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* Posts by JeffyPoooh

323 posts • joined 28 Jun 2013

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Report: Apple seeking to raise iPhone 6 price by a HUNDRED BUCKS

JeffyPoooh
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Coat it in gold leaf, with several super-bright "LOOK AT ME" blinking blue LEDs

Then you can charge $500 more. And you'll sell every last one.

Some people like to be seen spending money.

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Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray

JeffyPoooh
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Re: Not interested..

I've bought PS3s (when they're cheap) simply to use as very good DVD/BluRay players.

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JeffyPoooh
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Admittedly, I still buy CDs as...

I still buy CDs as they're sometimes (perhaps even 'often') cheaper than "buying" (sic) the album (sic) from iTunes or whatever.

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Canadian taxman says hundreds pierced by Heartbleed SSL skewer

JeffyPoooh
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Re: This is nonsense...

The CRA went to the NSA, they hooked-up their Wireshark, then pressed STOP, REWIND a bit, STOP, and PLAY on the giant Internet Recorder Thingy in Utah.

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SPACE RACE auction: $130k raised for spacesuits, Apollo 11 kit

JeffyPoooh
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Re: A, what?

"Did he really say 'a'?"

One careful audio analysis found evidence of a few milliseconds of an 'a'.

Perhaps he was a bit nervous and partially - mostly - misspoke, what with being the first human about to set foot on the Moon and all.

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JeffyPoooh
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"$130k..." "...raised tens of thousands of dollars..."

$15,000 + just over $43,000 + $37,500 + $62,500 + $68,750 + $150,000 + $240,000 = ...

Just the prices explicitly mentioned sum to over $600k.

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Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed

JeffyPoooh
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Re: That is what you get for using Windows

I have a Cisco iPhone. Seriously.

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Time is on their side: NIST's new atomic clock accurate for 300 MEEELLION years

JeffyPoooh

Re: Then we have leap seconds

"...Yes, your GPS takes this into account..."

"Yes..."? Oh thank God. I'm so glad to learn that my GPS isn't confused by leap seconds. It'd be so annoying to be misdirected by 7,494,811.45 km (25 light-seconds) when I just wanted to pop down to the shops. It's amazing that they took such subtle details into account.

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: Impressive.

Google: Chip Scale Atomic Clock.

$1500 price class.

On my Bucket List.

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: Serious question

The second is now *defined* as 9...770 of those Cs transitions. I guess that they can guesstimate the uncertainties and errors in their hardware. Things like residual magnetic fields and the like.

On my mantle is a hilarious but lovely $20 Made in China pure mechanical wind-up clock. Beside it is one of those "Atomic" radio clocks tuned to WWVB. I also have a rubidium brick that needs to be integrated into the household time system, somehow.

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NASA's LADEE: A Great Gig in the Sky, now on a death dive to the Dark Side of the Moon

JeffyPoooh
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Ah...

They're holding a contest to pick the day, hour and exact minute of impact. Thousands of punters may enter, covering all possible minutes. They plan to crash it on the back of the Moon, out of sight.

SO HOW CAN THEY DETERMINE THE EXACT MINUTE OF IMPACT?

Perhaps the LRO will be tasked to help pick a winner?

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We don't want your crap databases, says Twitter: We've made OUR OWN

JeffyPoooh
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A Comp Sci 201 project

Yawn. This is really basic stuff.

So, what did they do after lunch on that Monday? Rewrite the firmware inside the drive hardware?

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Google's Nest halts sales of its fire alarm – because waving your hand switches it off

JeffyPoooh
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Two fer Two?

If I understand the NEST company, they have about two products. Both have had significant bugs. If they have three products, then let's give it another month to see if they hit 3 for 3.

The Smart thermostat was so busy mining bitcoins* that it forgot how to be a thermostat. (*Disclaimer, I may have some of the details wrong.)

Now this Smoke Alarm bug/feature/bug.

It almost justifies becoming a Luddite. But not quite.

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How Microsoft can keep Win XP alive – and WHY: A real-world example

JeffyPoooh
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"Amazing new technologies were pouring out of Microsoft..."

Huh? Almost always: "new technologies" .NE. code. There are a few exceptions, but none that I can think of that would apply to MS.

Perhaps they could learn to Hibernate without assuming that all (for example) 4GB of RAM needs to be saved to disk. It seems like the OS doesn't even know how much and which memory is actually being used. It seems that they just stupidly save the whole 4GB block. Has nobody else noticed this?

Perhaps they could learn that if there's humans about, for example someone just having turned on the PC, then perhaps the humans could be allowed on the Internet in front of every single last installed program, and the OS, all seeking updates all at once for fifteen bloody minutes. Perhaps I'll stop caring when the fibre is connected to my house.

Perhaps they could provide a GUI where the Internet connection could be defined in terms of price and speed. So if the PC is connected via satellite at $0.50 per kilobyte, then all software maintenance and other non-human riff-raff would be automatically disabled. They've made zero allowance for having ultimate control over the Internet, except by dozens of individual settings all over the place. Many of which get reset by idiot programmers with updates. Daft.

Perhaps when MSSE needs an update, it wouldn't have to download a massive file each time. Stupid.

They don't even get the basics right - even in The Year Of Our Lord 2014.

It's bloody frustrating.

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Dutch doctors replace woman's skull with 3D-printed plastic copy

JeffyPoooh
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"Dutch doctors install entire 3D-Printed Head on woman!"

Headline - there, I fixed it for you.

Any tech news item about 3D Printing must include an over-the-top and completely false headline, that implies the impossible. I'm pretty certain that's the law.

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'iPhone 6' with '4.7-inch' display 'coming soon', but '5.5-incher' 'delayed'

JeffyPoooh

Re: My hunch

"...Android manufacturers need ridiculously large screens..."

Android phones have larger screens so that my poor frustrated coworkers have more surface area to lick just before they stick their stone-cold-deaf phones to the office windows, ...begging, ...pleading, ...howling in mental pain and anguish, trying to get the stupid sleepy-head Android OS to wake up and notice that Yes!, OMG!, there's a signal again. It often takes about five minutes before the OS finally wakes up and notices that there's '3 bars' again. I notice these mindless shenanigans because the poor Androidians are blocking the lovely view from my cube.

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JeffyPoooh
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"...those of us who use our phone as a phone..."

How quaint.

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BlackBerry sucker-punches TV star Ryan Seacrest in patent brawl

JeffyPoooh
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It must be a *Design* patent (on design and appearance)

As opposed to a *Utility* patent (on keyboards in general).

Anybody got a darn patent number so we can pull it up?

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CERN team uses GPUs to discover if antimatter falls up, not down

JeffyPoooh
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Re: Antimatter is going backwards in time

Some of your objections can be directed to Richard Feynman, but unfortunately he died rather young (69) in 1988.

All the antimatter particles created at the Big Bang went the other way. We don't run into them, and they don't run into us. That's where they went.

Any antimatter sentient being in our Universe would probably explode before having time to evolve thumbs and corner the stock market.

Subatomic particles have a short list of defining parameters: mass, spin, charge, etc. 'Age' is not on the list. Come to think of it, that's a good point for particles with a short lifespan. How do they know? Interesting...

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: And if it doesn't work...

Hey, I'm going to mine Bitcoins by crowd sourcing. Can y'all help me factor 386578260763796396261097346046265319764024627? Thanks.

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JeffyPoooh
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Antimatter is going backwards in time

Feynman conjectured that antimatter is just matter going the other way in time. Let's assume that this conjecture is actually true.

Therefore, from the Big Bang so-called antimatter went the other way ("backwards") in time. That's where it is; 13.77 billion years times two in the other direction. Missing Antimatter problem solved.

Therefore, any locally created antimatter in our half of the Universe will also be going "backwards" in time, and would therefore appear to fall upwards in gravity fields. So, yes. Antimatter appears to be repelled by gravity.

Perhaps this also explains Dark Energy too.

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First pics: Comet-chaser Rosetta hurtles towards icy prey, camera in hand

JeffyPoooh
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Re: Moving at 800 m/s

"It's absolute speed..."

Oh my God. The aether has finally been found. Michelson and Morley blew it. Einstein was wrong.

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JeffyPoooh
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My God, it's full of stars...

"All these worlds are yours, except 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Attempt no landing there. Use them together. Use them in peace."

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Forget sledgehammers – crooks can CRACK ATMs with a TEXT

JeffyPoooh
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Oh God...

So ATMs are now going to be infected with Symantec's bug-infested crapware? Crash. Burn. Blue screen of Symantec. No money...

WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE... BROKE... COLD... HUNGRY... DESTITUTE...

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French novel falls foul of Apple's breast inspectors

JeffyPoooh
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Considering that breasts are fundamentally Baby-Safe...

...it seems silly to get all worked up over them being exposed.

When I'm made King...

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Passport PIN tech could have SAVED MH370 ID fraudsters

JeffyPoooh
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Is there electricity and a network connection at your border entry points?

One's travel documents themselves are only critical at remote, isolated border crossings where they lack access to the (?) database(s).

At the other 99.9999% of border crossings, the document should be simply used as a token or index to bring up the online record (including an image of the subject's face and any other identifying info). The document itself could be a slip of paper with a ref. number or barcode printed on it.

The policies and procedures of "ID" predate the wired world. Daft.

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Reg tries out Google's Chromecast: Yep, we even tested smut sites

JeffyPoooh
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Re: Ordered mine from the Google Play store

"...put mine through its paces this weekend."

It won't take that long.

It took me about 30 minutes to make it work (mandatory download, etc.), and then I was more or less bored with it in just about 20 minutes more. It's more functional than interesting.

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JeffyPoooh
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@Google - Features Request

1) For Android devices, there's no need to limit yourself to adding the 'Cast' feature to specific apps, one by one. Build this 'Cast' capability into the OS, i.e. *your* Android OS. I can see why you won't be able to build this into Apple's iOS, but there's no excuse for not building it into Google's Android. (My guess, you're already working on it.)

2) There should be a feature to effectively redirect the audio back to the portable device, for convenient use of headphones. Think about it, it's brilliant.

3) Bug report: After selecting Canada, it still offered Pandora. Following the links, it was - of course - still not actually available. A very rude tease.

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: Chromecast Vs RaspBMC?

"...why would I buy one of these when I have a..."

Duh. One buys one of each, unless there's a specific reason not to. When something is Cdn$40 (or pounds, LOL), you just buy it.

Now, I just need to buy a 24-input HDMI switch...

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: I think I'll wait for the...

"...an interesting little toy."

More a tool than a toy. The *only* toy aspect are the lovely embedded wallpaper pictures. Other than that, it's simply a tool.

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It's 2014 and you can pwn a PC by opening a .RTF in Word, Outlook

JeffyPoooh
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Re: Microsoft Word 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013

Well the good news is that OpenOffice is safe if fed a maliciously crafted .doc file.

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Symantec fires CEO Steve Bennett: To lose 1 chief is unfortunate, to lose 2 is OK, apparently

JeffyPoooh
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I hope it hurts...

Sorry to be mean, but I hope that they suffer.

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8GB iPhone 5c is real, but no market-maker

JeffyPoooh
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Apple would do better at the other end of the Chinese market...

At the risk of generalizing, many of them are more interested in explicitly-and-obviously expensive bling than colourfully-embarassing, cheap-as-chips bargain versions. Offer them a diamond encrusted 256GB version that is visually-obviously (bright red, perhaps blinking?, maybe laser beams light show?) the most expensive version and it'll sell out instantly.

Sometimes it seems that the Apple Marketing people don't get out much.

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MH370 airliner MYSTERY: The El Reg Pub/Dinner-party Guide

JeffyPoooh
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Re: What now?

Same concept as the GPS car tracking devices, except Iridium instead of cellular. A tiny little puck, installed on any flat surface. All it needs is a connection to the Essential +28VDC Power bus, with the CB in a remote location. How often do you want it to 'ping' its position? How much money do you want to spend on data services for your fleet?

(I don't think that it necessarily needs to be an iPad.)

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: Smartphones

My post is relevant to "pings are from seabed".

Now, the relevance of that ("pings are from seabed") is up to you.

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: Smartphones

@Psyx

'Underwater Locator Beacon', a.k.a. 'Underwater Acoustic Beacon'.

Beer can sized gadget. Triggered by water. Pings acoustically at about 37kHz at about 160 dB for either 30 or 90 days.

Usually attached to the "Black Boxes'.

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: "The satellite would thus know to keep one of its receiving assemblies aligned..."

