* Posts by keithpeter

946 posts • joined 14 Jul 2007

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UK TV is getting worse as younglings shun the BBC et al, says Ofcom

keithpeter
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Windows

Nothing needs to be watched.

I've adjusted the title slightly.

http://www.gardnermuseum.org/music/listen/music_library?filter=composer

Link above leads to a tad under 10Gb of classical music, mostly chamber or solo. Enjoy.

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What Murphy’s law has to teach you about data centres

keithpeter
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Re: This story is very relevant

@Lee D

Well, good luck with it.

I'm assuming your simulation won't result in any pupils being sent home, as that would get the head sacked pretty sharpish. Remember we fine parents for keeping Jemima/Jeremy off school for a day without reason.

You seem quite confident that none of your colleagues read this peerless journal.

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Wanna go all Gandalf – YOU SHALL NOT PASS – on Windows 10?

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: OK, but is this really relevant?

"I support 10 windows users out of 1300 users on the LAN."

What are the rest on? Sounds interesting.

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This box beams cafes' Wi-Fi over 4kms so you can surf in obscurity

keithpeter
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Windows

libraries

"The moment a hotspot owner notices a traffic spike, they'll suspect a piggybacker, and it's not really expensive to employ a radio sniffer to triangulate and pinpoint the culprit."

@AC

You don't know much about library staff do you?

Seriously: quite sensibly my local public libraries throttle the un-authenticated wifi to around 80Kbytes/sec. You can get full speed (something like 1 to 2 Mbyte/sec but possibly that is just the top speed of my wifi card in this old Thinkpad) by authenticating and buying an access code for a certain period of time. Sounds fine to me - make a bit of money to offset the costs &c. The ones who just want to hop on to do email, update their status, or run an rdp session (latency is fine) can use the slower speed.

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Microsoft: This Windows 10 build has 'NO significant known issues'

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Hallelujah - File Explorer's file path limit is not 256 any more !

@TheVogon

Good point, but I think you should pull the figure down by a fairly large factor to reflect the fact that most of us would find a path like

C:\nvonsoiN/457fkdLvh/NVLSNGHHkbrb/FLLOPba.txt

a bit hard to recognise. I suspect working out which combinations of 256 characters that are significant to humans might be a hard problem though, and langage dependent.

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Devs, welcome your EVIL ROBOT OVERLORDS from MIT

keithpeter
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Exploits

This seems to me to be an analysis, comparison and substitution system albeit of significant complexity. The comparison phase relies on sufficient variation in the software components identified by the system to allow effective substitutions. In nature, variation is guaranteed through mutations and genetic crossing. In software, I gather that the trend is towards standardisation and the use of reusable component libraries.

Good luck with it all - I suspect there will be as many developer-less software houses in 10 years as there are now paperless offices.

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Rogue IT is shadow of its former self

keithpeter
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Pint

Re: "rogue IT carries on as per usual"

"Just recently a member of the team figured our CPUs were massively under-utilised and our Citrix boxes had excess GPU capacity. so we installed some bitcoin mining."

And you squared the Estates people about the increase in the electricity bill?

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Ditching political Elop makes for a more Nadella Microsoft

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Mobile vision

"There is no way to reset from the phone. They have to trek to an office sit down log in change pwd then head off again."

Remote desktop in from home PC or local cyber cafe? I can change password in an RDP session when I have to.

Or do you have good enough density of offices in your territory?

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keithpeter
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That photo

It speaks volumes does it not, the relative stance of the two executives.

Also motivates me to keep up with my diet...

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keithpeter
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Re: Technocodger

I'm wondering if Mr Pott has registered the domains... could be a money-spinner as we all get older

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LG's six-sided battery to take smart watches into new timezones

keithpeter
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Re: "not a symmetrical hexagon, sadly"

I'll say that the plan view of the battery has one line of symmetry and then leave...

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Windows 10 is due in one month: Will it be ready?

