owned by a sovereign nation) It's an entertainment company, and we have vendors send us large images and other media files for our marketing people to use. These vendor usually use dropbox or some other file sharing service, which causes problems for the marketing people. We have dropbox and other file sharing sites blocked for security reasons, hence the desire to see what others are using in regards for self-hosted solutions.

The suggestions for using a Qnap appliance were... appreciated, albeit amusing; our company is a mid-size organization with a couple thousand employees and a fairly beefy infrastructure. (multiple Netapp FAS filers backing multiple VMware clusters and a a couple hundred virtual servers.) We self-host our web sites, although a third party does the care and feeding on it.

One of the reasons for looking at a self-hosted solution was compliance-related; we want to tightly control who has access to the server on both the internal and external side for data loss prevention purposes. (It's also why there's a global block on file sharing sites.)

While I'd love to use a simple FTP server, this entails our marketing users (and their vendors by extension) figuring out an FTP client to send us files. We tried that, and it didn't work out terribly well. We could *probably* get permission to unblock dropbox for our marketing staff, but that locks us into using them as a vendor. (we did that with YouSendIt until they changed names and made us go 'waaaait a minute...')

The whole project got thrown on the back burner (and hence, my apparent disconnect over the past months) due to staff turnover. (And the less said regarding that, the better.) However, the issue has been raised again which prompted me to look and see what everyone's suggestions were.

Again, thank you to everyone for the suggestions, the discussion, and amusement.

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J. Cook
Boffin

Recommendations for private cloud software...

I am turning to the brain trust here for some assistance.

At the company I work for, we deal with a number of vendors who like sending us large files. These are typically files that are over the sane limits of email, and due to the various regulatory entities that govern our business, we can't allow our users access to sites like dropbox, Google Docs, etc. We've looked at setting up an FTP/SFTP/SCP server for our vendors to upload files to, but so far none of them have really worked out.

Besides OwnCloud, is there anything like dropbox that I can recommend or trial with our company? The basic workflow we are looking for would be something like this:

The employee working with the rep creates a login for the vendor to use on the site.

Vendor goes to the site, logs in with their account, and uploads the file(s).

The site gives the vendor and/or the employee a link with the file's location for sharing.

The file would stay on the site for a certain period of time, and automatically be removed or archived.

We would also need the ability to audit the application's usage, and obviously security is paramount.

Any ideas that the group here can provide would be appreciated.

(Note to Mods: If I've put this in the wrong spot, please let me know.. Thanks!)

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List prices mean zilch. Remember that when buying from upstarts

J. Cook

@anon, re: beancounters...

I worked for a place where the lead bean counter (that was really his title, too!) had a habit of demanding Net30 terms out of every vendor we bought stuff from, and cutting the checks to them on day 29.

Needless to say, we had a helluva time buying stuff for a reasonable price because our vendors would let this roll for a quarter or two and them tell us to go take a long walk off a short pier.

(The same place also wouldn't give anything over than net 5 to customers that paid us to do stuff, too- talk about a hypocrite. Glad I don't work there anymore.)

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WTF happened to Pac-Man?

J. Cook

I think VG Cats said it best...

http://www.vgcats.com/comics/?strip_id=136

(comic is... not exactly safe for work.)

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Apple says sayonara to Samsung's ninjas: iPad, iPhone don't infringe comms patents – report

J. Cook
Trollface

This is the part ...

... where we need to tell Samsung and Apple to get a room already. :)

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Proof Apple is GOING BACKWARDS: It's trying to patent a Newton-ish touchscreen stylus

J. Cook

Re: Apple Innovates Again; first it was corners, now sticks!

@ big_D: It's entirely possible; Google PaperMate PHD or Avery Tripleclick. ( I have a very old version of this sort of 3 in 1 pen, and while it's nice, the stylus only works with resistive touch screens, which makes it mostly useless for a modern smartphone, although there was a kickstarter for a company to make a really nice looking one incorporating a capacitive stylus.)

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LOHAN bloodhound unleashes solar-powered minitracker

J. Cook
Go

Re: just a thought

That is a bloody brilliant idea.

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Boston court confirms Peeping Tom's right to upskirt

J. Cook
Coat

So, if that's now legal, would it be legal for the peeped person to deliver a knee into the unmentionables of the peeper at maximum force in response to being peeped, with no threat of being arrested for assault?

Mines the full-body exoskeleton with ferro-fluid armor plates.

(also, Joke alert, in case the sarcasm didn't quite bleed through)

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Bloke rattles tin for giant 3D two-headed beast

J. Cook
Boffin

Re: Waiting for the Fed-Ex/Kinko's of 3D Printing

Most of the 3D printers I've seen on the market appear to be either clones of the MakerBot, or a modified/'improved' RepRap.

