Feeds

* Posts by JeffyPoooh

739 posts • joined 28 Jun 2013

Page:

A spin of roulette in the sporty Ford Fiesta Black

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Tiny, forced engines don't inspire confidence when it comes to long-term reliability

Junk yards are full of pristine crankshafts.

Everyone is paranoid about engine oil. Then the control arms rust off.

Daft. Completely bonkers.

0
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

"People might see you in it."

As above.

0
0

THE DEATH OF ECONOMICS: Aircraft design vs flat-lining financial models

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Corporations paying zero tax, a solution?

When corporations export their profits, they import (not really) something to balance their books. Typically they import (not really) Intellectual Property such as rights to use a trademark, or they import (not really) Management Services.

Track down these imports (not really), and slap an Import Duty on them (really!).

Start slow, maybe 1%, so nobody panics. Ramp it up to the Corporate income tax rate.

Seems like a solution to exported profits with zero tax.

A billion here and a billion there might help to solve a few problems.

5
0

SpaceX blasts a mischief of mice, a 3D printer and a cuddly toy* into SPAAAACE

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

3D Printers in SPAAAAAAACE...

Good. Two major advantages.

1) They'll finally be able to 3D print things enclosing a vacuum, such as vacuum tubes or barometers. Obviously they'd need to leave the ISS door ajar during this procedure, and make other arrangements for breathing - details, details... Sales of 3D Printed in Spaaaace vacuum tubes to discerning audiophiles are expected to reach $3.2 Billion, nearly six such tubes, by October.

2) In zero g, they'll finally be able to 3D print little things that are floating inside other slightly larger things, without the inner unsuspended part falling down while being printed. There may be minor issues with the unsupported middle bit drifting during the printing process, but we mustn't let such trivial practicalities obstruct our view of the future.

Such 3D Printers in Space are the future!! Someday very soon, perhaps by January 2015, everything we buy, everything!!, will be custom manufactured by 3D Printers in Earth orbit.

This message brought to you by the 3D Printer Hyperbolic Claims Association, a leading source of 3D Printing information.

5
0

Buying memory in the iPhone 6: Like wiping your bottom with dollar bills

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

128Gb = 16 GB ??

0
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

"...pure profit!"

"...pure profit!"

Nope. They're *obviously* using these price differentials to 'Robin Hood' the public, in a good and proper left wing sense. They're overcharging the rich and handsome that can afford it, to subsidize the unwashed masses that can't afford the 128 GB version and couldn't afford the cheaper one without the built-in subsidy.

Think about it. Do you think that Apple tracks 'normal' profit and even more 'pure' profit in separate columns? Of course not. That would be silly. They have an overall plan and an overall profit margin target. Therefore, logically, the overpriced one subsidizes the other cheaper one.

There is no other rational explanation. Plenty of irrational explanations, but only one rational explanation.

No wonder they call it the 'Jesus Phone'.

1
3
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: "A little eBay shopping and you can find 128GB Micro SD cards for under a tenner"

"Fake?" So is my iPhone.

It said "32GB" on the tin. It was only about 26GB in practice.

;-)

9
0

'People have forgotten just how late the first iPhone arrived ...'

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: First iPhone late

"...calls." ?

Is that an app?

2
0

eBay promises to refund seller fees after latest MASSIVE OUTAGE

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

I have a suggestion

Sellers could write-in another Terms & Condition as part of the boilerplate they already include.

"In the event of an eBay service or significant Internet outage impacting access to this auction site during the auction period, then the seller reserves the right to cancel the sale even after conclusion."

Some already have similar Ts&Cs, so this is not much different.

Enforcible? One could argue that it should be a T&C already built into eBay.

0
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Difficult to compensate

Bid Sniping is a common technique. Many people will bid in the last few seconds, so that others don't have time to review and bid again. It basically turns the public auction into a 'Sealed Bid' auction. That's the point of it. In these cases I will typically bid the price that would piss me off if anyone else got it for that amount or less. Others may bid "the maximum they're willing to pay", useful if you really really need the item.

