* Posts by keithpeter

974 posts • joined 14 Jul 2007

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Blighty tablet sales plunge 31 per cent in saturated market

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Ooooh..

"Sent from my home built Linux running desktop."

I see what there did you.

Our core-duo laptops cope with everything we need to do. Absolutely no pressing need to upgrade or acquire new kit.

Might get a tablet to try out ebook learning materials and to see if I can write some stuff for the platform. Just PDFs with hyperlinks. Flashcards for the modern era.

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The Lazarus Effect: Saved by Linux and Cash Converters

keithpeter
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Re: asymmetric fud...

"Must mention too the excellent Studio service that lets you build an entire distro to your own requirements."

Looks interesting but you need to know what you want before you make the distro image. The Debian dvd1 and dvd2 just let you install a basic one then install packages subsequently.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Re: asymmetric fud...

"OpenSUSE repositories can be almost anything including CDs, DVDs, Hard drives, local iso images, UBS directories/images/isos as well as lots of networked sources."

Excellent - where do I download a good selection of packages in DVD image form? It would be good to have an alternative to Debian in case they decide to go all cloudy.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Re: asymmetric fud...

"And remember kids, Linux is the only fully-functional piece of software you can install on your hardware without needing an internet connection to "phone home"."

If you have the patience to download* and burn the DVD1 and DVD2 and just possibly DVD3 images of Debian (Jessie/Wheezy/Squeeze) before taking a long trip you can later install a 'fully-functional piece of software' without needing an Internet connection of any kind. The result will be a fully performant desktop (actually a choice of around 5 desktop environments and umpteen window managers) with the ability to subsequently install a huge range of applications from the DVDs after the initial installation.

This includes the Debian 'main' repository only however so you might need to download a proprietary wifi firmware (a single deb package) for a laptop. I accept that support for the more exotic graphics cards using binary drivers could be problematic as a result of the dependencies needed for the kernel modules they require.

To my knowledge, Debian is the only distro that caters for offline installation of a significant selection of desktop software in this way. I'd be delighted to hear of alternatives.

*Or simply buy/borrow a DVD set from somewhere - don't underestimate the bandwidth of a jiffy bag in the post.

PS: doing a DJ live mix on Kali linux does strike me as a little - er - odd but then we are a broad church.

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YOU! DEGRASSE! It's time to make Pluto a proper planet again, says NASA boffin

keithpeter
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Coat

Not in purple ink and not all in CAPITALS

"Take Reg scribe Kieren McCarthy, who has a daughter born after Pluto was declassified. She's become so entranced with the recent news from Pluto that she writes letters to scientists asking for it to be reinstated again, based on how fascinating the place is."

If I have read the article correctly, that puts the little girl around 9 or 10 so this is probably OK - especially if she puts drawings in that can go on the departmental fridge.

I used to get letters from (chronological) adults IN CAPITALS and usually in purple or lilac ink claiming to have unified gravity and quantum mechanics, or to have disproved special relativity. One person that actually turned up at the lab insisted that she was sensitive to electricity and had to work away from power lines and could we 'test' her out and write a letter? The situation became slightly embarrassing when she told us that she had to catch the 3pm *train* back to town (yup - electric trains, 1kV traction power from overhead cables).

Back on thread: its words folks. Read your Karl Popper. What matters is the thinking you do about how Pluto got to be like it is.

Coat icon: mine's the one with a copy of The Logic of Scientific Discovery in one pocket and Medawar's The Art of the Soluble in the other.

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Want longer battery life? Avoid the New York Times and The Grauniad

keithpeter
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Coat

A relevant blog post

"I feel like someone just set up the entire vendor hall from an awful tech conference in my living room."

http://blog.lmorchard.com/2015/07/22/the-verge-web-sucks/

Link via another well known technical forum - the one with orange.

The blog post author's use of web developer tools in Firefox coupled with the lightbeam extension have given me an idea for Maths teaching next year...

The coat: quitting while I'm ahead, thanks all.

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keithpeter
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Re: Outside, trying to get in

@frank ly

Never actually had a *shutdown* on Linux other than thermal runaway when I had a problem with acpi and fan control on Ubuntu 5.10 or something. Might be worth checking the temperature as the computer tries to load the page?