No, I've not been looking for one, why do you ask?

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Squidge-droids maker updates iRobot for SUCK, SCRUB action

J. Cook
Go

Re: Any better?

I'd love to get a roomba, but I'm not certain what the feline portion of the household will do to it, or to the human contingent if they don't like it. (It's bad enough having one angry cat leaving poo around the place, I don't need more...)

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Inside Facebook's engineering labs: Hardware heaven, HP hell – PICTURES

J. Cook

Re: Meanwhile, outside hobbyville....

Well..... sort of.

Seeing as it's built out of commodity parts, you can either have a bin full of spares to cope with hardware failure, or since you built the thing, you'll have a really good idea how to fix it when it breaks. That having been said:

YES, It's certainly not for small businesses or for those without a clue (or for medium to large enterprises that demand 24/7 support from their vendors and also demand tried and tested hardware with similar support from the vendors.

However, if you have the talent in-house and they are willing to support it at 2 am when it falls over and needs fixing ASAP, then that's a different story.

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Sandisk breaks 128GB barrier with new $199 MICROSD card

J. Cook

verify it's not a fake flash...

There's a testing program that'll write blocks of data to the card, and then read it back. works on thumb drives, cards, anything that registers as a drive letter in windows. While the website is in german only, the program does have an english translation.

http://www.heise.de/download/h2testw.html

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Want to remotely control a car? $20 in parts, some oily fingers, and you're in command

J. Cook
Pint

@Ben Sonsall

... or a fence, as the mythbusters have done. repeatedly. the same section, even. :)

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Just as we said it would: HP clamps down on server fixers

J. Cook

Re: Just say

If it's anything like what they required waaay back in 1999-2002ish (which was the last time I did any HP authorized work for the company I was employed at), there was an online quiz for the technician to take and pass for each model or family before they'd get authorization to do warrenty or service work on those machines. That' was also the technician point of view- I don't know what hoops the company had to jump through from that perspective. HP did require that all techs (even for printers!) to be A+ certified before they'd allow them to even take the basic tests.

FWIW, in order to do warranty work for Dell (we participate in their parts only dispatch service for large corporate customers on our desktops and servers) there's a test involved as well.

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NetApp lets virtual swingers swap hypervisor with no guilt

J. Cook

Re: Missed a bit...

That is... a really cool feature. Might work with SQL servers as well, depending on if the DBA in question is using a 'sane' layout for the database and T-log files. (i.e., parking the database files on a separate drive from the OS drive, and the T-logs on another separate drive.)

It's make recovery a bit easier- the OS rolled over and died? attach the disks to a backup or auxiliary server, re-connect the databases to the backup, and keep rolling after the integrity check.

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It's a CLUSTER-PLUCK: Nutanix uses MapReduce to polish performance

J. Cook

Re: lock in

@UJSTech: That's one reason why, when their stuff was pitched to us, we said, 'interesting concept, but we want to see what we can get out of the money we've invested in commodity 2U servers and storage for the SAN filers before we start looking at something else'

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Drawers full of different chargers? The IEC has a one-plug-to-rule-them-all

J. Cook
Boffin

Re: Yet another failure?

Captain Scarlet wrote:

"Are these from people who use the power cords to swing the notebook computers over thei heads?"

No, it's mostly from people who take their notebooks somewhere where there's power, plug in, turn on/resume, work for a hour or two, turn off/hibernate, unplug, and go to the next location, wash rinse repeat for 6 hours a day for 5 days a week, more often if they use them on weekends, and do so for the full three-five year lifespan of the average notebook computer. I.e., lots and lots of connect/disconnect cycles during the laptop's usable lifetime.

This doesn't count people tripping over the power adapter, or if the machine is picked up from the front with the plug in the back (putting stress on the whole assembly when the entire notebook's weight is resting on the plug!) or any of a hundred different scenarios that would cause the solder joints or the plug itself to fail.

I've a friend of mine who re-solders and replaces broken jacks on laptops; other shops send work his way as he is quite good at it and doesn't charge the cost of a replacement mainboard for the job.

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Death of the business Desktop

J. Cook
Go

Re: *ahem*

But Trevor, tell us how you *really* feel. :)

(I expect that capturing the carnage on video for that 'interview' would be something that you could sell for a nice amount, though. )

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Host Minecraft on Shard Gaming? Grab your data RIGHT NOW before it goes completely titsup

J. Cook

Re: what are they trading?