Here's some free advice: If around $150 is 'The Price', you don't bid $150. Because many other will bid the round value. You have to adjust up a bit. And you have to adjust up again because others will also adjust up. Number of iterations depends on number of bidders. $150 -> $154.89 for example. Of course you'll get it for one bid increment above the 2nd place bidder anyway.

0
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

eBay mysteries

One thing that confuses me is the following: There are zillions of wee gadgets and parts available from vendors in China, items with a Buy-it-now price of about $1 with free S&H. And they seem very happy to package it up and mail it halfway around the world. The package arrives and, when they say FREE SHIPPING, they mean FREE. The postal meter label says Y000.00 as the cost of the postage. So here are the mysteries. How do they ship things so cheaply that they can make money? It would cost me $12 to send it back. Does the Central Committee provide free postage to some vendors simply to destabilize Western economies? How much does China Post pay when they dump off a container load of packages at the Western port, containing all these $1 sales?

PS: eBay and PayPal do provide a somewhat-useful fraud protection for buyers. I've had to use it a couple of times. Forced a full refund from a seller of dodgy software. I find that everyone else I've dealt with to be perfectly honest and honourable.

7
0

Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Replacement cycle....

I agree 5-6 years is low. A Dell 22" died on me after 7 years and that seemed way too damn early. Very sad, it was so nice up to then. Took it apart three times trying to fix it, but it was the panel itself. Sniff...

The good news is that 27-inch 1080-high monitors are constantly on sale for Cdn$200 or less.

Touch screen? No thanks.

1
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Time for a new paradigm...

Two screens.

The Look Screen™, with the content (displayed free of smudges), is placed where it normally goes, in front of your face.

The Touch Screen, with all the controls and buttons, goes flat on the desk. Placed conveniently at the end of your arms in their natural gravitationally-bound position on the furniture. There'd need to also be a keyboard that could flip out somehow or other... mumble mumble not sure of the details...

2
0

Google Apple grapple brings crypto cop block to Android

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Size of Key Space?

If the data is protected and encrypted with a code derived from the PIN, then the key space isn't very big. Grab some encrypted data (unsoldering flash chips if required) and run it through 10,000 (4 digit) or 1,000,000 (6 digit) possible keys and look for correlation with expected data. Hours or days?

What am I missing this time?

1
1

Spies would need SUPER POWERS to tap undersea cables

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Possible; not likely.

And yet the "special sub" exists, as more than an assumption. It has a name, USS Jimmy Carter. The point aimed at those claiming all this is "not likely" instead of "I don't understand". It's widely accepted to be a sub for tapping undersea cables, so what the heck is all this article and doubt about?

I can't explain orbital mechanics, and yet the Saturn V existed.

0
1
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: I doubt they splice

Everyone keeps spouting on about TDRs etc. Serious question here: Would TDRs still work, what with all the repeaters in the circuit?

I assume that most repeaters are probably unidirectional, right? What about the erbium-doped type? Anyone know? But they don't need 10,000 volts. They need a laser beam. So TDRs may be an issue in the first and last leg of the cable, but I presume aren't much use once you get a couple of repeaters further from shore, right? Anyone think about this?

Unless, the repeaters are sufficiently sophisticated to include such test equipment in the repeaters themselves. I dunno. Another point of failure vs BITE.

0
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: No need to splice fibres to evesdrop

"...raised about one-half of a Russian submarine from the open ocean..."

There, I fixed it for you.

That's what I was referring to above; "half right", get it?

1
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

some South American country

Do you recall that they actually cut the existing cable in situ (deep underwater) using a cable cutter on the end of a long cable? (!!!) I thought that that step displayed amazingly confidence. Then they fished up the ends one at a time to install the long splice with the new T junction. The section inserted into the existing cable was a fairly long section of new cable, not a short little thingamabob.

Then they ran the new cable sideways (east) to Whats-it-stan.

1
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Possible; not likely.

Explain this: the USS Jimmy Carter

0
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

"600 metres, the submarine ... ... 1,000 metres."

What's to prevent the USS Jimmy Carter from opening a hatch, lowering a 500m cable, dragging it around a bit (precisely as the cable repair ships do) until they snag the cable, then winch it up (precisely as the cable repair ships do) into the Top Secret cable tapping room, etc? I realize that this proposal would require the addition of a 500m cable and winch to the USS Jimmy Carter, and that might be technically extremely difficult.... ((Rolls-Eyes.))