Trying to load my death-test page (linked above) results in Firefox thinking about it for a bit then deciding to quit. With noscript you can actually load the page but the memory use is very high (1Gb RAM in the netbook).

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keithpeter
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Try this page

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/the-old-suburban-office-park-is-the-new-american-ghost-town/2015/07/20/b8e7653a-1f6e-11e5-bf41-c23f5d3face1_story.html

It has a number of 7000 pixel wide photos in the page with some javascript stuff resizing the images to suit resolution/dpi of page. Eats around 800Mb on Firefox which then crashes on Linux, spanners MSIE and Chrome on the Atom based 2Gb RAM Windows 7 client I use at work - system becomes unresponsive and hard drive is on all the time. According to comments on another forum, it spanners Android based phones as well. I resorted to links in a terminal to actually read the 1000 words!

PS: lots of moderation happening are we being spammed?

Coat icon: off out in the rain for the lutz

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HP slaps dress code on R&D geeks: Bin that T-shirt, put on this tie

keithpeter
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Windows

Tidy Desk

Got told off about papers on desk at a previous employer.

So I binned the lot, and then continued to bin any paper that landed on my desk. I pointed out that I 1) had no filing cabinet space 2) had to comply with 'tidy desk' policy 3) had seen a purchase requisition for a document feed scanner and document management software refused.

They gave in after about a month...

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UK.gov makes total pig's ear of attempt to legalise home CD ripping

keithpeter
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Coat

Re: Compensation for what?

"...buy a CD (do people actually still do that?)"

That would be me.

Usually 'classical' music. Sitting at home not on shonky earbuds on buses.

If format shifting were to become legal I might be bothered to rip each CD as a single track and use an old laptop with a USB audio interface into the stereo. Would it be worth the time it took me to do the ripping, tag correcting, and the cost of the hard drive space that would be needed for backups? Perhaps in return for search-ability and building a concert programme (aka 'playlist').

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Hacking Team hackers questioned over Hacking Team hack

keithpeter
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shadow boxing

"The hack and code leak has left companies like Oracle, Adobe and Microsoft scrambling to plug zero-day vulnerabilities that Hacking Team thought it had all to itself."

Tricky this zero day thing.

How many organisations are duplicating effort finding zero day defects?

How many are keeping the results of their trawls confidential?

How much of this activity is tax-payer funded?

Is there an opportunity cost there - could we not make more money just producing new shiny stuff to sell?

Is this whole thing just shadow boxing?

Coat icon: off out for a walk.

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Evil computers sense you’re in a hurry and mess with your head

keithpeter
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Boffin

Re: Alternative printer undoing

@GrumpenKraut and all hammer wielding technicians

Please, please remember your safety specs. Not joking - had a near miss a couple or three decades ago. Plastic breaks in surprising ways.

PS: Those orange plastic hammers with the head filled with lead shot you get with push together rack based shelving are very satisfying to use...

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Microsoft to Windows 10 consumers: You'll get updates LIKE IT or NOT

keithpeter
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Chill

"SAY THIS TO MY FACE IN THE REAL WORLD AND SEE WHAT HAPPENS."

@Destroy...

1) Sit down and have a nice cup of tea

2) Reflect on the fact that the younger people I teach use different computing devices to complete tasks, and that a given task may result in a student switching between three OSes

3) They do not appear to be terribly bothered by the logo on the screen as long as it (sort of) works.

From observations such as these, I conclude that

4) The future of the IT systems used in large organisations may be different to what we know today.

That is all

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keithpeter
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Childcatcher

Re: no matter what MS force on us

"Anyone declining updates puts themselves at risk as well as others."

Not declining so much as re-timing.

In the home segment, could be gaming, trying to get a document finished on a slower machine, or could be just a bit cautious given the recent history of borked updates. I'm assuming the update process can tell if you are on battery and not run upgrades then. Perhaps with this new wifi thingy, the update process could tell if you were on a mobile connection and delay updates. Perhaps it should be possible to associate the update process with a named connection (e.g. home wifi) so that it will wait until that named connection is in use before starting.

In general: This sort of looks like Windows becoming Fedora for home users and RHEL for large companies. What could *possibly* go wrong with simultaneous updates of scores of millions of computers in the homes of technically unsophisticated users?

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Microsoft nixes A-V updates for XP, exposes 180 MEEELLION luddites

keithpeter
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Pint

QLC+

"I'd have a penguin, but they don't understand the lingo."

http://www.qlcplus.org/ no good then? Or am I looking in the wrong glossary.

Best of luck with all the upgrading all.

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Peak Google? Chocolate Factory cuts costs amid dwindling growth

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Not just that

"Free food (not even checking badges), free coffee..."

OK so how much would charging a few dollars a meal bring in as a percentage of turnover?

And what would the resulting PR impact be on the Chocolate Factory Myth as being a whizzo place to work? Impressionable 20+ somethings with sneakers will still be needed in numbers I imagine.

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Adobe: We REALLY are taking Flash security seriously – honest

keithpeter
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Black Helicopters

The answer is obvious when you think about it...

How can one company fail continuesly and stay in buisness when everyone knows thier software, apps, whatever are the cause of most woes heard in computer security today[?]

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Union confirms two-day strike over Universal Credit's pisspoor IT

keithpeter
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Coat

Did I read this right?

3000 people administering a system used by 65 000 people? Could they not just take 20+ each and phone them up?

Or are the 3000 people inputting data for the people being enroled on UC later?

Coat: Confused. Not sure if coming or going...

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Mathematician: SUNSPOT DROUGHT will mean mini ICE AGE from 2030

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: "Mediaeval astronomers working in the years 1645 to 1715..."

Pretty certain the young uns' would have been using paper by then as well.

Coat: I'm off to find a goose feather to write with...

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Oxford Uni unearths 800-year-old document to seize domain names

keithpeter
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Windows

country code .ac

Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha have country code .ac.

You see .ac at the end of Web addresses in some surprising locations here in the UK, like the back of buses and on banners outside educational institutions that do not appear to be tax-payer funded.

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What do you MEAN, 'Click on the thing which looks like a Mondrian?'

keithpeter
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Coat

Piet

Piet is an interesting toy programming language. The 'code' is coloured pixels in a png. There are direction and colour change based syntactical rules. I have a prime factor program as my wallpaper on t'other computer.

Radiocars: the secret is become a regular. In Brum its seven sevens, a nod, and home after teaching evening class in 10mins.

Off out for the veg off the market now. The bus will do for that.

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Five lightweight Linux desktop worlds for extreme open-sourcers

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: can't resist BSD way to go

"... why not run OpenBSD (fvwm2 default)"

A default OpenBSD install comes with an interesting window manager called cwm as well as fvwm2, you have to edit the .xinitrc (I recollect) to use it when starting X. The Calm Window Manager is quite interesting and now in Debian Jessie. Very keyboard-centric non-tiling with search based program launching a la dwm/dmenu.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Tinker and tucker

@Khaptain: Upvoted for the quality of the rant.

My favoured light weight window manager is most unphotogenic. To (mis?)quote an American author, 'there is no there there'.

As others must use the testing laptop now and again, I compromise with an unsung workhorse: IceWM. Ugly as sin as installed, with a decent theme and some configuration you get a bare bones panel-at-the-bottom XP work alike. Throw in PCManFM as mentioned in the OA and the result is quite usable. No notifications, raging calm.

Google "Old-School Desktop" - my fixed gear bicycle for the mind.

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Microsoft SLASHES 7,800 bods, BURNS $7.6bn off books in Nokia adjustment

keithpeter
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Windows

Nokia 108 and other candy bars

Nokia candybar phones of current manufacture: S30 or S40 based. Are they going as well? Handy. Popular round here. Cheap as chips (so I guess no profit).

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We tried using Windows 10 for real work and ... oh, the horror

keithpeter
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Joke

@Russle

Is that you, Eadon?

PS: OA was interesting reading, thanks.

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Pluto probe brain OVERLOAD: Titsup New Horizons explained

keithpeter
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Pint

Re: This is proper engineering

"Well I wasn't around then, but in hindsight if I had been and seen how quickly things moved from "first artificial satellite" to "first man in space" to "first man on the Moon" I certainly would have thought we'd be doing bigger and better stuff than flying by Pluto and landing on a comet 46 years after Armstrong..."

Born around the time of Sputnik. I was taken to see 2001 when it came out and I can remember working out how old I would be and thinking it would be fairly OK to be on that space station.

