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* Posts by corestore

251 posts • joined 13 Jul 2007

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Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy

corestore

The taxi cab replaced the horse-drawn cab.

Uber and Lyft will make the taxi cab as obsolete as the horse-drawn cab, very fast.

But it's all temporary; taxi cabs have had a very good long run. Uber/Lyft.... give it five or ten years. After that, except for a few tourists, we'll be in self-driving cabs. Powered by Google.

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corestore

What a total hatchet job. I'm not saying you haven't hit on something, but you *totally* miss the point.

"But in an age of soaring prices across the city, the taxi industry has emerged as a striking example of how exclusive some corners of New York have become.

On Thursday, at the city’s first medallion auction in over five years, the largest bid for a “mini-fleet” of two medallions exceeded $2.5 million... individual medallions have also attracted ballooning sums. Today, the average market price is more than $1 million. In November 2008, it was less than $550,000."

Game over, man.

In 2014, there is STILL no way to get from NYC to JFK without changing trains. They built a shiny new train that goes around the airport - but you have to change trains from a normal commuter or subway train to get to it. Gatwick Express, Heathrow Express, OK. JFK Express? LOL. The huge politically connected taxi business with its million dollar medallions is in such tight cahoots with the city that a direct train service would NEVER be allowed.

Game over, man.

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MEN WANTED to satisfy town full of yearning BRAZILIAN HOTNESS

corestore

I'd better start taking my vitamins...

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The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal

corestore

Re: The police are WRONG

"Criticism of the police, while in itself technically legal, will usually, upon investigation, turn out to be linked to other offences"

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corestore

"I favour an alternative explanation: that the British police now truly believe they have the right to state that something's illegal even when that's not the case: "So what if it's not against the law, you shouldn't be doing it anyway."

DING.

There was another wonderful admission on that recently, of the truly innocent 'What, shouldn't I have said that? Why on earth not?' kind, in a connected matter: plod freely confessed that, in dealing with people trying to fly out of the UK, where there was some suspicion that they might have jihadist intentions, one tactic they were using was simply to *make them miss their flights*.

Yep. UK plod openly - nay, proudly - admitted they felt they had the power to deliberately detain people trying to leave the country at airports, not for any articulable legal reason, not for investigation, purely and only to MAKE them miss their flights.

You could NOT make it up.

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Hello, police, El Reg here. Are we a bunch of terrorists now?

corestore

"New rule: if you're going to constantly compare X government action to 1984 in the usual tiring Daily Mail way, you have to have read it first."

1. I never read the Daily Mail.

2. Newspeak.

3. Thoughtcrime

3. 'That's not watching a video, that's supporting terrorism'

4. 'That's not free speech - we'd NEVER curtail free speech - that's *propaganda*'

5. 'That's not a rifle, we would never ban rifles, that's an *assault weapon*.'

Redefine it, isolate it, destroy it, change the meme, change the language. 1984.

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corestore

Re: Two girls and a cup

Almost nobody seems to know the truth behind that iconic Vietnamese execution pic. It was a good guy executing a very bad guy indeed:

"But, when you learn the story behind the man who is being executed in this photo, the image and the reasoning behind the execution becomes a little bit clearer.

This man’s name was Nguyen Van Lem, but he was also known as Captain Bay Lop. Lem was no civilian; he was a member of the Viet Cong. Not just any member, either, he was an assassin and the leader of a Viet Cong death squad who had been targeting and killing South Vietnamese National Police officers and their families.

Lem’s team was attempting to take down a number of South Vietnamese officials. They may have even been plotting to kill the shooter himself, Major General Nguyen Ngoc Loan. It is said that Lem had recently been responsible for the murder of one of Loan’s most senior officers, as well as the murder of the officer’s family.

According to accounts at the time, when South Vietnamese officers captured Lem, he was more or less caught in the act, at the site of a mass grave. This grave contained the bodies of no less than seven South Vietnamese police officers, as well as their families, around 34 bound and shot bodies in total. Eddie Adams, the photojournalist who took the shot, backs up this story. Lem’s widow also confirmed that her husband was a member of the National Liberation Front (Viet Cong), and that he disappeared before the beginning of the Tet Offensive."