I suppose that one might argue that it would be equally impossible to fetch a sunk Russian submarine from the bottom of the sea too. In that case, one might be about half-right.

7
2

Scotland wins WORLD RECORD as voters head to referendum polls

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

In the Scottish Referendum, it'll take a long time to count the votes...

"ThRRRRRRRRRee million, ThRRRRRRRRRee hundRRRRRRRRRed and ThiRRRRRRRRRty-ThRRRRRRRRRee thousand, ThRRRRRRRRRee hundRRRRRRRRRed and ThiRRRRRRRRRty-ThRRRRRRRRRee."

"ThRRRRRRRRRee million, ThRRRRRRRRRee hundRRRRRRRRRed and ThiRRRRRRRRRty-ThRRRRRRRRRee thousand, ThRRRRRRRRRee hundRRRRRRRRRed and ThiRRRRRRRRRty-FouRRRRRRRRR."

...

2
1
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Big decision in Scotland tonight...

The Royal and Ancient Golf Club will announce whether it has decided to admit ladies.

3
0

Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

"...powers exist to seize and interrogate devices..."

Meanwhile in other news... Didn't Apple *just* announce that the power to "interrogate devices" is no longer available to anyone except the owner?

Does the iWatch have a PIN Code?

0
0

Apple's Cook: We have never allowed g-men access to Apple servers

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

"So only users, not Apple, can grant access to law enforcement agencies."

So not even Apple can unlock your iPhone if you're screwed-up the lock code?

What if you forgot your code? What if you entered your desired code incorrectly, and now have no idea what you've accidentally typed? What if your iPhone is unlocked and some joker locks it on you for laughs? Your data is safe, but beyond your own reach? Ideal for drug dealers, but suboptimal for most users.

I assume that an iPhone can be reset to factory clean, so that a hopelessly locked iPhone can at least have the hardware rescued, if not the data? Don't tell me that the locked hardware becomes landfill...

I await clarification for the details that I might have misunderstood. And thank you.

0
1

iPhone 6: Most exquisite MOBILE? No. It is the Most Exquisite THING. EVER

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: the first iPhone "...wait until he could achieve perfection."

Hmmm. Then explaining the iPhone "2" thru "6" might a bit awkward.

:-)

2
0

US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: I'd still say it's MIMO

*His* doesn't, and isn't. If it were redesigned, perhaps it could be (but same as a coat hanger could be). MIMO is more than just an antenna. MIMO has to include a box of tricks in the router itself. And every one that I've seen has at least three antennas.

So multiply redundant No.

I'm using "MIMO" to mean "MIMO", not just the words.

0
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Sceptical

Is this our emerging consensus? That the increased noise floor introduced into the legacy channels will eat into their informational bandwidth in precise balance to the bandwidth offered by the new channel.

It was about ten years ago I imagined a techique to hide some linear signals amongst the RHCP and LHCP, in such a way that nobody would notice. After thinking about it a bit longer I realized that the hidden signals would still increase the noise floor of the CP signals, so it really didn't increase the total data rate. It seemed to be a zero sum game.

Ideas - a dime a dozen.

0
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: I'm not yet sure what the hell OAM actually is ...

Yeah, of course I read the wiki and a few more. Still hasn't sunk in.

If the boffins would implement it at UHF and draw a schematic of the antenna system, maybe it would sink in.

0
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: I'd still say it's MIMO

"Does [my Crossed Yagi] count as MIMO?"

No.

A good example of MIMO are the wifi routers with three antennas. Usually.

0
1
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Sceptical

One thing to keep in mind is that CP received by linear, or vice versa, are compatible, but there's a -3dB loss due to the polarization mismatch. This 3dB eats into Shannon's window. I wonder if they've opened up another channel that carries precisely the same amount of information as is lost in the -3dB SNR reduction?

1
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

I fail to see...

I don't understand it (yet) either.

Perhaps they're using the polarization itself as another carrier. I can't imagine this would do more than slightly open up the Shannon window for additional bits. I'd be shocked if if were a doubling of throughput.