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: I see

If home Windows is like Arch (a Linux rolling distro) then I suspect there will need to be a Manjaro available soon (Arch with a month or so delay on updated packages and a nice installer) to keep support costs sane.

I might just restore Windows 7 on the refurbished Dell laptop and see what happens. I'm behind on the newer Micrsoft things.

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The slow strangulation of telework in Australia

keithpeter
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Pint

Re: This article is a bit bizarre

As a Brit living in the cloudy North, I too felt the need for a bit of context.

I realise that Australia is big, and that some people (like a retired cousin of mine) live in the middle of nowhere, and I fully understand that those outlying communities may have bandwidth limitations.

I was most interested in the author's first sentence about getting a direct wireless link to a (presumably) very local provider - which implies a line of sight location and a population density high enough to provide enough customers for a wireless link based business.

I also gathered that there are locations with high bandwidth (Universities as always) which raises the possibility of co-working spaces as a possible small business idea.

Would any of the Sunny Southern hemisphere based commentards give us a simple time-line on connectivity? Is there a Web page?

Pint icon: it is Sunday and it is raining (again).

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Microsoft's magic hurts: Nadella signals 'tough choices' on the way

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Old rant...

@ Phuq Witt

"Go and work for the college I used to work for."

The moment I read that, I understood.

"Oh —the hours of fun we used to have, trying to shoe-horn text into those [forms], without half of it mysteriously vanishing, or randomly changing size/colour/font/orientation! And, needless to say, being harangued all the while by management wanting it done 'yesterday'."

I was a very juniour PHB for a mercifully short period a few jobs and a decade ago. The most useful thing I did I think was to retype all the forms using a rational layout for filling in at the keyboard. Oh I had fun with that one getting people to explain *why* a given form needed to be laid out the way it was.

I got one form down from 4 nested tables to a single table with a few rows which could re-size when you typed. People had just sort of copied ancient printed 3 part sets as best they could in Word 2 or something and the results had been migrated forward by all the Word generations since sometimes via RTF. A particular favourite was the form where someone had plit a column by just drawing a line down the table with the drawing tools. OK for printing and writing on... not so good for typing into. And I got a monochrome small version of the logo approved for the header that cut file sizes down by about half a meg. Bear in mind that some of these forms were filled in and emailed thousands of times a year...

Tramp Icon: Oh, the power. I miss it for about half an hour every other month or so.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Old rant...

I'd love to get my hands on one of these complex documents that people always mention on these occasions.

I'm having more problems with old .doc -> .docx than I'm having with .odt -> .doc -> .docx if you see what I mean.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Powers of two

That's 1/128th which seems a bit harsh given the figures in the OA (I've rounded off).

Lumia: 8 million

Non-Lumia Microsoft: 24 million

Total Winphone: 32 million

Android: 255 million

By my arithmetic that says Winphone about 12.5% of Android.

I have no skin in this game, I'm hanging on to my old Blackberry, but a friend of a friend is very happy with her new Lumia (which takes very nice photos - I was surprised).

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Who wants a classic ThinkPad with whizzy new hardware? Lenovo would just love to know

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Definitely as long as it's as good as it's predecessors

"Old Thinkpads never die. I know of one venerable X 20-something that is still going strong and getting regular use in a fairly tough outdoor environment."

I can't match an X20 but my X60 is chugging away fine here for piddling about on the Web and writing worksheets. Screen a bit pixelly and dim but I don't work in full sunshine if I can avoid it anyway. New no-name battery gives around 5 hours (Debian). Cheap. Plenty of spares around (e.g. keyboards just above a tenner, standardised hard drive 'caddy' means you can fit any 2.5" Sata drive and swap them round). Same psu as most of the core-duo based thinkpads (T61/X200 &c).

The X200 I got for the missus is newer and has a better screen and stays cooler. She uses Windows for the iPlayer and the Channel 4 player thing. Cheap - probably a better buy than an X60 now given the age of the X60/X61.