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corestore

'1984' was a WARNING. Not a bloody INSTRUCTION MANUAL.

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Top money men face up to 2 YEARS in slammer for neglecting to spot crim-cash activity

corestore

Re: HSBC only got a slap on the wrist last time.

Actually no they didn't.

You want to Google this a bit. There's no actual evidence they laundered a single bloody cent. What they got fined for was paperwork errors; not having all the right forms filled in to PROVE that they WEREN'T laundering. Just that. Paperwork.

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corestore

This is starting to really disturb me.

First we had the US government leaning on banks, Mastercard, & Visa, to strangle the ability of Wikileaks to conduct banking and accept donations. No court case, nothing illegal or criminal proven, all done on the quiet. 'Silent but deadly'.

Then we had 'Operation Choke Point' (Google it) - US DoJ again using pressure on banks to get them to deny banking facilities to individuals and businesses that are perfectly legal but controversial, politically incorrect, or 'morally' dubious. Again all quiet, secret, not involving the law or lawmakers.

Then the same again in the UK - HSBC closing the accounts of Islamic charities and individual Muslims and their families. Again silently, no discussion, no explanation, no publicity, nothing involving parliament or the law, 'no comment' all round.

Now this. Very disquieting. Inland revenue 'rules' and 'guidance' - completely shortcutting the courts and democratic institutions. Making financial institutions an arm of law - no, of POLICY - enforcement. They've clearly been reading Frank Herbert:

"Control The Coinage And The Courts - Let The Rabble Have The Rest!" - Emperor Shaddam IV…

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Free 2004-spec AS/400 pops up in the cloud

corestore

Hah.

Back in... around 2000, I ported the Hercules mainframe emulator to AS/400.

Cue jaw-dropping and apoplexy in IBM, at the prospect of being able to run S/390 & z/Series software on AS/400 :-)

Oh and free trivia... Did you know the AS/400 was nearly called the System/40? Seeing as how it was a direct descendant of the System/38... but also had some compatibility with the System/3 / System/32 / System/34 / System/36 line...

And yes I have one of each, all pretty much up and running :D -

http://www.corestore.org/3.htm

Mike

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ISPs 'blindsided' by UK.gov's 'emergency' data retention and investigation powers law

corestore

Re: Tory-led government's Drip bill?

The answer to that is simple, and two-pronged:

1. Email is held strongly encrypted.

2. Only the user has the key.

IF YOU DON'T HAVE, OR HAVE ACCESS TO, THE DATA, YOU CAN'T HAND IT OVER!

You so arrange things that you CAN'T hand it over in response to ANY order, subpoena, warrant, demand, or threat. You make it physically impossible.

More and more companies are going to have to build this methodology into their systems, until it's pretty universal.

The mealy-mouthed disclaimer that "we will disclose data in response to law enforcement requests", seen on so many sites and services, ENDS. It ends NOW. Enough already!

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corestore

Re: Please to explain?

I'm not selling anything in Britain; I'm storing emails in Iceland.

Or selling server capacity in New York.

Please to explain why I don't use a British 'warrant' for toilet paper?

If they want to try an MLAT in my own country, let them.

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corestore

"The planned legislation demands that warrants are served in a variety of ways on a person outside the UK whose company offers a form of telecommunications to Brits."

Please to explain?

How can a British warrant under a British act have any validity or enforceability on a person or body corporate located in, say, Iceland? Surely they would operate under, and be bound exclusively by, Icelandic law?

So what is the point?

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Kiwi ISP 'Slingshot' stones geo-blocked content

corestore

I've said it before...

...and I make no apology for saying it again; this kind of service IS the future of the internet.

The attempts to balkanize and carve up the internet - with Google search result filtering in Europe, and 'Cleanfeed' secret censorship in the UK being the two most glaring examples - won't succeed. Customer demand is too strong. Before too long, this kind of service will be the *default* from ISPs in non-US countries. The demand is there; if ISPs don't meet it, services like unblock-us.com will.

Trying to stop or regulate the internet at national borders has a name: I call it 'Canute Syndrome'.

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Alabama quadchopper hits THREE THOUSAND FEET next to AIRPORT

corestore

From the link you cite:

"There is currently a rulemaking proceeding that aims to improve the regulations on UAVs. It will take a while; indeed, you shouldn't hope for anything before 2010-2012. "

In other words is waaaaaay out of date.