Problem is, these academics are so hungry for fame that they issue press releases for the most mundane and/or idiotic things sometimes. One can't tell if it's a real thing or another BS publicity stunt. It's a wonder they didn't mention that "the rotating wave are 3D printed."

1
1
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Numbers always confuse me

"Sending two beams at the same frequency but at opposite polarisations is..."

...old hat.

That's how satellite TV works. FSS uses H/V and DSS uses RHCP/LHCP. It's bordering on ancient.

I'm not sure if they're talking about the same thing here. They can't be that daft to not be aware of the above factoid. I'm not yet sure what the hell OAM actually is, but it has to be something different than just polarization.

0
0

Speaking in Tech: 'I'm an Apple guy and I COULD CARE LESS about the iWatch'

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

"Kids are terrified of Microsoft's Minecraft buyout"

Yes. True.

Two kidiots. Both Minecraft enthusiasts. Both bothered by possibility of change within the Minecraft universe. Microsoft had better tread very carefully else they'll have bought $2.5B of NEGATIVE "goodwill and other intangibles."

1
0

SCREW YOU, Russia! NASA lobs $6.8bn at Boeing AND SpaceX to run space station taxis

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge

Re: Low expectations

"1:10,000" vs "2:135"

1
0

4K-ing excellent TV is on its way ... in its own sweet time, natch

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Consumers who care about quality?

"4:3 ... 16:9"

Stretch, Crop, or Black Bars - choose your poison. All are awful in their own way.

BUT WAIT!! There are some blended modes where they intelligently merge two or three of those techniques. Just a hint of cropping top and bottom, and some gentle stretching but mostly at the edges. It's subtle and works better than the other options. One of our TVs (Sony?) offers this mode and it's nearly invisible (Y Opinion MV).

3
2
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

'Honey Boo Boo' in 4K glory

I'd probably hang myself.

13
0

First Irish boy band U2. Now Apple pushes ANOTHER thing into iPhones, iPods, iPads

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Fill up yer memory

"32GB" iPhone 4S, with 1.0 GB Available. And that's with all the music files removed, except for one U2 album that seems to have slipped through somehow.

So, yeah, It's easy.

1
0

iPhone 6 will make you fork over with Apple Pay if you want to BONK

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Slip a Canadian Debit card into your iPhone 6's case, behind the phone

Bonk away, straight from your chequeing account.

It'll confuse onlookers anyway...

4
1

Microsoft buys Minecraft for $2.5bn. Notch: I'm getting the block outta here

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Here's the inside story of why Microsoft bought Minecraft

You may recall that somebody using Minecraft built an 'actual' Hard Disk Drive using millions of those silly blocks. Others have built fully functional CPUs and so on, using the same silly blocks.

The technical folks at Microsoft having heard about these accomplishments got somewhat confused, and they somehow assumed that this meant that HDDs and CPUs could now be virtualized. They schemed to cut Intel, AMD, Seagate and other hardware manufacturers out of the PC market. All their hardware will be replaced with virtual hardware built up from those silly Minecraft blocks, trillions of them per fully-virtualized PC. All PC hardware will be replaced by virtual Minecraft blocks, rented by Microsoft.

Somebody from the HR section happened to be walking by the conference room and overheard their nefarious plans. The HR drone stuck their head in and asked if the virtualized PC would need to be run on actual hardware.

The MS Brain Trust replied nearly in perfect unison, "No, we plan to use recursion. It'll be software all the way down!"

1
0

WTF is ... Virtual Customer Premises Equipment?

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: So much wrong with this.

"...easy to have twenty or thirty devices on a network."

For those of us that heat our houses with consumer electronics, it's easy to get up above 50. I think I can have more than 80 Ethernet ports (mostly empty of course). I've got three wifis covering the 2.4 GHz band, and two more on 5 GHz band. Fing shows dozens of clients on each router.

It's very educational, in terms of keeping it all working.

0
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: I'll give you my router

My FibreOP installation has three boxes:

1) Optical Network Terminal. You need a box with an optical port on it.

2) Their Router with wifi. You need a box with antennas on or in it.

3) Battery Backup (DC UPS): To keep the POTS alive for 911 purposes

I've added GB Ethernet Switches and several more of my own wifi routers.