One good reason for an hourly handshaking signal is the same conceptual logic as your mobile phone: What if someone wants to call you? Where are you? How does the network find you?

A handshaking signal upon power-up and every hour thereafter is about right for the Inmarsat network to know at least under which satellite is the aircraft. In that way, they know where to find you (roughly), in case somebody is calling you.

Yes, the Inmarsat offers a vast range of modes and speeds. The satellites offer Global, Regional, and Spot beams (fixed pattern).

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: "The satellite would thus know to keep one of its receiving assemblies aligned..."

@ Psyx

Okay. Sorry, I missed that it was trite. Cheers. Here, have a beer...

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: What if it was ditched and sunk intact?

"...extremely difficult to land a large jet on water under any semblance of control, to the extent that it has *never* been done."

"We'll be in the Hudson." A very very high semblance of control.

Yes, a few bits broke off (e.g. an entire engine), but the only residual floaty bits were a couple of passengers that fell off the wing.

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: "The satellite would thus know to keep one of its receiving assemblies aligned..."

"ie downward at planet earth."

As opposed to randomly aiming off into space? And the Inmarsat satellite depends upon random airliners to keep its spatial orientation? Utter nonsense. Doesn't anyone have any common sense about how technology works, at least in general?

Ref: MH370_last_ping_corridors.jpg image.

Inmarsat at about 64E, .: must be I-3 F1 at 64.5E. Inmarsat satellites do have spot beams, but the pattern is fixed. These satellites do not steer beams onto individual aircraft clients. That is *obviously* impractical for a general service provider such as Inmarsat.

The oh-so confusing "tilt" angle of 40 degrees (ref image) is simply a representation of the calculated range ring from the satellite, where the computed range intercepts the Earth. The range was derived by Inmarsat boffins based on signal timing (range).

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: Here's more sensible analysis...

"The Northern arc seems a likely route..."

The two arcs are not routes. They are a representation of the possibilities for *** -> a single position at a single point in time, <- *** about 7.5 hours into the flight.

One single point anywhere along those lines. This is assuming that the boffins at Inmarsat have done their sums correctly - likely (but I hope that they've checked their assumptions).

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JeffyPoooh
FAIL

"The satellite would thus know to keep one of its receiving assemblies aligned..."

"The satellite would thus know to keep one of its receiving assemblies aligned at a suitable angle."

FAIL.

Complete bollocks.

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This city's smog is so TERRIBLE, people are told to stay indoors. Beijing? No – PARIS

JeffyPoooh
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It could also be because... ...ocean.

Yes. But look up the Low Emission standards. ULEV TZEV etc.

They're ridiculously tight. Fleets fail due to insufficiently impermeable fuel lines. Crazy.

These modern cars simply do not pollute the air (aside from CO2).

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: That'll be all those crappy French cars with engines burning oil.

They've made a mistake. They've reportedly instituted usage limits on cars.

They should have instituted limits on just the diesel smoldering cars and trucks. And then invited modern petrol powered cars to SVP leave their engines running day and night to clean the air.

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Brawling neighbours challenge 'quiet' cul-de-sac myth

JeffyPoooh
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Re: Tip toe through the cat crap

We don't have any cats left in our neighbourhood. We do however have a happy and well fed eagle living nearby.

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FANBOIS' EYES ONLY: United Airlines offers FREE MOVIES on iOS kit

JeffyPoooh
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So, is this via WiFi?

How well will it work when 100+ people try to use it at once?

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Google's Drive SLASH, secret 'big upgrade': Coincidence? HARDLY

JeffyPoooh
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De-Dupe on a gloibal scale

Maybe Google already has copies of most files on Earth. A bit of clever de-duping might lead to efficiencies.

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Battery vendors push ultracapacitor wrappers to give Li-ions more bite

JeffyPoooh
Facepalm

"...adding RF and EMI shielding capabilities."

Both RF & (!) EMI? Wow...

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Backdoor snoops can access files on your Samsung phone via the cell network – claim

JeffyPoooh
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Re: Lot's of speculation

Even the memory card jammed into the phone can run code.

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Does Apple's iOS 7 make you physically SICK? Try swallowing version 7.1

JeffyPoooh
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Re: Better than Android then?

Buy your choice of phone and several tablets, a tablet or two of each ecosystem. Duh.

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