Since then there's been a court case which proved the FAA's purported rules about UAV operations aren't worth the paper they (aren't) printed on; they don't exist. So as of now there ARE no rules affecting UAV operations in the USA; until the FAA get their arses into gear and go through the notice-and-comment rule making procedure, both amateur and commercial UAV/drone use is legal and unregulated in the USA.

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Judge says there's no such thing as a 'Patent Troll'

corestore

'Chancer', 'wide boy', and 'thieving git' appear not to be on the banned list...

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Google BLOCKS access to Goldman client-leak email

corestore

Re: "avoid reputational damage to Goldman Sachs"

There speaks someone who knows little about money.

GS have a pretty damn good reputation for getting it right. They're the only big bank who didn't *need* bailout money in 2008 - but of course the US gov made them take it anyway, because they wanted all the big banks to be in same boat, beholden to them.

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FTC: T-Mobile USA took '$100s of millions' in bogus txt charges

corestore

Four good letters...

RICO

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Anti-snoop Android 'Blackphone' sees the light of day

corestore

Re: What's the result of...

Not relevant to the phone, but I'm a cinematographer; I have no choice but cross borders with several terabytes of digital cinema data.

As for risk profile, phone falling into unauthorized or unwelcome hands is clearly a high risk; they're very vulnerable to theft - including by less than straightforward phone thieves in the target market for this phone (think corporate espionage, both private and government-sponsored).

Physical access is ALWAYS a risk, and one that can be substantially mitigated very easily by strong whole-disk encryption, with a strong passphrase at boot time - Truecrypt-style. I can't think of a good reason for NOT making that part of the defenses for this phone, but I haven't seen it mentioned in the spec.

So, does it or doesn't it?

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corestore

What's the result of...

CelleBrite UFED vs. Blackphone?

Can the authorities just slurp your data with physical access?

Or does this version of Android come with secure whole-disk encryption?

That is a necessary default for *anything* purporting to be secure these days.

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We got behind the wheel of a Tesla S electric car. We didn't hate it

corestore

Re: Google maps? Really?

"both" would be a better option; Google is (at least in theory) always up to date and should have accurate real-time data on traffic density and delays.

If the satnav is internal, it's always available, but needs periodic updates and a source of real-time traffic data...

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corestore

Yet...

If anyone would be first with this, Tesla is a logical one to bet on; they ARE in the business of selling the future.

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MPAA, meet the Streisand effect: Picture ass. slaps Reddit with takedown

corestore

Re: For those who have never seen it...

To know is to die...

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corestore

" a link appeared to a copy of the 2010 film Edge of Darkness, which was adapted from the British TV series of the same name."

Who in hell would download *that*?!

The original was an absolute masterpiece, possibly the best thing ever filmed for TV.

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Tell us about your first time ... on the internet

corestore

The first time?

The very first time I set up my *own* connection to the internet, at home?

Mid 1990s. OS/2 Warp.

All preconfigured, it Just Worked out of the box. Remember when IBM was an ISP? Very smooth and well-lubricated, no trouble at all.

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USB charger is prime suspect in death of Australian woman

corestore

OK the headphones were plugged into the laptop, and the laptop was plugged into... what?

What laptop uses a *USB* charger as a *power supply*??

Something here doesn't add up.

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Google Glass gets 2GB of RAM. Think about this. Two gigs of RAM

corestore

Re: Glassholes

"But I want it to be. Glassholes are some of the most abhorrent people on this earth.

It I was an employer I wouldnt employ a Glasshole. Unless I was in the Stockmarket biz or marketing. You know, those areas that produce nothing."

Well I'm a fireman and I'm looking at ways to use the Glass display to show data from thermal imagers to both firefighters working inside, and Chiefs monitoring outside.

You know, useful stuff.

I may be a Glasshole, but with your attitude you resemble a manky armpit mate.

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corestore

Re: Glassholes

I don't see it as derogatory at all... it's typical British tongue in cheek wordplay.