They can virtualize all they want, but you still need a box(es) with an optical port (or DSL/Cable port), a couple of antennas, and a battery backup.

0
0

Cable internet won't need dose of fibre to stop feeling bloated

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

No need to wait. Code it already.

"...the devices will drop 'just enough packets to send TCP the signal that it needs to slow down...' "

Dropped packets exist now; for various reasons. So anyone could implement this crude fix whenever they want. It doesn't need to wait for a standard. Just do it already.

0
0

As bankruptcy looms for RadioShack, we ask its chief financial officer... oh. He's quit

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

eBay is the replacement, if you can wait a month for delivery

Search on "kit" or "diy kit" under the category 'electronics' (adjust as required) and you can order up all sorts of cute solder-it-yourself building blocks kits. These wee kits can be adapted and integrated with Arduino to do almost anything. And everything is like $3 shipped. I think I could build a digital SW receiver out of such blocks for about $100.

The Good Old Days are actually right about... ...now.

0
0

NBN Co says Melton test not valid, likely uses processes developed there anyway

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

FTTH IS A TOTALLY SOLVED PROBLEM - T-shirts already issued

A few months ago, we had Bell Aliant FirbeOP FTTH installed. Amazingly, we live in a low density neighbourhood with multi-acre lots. They rolled an out-sourced fleet of trucks to run the main cables. Then a nice man came and ran the pre-made fiber (length per satellite map images) through the trees to the side of the house in an hour or two. Then another nice tech showed up and screwed some boxes (same ONT box as shown in the image) to the wall in the basement (2 hours). Most of the expense was getting the fiber to the pole in front of my house. The added effort to install in the next 400 feet into my basement was a trivial addition. The whole exercise is financed by the fact that the local telco can now also provide 'Cable TV' service via fiber optic cable. They've opened up a huge new business, and it's working (they're winning). The fact that we now have 175 Mbps and 3ms ping in the forest is just a nice bonus.

Anyone in the world that is still struggling with the feasibility and financing of FTTH needs to reach out to Bell Aliant and see how THEY DID IT already. IT'S A TOTALLY SOLVED PROBLEM.

0
0

'Speargun' program is fantasy, says cable operator

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: USS Jimmy Carter

I came to the comments forum to post: "USS Jimmy Carter" followed by something witty.

Well done on your selection of "Just sayin'...". Perfect.

Note to those confused: Google the boat name. Figure out its purpose.

0
0

A SCORCHIO fatboy SSD: Samsung SSD850 PRO 3D V-NAND

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Return of the Ramdisk?

AB: "...some SSDs use a set of capacitors on the circuit board..."

Apparently so, for example in the MX100 256GB SSD that I recently bought for $120Cdn shipped. The internal images on the 'net show a row of capacitors lined up on the circuit card.

The old T510 laptop is now noticeably snappier. Spend my evenings catching up on Brady Haran's videos on YouTube and sipping red wine. Fantastic.

0
0

'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Meeeh

It was also a 'Power Toy' available under Windows XP; free from Microsoft IIRC.

We had it installed for so long that I'd forgotten that multiple desktops wasn't a built in feature.

27
0
JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Meeeh

Mm: "...what most people do want. The choice."

No. Impossible. You'd have to invent a check-box technology, and something like a Registry or similar data structure to store the user's preference. This is all completely impossible. Computers OSes must contain hard coded decisions, and it is impossible to offer any user options whatsoever.

Right?

</Sarcasm>

16
0

Forty-five years ago: FOOTPRINTS FOUND ON MOON

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

The deadly Lunar Rock Spiders...

Deadly Lunar Rock Spiders - that's the real reason we never went back. As per the horror/comedy* film 'Apollo 18' **.

* 'comedy' ? - Not really. At least not intended.

** Almost a mandatory movie for Moon Enthusiasts, but not quite. Or perhaps not at all.

0
0

Infosec geniuses hack a Canon PRINTER and install DOOM

JeffyPoooh
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: The problem is that it doesn't require any physical presence

Maybe there should be a physical button that needs pressing to enable the 'Write Protect Off' state of the program store. Maybe the button could be behind a wee locked door inside the printer.

0
0

Page: