* Posts by corestore

325 posts • joined 13 Jul 2007

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Judge makes minor tweaks to sex ban IT man's order

corestore

"There is no requirement for an alleged perpetrator to be found guilty of anything before the SRO punishment can be imposed."

SOPOs

ASBOs

Football banning orders

TPIMS

Criminal asset confiscation

Serious Crime Prevention Orders

Slavery and Trafficking Prevention Orders

Public Spaces Protection Orders

Need I go on? The number of ways in which governments have extended the 'order' state in the last ~20 years is beyond comprehension. The number of circumstances in which the proving of guilt is entirely optional and the lack of a guilty verdict is no obstacle to punishment is beyond frightening.

You're not sleepwalking into '1984'; you've been there for some time. The frogs are well and truly boiling.

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EU U-turns on mobile roaming fees: No 90-day cap after all

corestore

"In the latest proposals telcos operators will be allowed to question customers whom they suspect are buying a cheap sim card in one country and using it in another country with higher phone bills."

Errrr why? Aren't there single market rules here? Isn't this precisely analogous to the clearly-established right to use cheaper decoders and subscriptions sourced elsewhere in EU to watch football? What questions will they be allowed to ask??

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Australian universities drop tech services to dodge metadata retention obligation

corestore

You know a point I've never seen in discussions about data retention anywhere in the world? How a *lack* of metadata can be used - or rather misused.

Let's say you're very privacy-minded. You always use TOR and other end-to-end secure protocols - riseup.net for email etc.

So you have no - or virtually no - 'data retention' footprint. There's no metadata; just encrypted traffic to obfuscated destinations.

"OK boys... give us a list of everyone who's using your system but *doesn't* have any metadata... let's take a real hard look at them to see what they're up to... that's our list of suspects right there..."

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Nest offers its thermostat in three new pretty colors!

corestore

But can we still root it and turn it into HAL? This is serious.

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OpenBSD 6.0 lands

corestore

Well I'm really more of an anti-VAXxer...

I don't care what people say...

36 bits is here to stay...

%DECsystem-10 continued...

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corestore

Bugger.

So I won't be able to run it on my VAX....

http://www.corestore.org/VAX780.htm

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Cops to let the private sector chase after cybercrims' assets

corestore

Not another one...

Where do we start?

ASBOs

Football banning orders

TPIMS

Sexual offence prevention orders

Criminal asset confiscation

Yet another addition to the list they've been working on for the last 20 years or so. A list of circumstances where the proving of guilt is entirely optional - and the lack of a guilty verdict is no obstacle to punishment.

I'm fucking glad I left this God-forsaken country 20 years ago. Place is going to hell in a handcart.

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Julian AssangeTM to meet investigators in London

corestore

He's not been charged with anything. They just want to question him.

Is there any good reason they couldn't have simply questioned him on Skype at any time in the last few years if they really wanted to?

Assange is a prize plonker with an ego the size of a small planet - but his present circumstances are just suspiciously convenient.

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Android's latest patches once again remind us: It's Nexus or bust if you want decent security

corestore

It's Nexus or bust - full stop!

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Get ready for mandatory porn site age checks, Brits. You read that right

corestore

This is nothing to do with porn or child protection...

Remember when Cameron said that the police and security services needed - and would be given - the capability to know exactly which individual is using any internet-capable device at any given time?

Yeah. That.

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corestore

Re: The Govt filter for stuff we shouldn't see.

Ahh but there isn't one you see; the government left it to the IWF to maintain the blacklist. And of course since they're a private organization they're not covered by freedom of information laws so the blacklist stays secret...

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Florida man sues Apple for $10bn, claims iPod, iPhone was his idea

corestore

DynaBook... 1972 version... https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CmG-wgiVAAAR-4Y.jpg

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You know how that data breach happened? Three words: eBay, hard drives

corestore

It's astonishing what shows up on eBay. A few years ago I bought an SGI Onyx system. The previous owner had bought it at some auction but never got it powered up.

I got it powered and attempted to crack root by booting single-user - only to find it was protected by a BIOS password to prevent that. I devised a hardware crack to bypass the BIOS password; got it booted single user; wiped the root password - and discovered it was an ex-NASA system with all their 'interesting' data still intact - lots of user accounts... Oracle databases... fascinating stuff. But very very naughty by NASA...

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TalkTalk scam-scammers still scam-scamming

corestore

"Jackson requested to cancel her contract due to her lack of trust in the company, but was told she'd need to pay £247 to leave early. "Despite it being an 18-month contract which I began in 2013 and have not since renewed."

I hate it when it gets difficult to tell the fake scammers from the real scammers...