The major thing noone had any idea about was the impact of mobile computing and a ubiquitous world-wide distributed network. Dick Tracy had his watchphone but it was essentially two-way communication. Star Trek people had their communicators but again basically walkie-talkies with sensors. Floyd phones home from a videophone kiosk.

Pint icon: congratulations to the team who ran this especially for the detailed anticipation of possible faults.

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Linux on the desktop is so hot there's now a fight over it

keithpeter
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Windows

Advantage over rdp session?

"It's just as easy to pipe a Windows app into Citrix Receiver on Linux as it is Citrix Receiver on any other operating system."

Judging by the screen shot the main advantage over running an rdp session into my Windows desktop is the way individual applications can be 'piped' into a graphical session. Am I right?

Disclaimer: civilian end user here

PS: @Khaptain: I suspect that use of the phrase in question has been ironic for at least a decade.

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ONE MILLION new lines of code hit Linux Kernel

keithpeter
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Windows

Lines coming out?

OK so extra code for GPAs &c going in. Most 'stock' compilations of the kernel will simply leave that code out or provide it as a binary module for dynamic loading as others have said.

Anyone have an idea about how much code came out? The x86 changes for instance could be replacing older crufty code with newer code thus eliminating some exploits (and perhaps introducing new ones).

"One of my most productive days was throwing away 1000 lines of code." -- Ken Thompson

"When the Lisa team was pushing to finalize their software in 1982, project managers started requiring programmers to submit weekly forms reporting on the number of lines of code they had written. Bill Atkinson thought that was silly. For the week in which he had rewritten QuickDraw’s region calculation routines to be six times faster and 2000 lines shorter, he put "-2000" on the form. After a few more weeks the managers stopped asking him to fill out the form, and he gladly complied."

http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/103807/what-is-negative-code

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UK TV is getting worse as younglings shun the BBC et al, says Ofcom

keithpeter
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Windows

Nothing needs to be watched.

I've adjusted the title slightly.

http://www.gardnermuseum.org/music/listen/music_library?filter=composer

Link above leads to a tad under 10Gb of classical music, mostly chamber or solo. Enjoy.

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What Murphy’s law has to teach you about data centres

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: This story is very relevant

@Lee D

Well, good luck with it.

I'm assuming your simulation won't result in any pupils being sent home, as that would get the head sacked pretty sharpish. Remember we fine parents for keeping Jemima/Jeremy off school for a day without reason.

You seem quite confident that none of your colleagues read this peerless journal.

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Wanna go all Gandalf – YOU SHALL NOT PASS – on Windows 10?

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: OK, but is this really relevant?

"I support 10 windows users out of 1300 users on the LAN."

What are the rest on? Sounds interesting.

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This box beams cafes' Wi-Fi over 4kms so you can surf in obscurity

keithpeter
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Windows

libraries

"The moment a hotspot owner notices a traffic spike, they'll suspect a piggybacker, and it's not really expensive to employ a radio sniffer to triangulate and pinpoint the culprit."

@AC

You don't know much about library staff do you?

Seriously: quite sensibly my local public libraries throttle the un-authenticated wifi to around 80Kbytes/sec. You can get full speed (something like 1 to 2 Mbyte/sec but possibly that is just the top speed of my wifi card in this old Thinkpad) by authenticating and buying an access code for a certain period of time. Sounds fine to me - make a bit of money to offset the costs &c. The ones who just want to hop on to do email, update their status, or run an rdp session (latency is fine) can use the slower speed.

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Microsoft: This Windows 10 build has 'NO significant known issues'

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Hallelujah - File Explorer's file path limit is not 256 any more !

@TheVogon

Good point, but I think you should pull the figure down by a fairly large factor to reflect the fact that most of us would find a path like

C:\nvonsoiN/457fkdLvh/NVLSNGHHkbrb/FLLOPba.txt

a bit hard to recognise. I suspect working out which combinations of 256 characters that are significant to humans might be a hard problem though, and langage dependent.

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Devs, welcome your EVIL ROBOT OVERLORDS from MIT

keithpeter
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Windows

Exploits

This seems to me to be an analysis, comparison and substitution system albeit of significant complexity. The comparison phase relies on sufficient variation in the software components identified by the system to allow effective substitutions. In nature, variation is guaranteed through mutations and genetic crossing. In software, I gather that the trend is towards standardisation and the use of reusable component libraries.