My guess is that someone absconded with the company's bankroll, or other shenanigans.

Yet another valid reason why putting all your stuff with one hosting provider (or the absolute cheapest) is not the best idea in the world.

*wanders off to start an FTP backup of his hosted sites, just in case*

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Hyenas FACEBOOK each other with their ARSES: FACT

J. Cook
Coat

I was wondering when the toilet humor would start from this article. At least it was all natural, and we didn't have to force it.

Mines the one with the roll of bog paper in the pocket.

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Oil execs, bankers: You'll need this 'bulletproof carbon-nanotube-built' BUSINESS SUIT

J. Cook
Boffin

@Don Jefe:

Yeah, 20 grand for what equates to something not much better then type I armor? no deal. Most kevlar vests are type IIIA and will stop pistol rounds, but not rifle rounds. An exec wearing this suit would still need type III armor on underneath, and even then, it's only limited protection. One also has to wonder if the suits have an expiration date similar to the shelf life that the vests have as well.

Amusing links for everyone's reading pleasure:

http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/bot16.htm informal ammo penetration testing against IIIA rated armor

http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/bot57.htm the same, but against something the local military or SWAT unit might be wearing (type III plates in a standard plate carrier)

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Have you reinstalled Windows yet? No, I just want to PRINT THIS DAMN PAGE

J. Cook

RE: fun with HP laserjet printer displays...

Heh- My favorite phrases were generally:

"INSERT COIN"

"BBQ SAUCE LOW"

and the infamous, two line monster:

"SKYNET CONNECTED

AWAITING COMMAND"

Best part is that if someone gets their knickers in a twist, you power cycle the printer and it goes away.

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They've taken my storage hostage ... now what?

J. Cook
Flame

Re: Backups, backups, backups! (@ Brian Miller)

"Imagine for a moment that, instead of stealthy malware encrypting all it finds, utility workers outside crossed the lines, and fried everything on the circuits. Instead of 120V on the line, imagine that it was briefly touched with 480V."

Had something similar happen with a client for the company I was working for at the time- they had an electrician onsite who managed to put 220 to the ground line of one of the circuits briefly. It blew the power supplies on a pair of newly installed* workstations** and made the UPS protecting the server from power outages have a bit of a lie down. Fortunately, the server didn't have any major filesystem damage, and the UPS was fine once it was unplugged and plugged back in and restarted.

Never heard what happened regarding who paid for it, but I expect the electrician's insurace took the hit.

Fire icon, because... well, "i love the smell of burning diesel in the morning!" :)

* The workstations were a couple months old

** I walked into the shop the morning that happened after they had brought the workstations in- they reeked of burned capacitors. They promptly send me out to look in on the server.

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Windows 8.1 and Server 2012 R2: Quick start guide for sysadmins

J. Cook
Boffin

I'm rather use KMS keys than MAK keys...

Another good tip to know: the KMS host can run on just about anything: dedicated server, park it with one of your AD servers, or even the admin's own workstation.

Just be absolutely certain that there's only *one* KMS host in the organization- if a second one appears, it'l mess things up something fierce. (Don't ask me how I know this.)

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WD Sentinel DS 6100: What does a disk-peddler know about servers?

J. Cook

Noise and power consumption levels would definately be nice...

I've been looking at setting up a home file server for media storage and general abuse; the one option I considered generates large amounts of noise, heat, drink power like an old 60's vintage air conditioner. (surplus poweredge 2950 G3 chassis loaded with 6x SAS drives, with a surplus MD3000 shelf loaded with 15 more SAS drives) It'd be enough to run media storage and a VM test lab environment, but at an expense.

If I could swap the shelf with a reasonably purpose built NAS that could handle NFS ir iSCSI well enough, then I'd be sold.

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Great Britain rebuilt - in Minecraft: Intern reveals 22-BEEELLION block map

J. Cook

Re: Why bother ? (AD@10:36)

I see you've played around with Feed The Beast and all the various and sundry addins for it.

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Lighting bods blind designophiles with LED-powered lounge lamps

J. Cook

Re: I'd be happy with ...

@Gene: Seconded on the LED recessed fixtures. They throw just as much light as the 75-100 watt bulbs they replaced, give off much less heat, and will probably still work right up to the point where I'm demolishing the ceiling they are installed in.

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Cloud storage: Is the convenience worth the extra expense?

J. Cook

Another one regarding colos...