It will be interesting to see how this Designer Retro(R) or Brand Heritage(TM) thing goes. The analogy with cars should worry the hopeful. The Fiat 600 is no way the same as the little red tin can I remember from the 60s.

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Microsoft's new mission statement: It's all about doing MAGICAL THINGS

keithpeter
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Transition

The expansion is over, saturation is here. Lenovo's head of design came up with this one...

http://blog.lenovo.com/en/blog/retro-thinkpad-time-machine/

Microsoft have some room to expand into mobile devices as end points to their back end systems. And they may have machine learning products to sell.

What else is there? What is the next Big Thing? Anyone any ideas? What itches remain to be scratched in the corporate workaday world?

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Hi-res audio folk to introduce new rules and weed out impure noises

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Dynamic Range

@Timbo

Or any jazz recording from the late 50s early 60s that mentions 'Hackensack NJ' in the recording credit (if you like jazz).

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keithpeter
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Re: for dogs only

@Hey Nonny Nonny Mouse and all

I'll try that. Might be worth trying Audacity's low pass filter on the square wave track and progressively reducing the cut off frequency until your (individual) perception of the 'richness' of the square wave changes notecibly. Make a note of the cut off frequency you end up with. It might be lower than you imagine. You can play with pure data (puredata.info) as well to build up waveforms by superimposing harmonics (fourier synthesis).

I've stopped worrying about audio quality above CD or 196kb/s mp3 these days: hypersonic starts around 10 - 12kHz for me.

Random thoughts: visual processing starts in the retina and optic nerve, and our visual model of what is before us is synthesised in a couple of regions of the brain at quite a high level above the raw signal from the rods and cones. Damage to the various components of the visual cortex has subtile effects (Oliver Sacks wrote about aspects of that in one of his books).

Perceptual psychologists (the experimental ones not the boutique ones) have developed a concept of 'categorical hearing' - a musician trained in the Western tradition will tend to bin sine waves into pitch classes even when they are quite a few (hundred) cents off an actual pitch. Non-trained ears can recognise the sine waves as different at a finer level. BUT talk to a pianist who works with a string quartet (e.g. playing a piano quintet) ... the quartet musicians will drift into perfect fifth intervals instead of the equal intonation interval if they rehearse without the pianist for any length of time...

My direction of travel here is that 'music' may actually be made in our minds rather than existing as a sound field in a room, so you only need to produce *enough* of the sound field to trick the mind into making the music... mumble mumble

Coat icon: its time I took a walk. Mine's the one with the penny whistle in the pocket.

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BT: Let us scrap ordinary phone lines. You've all got great internet, right?

keithpeter
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@Aggrajag and all

512 kbit/s in my case on adsl. No prospect of upgrade this decade (a court battle was fought on that issue). One mile from Birmingham city centre.

I am actually thinking of ditching the landline and relying on mobile/cafes

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Capita: Call centre workers, can you fall on your swords? Please?

keithpeter
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Re: Double Cross

"The welfare bill come out of different pot of money. Simples really."

Er - what?

UK jobs -> Elsewhere (doesn't matter where really)

UK tax base shrinks

Less tax raised, so less money for welfare, defence, health, education, building houses &c

Where is Worstall when you need him?

Coat icon: mine's the one with a copy of Grundrisse in the pocket

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As the US realises it's been PWNED, when will OPM heads roll?

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Bureaucrats

...and it has to be said that in the US, you can find out about stuff. In the UK our culture of secrecy means that there is a good chance that all kinds of stuff will never come to light.

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This whopping 16-bit computer processor is being built by hand, transistor by transistor

keithpeter
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Re: what is the THIS that you want teaching?

"How computers work, as opposed to how to use them."

OK, so are we taking an historical/hardware approach or building up from logic (and/or/not and Boolean algebra, leading to shift registers, half adders &c) or from the conceptual side (Von Neumann machine/Turing computability which rests on the 'diagonal proof' and its generalisation) or through programming (variables, assignment, loops, subroutines/functions then into more abstract areas) or all of those?