When I got Glass I blogged about being inducted into the 'Honourable Order of Glassholes'

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US Supremes just blew Aereo out of the water

corestore

1. A very rare case where I agree with Scalia; this was a real tortuous stretch. SCOTUS essentially said, it doesn't matter what the law says and if you technically comply with it, if you LOOK like a cable company you ARE a cable company.

2. The answer will be crowdsourcing, not centralising. We need an Uber for the airwaves. Something like sharemyslingbox.com (not a real URL, an illustration of the kind of concept).

3. "There has grown up in the minds of certain groups in this country the notion that because a man or corporation has made a profit out of the public for a number of years, the government and the courts are charged with the duty of guaranteeing such profit in the future, even in the face of changing circumstances and contrary to public interest. This strange doctrine is not supported by statute or common law. Neither individuals nor corporations have any right to come into court and ask that the clock of history be stopped, or turned back." - RAH

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Google, Microsoft to add remote KILL switch to phones

corestore

Also...

There HAS to be some way of undoing the 'kill'. There HAS to be.

Think.

The possibilities for mischief, false or erroneous kill requests etc. are legion.

And, what happens the day crackers (or indeed enemy state hackers) get hold of the keys to the kill switch system? How many millions of phones could get 'killed' before they manage to turn the system off?

It needs to be an on/off switch, not a deadly death permanent bricking.

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corestore

And what's the real subtext here...?

Also gives the networks the ability to brick your phone if you do something they don't like, such as an unauthorized SIM unlock?

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T-Mobile boss: 'High and mighty' Verizon and AT&T are 'raping you for every penny you have'

corestore

Excuse me?

T-Mobile?

The company that tried to bill me $7,000 for three days light to moderate internet use in Iceland four years ago? And insisted the bill was correct, represented the true cost of providing the service, and was perfectly reasonable, a bargain even?

And only backed down (and backed down quickly!) when I threatened them with the law of unconscionable contracts?

Pot? It's Kettle on line one...

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Tor is '90 per cent of the net' claims City of London Police Commish – and he's dead wrong

corestore

It isn't 90% of the internet...

...but the post-Snowden lesson is that it (or something like it) bloody well SHOULD be!

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Top Canadian court: Cops need warrant to get names from ISPs

corestore

Sounds like telcos and ISPs in Holland should be putting certain strategic bits of infrastructure overseas, out of reach of Dutch law, if they have any interest in protecting privacy of customers.

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corestore

Re: alternative view courtesy of StateWatch...

Well how did bway.net get their AnonDSL service working?

(I think they've changed ownership and systems a few times since then, so I have to refer you to archive.org - https://web.archive.org/web/20040321130622/http://www.bway.net/bway/dsl/anondsl.html )

Obviously it's not very compatible with static IP addressing, but otherwise... yes you need to manage IP address allocation, but you don't need to keep a long-term log of what you've done!

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corestore

No-one is mentioning the elephant in the room here; why do ISPs routinely record the association between IP address and account details in any case?

If you're privacy-minded, the surest defence against turning over data, with or without a warrant, is to make a point of *not keeping the data in the first place*. Keeping IP address allocation records should be turned off by default.

My previous, excellent, ISP - bway.net - did that as a matter of policy, and proudly advertised the service as a pro-privacy feature; they called it AnonDSL. Given Snowden etc., it's only a matter of time before more and larger ISPs start doing exactly the same thing for exactly the same reason. The market for privacy IS out there.

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Are Facebook rants about harming your wife protected free speech? US Supremes to decide

corestore

I'm extreme, and extremely passionate, when it comes to free speech. Very very little should be banned. But I don't have a problem with criminalising real, specific, and explicit threats of, or exhortations to, violence. "Death to the Jews!" is fine. "Bring plenty gasoline, we're going to burn those Jew bastards tonight - meet here at 11pm" is not.(1)

This one is very close to the line, if not over it. I think a lot will hinge on the interpretation of his so-called 'disclaimer'. I think it likely that the disclaimer may have been very much tongue in cheek, intended to enhance the threats, rather than the reverse.

(1) No antisemitism intended or implied; I just picked a random group who are sometimes targeted by racists for my example.

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US allows commercial use of sharper satellite snaps

corestore

Re: People are starting to react to surveillance.

