* Posts by keithpeter

897 posts • joined 14 Jul 2007

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Carry On Computing: Ten stylish laptop bags for him

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: ManhattanPortage..

@ The Mighty Spang

Aghhhhhh they've changed.

Mmine was Sanfordised cotton and cost around £50 which I thought was a lot for a bag. I've had it since 2008. Going strong. Just get a sleeve for devices (I use a little muji zipped one that has pockets for pens and notebooks on the outside, something like £12) .

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keithpeter
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Windows

ManhattanPortage

ManhattanPortage messenger bag (waxed cotton) plus a laptop sleeve. The money left over can get you a cheap weekend in Prague.

My messenger bag has 6+ years on the clock

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Governance the key if you don't want mobile workers escaping your control

keithpeter
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Windows

Time to hack by bad actor

Have I got this wrong? OA recommends that devices be set up so they wipe data when not in communication with server for a period of days. OA then cites the 3 minute time out as limiting the time that a thief has to hack/reset the machine. Surely a thief will just isolate device from network connection and hack away at their leisure?

PS: phone cameras are pretty good these days. Screens full of information can be snapped quite easily on trains or in coffee bars. A bit of staff training about where to access sensitive or commercially valuable information might be a good idea in addition to IT 'governance'.

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One for Tim W: increase minimum wage to reduce benefit budget

keithpeter
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One for Tim W: increase minimum wage to reduce benefit budget

Hello All

I was thinking (always dangerous I find) today about the cleaners, catering staff and security guards in the building where I work. All outsourced. Most on minimum wage or minimum+£1 or so. Many receiving benefits (most people who claim housing benefit are working).

Why do we subsidise employers? What would be the (macro/micro) economic impact of jacking up the statutory minimum wage to 'living wage' levels as a way of cutting the benefit bill?

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Hold on to your hats people, the MoD's found the cloud

keithpeter
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twin rotor

Picture with article: One of those twin rotor choppers was flying circuits round Selly Oak/QE Hospital a month or so ago. Low and people looking out the windows. Very impressive - the rotors go amazingly slow given the scale of the thing. I'm assuming it was an exercise of some kind.

Back on topic: presumably low risk traffic on the cloud. They would just use project names for anything sensitive ("RE: steampunk - starting positions now please")

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Why does Uber keep its drivers' pay so low? Ex-CFO: 'Cos we can'

keithpeter
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Windows

"if the taxi drivers have only been able to be shafted by uber because they resolutely refuse to come into the 21st century"

What is this 21st Century of yours like?

Mine is the one with electric self-driving cars and motorways lined with solar cells to generate electricity. I'm not sure who will actually need to *own* a car then. We can just rent one by the minute. Automated lorries and deliveries by drone.

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Right Dabbsy my old son, you can cram this job right up your BLEEEARRGH

keithpeter
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Pint

Parents...

I've become good at remembering names - it is a useful survival skill in teaching. If they know that you know their name they will behave better than otherwise...

Over the years I have taught quite a few students with names similar to famous people and some similar to infamous people. One wonders what the parents were thinking of!

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It’s Adobe’s Creative Cloud TITSUP birthday. Ease the pain with its RGB-wrangling rivals

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: the real problem with the Gimp

"Cinepaint (a high bit depth fork of the Gimp) used to be very good, but no longer works with modern versions of Linux. Sigh."

http://www.deb-multimedia.org/dists/jessie/main/binary-i386/package/cinepaint

The cinepaint .deb there plus the three libraries and cinepaint-data package install OK on Debian Jessie and bring in some dependencies from main (libcms1 and so on). I didn't enable the deb-multimedia repository as I don't want it overwriting stuff from main, so downloaded debs and used dpkg -i and handled the dependencies by backtracking and installing those (sort of slackware style). YMMV.

Cinepaint has to be started from terminal and complains about not being able to colour manage the monitor (laptop, Jessie MATE desktop). Looks really old fashioned, like GIMP 1.x ish. Might be an early build?

Looks like it was taken out of Debian Main after squeeze. There is some stuff on the mailing lists.

PS: liblcms1_1.19 package I got from Wheezy, I've run into that one before and its probably the cause of the colour management error.