While one can own the server and co-locate it, the facility can be compelled to allow the government (Law enforcement, NSA, etc.) to seize the server. Your only data privacy hope at that point is full disk encryption and hope they can't brute force the key. Oh, and you also have to keep paying the colo facility- they can (and do!) put liens on equipment there for unpaid services. (remembers a fun trip at one site to perform just such a task for a company that was far behind in payment, and in fact went bankrupt- the company ended up keeping the gear as payment for services rendered up to the point of contract violation.)

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It's official: Apple sends out invitations for September 10 event

J. Cook
Joke

Wait, El reg finally got an invite?

I thought they were persona non grata at apple events from way back.

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Behind the candelabra: Power cut sends Britain’s boxes back to the '70s

J. Cook
Go

Ah, power cuts...

It's massive, massive overkill, but a whole house UPS rated to run the entire place for the ten-fifteen minutes that it'll take the generator to fire up and the automatic transfer switch to cut over? (I've seen the one in work's datacentre in operation- quite impressive.)

Also, there was the time I was doing setup/tear down for a local convention with an assistant pushing a trolly load of gear into a darkened room at the hotel we had booked. I got five steps in, yelled "AZIZ! LIGHT!"*. The instant I shouted it, the lights came on in the room from the presence sensor, and I swear my assistant jumped three feet straight up. I couldn't stop laughing for several minutes afterwards.

* From the excellent movie "The Fifth Element", of course.

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BOFH: Backup server's failed? We have a backup backup server

J. Cook
Pint

The PFY forgot one machine...

The server titled "GNDN"- it's the most important device in the entire room. :D

Beer, because it's 5 pm somewhere...

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BOFH: Don't be afraid - we won't hurt your delicate, flimsy inkjet printer

J. Cook
Boffin

Fun times...

I used to be an HP certified repair tech. Fun times dealing with companies that were still using their LJ 4si printers* which had roughly 2 million on the page counter and were still chugging away. The 4, 4+, and 4m were all tanks as well- as long as you replaced the fuser and pickup rollers every 150,000 pages, they would practically run forever. (hell, there are probably still companies using them, and HP's dropped all but parts support for them for almost a decade now.)

As far as impact printers? the only ones I've dealt with on a routine basis were largely Okidata 320s, which also have a rather distinctive test page noise. At one point I was down to 20 minutes start to finish to take a non-functional one, tear it down and swap out whatever was broken, and get it back into service, if not fully at spec. (this included that frustratingly annoying white gear mounted on the main stepper motor, which was almost always the cause of print quality issues.)

* They were largely identical to the IIIsi with a number of changes to the formatter and controller boards to make them go faster. the 5si/8000 were based on a different engine entirely, but had the same relationship and very nearly the same parts compatibility

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'First' 3D-printed rifle's barrel splits after single shot

J. Cook
FAIL

No thank you.

A couple things to note:

1. The cartridge used was a .22LR, which is a very low powered cartridge. It still split the barrel and receiver, which makes perfect sense. Even that small a cartridge generates a pretty decent about of pressure (24,000 PSI per SAAMI specs) when it's fired. The receiver, chamber, and barrel must contain that for safety's sake. By way of comparison, the 9x19 spec is 35,000 psi, and the 7.62x39 that the AK47 uses is a whopping 45,000 PSI. The fact that the barrel and receiver failed on the first shot does not surprise me at all.

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Tickle my balls, stroke my button and blow the fluff from my crack

J. Cook
Go

Still rocking the trackball over here as well...

I'm using an ancient corded Trackman Wheel that I had pulled from service when I got a cordless one, and promptly put it back in when the cordless one flaked out one too many times in the middle of a gaming session.

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Optical archival system - where to buy from?

J. Cook
Boffin

Another one for LTO tapes...

I recently had the opportunity to see if some ten year old archives written to LTO1 could be read when I was running a content indexing /audit on a large number of tapes that we had stored off-site. despite have to locate a drive that could read the tape and tracking down software to do the same, I was able to read the indexes from those tapes just fine, and could have performed data restores if needed. I didn't bother testing the DAT tapes we had in the same project, I already know they work just fine. (The DLTs we would have had to source a drive from, along with the older QIC style tapes. While I've got a drive for the travan tapes we had in there, I'd have to cobble together something from the same boneyard of old machines I have. But again, I have no doubts that they could be read.)

As I'm fond of saying: how much is your data really worth to trust to something new, from a single vendor with a track record of dropping support for products, and with an unproven track record?

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Asus FonePad: You may feel a bit of a spanner

J. Cook
Boffin

Re: Does anyone make a bluetooth handset?

I have the red one. it works pretty decently, although the button and internal wiring is super delicate. I ended up having a friend of mine who is better with a soldering iron wire a more durable switch to it.