I'm a pro. A pro drone with a pro camera rig can easily cost north of $80,000:

- $35k for my Red Dragon camera

- $30k for a Master Prime lens

- $25k for a drone capable of lifting them

You destroy my drone, you better have a very good lawyer and very deep pockets because I'm going to pwn your sorry ass, when you get out of jail. Stupid stupid stupid.

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corestore

Possibly the ultimate 'Canute Syndrome'; who in hell do the USA think they're kidding, thinking they can regulate the sale of images that weren't even taken on US soil?!

Given the capabilities of other countries in this field, such a law would never survive strict scrutiny under the first amendment; it serves little to no useful purpose.

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Remember Control Data? The Living Computer Museum wants YOU

corestore

Re: They don't want much...

Moron managers at LCM?

I happen to know some of the people there. One of their pdp-10s came from my collection. They're extremely high-calbre folks.

You do NOT know what you're talking about, and I suggest you pull your horns in rather sharpish.

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Texan parks quadcopter atop Dallas Cowboys stadium

corestore

Send in a proper big octocopter to retrieve the toy...

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UK govt 'tearing up road laws' for Google's self-driving cars: THE TRUTH

corestore

Re: I'd be curious to know...

If it's going to be sold widely, yes. Are you aware of any provision in the construction and use regs that would specifically prohibit a car controlled by a computer?

If it's not - if it's a small test fleet - there are special provisions for this. SVA etc.

And if it's imported from overseas, as is very likely, then the approval there is good for temporary use on UK roads. I've moved cars between countries on several occasions. Currently driving a UK-registered car on UK plates & MOT in New Zealand as a temporary import. The regs that apply are those in the country of registration, not the country where it's being temporarily driven.

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corestore

Re: I'm against it at this time. here's why...

*guffaw*

You've clearly never driven in NYC!

Or, Goddess help us, New Jersey!

Oh, and UAVs are perfectly capable of operating entirely autonomously, and frequently do; you program a flight path, the drone executes it, traveling and loitering as programmed, and returns to the spot it took off from. I'm in the movie business, this is fairly common practice for our drones. They CAN also be flown under full manual control of course, but they don't HAVE to be.

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corestore

I'd be curious to know...

Is there actually anything in current UK law that says that a car must have a human driver? Has anyone bothered to *check*? Much of the law in this area is so old that the possibility wouldn't ever have occurred to anyone, and there may well be nothing in law either allowing or forbidding this. And if the law is silent... qui tacet consentire videtur...

I'm sure it's an offence to operate a vehicle without a license, but try taking a machine to court for that offence. They might try a case against the occupant... but which occupant? The one who happened to say "OK Car, take me to Glasgow"? How to prove who said it, if more than one occupant?

And if the occupant has a license anyway, what charge could be offered? Can't be driving without a license. Failing to maintain control? "I maintained perfect control! I had a computer do it for me! If you think it didn't do a good job of controlling the car and an offence occurred, prove it!"

This could get very interesting :-)

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corestore

Re: Driverless car

Good point. It'll be 'Ford - powered by Google'

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NSA: Inside the FIVE-EYED VAMPIRE SQUID of the INTERNET

corestore

Re: Outrage

Yes. Good old-fashioned human intel.

The alternative - what we have at present - is far, far too amenable to misuse, however benign the proclaimed intentions, however laudable the alleged purposes.

Intelligence work has to be based on capabilities - what your adversary CAN do to you, not what you think they WANT to do to you. And it's very clear, the security state has become the adversary here, and what they CAN do to ALL of us has gone so far over the line that the line is now a dot on the horizon.

"1984 was a WARNING, not a bloody INSTRUCTION MANUAL!"

Mike

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corestore

Interesting...

"Documents provided by Snowden show that GCHQ particularly prizes the data they get from Sweden..."

I wonder, I just wonder, if this apparently exceptionally close relationship between US spooks and Sweden could have any bearing on the Assange situation?

I don't LIKE the guy, I think he's a prize plonker with an ego the size of a small planet, but his situation and circumstances seem... convenient. Very convenient.

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Australia's first public swatting victim a nice bloke

corestore

Good luck...

"It will probably take weeks to months before we can find out through IP, servers and back-tracking the electronic footprint."

I thought they sent a text message?

Good luck anyway, if they used a pay-as-you-go phone, bought with cash & topped-up with cash...

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