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Lies, damn lies and election polls: Why GE2015 pundits fluffed the numbers so badly

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Lord Ashcroft

Good catch with Ashcroft's constituency based polling. More detail here...

http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/what-we-got-wrong-in-our-2015-uk-general-election-model/

Anyone got the results as a CSV file or R data frame yet?

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keithpeter
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Windows

Re: "Shy Tories"

"I'm a Conservative voter ( of the socially progressive, libertarian, small state variety )."

Excellent. Now who owns most of the docks in the UK? And who owns most of the power stations? Who owns most of the telecoms companies, and the Royal Mail? And the small company that produces radio isotopes for use in hospitals and your dentist's x-ray machine (an early privatisation)?

When you roll back the state, other corporate bodies (I'm thinking of Thomas Hobbes' powerful image here) tend to fill the vacuum. Individual share ownership hasn't really happened has it? The UK's best export at present appears to be rent/profit.

Now: can you get rid of OFSTED and just 'let the market decide' in education please? Could save a cool half billion that way, and stem the tide of head teachers taking early retirement.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Re: We don't vote for parties...

"Although I do understand your point and where you are coming from, is it fair to foist a second placed UKIP candidate as MP onto a constituency which voted for eg Labour or Tory?"

There is another way.

Scottish assembly has roughly 75% seats awarded by FPTP in constituencies and the other 25% based on a regional list transferrable vote system. Your vote basically gets used twice. I can't get the data broken by constituency so I can map it into the 9 English government regions (each with their own list) yet, but rough estimate on that through on England results as a whole would suggest something like 14% of 150 seats allocated to the regional lists or 20 seats in total. Better than 1 but not the full proportionality.

Do you think 20 seats would be enough of a 'pressure release valve'? Certainly give the kippers a voice.

Irony: the party now in power is the one least likely to consider radical change in the voting system (and the Labour Party never really explored that either when they had the chance).

Disclaimer: unshy labour voter

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Facebook echo chamber: Or, the British media and the election

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: I read somewhere...

How about if you can only vote if you are either working/full time education or have sufficient NI contributions over your working life to entitle you to a full pension. If you're the ward of the state (i.e. on benefits) you don't get a say?

The qualified franchise worked *really* well in Ulster in the late 50s early 60s didn't it? (Not).

Sit down quietly and think through the consequences. Especially think about the next time there is a global economic downturn...

Random fact: most of the people claiming housing benefit are in jobs.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Re: TW is right, but for the wrong reasons...

One third of the electorate didn't vote (unknown is how many did so in protest, and how many just didn't care either way).

One factor: Safe seats.

In the constituency in which I reside the incumbent was returned with seven times the number of votes of the candidate who recieved the second largest number of votes. Around 21 000 of us could have stayed in bed/gone out/done overtime - those votes do not count for anything. Not surprisingly, the turnout was 12% lower than the average turnout for the election as a whole.

UKIP did not have any safe seats. UKIP voters would have turned out in a gale/tornado/torrential rain/floods. The 'safe seat' effect tends to increase the proportion of the vote recorded for underdog parties, although I fully accept that the FPTP system acts as a barrier to such parties winning seats.

In the system used to elect the Scottish Assembly (roughly 3/4 constituency and 1/4 proportional representation based on regional lists) all the votes counted would have fed through to register a preference for regional MSPs, so a reason for turning out. Plus the underdog parties (UKIP/LIBDEM) would have been allocated some of the regional seats, so house slightly more representative. And an even smaller majority for David I think, I'm still puggling the R scripts.

Data presentation task: map constituencies to the nine government regions in England (each with roughly the population of Scotland) and then apply the same regional list system as in the Scottish Parliament. Not enough to change composition of Commons radically, but slightly more representation for underdog parties, and an even smaller majority for Conservatives.

Meeja note: Huge celebration and triumphal hurrahs for Consevatives on securing a majority in the Commons that is smaller than the one John Major had in 1992? Good heavens above.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Brecht quote

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/may/09/labour-left-miliband-hating-english

(Nick sort of balances Polly)

An interesting question: how did we get to be socially conservative with a small c &&c. History? Echoes of empire?

