* Posts by Graham Marsden

6844 posts • joined 19 Jan 2007

What do we do about a problem like Uber? Tom Slee speaks his brains

Graham Marsden
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Facepalm

Re: Political soapbox much?

And let's not forget this gem...

> It’s an acute problem for progressives and the Left when you want to ban or regulate something, and yet you can’t show "harm" to justify it.

Sure, because the Right have *never* decided that they wanted to ban or regulate something yet have been unable to show "harm" to justify it...

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NASA books space shuttle delivery truck

Graham Marsden
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Re: Contract Out, Screw the Workforce

Remember Alan Shepard's comment:

"It's a very sobering feeling to be up in space and realize that one's safety factor was determined by the lowest bidder on a government contract."

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Bloke sues dad who shot down his drone – and why it may decide who owns the skies

Graham Marsden
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Re: @h4rm0ny - What is the sky?

I think what's really clear is that *both* of them are playing PR games.

Your take was "Way I read it, the drone owner is self-entitled, aggressive and thinks it's fine to hover over people's fenced in gardens filming them or their family members and I'm on Meredith's side on this", but you (and your upvoters) didn't seem to have done any looking to see if there *was* an "on the other hand" version which may contradict it, hence the downvote.

As for the gun stuff, personally I don't live in a country where there are people who think that "go for your gun" is the apparent default method of resolving an issue. (If Meredith was so concerned about the drone, why didn't *he* call the Police...?)

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Graham Marsden
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@h4rm0ny - Re: What is the sky?

Downvoted, not for the gun stuff (see later), but because here's the drone owner's version

* * * * *

In a video Boggs sent WDRB, he comments on drone's path 40 seconds before, during and after the incident.

"We are now one minute and 18 seconds into the flight," he says on the video. "We are now 193 feet above the ground. This area here is the world-famous drone slayer home, and this is a neighbor's home, and our friends live over here, and over here, and over here. You will see now that we did not go below this altitude -- we even went higher -- nor did we hover over their house to look in. And for sure didn't descend down to no 10 feet, or look under someone's canopy, or at somebody's daughter."

"We are right now one minute, 56 seconds over the drone slayer's house. We're still not on his property line -- we're just now getting ready to cross it....In less than two seconds...we are outside of his property, still at 272 feet. He shot the drone here, and you'll see it rapidly lose altitude, and the drone crash. Boom -- there it goes. Crazy, in the words of the great Paul Harvey, now you know the rest of the story."

* * * * *

Now, regarding the guns, if someone starts shooting at and destroying my property, I think I'd be a little miffed, and if I wanted to have a word with them, I doubt I'd just go up to their house, knock on the door and say "excuse me, old chap, would you mind not doing that?" I'd want a few friends with me. When we see the guy I want to speak to is packing a side arm and threatening 'If you cross my sidewalk, there's gonna be another shooting" I think we're going to back off. (NB nowhere can I find anything that says the drone owner or his friends are carrying firearms...)

So have "the various attempts to cast this has someone shooting down an innocent drone that was just flying along through the sky" really been exploded?

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Apple buys mood sniffer AI firm Emotient. Stop rolling your eyes at me, user

Graham Marsden
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Coat

Happiness is mandatory, citizen...

... Failure to be happy is treasonous and can be punished by termination.

- Your friend, The Computer.

(Mine's the Red Security Clearance one)

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Three-years-late fit-to-work IT tool will cost taxpayers £76m

Graham Marsden
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Devil

@<shakes head> Re: Whaaat?

> never attribute to malice that which can easily be explained by stupidity

In this case, it's not simply stupidity, it's ideological idiocy.

Call me David, Gideon Osborne and IDS have presided over the train-wreck that this Austerity, penalising the poor for being poor whilst desperately flogging off the family silver (and, latterly, the furniture) to their rich mates to try to make the books balance and now Gideon is claiming that there's a "cocktail of threats" (should that be a cock-up?) which mean that he has to keep on kicking the least well off in society because it's clearly *their* fault that the banks and financial markets crashed...

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Call of Duty terror jabber just mindless banter

Graham Marsden
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@Voland's right hand - Re: Yes, but....

> For that you might as well use SMS. In clear text.

Or even: Bumbling would-be UK bomber asked Twitter followers for target suggestions

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Oh UK.gov. Say you're not for weakened encryption – Google and Facebook

Graham Marsden
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Big Brother

Re: Banks

Remember the NSA have already been snooping on SWIFT for years...