Good luck with it all - I suspect there will be as many developer-less software houses in 10 years as there are now paperless offices.

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Rogue IT is shadow of its former self

keithpeter
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Pint

Re: "rogue IT carries on as per usual"

"Just recently a member of the team figured our CPUs were massively under-utilised and our Citrix boxes had excess GPU capacity. so we installed some bitcoin mining."

And you squared the Estates people about the increase in the electricity bill?

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Ditching political Elop makes for a more Nadella Microsoft

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Mobile vision

"There is no way to reset from the phone. They have to trek to an office sit down log in change pwd then head off again."

Remote desktop in from home PC or local cyber cafe? I can change password in an RDP session when I have to.

Or do you have good enough density of offices in your territory?

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keithpeter
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Windows

That photo

It speaks volumes does it not, the relative stance of the two executives.

Also motivates me to keep up with my diet...

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keithpeter
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Pint

Re: Technocodger

I'm wondering if Mr Pott has registered the domains... could be a money-spinner as we all get older

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LG's six-sided battery to take smart watches into new timezones

keithpeter
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Coat

Re: "not a symmetrical hexagon, sadly"

I'll say that the plan view of the battery has one line of symmetry and then leave...

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Windows 10 is due in one month: Will it be ready?

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: I see

If home Windows is like Arch (a Linux rolling distro) then I suspect there will need to be a Manjaro available soon (Arch with a month or so delay on updated packages and a nice installer) to keep support costs sane.

I might just restore Windows 7 on the refurbished Dell laptop and see what happens. I'm behind on the newer Micrsoft things.

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The slow strangulation of telework in Australia

keithpeter
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Pint

Re: This article is a bit bizarre

As a Brit living in the cloudy North, I too felt the need for a bit of context.

I realise that Australia is big, and that some people (like a retired cousin of mine) live in the middle of nowhere, and I fully understand that those outlying communities may have bandwidth limitations.

I was most interested in the author's first sentence about getting a direct wireless link to a (presumably) very local provider - which implies a line of sight location and a population density high enough to provide enough customers for a wireless link based business.

I also gathered that there are locations with high bandwidth (Universities as always) which raises the possibility of co-working spaces as a possible small business idea.

Would any of the Sunny Southern hemisphere based commentards give us a simple time-line on connectivity? Is there a Web page?

Pint icon: it is Sunday and it is raining (again).

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Microsoft's magic hurts: Nadella signals 'tough choices' on the way

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Old rant...

@ Phuq Witt

"Go and work for the college I used to work for."

The moment I read that, I understood.

"Oh —the hours of fun we used to have, trying to shoe-horn text into those [forms], without half of it mysteriously vanishing, or randomly changing size/colour/font/orientation! And, needless to say, being harangued all the while by management wanting it done 'yesterday'."

I was a very juniour PHB for a mercifully short period a few jobs and a decade ago. The most useful thing I did I think was to retype all the forms using a rational layout for filling in at the keyboard. Oh I had fun with that one getting people to explain *why* a given form needed to be laid out the way it was.

I got one form down from 4 nested tables to a single table with a few rows which could re-size when you typed. People had just sort of copied ancient printed 3 part sets as best they could in Word 2 or something and the results had been migrated forward by all the Word generations since sometimes via RTF. A particular favourite was the form where someone had plit a column by just drawing a line down the table with the drawing tools. OK for printing and writing on... not so good for typing into. And I got a monochrome small version of the logo approved for the header that cut file sizes down by about half a meg. Bear in mind that some of these forms were filled in and emailed thousands of times a year...

Tramp Icon: Oh, the power. I miss it for about half an hour every other month or so.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Old rant...

I'd love to get my hands on one of these complex documents that people always mention on these occasions.

I'm having more problems with old .doc -> .docx than I'm having with .odt -> .doc -> .docx if you see what I mean.

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keithpeter
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Windows

Powers of two

That's 1/128th which seems a bit harsh given the figures in the OA (I've rounded off).

Lumia: 8 million

Non-Lumia Microsoft: 24 million

Total Winphone: 32 million

Android: 255 million

By my arithmetic that says Winphone about 12.5% of Android.

I have no skin in this game, I'm hanging on to my old Blackberry, but a friend of a friend is very happy with her new Lumia (which takes very nice photos - I was surprised).