Disclosure: I have lived in various parts of the UK but they have tended to be the parts that are still red on the BBC's map. Not deliberate, just the way it happened.

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Systemd hee hee: Jessie Debian gallops (slowly) into view

keithpeter
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Pint

Default UI

"Jessie made headlines early in its development because it opted for Xfce instead of GNOME as the default desktop. Eventually, though, Debian went back on that decision and you get GNOME 3.14 if you accept all the defaults in the installation process."

That happened in the development phase for Wheezy as well. Now Joey Hess has moved on, I wonder if it will happen in the Stretch cycle. Google for Joeyh's posts to the debian-devel mailing list for the reasons behind XFCE4 as default.

I installed from the live MATE CD. Reasonable selection of software on boot. Install time about 20 mins with no Internet connection(*), added a sources.list file manually, then a walk down to the Selly Sausage cafe in Selly Oak to install all the extras (R, LaTeX &c) on their fast wifi.

(*)I switch the wifi switch off, allow the wlan0 detect to fail, then select 'do not configure network at this time' option then continue. Decline popcon, and decline network mirror prompt. Use the sources.list generator to set up a suitable list for apt-get later.

Pint: no sausage icon

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Hey devs! Confused by EU privacy law? Pull out the FLASH CARDS

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: On the other hand

Yup - I winced when I read that word.

However a set of cards like this about, say, protected characteristics or about, say, safeguarding of vulnerable adults and children would lead to discusssion of the issues among people who work with members of the GBP.

Much better than the 'online training' that we get that consists of multiple choice quizzes about pointless facts. It should be possible to produce a 'facilitator's guide' to using the cards with a group of staff so no expensive external trainer needed.

Nice find

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HP wag has last laugh at US prez wannabe with carlyfiorina.org snatch

keithpeter
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Windows

sheep

View the html of the main page for the address of the easter egg

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Tortilla de patatas

keithpeter
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Mushroom

chilli

I was thinking of a couple of green chillies (de-seeded and cut fine) chucked in with the onion myself. Probably not authentic. Call it the Ladypool Road crossover version (Brummies will recognise the reference)

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Philip Glass tells all and Lovelace and Babbage get the comic novel treatment

keithpeter
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Windows

Etudes

Try the piano Etudes.

(in the same general territory as the Shostakovich preludes and some Scriabin pieces, not what you are expecting).

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keithpeter
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fixing washing machines

Anecdote: A N.Y. music critic was writing a review of a Glass piece in the early days and was surprised when the guy fixing his washing machine came over to correct one of the descriptions. It was the composer.

I read a blog post by the critic a few years ago but google is flooded with links to book reviews at present so I'll have to dig for the source. Might be in Kyle Gann's Minimalism book.

Coat icon: I'm off down to Waterstones now to see if they have a copy in yet

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Want to go green like Apple, but don't have billions in the bank?

keithpeter
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Windows

Client = upgradeable

The fashion for thin client devices seems to preclude replaceability.

Just wondering if laptops, as they become niche for those who produce stuff, and as Moore's law looks like it might be rolling over, will become more modular like desktops thus allowing upgrades on a basic screen/keyboard/battery shell? Standard x86 or Atom based logic boards allowing upgrades and swappable batteries and storage.

PS: There is a unified history of electronic computing to be written from the standpoint of the engineering involved in getting rid of heat is there not?

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LA schools want multi-million Apple refund after kids hack iPads

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: It does my withered black heart good

"...to see young children following in my, and I'm sure many others, footsteps and outfoxing the hapless IT depts of schools."

Some of the earlier generation of outfoxers may now be running the show...

http://www.pennmanor.net/techblog/1to1devices/#/5

(Part of what appears to be a small and carefully managed project based in a school with involvement from teaching staff and clever use of peer mentoring).

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keithpeter
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Re: Inventory management: - TEXTBOOKS

"I'm not referring to current UK textbooks. I'd call them comics except I wouldn't want to get sued by the Beano."

In fairness, you have to remember that the authors of textbooks are bound by the syllabus they are writing the book to cover. And that syllabus can be changed by the Secretary of State for Education without any need for legislation.

The 700 page tome I recommend to my adult students seems to cover the GCSE Maths syllabus fairly well, and has some reasonably tough challenge problems in it.