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Foetuses offered vaginal music streaming service

Graham Marsden
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Alert

Re: Musical vibrator?

Don't forget the Motorhead branded Vibrator!

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A third of UK.gov big projects will fail in next five years, warns NAO

Graham Marsden
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WTF?

What...?

... Only a third???

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GCHQ mass spying will 'cost lives in Britain,' warns ex-NSA tech chief

Graham Marsden
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Facepalm

Re: He's wrong and in denial

> As a society we are desperately behind the crims who are in control at the moment.

Yes, the ones in control are the politicians and the Media Barons who decide what we are or, more importantly, are not allowed to read and see. The Big Busineses who tell our "elected" representatives how they should run the country and how if they would pass a certain law it would be to everyone's benefit (and here's a nice lucrative Directorship for you).

> You may not read about all of these events but they happen daily and serve to illustrate just how bad the situation really is

HOW can they illustrate *ANYTHING* if we can't read about them? The Government and the Security Services might claim that they've prevented X many attacks, but without anything to corroborate such assertions, they are just meaningless BS.

PS: Oh, and your post might have had more credibility had you not posted as an Anonymous Coward...

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Graham Marsden
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Alert

Binney has previously described as "absolute horse shit"...

... claims by the UK government's lawyers that the huge volumes of data collected by the intelligence services won't be readable at the point of inception.

But, but... Matt Bryant disagrees with him, so he *MUST* be wrong!!!

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Graham Marsden
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@werdsmith - Re: Gosh, a voice of reason speaking to our government!

> If you want to find a needle in a hay stack, you don't send in a person to sift through the hay with their hands. You just move all the hay past a powerful electromagnet.

But that assumes that a) there *is* a needle in the haystack and b) you don't have *so many* haystacks that you can actually search all of them.

There's also the small matter of the several attacks over recent years which have been by people who have been known to the Intelligence Services, yet have still been able to perpetrate their attacks...

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Obama: What will solve America's gun problem? What could it be? *snaps fingers* Technology!

Graham Marsden
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@Pompous Git - Re: Huh?

> It's amazing how many houses burn down because the house next door caught fire.

If the fire is anything more than very minor, a fire extinguisher is going to do you damn all good if you use it to try to put the fire out.

The point of a home extinguisher is actually to ensure you can create a safe escape path and get out of the house and then let the Fire Brigade do their job.

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Americans massively back call for more police body camera tech

Graham Marsden
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Re: Wearing the cameras is only part of the solution

> Presently, in most jurisdictions, the field video is owned and controlled by the police department.

At least this is one thing that Britain's Surveillance State got right: If you appear on CCTV or other such video footage which has been taken by the Police or similar authorities you have a right to see that footage.

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Graham Marsden
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Holmes

@Big John

> Cops know where to look to find most of the trouble.

It's curious, they go looking for trouble and, even if there wasn't any to start with, they seem to manage to find some.

Ask Constable Savage for more information

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Oh, Zuck off: Facebook under attack for its attacks on net neutrality

Graham Marsden
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"the 30 advocacy groups – only five of which are based in India"

And how many are based in Egypt? None? Oh, well then they clearly shouldn't object to FB doing anything in Egypt, should they? In fact they obviously shouldn't object to *anything* happening in *any* country that they're not based in...

> We're not a small, vocal group, complains the small, vocal group

The "small, vocal group" which probably has an awful lot of members all around the world, people who are interested in everyone having access to the internet (and that's *all* the internet, not just the walled garden that Zuck wants you to pay to step outside of).

> "[...] unfounded and divisive attacks" – like the one they just launched into"

Hmm, I'm wondering if El Reg has Another Opinion-holder who writes articles that should be entitled "Opinion" rather than being presented as fact...

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Day 2: Millions of HSBC customers still locked out of online banking

Graham Marsden
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Re: HSBC =

Highly Suspect Banking Corporation

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Library web filtering removes info access for vulnerable, says shushing collective

Graham Marsden
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Boffin

@1980s_coder

If you only have access to a small local library, there may not *be* books on the subjects you want (or those books may be 20 years out of date).

There's an awful lot more information out there on the internet and it's much easier to search through it and find the bits that are actually relevant to what you want to know.

And if you find information "offensive" or "dangerous", don't look at it!

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Outfit throws fit, hits FitBit's hit kit with writ (Apple also involved)

Graham Marsden
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Devil

@Steve Davis 3 - Re: and award for openess

> pretty well eveyone readint this site is in violation of at least 20 patents just for getting out of bed in the morning

And if they stay *in* bed then they are in violation of my patent for the utilisation of a device constructed of woven fabric intended to maintain a comfortable body temperature...

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Intel, Warner lock horns with hardware biz over HDCP crypto-busters

Graham Marsden
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Holmes

So in *this* case...

... encryption is ok?

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SpaceX makes rocket science look easy: Falcon 9 passes tests

Graham Marsden
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Facepalm

Re: Pretty soon....

No, I ordered the Hawaiian, not the Pepperoni...

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Microsoft's 200 million 'Windows 10' 'devices' include Lumias, Xboxes

Graham Marsden
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Thumb Up

A reminder re: "Nagging Pop-ups"

How to get rid of them

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It's amazing the UK Parliament agreed to track 22bn Brits' car trips. Oh right – it didn't

Graham Marsden
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Re: RTFR

> Read the report and try and form your own opinion.

Certainly, Matt. And my first opinion is (unsurprisingly) that you've cherry-picked quotes that support your position whilst missing out other, very relevant, sections.

For instance:

There is a further related issue – the level of vetting required for control room operators to access police Airwave or the ANPR system. It is currently, rightly, the decision of the Chief Constable on whether or not to give access to the Local Authority control room. This is important and my concern is the lack of consistency and the absence of a recommended standard. This is something I have raised with the National Police Chief’s Council (NPCC) via the ANPR and CCTV policing leads.

And also:

It is now possible for UK police forces to interrogate in excess of 11 billion records per year lodged on the system. The main ways that the data can be exploited through data mining are outlined as:

• vehicle tracking: real time and retrospective;

• vehicle matching: identifying all vehicles that have taken a particular route during a particular time frame;

• geographical matching: identifying all vehicles present in a particular place at a particular time;

• network analysis: by identifying the drivers of vehicles and their network of associates, ANPR can be used to indicate vehicles that may be travelling in convoy;

Now whilst, of course, someone like you would argue that this is a good thing for finding paedophiles and drug dealers and terrorists, someone who has a slightly broader perspective would realise that this also contains a risk of abuse since it could be used to identify anyone whose vehicle was in the vicinity of an event which was not officially approved by the State.

In 2015 the Home Office has committed approximately £5 million to support the development of the National ANPR Service which includes cloud based storage.

Hmm, cloud based storage? I wonder if any of that is based in the USA or owned by US corporations who are, of course, required to hand over any and all such information to their Security Services on demand (and not tell anyone they've done so...)

And in the section titled "Legitimacy of ANPR system use by police" where the author of El Reg's gets the quote about the lack of "statutory authority for the creation of the national ANPR database, its creation was never agreed by parliament, and no report on its operation has even been laid before parliament" (so, clearly, Kat Hall *has* RTFR) it also says:

These issues fall into sharper focus given the desire within some quarters in the police to extend retention periods from the currently agreed two year period to a maximum of seven years. I have referred these concerns over the legality of ANPR to the Home Office.

(Perish the thought that the Home Office would disagree or retroactively change the rules...)

Then in the section "Compliance with Guiding Principles within the Surveillance Code of Practice" the report's author says:

I have openly called for greater transparency from the police relating to the numbers of ANPR cameras deployed and any evidence relating to their efficiency and effectiveness to also be published. It is not acceptable to have to rely on submitting Freedom of Information requests. Police forces should be willing to publish this information on websites and engage in debates around its usage.

So I think my opinion is that the report's author isn't quite as "supportive" of ANPR and the database it generates as you assert...

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Graham Marsden
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@Bernard M.Orwell - Re: Just to annoy the tin-foil attired!

Yes, Matt is correct in *one* small detail, but, as I pointed out, that's only a tiny part of this. (Of course that won't stop him declaring victory...)

> one of the valid defences is to claim that someone other than the named driver was operating the vehicle at the time of the offence

It is not enough to *claim* that someone else was operating the vehicle, you have to *name* them as the law requires that you to know who is driving your vehicle at all times and fibbing about this tends to get you into trouble as a certain ex-MP found out...