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Did Kim Dotcom invent 2-factor authentication? Er, not exactly...

J. Cook
Pint

Only a pinch pf salt?

More like a car load.

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Hey, you, dev. What do you mean, storage is BORING?

J. Cook

Re: Storage has been the bane of my existence for some years.

Agreement here- Another bottleneck that a lot of people don't think about is the connection from the storage appliance with xx TB of storage to the servers that access it. You can have a petabyte of storage configured for nothing but IOPS and more IOPS, but it's all todger waving if the network connectivity isn't there.

Work's test lab has a tidy little branch location style SAN filer with ~20 TB of storage, but only 2 gigE network interfaces. Running two separate AD forests, three SQL servers, and a couple apps from a pair of ESX boxen is painfully slow, because of that.

Compared to the production environment (dual mid-level filer heads with quad 10 GbE going to a 7 node esx cluster, with each node fitted with a dual port 10 GbE card) is night and day, performance wise.

Anon to protect that thing they call a paycheque.

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Prenda lawyers miss sanctions deadline

J. Cook
Go

Re: failure to comply will result in additional sanctions

IIRC, the answer is "not very", as Judge Wright also recommended action by the respective state bars for their shenanigans.

That saga deserves the special kettle popcorn I have in reserve for the really entertaining cases.

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Quid-a-day nosh challenge hack forms foraging party

J. Cook
Boffin

Re: A quid a day

Putting leftovers in the freezer and re-heating also works.

I have a (probably bad) habit of 'one-pot' meals based on the boxes of macaroni and cheese with various bits thrown in- usually mushrooms, olives, broccoli, and some form of meat thrown in for protein. I package up lunch-sized portions, and freeze whatever I'm not going to eat in a couple days. Do this with a couple different recipes, and one can get a nice mix of food for lunches and dinners for the week out of a couple days cooking.

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Ten ancestors of the netbook

J. Cook
Go

Re: Zenith Minisport

Ah, yes. I had one of those waaay back when I was going to school to learn my trade. It was awesome for taking notes on, and playing games behind the instructor's back when I was bored.

Alas, mine died a very untimely accidental death from screen breakage.

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It was the Reg what won it: Online Hitchhiker's Guide thriving

J. Cook
Go

Oh hey...

Looks like I ought to resurrect my account over there.

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Diagnostics tools ARE useful, but more for the vendor than me

J. Cook

Ah, EMCC...

EMC- We like to charge lots of money.

In their defence, their data domain kit is pretty awesome in regards to backup and VTL. But it's not much of a defense, really.

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Are you being robbed of sleep by badly designed servers?

J. Cook
Trollface

Re: Badly Designed Server = Server running Windows

He's implied that it's ESXi- I don't know of any other OS that will cough a purple screen of death when it panics.

And Eadon, you need to put down the crack pipe. Or maybe start playing around with a server 2008 R2 box- done up properly (i.e. on solid hardware, and using signed drivers or even built in drivers) the OS is pretty damned reliable at this point, on the same level as your beloved linux. Admittedly, in the four years I've been admin of our ESX stack, I've seen the hypervisor purple screen on me exactly once. The fault? a perfect storm of a flaky NIC driver (HA HA! Linux has them too!) and a bad packet on the 10 GbE connection causing NFS to go down like a Clinton intern, which took the hypervisor and all the machines running on the box down with it. (On a side note, if you are running ESX/ESXi 4.x and using the Intel 10GbE network cards, get thee to VMware's site and install the updated drivers- that will fix this issue.)

Troll icon, because hey- If I'm a gonna troll, might as well go whole hog.

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J. Cook
Boffin

iLO, DRAC, and Managed PDUs, oh my.

While all of our dell servers have a drac built on them*, we don't use them at all. What we do use is a managed PDU/KVM combination that Raritan makes- while the units we have are quite pricey (the controller itself is something like 16 grand retail for starters!) it's definitely worth it when you have a server that's shagged itself and needs a kicking.

* IIRC, they are standard on all poweredge servers at this point. I could be wrong, though.

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Windows 7 'security' patch knocks out PCs, knackers antivirus tools

J. Cook

Re: Dell OEM and other hit last weekend - was it this?

@wondermouse: It's entirely possible that MS may have nuked the OEM key that Dell uses on their pre-loaded image. I seem to recall Dell doing that for their XP image, at least.

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Review: Intel Next Unit of Computing barebones desktop PC

J. Cook
Coffee/keyboard

Re: Gahhhh, when will people learn kettle style IEC leads are different to others?

*awards Frankee Llonnygog an internets*

You sir, owe me a new keyboard.

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