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Universe's shock rapidly expanding waistline may squash Einstein flat

corestore

Or... time?

I recall reading a fascinating new theory - or conjecture - that turns everything on its head: it suggests that the apparent observed change in rate of expansion which lead to the necessity of inventing this unobserved and perhaps unobservable 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' (perhaps the mythical 'ether' of the 21st century?) is just that - an *apparent* change; the true underlying mechanism is that *time itself* is slowing down and will - eventually - stop entirely. It's an elegant conjecture certainly.

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EU bureaucrats claim credit for making 'illegal online hate speech' even more illegal

corestore

Funny no-one else seems to have spotted...

"Spokespersons from all of the IT companies added that they already follow the code of conduct and work hard to promote counter-narratives."

Since when has it been the business of Twitter FB et. al. to "promote" ANY political "narrative"?!

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Kazakhstan wins bid to get Mega IP address info on state secrets hackers

corestore

Re: Mega has been dubious from the beginning

Well if it's something you *really* need to be kept secure you (obviously!) encrypt it yourself using a cipher you're confident in *before* you let it anywhere near Mega or anywhere else!

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corestore

Privacy-Conscious?

"It is a particularly sharp loss for the firm which bills itself as a privacy-conscious file host."

A drum I've banged many times before; the best way to be "privacy-conscious" is to **not keep log files in the first place**. If you haven't got the data you can't be forced to turn it over.

Mega should be able to respond to this subpoena by handing over an *empty envelope* and saying "here - this is everything we have..."

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First successful Hyperloop test module hits 100mph in four seconds

corestore

Re: Snake Oil

"You won't have many intermediate stations along an high speed line, because they may also require the train to slow down while passing by for safety reasons"

Not so - in Japan they often have this on Shinkansen lines. Four lines through the station; two next to the platforms for stopping trains - and two in the middle for non-stop services that blast through at full line speed. Quite a sight!

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corestore

$6bn and that needs government money to fund it?

The biggest technology project of the 1960s was Project Apollo.

The second biggest technology project of the 1960s was the IBM System/360. IBM totally bet the company on it... bringing it to market cost IBM $5bn - and that IS in 1964 dollars! $35bn in today's money...

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FCC urged to pause its fight against America's $20bn cable-box rip-off

corestore

Don't wait for the FCC...

Just reverse engineer the damn protocols and put them in some Linux media player setups... I've been banging this drum from time to time for over ten years and I'm astonished no-one has done it.

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Elon Musk takes wraps off planet-saving Model 3 vapourmobile

corestore

Re: Sedan (definition?)

Not a hatchback IIRC; this thing has a traditional boot.

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corestore

Re: Bizarre

Errr you do know you can get a refund of the deposit at any time for any reason?

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GitHubber wants to revive the first Unix in a PDP-7 emulator

corestore

Oh.

A few years ago I corresponded with DMR about precisely this project.

He mentioned having those listings; we pondered whether it would be

practical to get them machine-readable and try to get them loaded and

booting on one of my pdp-15s to recreate an operational 18-bit Unix...

but ultimately decided it was impractical at the time.

And from 2007...

"Post by Dennis Ritchie

Was there a PDP-9 [Unix] port? Mr. Ritchie, sir?

Yes, Ken moved the -7 system to both the PDP-9 and PDP-15

just to try them out. Minimal effort, just some new drivers, no

effort to take advantage of extra features on either. Total time

they actually ran was probably measured in hours or a few

days at most. One of the machines ran a step-and-repeat

camera for making IC masks.

And all that software is presumably long gone along with the PDP-7 version.

Oh, well."

Glad he was wrong. Nice to see those listings have survived and surfaced. Maybe one day I WILL get them running on my pdp-15 :)

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Apple must help Feds unlock San Bernardino killer's iPhone – judge

corestore

Re: In next weeks news...

(point being it's useful to be able to distinguish between a boot-time password to decrypt device and a simple everyday screenlock password... the former should have a very high level of security; the latter should be convenient; we trade some vulnerability for that convenience if an adversary gets hold of a phone that is powered on)

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corestore

In next weeks news...

iOS and Android updates released which will allow boot-time passphrases of unlimited length for added security of encrypted devices...

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Hey, glassholes: Google patents movement-sensing, shape-shifting specs

corestore

Steampunk

OK I have a spare Glass or two lying around; I am *totally* giving a set to an artist friend for a steampunk-look makeover! :D

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ZOMBIE Google Glass 2 FEEDS ON Italian BRAINS, says specs supremo

corestore

You miss the point entirely

That's just dumb. Part of the *point* of Glass is that it allows you to keep your phone in your pocket. It's a Bluetooth headset with display and camera as well as earpiece and microphone.

You get an email or text message; it comes up on the Glass display; your phone stays in your pocket.

You want to take a pic; you press the button on Glass; your phone stays in your pocket.

Also - how in hell do you take hands-free shots with your phone? What's the point in having a second Bluetooth device which is just a camera? I have one; it looks like a rather fat version of a standard Bluetooth earpiece. Remember Looxcie? But since I got Glass it's been gathering dust.

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Oi, Google! Remove links to that removed story, yells forceful ICO

corestore

Re: Convictions can be spent

*covers his ears to protect them from the deafening WHOOSH*

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corestore

Re: Convictions can be spent

"The historic articles will not be removed, they just won't feature in search results. I fail to see the harm, it's not censorship - you can still go to the original documents."

Please explain how censorship of Google search results isn't censorship?

"It's not censorship, we would never censor, those are just search results..."

"We would never infringe free speech - but that's not 'speech', that's propaganda..."

"Of course we would never ban rifles! But that's not a rifle, that's an 'assault weapon'..."

Redefine the meaning of a word and you can get away with *anything*, eventually!

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Oz goes mad with the ban-hammer

corestore

Re: How the fsck...

"From being legally sold, yes.

That's what a 'ban' is - a legal decree that some thing is not allowed. It won't 100% prevent people from playing it but it will mean that anyone selling it to Australia will be breaking the law."

Small typo there, let me fix: "anyone selling it *IN* Australia will be breaking the law"

I'm in America. I can sell anything I like within *American* law. Including games to Australia. Aussie law applies in Australia and only in Australia. This is a textbook example of what I call 'Canute Syndrome'; legislating it as if there's a little local internet for local people.

Now if they want to make it illegal to BUY certain games in Australia, criminalize the purchaser... well they can go down that road, but they'll look very very foolish, and rather authoritarian.

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corestore

How the fsck...

...do you BAN a game, in any *meaningful* sense of word, in the age of downloads and Steam?!

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Use snooped data in court? Nah, says UK.gov - folk might be cleared

corestore

Here's a bloody good question...

...that almost nobody is asking.

"Stingray IMSI catchers..."

Google, Apple, et. al. responded to the Snowden revelations by taking precautions to help their customers stay secure from snooping - crypto on the backbone, crypto on by default, etc etc.

What measures are mobile telcos taking to protect *their* customers from the revelations of Stingray and similar devices? Have they designed and/or implemented protocols to ensure their devices only connect to genuine cell towers? If not, why not, and what do they intend to do?

No-one seems to be asking this obvious question; I think El Reg should, and be persistent about it...

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ACLU files new lawsuits in hunt for police 'Stingray' mobe-trackers

corestore

Regulations?

"Regulation of the sale of StingRay equipment requires FBI involvement in law-enforcement purchases from the Harris Corporation."

'Regulation' made by whom, under what authority? What powers 'require' the FBI to be involved before a business transaction can take place? What does the text of these 'regulations' say?

These are the kinds of questions you should be asking.

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Mattel urged to scrap Wi-Fi mic Barbie after Register investigation

corestore

Larry Niven...

...got there long ago. Louis Wu:

"...The children! Protect the children! Where are the children?...The Playmate program. It guards them and teaches them and plays with them. They'll be fine..."

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Ex-cops dumped on never-hire blacklist for data misdeeds

corestore

"But you can still carry out the investigation during their notice period, and take any action deemed necessary"

Well if they disregard their notice period and quit on the spot, you can't even do that - although that's obvious a breach of contract and would leave them legally on the hook for that breach.

As for reference, I don't know if there's any case or statute law in this area; IANAL. But I would imagine that anything goes WRT the reference, so long as it's factually accurate - which it would be in this case. But I think the most common approach is simply to decline to provide a reference; says it all, without exposure to legal risk.

(But then that raises other dangers; an unscrupulous employer could raise a fatuous and fake disciplinary issue, for the sole purpose of having half a legal leg to stand on when giving an unjustified and spiteful bad reference...)

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corestore

Sorry to be rude, but bollocks.

A cop who resigns can *of course* still be prosecuted for any offences they may have committed, as can anyone else.

If it's a *disciplinary* matter, rather than a criminal matter, anyone can resign from any job at any time rather than go through the internal disciplinary procedure.

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corestore

Why illegal? Ask the construction industry; they maintained a secret blacklist for years - a blacklist of union members and activists, and workers who had 'form' for objecting to safety violations. They got in a huge amount of hot water for it, and it's not over yet...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consulting_Association

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corestore

1. In a free society you can never ever be prevented from resigning your job. Not even coppers.

2. They're proud? Of maintaining an employment blacklist? I thought that was illegal...

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UK Supreme Court waves through indiscriminate police surveillance

corestore

Congratulation!

"Police arrived, took statements and issued her with a “prevention of harassment” (PoH) letter. This is a piece of paper, for which the police have no legal authority to create or enforce, which can be used in court as evidence that a “course of conduct of harassment” took place. PoH letters can be issued before any serious investigation has taken place."

Now you know what sex workers have been subjected to for *decades*.

Google 'prostitute's caution'.

It's like a normal caution, it appears on CRB checks, and it will generally have a severely negative impact on employment prospects.

Except, unlike a normal caution, there's no law whatsoever authorising or defining it, the police have just thought it up and implemented it on their own. Unlike a normal caution, it requires no evidence whatsoever, and you don't have to have broken any laws to get one; mere suspicion is sufficient. Unlike a normal caution, you don't have to admit guilt or accept it; the police simply impose it on the woman. And unlike a normal caution, there's no possible appeal because, legally, it doesn't exist!

Orwell and Kafka must be spinning this morning...

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Australia's social media censorship law – for the children - all-but passes

corestore

Canute Syndrome

This will of course affect all the vastly popular social networking sites that are based in... Australia.

Australian law isn't presently enforceable in Menlo Park or Mountain View, or indeed against anyone not located in Australia.

Hence, Canute.

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Telly behemoths: Does size matter?

corestore

Re: 'ello Tosh....

DING, ding a thousand times ding.

New sets (does anyone still call them 'sets'?) tend to be delivered with brightness and saturation set way too high, on the basis that this will somehow make them stand out and look good in a bright showroom display - but is totally counterproductive in the home.

As a cinematographer it really pisses me off to know that so often my work won't be seen as intended; first thing you need to do with a new TV is calibrate it properly to your room.

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corestore

Re: Sony

What is this 'Sony' of which you speak?

People make the same mistake with Sony that they make with IBM - more so, even. Sony isn't a monolithic entity, it's a collection of almost separate businesses flying in relatively close formation some of the time.

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corestore

Back in the mid 1990...

...when I was working for a major computer company I won't name (DEC)...

...I was visiting a customer and spotted Something Interesting in their skip as I was leaving. A brief and successful negotiation with the security bod followed, and I found myself the proud new owner of a top-end Barco 808 projection system (the three tube variety found hanging from boardroom ceilings).

After a brief bit of interface hackery, a bit of fresh white paint, and some serious sweat lifting the thing onto its ceiling mount in our living room... well we became very popular; the Corestore residence was the only place in Cambridge you could watch Babylon 5 on a ten foot screen! :D

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Paranoid Android Kaymera smartmobe takes on Blackphone

corestore

Re: $ecure payment$

"but I'm sure the clever people at Apple, Google and Microsoft could get together on an interoperable standard."

Doesn't that already exist, called 'Skype'?

I seem to recall some acronymous agency offering a bounty to anyone who could crack Skype encryption?

Or was that misdirection?

No need for black helicopters in any post on this topic; they're there by default.

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Thousands of UK drivers' details leaked through hole in parking ticket website

corestore

Re: Yet another reason..

This isn't about driving licenses. They don't - yet - have ANPR readers for driving licenses!

This is about *cars*.

You don't even have to have a driving license to be the registered keeper of a car. You don't have to be a UK citizen or resident. You don't need a national insurance number, or a driver number. You ONLY need to give your name, and an address where you can be contacted.

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corestore

Re: Yet another reason..

There ARE no 'nebulous rules'. The DVLA have two simple rules:

1. It must be a UK address

2. They must be able to write to you there.

It can be a friends house, a holiday home, a PO box, a business accommodation address, anything - so long as they can write to you there.

I *know*. I *checked*.

Insurance are only concerned about where the car is parked most often, to determine risk.

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corestore

Re: Yet another reason..

You're all making a VAST and incorrect assumption about the so-called "wrong address".

Why are you assuming I won't receive and deal with mail addressed there??

The ONLY reason to do this is to ensure that anyone discovering said address through the DVLA will learn nothing about ME, other than the fact that I can receive mail sent there.

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corestore

Re: Yet another reason..

Oh the insurance company are well aware. I give my address, but declare that the car is mostly stored at a different address, for which I supply the postcode, and they're happy with that.

Is it somehow illegal to own or rent multiple properties? There's no obligation to give the DVLA your main residence address, or the address where the vehicle is kept. All they need is a UK address at which you may be contacted. I know; I asked them.

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corestore

Re: Yet another reason..

The address is valid and legal, not false.

It just can't be linked to where I really live. It's air-gapped, so to speak :-)

Why would I not respond?

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