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Graham Marsden
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Meh

Re: Just to annoy the tin-foil attired!

"And it's Bryant, he's got the ball, he shoots... he moves the goalposts... HE SCORES!! And the crowd goes... meh."

Let's see what is *actually* being said:

There is no statutory authority for the creation of the national ANPR database;

such a move warrants a specific statutory basis and "clear mechanisms for accountability and governance". Privacy, data protection and human rights concerns must also be properly addressed,

No justification has ever been made for the change in the use of ANPR technology from a tool used to target suspected vehicles to the enormous national database

The lack of statutory oversight highlighted [...] should be urgently addressed [...] drivers are none the wiser as to what is happening to their data

the public must be made aware of how advancements in technology can alter the way they are monitored. There needs to be consultation and debate on matters that can severely impact on an individual’s right to privacy

So, whilst privacy is mentioned in there, it's only one *small* part of the overall picture and to claim that it's ok because the data on registration numbers themselves is not "personal" information is disingenuous at best and laughable at worst.

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Graham Marsden
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Big Brother

@Sirius Lee - Re: Being too literal?

This is not about "the police using a specific record to convict someone of some crime", it is about *everyone* being considered a potential suspect and paedophile/ terrorist/ drug dealer (Oh my!) such that we must *all* be tracked and our journeys recorded just in case we may do something wrong.

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Graham Marsden
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Facepalm

Re: Grey Pants Retarden "There is no statutory authority.....

Let's see:

We have a report from the Surveillance Camera Commissioner, the guy who was appointed *by the Government* to look at these matters on one hand and, on the other, a Funding *Bid* which *recommends* "that the Commissioner approve the submission of a bid to the Police Innovation Fund that if successful would support the development of the National ANPR Service" and a page from Wikipedia that Matt has managed to dig up to support his usual argument that we should allow the State to snoop on all of us, because *he* thinks that's a good idea.

Which one do you consider the more reliable, boys and girls?

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Graham Marsden
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Big Brother

"There is no statutory authority for the creation of the national ANPR database...

"... its creation was never agreed by parliament; and no report on its operation has even been laid before parliament."

"Well, yeah, but nobody told us we *couldn't* do it. (Of course we didn't actually bother to ask anyone...)"

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Flare-well, 2015 – solar storm to light up skies on New Year's Eve

Graham Marsden
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Coat

Obligatory warning...

... about walking plants...

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Facebook must face furious shareholders in class action over IPO

Graham Marsden
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Re: Suing because they "lost out"?

If it was just because they'd "lost out", then there wouldn't be a case.

If, however, FB deliberately witheld relevant information from potential purchasers in order to encourage people to buy over-valued shares, that's another matter entirely...

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Aroused Lycra-clad cyclist prompts Manchester cop dragnet

Graham Marsden
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"Interesting debate"?

Here's what the law says:

* * * * *

Sexual Offences Act 2003:

66 Exposure:

(1) A person commits an offence if—

(a) he intentionally exposes his genitals, and

(b) he intends that someone will see them and be caused alarm or distress.

* * * * *

So unless he was waving it around and shouting "Get a load of this, darling!" no offence was committed.

(PS for pedants: Although it says "he", that's simply for convenience and brevity and it includes women too)

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Here – here is that 'hoverboard' you've wanted so much. Look at it. Look. at. it.

Graham Marsden
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Flame

And I was expecting...

... it to be this story from the USA about the "Hoverboard" that caught fire and caused a shopping mall to be evacuated!

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Watch out, er, 'oven cleaners': ICO plans nuisance call crackdown in 2016

Graham Marsden
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Mushroom

Why does anonymous call blocking...

... not block anonymous calls?

When I do 1471 and get a message saying "We do not have the caller's number", THAT is as good a definition of "anonymous" as you can get, yet those calls *still* get through to my phone.

WHY? It is hardly rocket science to realise that if I can get that message *after* I do 1471, then my phone company can do it *before* they put the call through and, if it thinks "Oh, I would play the 'we do not have the caller's number' message if someone does 1471, then it does *NOT* put the fucking junk call through!

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US Marines kill noisy BigDog robo-mule for blowing their cover

Graham Marsden
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Anyone heard of this thing called the internet...?

That started with the military, didn't it?

Now try asking Firefighters or Mountain Rescue teams or any other such group who may need to carry heavy equipment over rough terrain that is impassible to 4x4s and see what they think...