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You’ll be the coolest guy in IT if you ain't got your ID

keithpeter
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Windows

Human brain...

@1980s_coder

Human brain has algorithms for directing attention to novelties and switching routine processes to the background. I guess we just have to design systems round the brain a bit sometimes. The access procedures for the facility seemed to be designed with humans in mind so access was able to be granted.

PS: In the building I work in three days a week (not in a secure capacity), all the doors are unlocked from the corridor side by a simple 'bonk' of a photo ID card. We have to wear those on colour coded lanyards so everyone knows who is staff, and that rule is enforced. Solves the locked out problem.

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Apple swears that NO FANBOI will queue for its new gumble

keithpeter
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Re: An appointment to buy a watch !

@TonyJ with the Tag Heuer(*) and all...

Sir Jonathon appreciates the issue...

"However, it was not without some trepidation that he embarked on the watch. “It was different with the phone – all of us working on the first iPhone were driven by an absolute disdain for the cellphones we were using at the time. That’s not the case here. We’re a group of people who love our watches. So we’re working on something, yet have a high regard for what currently exists.”

Have you noticed how Sir Jonathan is being wheeled out to do press (which I don't recollect previously)? New PR team (Mr Cook ditched Ms Cotton) or desparation? Time (sic) will tell.

*My own preference is rather eccentric; I'm dithering between a MeisterSinger soon or waiting for a much more economical circular Slow Watch. I like the 24-hour idea as it reflects the path of the Sun. I might just go for an astrolabe. No jokes about single hands please.

Icon: mine's the one with the silk liner and dotted hanky in the top pocket.

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Operation Redstone: Microsoft preps double Windows update in 2016

keithpeter
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Windows

LTS?

"Such a schedule would also see Windows development mirroring that of Linux distributions such as Fedora and Ubuntu, which issue new releases semiannually."

Will there be a Windows LTS though?

Ubuntu: LTS every 2 years each with 5 years support

Fedora: Basically acts as the input/testing platform for RHEL, each release of which has a 10 year support period (and no-cost clones including CentOS, now owned by RedHat).

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HP Stream x360: Flippable and stylish Chromebook killer

keithpeter
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Pint

Re: Headphone socket EMI noise?

"The HP Stream 7 tablet has electrical interference noise on the headphone audio."

I used to get that on an old Dell (I use recycled kit). I got round it using a cheapo USB sound card. I actually had an old Griffin iMic USB sound adaptor hanging around but you can get smaller ones with just the USB plug and a couple of 3.5mm sockets for a tenner.

Pint: have one for reporting on booting Linux on these cheapo laptops. Nice to see.

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Streaming tears of laughter as Jay-Z (Tidal) waves goodbye to $56m

keithpeter
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Nee-Chee

"...and some bloke called Fred-rick Nee-chee, who I think once played bass for Cher"

Nietzsche and Blumlein in the same article: well done - a fair chunk of C20th history lies between those two. One worrying thought about all this cloudy interweb stuff was put into words by Nee-Chee himself when writing about his writing-ball: “our writing tools are also working on our thoughts”.

Back to my CD collection before venturing out in the rain.

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Locally Integrated Menus back on Vivid Vervet’s menu

keithpeter
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Pint

Re: Menus

@thames and all

Yup works as explained.

You have to press Alt-I pretty sharpish - if Unity thinks you just pressed Alt then you get the HUD (reasonable as it says that on the keyboard shortcut screen that comes up when you start a live session).

I shall install Ubuntu 14.04.2 on the 1366/768 Dell laptop where Unity makes a lot of sense with its left hand launcher. I'm still dubious about this 'feature' of having to release the Alt key, I suspect it is more of a side effect of the global menu's need to hijack magic keys.

Happy bank holiday and pints to all.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Menus

So to invoke a command contained on a submenu, I do this...

Press Alt-I, release Alt, press O then press F to issue the command.

I shall try it, and thanks for taking the time to point it all out. I could not see any documentation at all of this change to shortcut operations.

I'm not convinced that this is actually a 'feature' as the Alt-IOF shortcut shows each stage of the menus opening on Gnome and almost all other DEs on any OS.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Menus

""It does exactly that in my 14.04..."

@Rob Carriere

Just downloaded the 14.04.2 live iso, and, no, alas, it does not. I'll do the bug report thing so we are all clear what I'm on about...

Steps to reproduce: Load LibreOffice Writer, click in the new document window, press and hold the Alt key while pressing the I then the O then the F keys then release the Alt key

What I see on Unity in 14.04.2: The Insert menu opens when the I key is pressed, but then when pressing the O key, the Insert menu closes and the Format menu is opened, and when finally pressing the F key, the Format menu is closed and the File menu is opened.

Expected behaviour (what I see in Gnome 3 and other full-fat DEs): The Insert menu opens when the I is pressed, then the Object submenu of the Insert menu opens when the O key is pressed, and then finally the Formula option in the Object menu is selected when I press the F key. A mathematical formula object is inserted into the document and the menus close, irrespective of either releasing the Alt key or keeping the Alt key depressed.

Summary: in Unity at present, you can get the top level menus up using the Alt-Key shortcuts, but not submenus. Typing in more than one letter after the Alt key is pressed simply changes the menu selected instead of bringing up a submenu. The ability to invoke commands in submenus by typing Alt-<chord> has been lost.

Does this look like what you see under Unity?

If you see the expected behaviour then what settings are you using to get that behaviour?

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keithpeter
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Menus

Hello All

Vervet Unity Question: If you start LibreOffice Writer, and then click in the new document window and then type in the shortcut Alt + IOF, does the LibreOffice formula editor appear?

The way that the global menu code introduced by Canonical in Unity broke keyboard shortcuts is the reason I stopped using Unity based desktops after 12.04. No other reason. I suspect that menu calls are still hijacked by Canonical's global menu and that, therefore, keyboard shortcuts will still be broken. I would be absolutely delighted to be proved wrong on that.

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Microsoft dumps ARM for Atom with cut-price Surface 3 fondleslab

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Bob, Zune, Clippy, and Steve Ballmer

"Yes, how about 92% of the world's office desktop computers and laptops?

Poor poor Microsoft..."

The younger people I work with do associate Microsoft as a brand mainly with work. And that means office PCs that are mostly OK but a bit slow.

We run some decidedly clunky 'business applications' that have UIs that appear to have been designed by someone who likes cluttered and difficult to read screens, and who appears to believe that the published procedures actually represent the way tasks are completed.

These business applications have nothing to do with MS of course, but they are associated in our minds with the Microsoft logo - which we have lots of time to see as we watch the little arrow chasing itself around the circle.

My younger co-workers will be making the decisions in a decade or two. This I suspect may be the reason for Microsoft's foray into lower end hardware including this new tablet.

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Smart meters are a ‘costly mistake’ that'll add BILLIONS to bills

keithpeter
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Windows

Just give us the numbers

At least we have had the cost-benefit analysis for the HS2 and people can argue about it. Get them to *publish* the report so we can all see what the numbers are like for smart meter rollout.

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Microsoft's Windows 10 build list snowballs for Lumia mobes

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Since when did the old Nokia Lumias suddenly get named just Lumia.

"...Nadella has to give Elop a bag of Doritos..."

@returnmyjedi

Elop's paunch looks huge there - even worse than mine - there must have been a lot of bags of Doritos exchanged over the years.

Seriously: I think it is good that MS are releasing public betas like this.

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Dot-sucks sucks, say lawyers: ICANN urged to kill 'shakedown' now

keithpeter
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Windows

"What's more, the company intends to charge ordinary consumers just $9.95 for a dot-sucks domain."

So what is stopping 'ordinary consumers' [cough marketing's bf cough] buying up the appropriate domains and just sort of not using them? Or putting a cat picture up...

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Mono Magic: Photography, Breaking Bad style

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Secondhand prices

"Selling most 35mm cameras seems to attract no takers."

Pop a card on the noticeboard in the local art school (the one that does degree level fine art) in your area. That audience seems to be interested in the possibilities and most art schools will have a wet darkroom tucked away somewhere.

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keithpeter
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Re: pinhole cameras are fun

@Nigel: I experience things with a pencil and a sketchbook more these days but may indeed dig the brass brick out. The apotheosis of 3 inch screen isolation must be the selfie stick. I may experiment with handing total strangers the Nikon and asking if they can take a photo of us. Sort of Richard Hamilton process.

@Everyone: Retro analogue things are back in fashion (vinyl records, film cameras including instant, knitting, making stuff like furniture, cooking). Is this because we want to leave marks in some way through the process as a kick against the pixels? If OP wanted a crisp sharp colourful picture of his moggie, he would have just taken one on his iPhone. Instead, the image presented, dusty though it is, has a story and is a momento of time spent.

Google 'William Christenberry box cameras' for an idea and a theme (change over time).

The coat: off out before the downvotes start...

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keithpeter
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pinhole cameras are fun

Just saying, if you can find a community darkroom and want a project for an afternoon.

Using 35mm film as negative

http://www.kodak.com/ek/US/en/Pinhole_Camera.htm

Using printing paper as 'negative'

http://www.pinholephotography.org/Beer%20Can%20construction.htm

The wheelie bin camera guy

http://www.pinholephotography.org/

Might dust off the old Nikon this holiday.

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Dear departed Internet Explorer, how I will miss you ... NOT

keithpeter
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Windows

NetSurf

For those who wish to sample the mid-90s Web as part of some strange retro compulsion, try installing the Netsurf browser in a live Linux session, and make sure that Javascript is switched off in preferences... It is *quick* mind you.

"...including worthier projects such as Opera and Mozilla’s flying open sourcers."

Flying open sourcers: nice phrase that, I shall steal it.

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LOHAN chap compiles 'tenner a week' cookbook

keithpeter
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Windows

oatmeal = Porridge oats

UK.

The stuff in the breakfast cereals section that comes in a polythene bag and does not cost much. Not the hipster rolled variety but the flakes. Cheap. Antioxidant. You can do a week's breakfasts for a quid (half and half milk/water sweatened with cheapo honey).

"If I do it again next year it might be a selection of other people's ideas..."

Huevos rancheros. With kidney beans in the tomato sauce. I can walk 30 miles on that. Serve with rice for main meal. See

http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/eggs-recipes/mexican-breakfast/

I use pitta breads instead of tortillas and just use the tinned tomatoes, onion and a pinch of chilli powder.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Micro Review

OK, a copy landed on the mat this morning packed in one of those cardboard sleeve things. You get 122 pages in a glue spine paperback. Recipes divided down by food type (Bread, Pasta/Pizza, Meat &c) rather than meals (breakfast, lunch dinner). There is a section on veg cooking and buying that might help clueless students (e.g. me, 30 years ago).

Biggest omission (in my opinion): oatmeal. Cheap source of carbohydrates, good for you and would sort breakfast out when made half-in-half with milk and water. Something like a quid for all week mainly depending on the milk as oatmeal can be had for £1 per kg and keeps for a year or two. Add another £1 for a month's worth of honey for sweetening. Or chop half an apple in or some nuts or dried fruit. Or throw in some scavenged blackberries - ace.

Savory oatmeal for a warm lunch or light meal: fry onion in some kind of fat (bacon fat would be tasty for meaties, butter is good as well) in a small saucepan, add one cup oatmeal and stir in for 30sec then add two cups water, salt and boil for the usual 5 min. A good handful of spinach leaves helps appearence and taste. Towards the end of the boiling, chuck in a stingy handful of the strongest grated cheese you have. For a main meal pop a poached egg on top. Pepper to taste.

Oatcakes: Continuing the bread theme in the book, you will need a whisky glass of course...

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/520634/scottish-oat-cakes

No yeast so might be an easier way into bread making for those of us who have never got round to trying.

Second biggest omission: kidney beans &c. I just use the canned ones as the factories get the beans fresh and steam cook them on an industrial scale. Barbunya Pilaki made with Borlotti beans (aka Roman beans) could be a pre cooked neck filler when served with pittas and homous.

The audience: if this goes to a second edition, the thorny issue of educating the clueless students without nagging them arises. Drip feeding information about storage of left-overs (lifetimes in the fridge), diet balance for a weekly menu into the recipes might be an idea. Or just go for it and put a chapter in about a typical weekly menu at the end.