Could take a bit of time (and need some serious skills). Best of luck. One tiny activity I use sometimes: take an 8 by 8 grid of squares on squared paper. Draw a resonably complex shape (each square is either black or white).

Now devise a way of sending the shape to someone else using an sms message. Document the method for reconstructing the shape.

Now find a method that will work for a shape drawn on a 16 by 16 grid, and then a 32 by 32 grid &c.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Tip of the hat

"And I agree with the other posting - THIS is the kind of thing that should be taught about in school."

OK TonyJ and anyone, what is the THIS that you want teaching?

I'm serious.

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keithpeter
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Sponsorship...

Or sponsor a gate or two?

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Microsoft sez soz over Windows 10 'freebie' balls-up

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: In Linux the DE (Desktop Environment) is an installable component, like a media player...

"There are fourteen different downloads linked from

http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php"

True enough, and I take the point being made but these 14 downloads are essentially installing the same OS but with different default setups. They are provided as a convenience to the one who is installing, and to allow the one who is installing to demonstrate compliance with local laws (the no codec variants). It would in principle be possible to have a single Mint DVD (at least for the Ubuntu based install) and then ask the installer a series of questions about the software required (c. f. the Debian installer as run from the netinstall image).

The various Widows versions have different functionality I understand, so that Windows 7 Home edition as supplied with my refurbished T61p under a scheme for refurbished computers will not be able to do everything that the College machines with their Windows 7 Enterprise (?) versions can do.

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Brace yourself, planet Earth, says Nokia CEO – our phones ARE coming back from mid-2016

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Philips

My 3120 is still going strong with 5 day battery life. I use it as an emergency phone.

Having said that, what will happen with the current range of Nokia branded s30/s40 phones, e.g. the Nokia 108 &c? Will they carry on under the Microsoft brand? Will Nokia continue to use the s30/s40 OS at all?

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MOUNTAIN of unsold retail PCs piling up in Blighty: Situation 'serious'

keithpeter
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Re: If you need a "new" PC

Nvidia 6200 card needs legacy drivers on Ubuntu 14.04

Puppy runs in ramdisk I recollect, so check BIOS entries for the other Linux isos. Google the mobo model &c. F6 and nomodeset may (according to a quick google) help with Ubuntu.

64 Bit: should be OK but try a 32 bit live CD just in case

Note to mods: previous more detailed post kept getting blocked?!

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keithpeter
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Windows

Re: If you need a "new" PC

Put the Ubuntu disk in, cleaned off the drive, and loaded it. Or tried to. Refused to install. Tried again. Same thing. Gave up. NEXT.

I would be very interested to learn more about this desktop PC. Brand, processor, video card &c.

If you managed to boot Mint into a live session, just hit terminal and do an lspci command and post it here.

I test out stuff like this....

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The insidious danger of the lone wolf control freak sysadmin

keithpeter
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Re: It happens

"...came in early/worked late/weekends just to prove how "valuable" she was."

Disclaimers: I don't work in IT but I do have to think about people's motivation a lot. This comment is not genered especially, applies to Tims and Tabithas

What drives this overwork and inability to share/work with other people? Is it a cynical strategy to increase wages? Is it insecurity/bad attack of imposter syndrome? Or is it simply never having learned how to work with other people? Or all/any of these depending on the specific Tim/Tabitha?

Consequent on a diagnosis, has anyone devised strategies for managing the issues short of waiting for the Tim/Tabitha to disappear or jumping ship themselves?

Just wondering...

Coat: mine's the one with the herbal tea and essential oils in the pocket.

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UK.gov loses crucial battle in home-taping war with musicians

keithpeter
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Windows

format shift?

Is this copying CD to CD or is it about format shifting (CD -> mp3 so I can listen to the stuff I bought on my phone)?

If latter, then Brennan et al are in trouble are they not? I recollect a promise to do something about format shifting something like a decade ago but still 'nowt.

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Open-source Linux doesn't pay, said no one ever at Red Hat

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Even if it doesn't pay.

"Are you kidding its becoming Windows. Still Red Hat should give Poettering all kinds of stock options. Even Microsoft wasn't able to cash in on others work as well."

All the code is GPL licenced I believe. So the system can evolve into something a bit saner over time. Some of the *bsd people are hoping to build their own launchd so having a *thing* that lives between the kernel and the applications seems to be a popular development.

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Testing Windows 10 on Surface 3: Perfect combo or buggy embuggerance?

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: I almost feel sorry for Microsoft

Quote from OA

"Windows 10 feels rougher, not only because of bugs in the preview, but also because restoring a desktop focus has made the tablet experience worse in some respects."

Hopefully UI designers (everywhere) will draw the obvious conclusion from this expensively won experience: design one UI for touch and a different one for Desktop. Don't compromise.

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BlackBerry on Android? It makes perfect sense

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Keep making physical keyboards!

@Shadow Systems

" Touch screens are fine if you're a media consumer, not if you're a Professional whom needs to Get Shit Done. Email, meeting notes, calendar appointments, marking up schematics to collaborate in manufacturing, and all the other things that a physical keyboard will make infinitely easier for someone whom needs to GSD"

I enjoyed your spirited defence of hardware keyboards on phones. I see two issues...

Installed base working fine:

My fairly ancient Bold 9000 can do all the things in your paragraph above with the exception of marking up diagrams (which task I personally would rather perform sitting at a device with a larger screen in a quiet well-lit room free of distractions). I can also drop the Bold down the stairs and sit on it accidentally without cracking the screen or the case unlike some makes of tough-screen device. There is a replaceable battery and a charge lasts several days depending on call frequency. What size is the replacement market?

Motivation for buying new shiny devices:

Is the (possibly saturating) market for small form-factor mobile devices not driven by shiny consumer oriented apps and bandwidth consumption? How would a distinctly work oriented device fit into that?

The tramp: yes, I am a cheapskate

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How much info did hackers steal on US spies? Try all of it

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: This is rapidly becoming a world laughing stock

I hope that this discovery will lead to questions being asked about the resources being spent on mass surveillance of home and allied populations - i.e. huge data trawls producing low priority information that is mostly just deleted after some period of time.

Just possibly someone might begin to think that a little spending on actual secure systems for the basics like this might be a better idea?

Jaron Lanier writes about 'siren servers' by which he means the way various agencies 'sell' large IT based projects to gullable politicians/corporate managers. Shiny, sound good, but apparently generate little advantage.

PS: if this happened in the UK we would never hear about it of course. Rest assured.

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VMware unleashes Linux on the (virtual) desktop

keithpeter
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Windows

Client desktop - Re: THANK YOU, VMWARE.

I sort of expected it would be MATE. Judicious customisation of the panels (basically removing one) can result in something that looks very Windows ish thus reducing training cost/pushback on change. The Alt-F style keyboard shortcuts for LO and all work just the same as in Windows as well.

Slackware choice interesting: you have a plan for pushing out updates to the slackbuilds I imagine. Running RStudio from a slackbuild had me recompiling WebKit almost twice a month. Good luck and write it up when it happens.

Probably not for this application but have a look at Deepin Linux. Very win7 ish custom DE on top of Ubuntu LTS. Has codecs and flash.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Re: THANK YOU, VMWARE.

@Mr Pott

About those seats, and the people sitting in them. Which of the many variants of desktop Linux had you in mind? I'm interested from the point of view of staff (re)training, having had some experience of that and still occasionally having problems sleeping at night.

Or where these people already using a Linux desktop and the development described in the original article allows you to virtualise those seats?

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Shine a light on the rogue IT that hides in the company shadows

keithpeter
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"After much wailing and gnashing of teeth we're going to look at a Remote Desktop connection back to a server in head office which will allow them access to a copy of IE. Hopefully the cost will be more than the cost of a new HR solution and they can just ignore the old one."

I use an RDP session into my general purpose work desktop most days from my linux laptop and it works rather well for 'business app' administration type things (not so well for anything that needs graphics). I'm a teacher so I suppose we get cheap licences &c. I prefer the rdesktop client but remina does actually work as well.

Coat: Mine's the one with holiday brochures in the pocket.

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Oh, shoppin’ HELL: I’m in the supermarket of the DAMNED

keithpeter
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Alert

Ribbon People

I suspect if they forced the Microsoft coders who came up with the ribbon interface to actually use it it would have never gotten past the planning phase...

Alas, I think The Ribbon People actually thought that The Ribbon was a good idea. I have to face the fact that there are people in the world who think like that.

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keithpeter
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I just go to the tills

I just go to the tills where people get paid to scan the stuff.

When there is a queue and some spare bod comes around and asks 'would you like to use self-checkout' I just point out that the reason that I am in the queue is that I have already decided not to use self-checkout. I then respectfully suggest that if the spare bod really wants to get the queue down, they could hop on a till themselves.

Mind you, I'm tending to go to markets (the ones in the open air with stalls) far more now, and I also find myself using small corner shops as a matter of deliberate policy.

Credit to Mr Dabs for logging the self-checkout phenomenon. I think that this was a brave move to make on this particular Web site because I have an hypothesis that many here would like interacting with a machine with a pretty obvious logic rather more than interacting with a human being.

I think that the ultimate supermarket rant is still that of David Foster Wallace from the pre-self-checkout era. See 7th paragraph of Wallace's text below...

http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB122178211966454607

Alas, David Foster Wallace will not be able to update the rant, and that leads me to the thought that we should all perhaps sit down for a bit and not worry about minor things.

Coat icon: off down to Birmingham Food Markets to buy veg and argue with the 'KIPper who runs the pots and pans stall. Always fun.

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Port of Hamburg to pave its roads with Cisco things

keithpeter
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Windows

Liverpool early to mid 1970s...

Dad had a friend who worked in a bunker in a cellar somewhere off the Dock Road or there abouts or near the town hall. I remember a row of CRT monitors set into grey desks with joystick controllers in front. As you moved the joystick, the monochrome CCTV cameras dotted around Liverpool city centre moved. Pressing a rocker switch on the end of the joystick zoomed in or out. Traffic flows were monitored visually as well as using pneumatic sensors set into the roads near traffic lights. A computer matched the traffic lights to the average speed of traffic through the city centre. The average speed was shown on a large display. It struck me at the time (as an abnoxious teenager) that the drivers of the cars throught they were in control with the illusion of agency, but really the computer program was in charge of the *average* movement through the centre, so that any relative advantage you gained in one section of road would result in a longer wait at a subsequent set of lights. [1]

I supose as the cost (both capital and energy to run) of computing devices continues to drop [2] we will see more of 'management' of cities. [2]

[1] (PDF, see slide 8 for the display section) http://www.ciht.org.uk/download.cfm/docid/df2d4cbb-435d-4f2c-bd044db69f02d0ef

[2] http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2012/08/how-low-power-can-you-go.html

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Fedora 22: Don't be glum about the demise of Yum – this is a welcome update

keithpeter
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Windows

Scroll bars

I popped Fedora 22 workstation on a recycled Dell Latitude E5420 i5 Sandybridge laptop with intel graphics (and an atheros wifi card, I swapped out the Broadcom).

Gnome 3.16 seems fairly snappy to me. The new scroll bars on 'native' applications take a bit of getting used (hint: middle button to scroll). Firefox and LibreOffice are not 'native' and use scroll bars you can actually drag. I like the new notifications.

Default filing system is btrfs for / and xfs for /home, and the installer default is to set up LVMs and grab around 60Gb for root. I usually go for ext4 and a single partition. I find customising partitions on the 'spoke and wheel' installer requires some clicking around, and the 'make more space' command is downright confusing as it actually deletes partitions.