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No, drone owners – all our base are belong to US, thunders military

Graham Marsden
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Re: Accidents happen...

> What kind of nutcase would put something like that in the hands of a child?

The point is, even in the hands of an experienced pilot, things can go wrong. If some idiot decides to fly a drone near an airport or over a busy road or off the top of a block of flats and there's a problem, there is a risk to anyone below. And even a moped in the wrong place can cause an accident...

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Graham Marsden
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Unhappy

Accidents happen...

Ask Skier Marcel Hirscher who was nearly decked by a falling drone during a slalom race.

I'm sure the drone pilot was experienced and there was no malice or stupidity involved, but none the less, one of these things dropping from the sky is bloody dangerous!

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EU privacy watchdog calls for new controls on surveillance tech export

Graham Marsden
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Big Brother

Dual use? ITYM Dual Standards...

... In other words, it's ok when *we* do it...

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I have you now! Star Wars stocking fillers from another age

Graham Marsden
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Thumb Up

Star Wars (Atari arcade) 1983

Ah, that brings back memories!

Not only great graphics and gameplay, but also voice clips from the film: "Red Five standing by", "Look at the size of that thing!" and, of course, Obi Wan urging you to "Use the force Luke" when you did the Death Star trench run where, if you could complete it without firing your lasers, you got a bonus to your score!

A team of three once played the game for over 5 days, racking up a top score of one *billion* (and twelve) points before calling it quits! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Wars_%281983_video_game%29#Records

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India may have binned Facebook's freebies on net neutrality grounds

Graham Marsden
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Mushroom

Let me fix that for you...

"Every time Zuck is able to put the Internet's resources to work collecting people's information it's a win for him and his advertisers..."

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Death Stars are a waste of time – here's the best way to take over the galaxy

Graham Marsden
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@Tromos - Re: There's easier ways to destroy a planet

Populating (or over-populating or even going for all-out nuclear war) won't destroy a planet. Sure, it'll majorly fuck up the ecosystem, but the big ball of rock will still be there.

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Graham Marsden
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Thumb Down

All that...

... and not a mention of Von Neumann machines or Berserkers?

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IT bloke: Crooks stole my bikes after cycling app blabbed my address

Graham Marsden
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Thumb Down

Re: Common sense

Common sense *should be* designing an app with security *first* in mind, not 27th after all the bells and whistles and pretty bits...

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UK ISP Sky to make smut an opt-in service from 2016

Graham Marsden
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Re: @Vimes - Ambivalent @Graham Marsden

> Even if I decide to call the MDs office?

Then you get the switchboard drone who is unlikely to put you through... :-(

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Graham Marsden
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Boffin

@John Miles 1 - Re: Whats the problem

I suggest you look at the "success" of such filtering systems like that of Australia where it wasn't just porn that was being blocked, but other sites which were considered to be "objectionable".

If you want your ISP to block stuff, feel free to ASK them to do it, but don't be so arrogant as to assume that everyone else wants the Nanny State to tell them what they can or cannot see, simply because you don't like it.

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Graham Marsden
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Unhappy

@Vimes - Re: Ambivalent

> I would be strongly tempted to call up customer services and make things as awkward for them as possible

Unfortunately, of course, this will just be awkward for some call centre drone who had nothing to do with Uncle Rupert and Nanny David's puritanical decision making... :-(

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25 years ago: Sir Tim Berners-Lee builds world's first website

Graham Marsden
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Coat

As soon as I read the subject line...

... I was thinking "Yeah, but how long before the first kitten pic was posted?"

(Followed by "I bet it was after the first porn appeared...!")

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Drivers? Where we’re going, we don’t need drivers…

Graham Marsden
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Alert

@robertcirca - Re: Brainless people

> I still like driving my BMW on a german highway.

But can you still use the indicators (unlike most British BMW drivers)...?

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Graham Marsden
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Happy

@2+2=5 - Re: to walk in the shoes of others....

> other dvr< cars moving out of the way automatically.

Well at least they're more likely to move over when I'm filtering past them on my motorbike :-)

(Instead of being a cunt and deliberately moving to block me because "If I have to sit in this jam, then so should everyone else...)

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EU reforms could pave way for smells and noises to be trade-mark protected – expert

Graham Marsden
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Joke

Ok, guys...

... bit early for April 1st...

... What? You're *serious*???

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