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keithpeter
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Windows

£20 a week next

Middle price recipes next ok?

Worth noting that Lulu allows purchase without creating yet another login and accepts paypal. Watch out for the naughty marketing opt-in on the penultimate screen.

Might get into the self-publishing thing...

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Lighty and flighty: Six sizzling portable projectors

keithpeter
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@Will Godfrey

"I'm also puzzled at who these are targetted at."

Me (a few years ago).

I have in the near past gone into community centres, libraries, adult education centres, pubs (when closed), works canteens, and Quaker meeting houses for the purpose of teaching maths to adults.

Laptop, projector, sometimes a Mimio, flipchart, chunky pens. When I did this kind of stuff I was lugging a huge Phillips projector in a rucksack along with a 15.6" laptop, web'n'walk dongle for Maths Web sites and remote Moodle access, (paper) workbooks and marked work. As I don't drive that was all going on the bus. It worked.

I'd want 2k lumens or so. That Canon looked ok, and I like the look of the short thow lens, the rest are toys for my use. Don't care about 'flesh tones'. 1024x768 is fine. I need crisp bright projection of what is on the screen including a 'magic notebook' type device.

I'm in classrooms these days. I miss the improvisation. My favourite was the quite nice looking if rather low-ceilinged classroom in a community centre. We got started, all going nice, when suddenly there was the Mother of all thumping noise from the ceiling. The 'classroom' was under the stage of a small hall, and the ladies had just started their exercise class. 20 of them and they were not svelte...

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Windows 10 build 10041: 99 bugs on the wall, fix a bug, add a feature, 114 bugs on the wall

keithpeter
Bronze badge
Coat

Anyone trying with low end hardware

Is this build working with lesser hardware? For example a Atom D2700 based small PC with 2Gb ram? That might save some landfill at the cost of the PC manufacturer's balance sheet...

Mine's the slightly threadbare one...

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Attack of the Digital People: The BBC goes fully Bong

keithpeter
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: Fibonacci

@DavCrav

Many thanks.

@The others: please, for the sake of the children, pay attention to the content rather than the form of messages from the chalkface. There are 500,000+ of us and I would be the first to admit that we cannot all complete the Times crossword before breakfast.

There are certainly gramatical errors, typographical errors, and even numerical errors to be found in the 1,107 LibreOffice files I produced in the academic year 2013/14. My work was fit for purpose judging by the pass rate last summer.

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keithpeter
Bronze badge
Windows

Fibonacci

"One Reg reader we're aware of, with a distinguished software career in household-name tech companies, teaches 10 year olds Fibonacci sequences after hours."

Good for him/her. But the Fibonacci sequence is just one topic, although one that threads a huge range of maths (Google Ron Knot's Fibonacci page). Any other topics needed? I'd recommend Adam Spencer's Big Book of Numbers for around 100 starter ideas.

My own view is that we need less targets and more teaching in education (but then, I am a teacher, and therefore suspect).

Go

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Gamers! Ransomware will scramble your save files unless you cough up $1,000

keithpeter
Bronze badge
Windows

Re: World of Warcraft (WoW) etc

@Shane8

Do a clonezilla clone of the hard drive once a month? Just keep the last clone or two to save hard drive space if you have much files.

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Microsoft hints at faster release cadence for Windows 10 previews

keithpeter
Bronze badge
Linux

Incremental or fresh install

I use a stable and well maintained Windows 7 client/Windows Server 2008 based system at work. It works and someone else has to keep it working (which they do). At home, I use Debian Sid on this laptop and Wheezy on the authoring box that Just Has To Work. They work. I update Sid twice a week with around 100Mb of updates (less at present because of the Jessie freeze). I update Wheezy once a month or so.

Are these Windows 10 releases incremental so each update changes only a small percentage of the files on your hard drive? Or are they effectively fresh installs of the entire system?

If latter, it would be sensible I think to have monthly releases so there is actually some *time* spent on each state of the platform to report bugs.

If former (i.e. like Sid or a rolling release like Arch or OpenBSD -current branch) bring it on and pop it out twice a day if you need to. I presume the bug reporting system has full information on the state of the system at the point where the bug is being reported.

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