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Who wants a classic ThinkPad with whizzy new hardware? Lenovo would just love to know

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Definitely as long as it's as good as it's predecessors

"Old Thinkpads never die. I know of one venerable X 20-something that is still going strong and getting regular use in a fairly tough outdoor environment."

I can't match an X20 but my X60 is chugging away fine here for piddling about on the Web and writing worksheets. Screen a bit pixelly and dim but I don't work in full sunshine if I can avoid it anyway. New no-name battery gives around 5 hours (Debian). Cheap. Plenty of spares around (e.g. keyboards just above a tenner, standardised hard drive 'caddy' means you can fit any 2.5" Sata drive and swap them round). Same psu as most of the core-duo based thinkpads (T61/X200 &c).

The X200 I got for the missus is newer and has a better screen and stays cooler. She uses Windows for the iPlayer and the Channel 4 player thing. Cheap - probably a better buy than an X60 now given the age of the X60/X61.

It will be interesting to see how this Designer Retro(R) or Brand Heritage(TM) thing goes. The analogy with cars should worry the hopeful. The Fiat 600 is no way the same as the little red tin can I remember from the 60s.

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Microsoft's new mission statement: It's all about doing MAGICAL THINGS

keithpeter
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Windows

Transition

The expansion is over, saturation is here. Lenovo's head of design came up with this one...

http://blog.lenovo.com/en/blog/retro-thinkpad-time-machine/

Microsoft have some room to expand into mobile devices as end points to their back end systems. And they may have machine learning products to sell.

What else is there? What is the next Big Thing? Anyone any ideas? What itches remain to be scratched in the corporate workaday world?

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Hi-res audio folk to introduce new rules and weed out impure noises

keithpeter
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Windows

Re: Dynamic Range

@Timbo

Or any jazz recording from the late 50s early 60s that mentions 'Hackensack NJ' in the recording credit (if you like jazz).

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keithpeter
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Coat

Re: for dogs only

@Hey Nonny Nonny Mouse and all

I'll try that. Might be worth trying Audacity's low pass filter on the square wave track and progressively reducing the cut off frequency until your (individual) perception of the 'richness' of the square wave changes notecibly. Make a note of the cut off frequency you end up with. It might be lower than you imagine. You can play with pure data (puredata.info) as well to build up waveforms by superimposing harmonics (fourier synthesis).

I've stopped worrying about audio quality above CD or 196kb/s mp3 these days: hypersonic starts around 10 - 12kHz for me.

Random thoughts: visual processing starts in the retina and optic nerve, and our visual model of what is before us is synthesised in a couple of regions of the brain at quite a high level above the raw signal from the rods and cones. Damage to the various components of the visual cortex has subtile effects (Oliver Sacks wrote about aspects of that in one of his books).

Perceptual psychologists (the experimental ones not the boutique ones) have developed a concept of 'categorical hearing' - a musician trained in the Western tradition will tend to bin sine waves into pitch classes even when they are quite a few (hundred) cents off an actual pitch. Non-trained ears can recognise the sine waves as different at a finer level. BUT talk to a pianist who works with a string quartet (e.g. playing a piano quintet) ... the quartet musicians will drift into perfect fifth intervals instead of the equal intonation interval if they rehearse without the pianist for any length of time...

My direction of travel here is that 'music' may actually be made in our minds rather than existing as a sound field in a room, so you only need to produce *enough* of the sound field to trick the mind into making the music... mumble mumble

Coat icon: its time I took a walk. Mine's the one with the penny whistle in the pocket.

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BT: Let us scrap ordinary phone lines. You've all got great internet, right?

keithpeter
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Windows

@Aggrajag and all

512 kbit/s in my case on adsl. No prospect of upgrade this decade (a court battle was fought on that issue). One mile from Birmingham city centre.

I am actually thinking of ditching the landline and relying on mobile/cafes

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Capita: Call centre workers, can you fall on your swords? Please?

keithpeter
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Coat

Re: Double Cross

"The welfare bill come out of different pot of money. Simples really."

Er - what?

UK jobs -> Elsewhere (doesn't matter where really)

UK tax base shrinks

Less tax raised, so less money for welfare, defence, health, education, building houses &c

Where is Worstall when you need him?

Coat icon: mine's the one with a copy of Grundrisse in the pocket

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