You have to enable the RPMFusion 22 repo to actually play music or anything as per usual in the RedHat world but that really is a 'just click a couple of times' job.

Yum: I used to use yum -localinstall sometimes but can't find the corresponding command in dnf. Not sure if the mirrors plug in is functioning or not in dnf updates, I did see a few time-out errors when updating and installing.

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Taming the Thames – The place that plugged London's Great Stink

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Agree.

"This wasn't for one moment slave labour, it was paid employment, with little alternative but the rather unattractive option of the workhouse."

Read Robert Tressell's The Ragged-Trousered Philanthropists for an insight into aspects of the building trade in the late 19th cent. And just a good novel with clear strong writing. You had to watch out in case "the thing" happened in those days.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Agree.

"It's as though every architect born after 1945 decided 'Gosh, what the world really wants is square grey boxes with square glass, just like they had in Soviet Russia'."

http://nautil.us/issue/24/error/ingenious-john-ochsendorf

It has been suggested that this tendency reflects the education and experience that structural engineers have. They work with a limited range of materials and regulations prevent exploration of older structures.

I rather like *some* recent work: e.g. the way the old and new structures in Manchester Piccadilly have been integrated, the renovated tea hall at Leeds Art Gallery, the Liverpool Picton Library extension that puts a roof over a gap between the two buildings so you can sit *outside* the Picton dome.

But, in general, I take your point.

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Libre Office comes to Android

keithpeter
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Windows

A small start

Alpha proof-of-conceptish but a start.

The end point of this path is a fully functional LO running on android PCs. Low power, relatively secure, PC in the screen style commodity hardware. Ideal client for large corps?

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Finally! It's the year of Linux on the desktop TITSUP

keithpeter
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Pint

Re: That's evolution (no, not the program)

"While there are many reports of the positive impact of this font in the popular media, it is important to note that no published peer-reviewed empirical research can be found (as of 5/7/15) that has shown this font to be effective with English readers. Two studies have investigated the effect of specialized fonts used with students with dyslexia. Rello and Baeza-Yates (2013) measured eye-tracking recordings of Spanish readers (aged 11-50) with dyslexia and found that OD did not significantly improve reading time nor shorten eye fixation."

Any quantitative data about the effectiveness of this font that will contradict the Wikipedia article above? If so, I'll use it for all my handouts next year (I'm a teacher).

PS: what licence is it issued under?

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Windows and OS X are malware, claims Richard Stallman

keithpeter
Bronze badge
Windows

Re: ingenuity

"I wonder where you got that from?. As far as I remember Cuban hospitals started to use Linux about 15 years ago. I am more concerned about Cuba when they let Microsoft in."

Have a look at the Nova 4 user manual, especially the section on network installation.

Fully agree with your observations on TTIP however

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keithpeter
Bronze badge
Windows

ingenuity

http://kernelmag.dailydot.com/issue-sections/headline-story/13117/tech-cuba-reforms/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jugaad

Just thinking random thoughts and standing rms on his head a little: those places where technology isn't seamlessly packaged, closed or easy to use may have an advantage in that (some) people are used to hacking things (using 'hacking' in its sense of 'adapting stuff to meet needs'). Is this not the logic of the Raspberry Pi?

A point to watch: will the Cuban government allow free software in? Because once it is in, people will be able to get round what controls remain...

PS: A weekly drop of 1Tb on a hard drive currently beats my adsl connection's bandwidth by a factor of around 5.

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Carry On Computing: Ten stylish laptop bags for him

keithpeter
Bronze badge
Windows

Re: ManhattanPortage..

@ The Mighty Spang

Aghhhhhh they've changed.

Mmine was Sanfordised cotton and cost around £50 which I thought was a lot for a bag. I've had it since 2008. Going strong. Just get a sleeve for devices (I use a little muji zipped one that has pockets for pens and notebooks on the outside, something like £12) .

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