* Posts by theOtherJT

147 posts • joined 6 Jun 2013

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Welcome, stranger: Inside Microsoft's command line shell

theOtherJT
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Re: Falcon 3.0, the ultimate test of your config.sys/autoexec.bat skills?

My personal demon was MechWarrior2, which needed to be run off a parallel port connected zip disk because there wasn't room for it on the C drive. Himem, CDRom drivers, Sound drivers, joystick drivers LAN drivers and Zip drive drivers... Took DAYS to finally get that bastard to start.

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theOtherJT
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Re: From the article:> get-childitem | where name -notlike Windows

This is true.

get-childitem | where {$_.name -NotLike "Windows"}

is what you want here.

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What's broken in this week's Windows 10 build? Try the Start Menu, for one

theOtherJT
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Unhappy

Re: Company bloat/inertia?

I think we're just seeing the inevitable outcome of perpetual development.

Windows has been around a very long time, and there are ghosts of those early dos days still in the code. Every version has been an update from the version before to some extent - even when we went 32bit native from the awful dirty 16/24bit stuff, and again when the NT kernel came along. Every time there's been some bit of legacy crap from the previous version that couldn't be replaced because too many other things relied upon it.

Like Ankh-Morpork, what Windows is mostly built upon is the remnants of previous iterations of itself. There's so much _junk_ down there that I don't think anyone on the Windows team really knows what a lot of it does, which has turned the development process of each new version into a hunt for buried land-mines.

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Windows 10 Device Guard: Microsoft's effort to keep malware off PCs

theOtherJT
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How is it stored?

Presumably device guard has to live on the disk somewhere, and if I can get raw write access to the disk I should be able to kill it, no?

Or are they suggesting that Windows 10 is going to live on something like an LVM volume managed by the hypervisor? I'm not sure I like the sound of that. I don't see that playing nicely with my various multi-boot setups.

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The Internet of things is great until it blows up your house

theOtherJT
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WTF?

but when the manufacturer offers ‘Electric blanket-as-a-service™’ - free for the first year, and at a modest annual fee thereafter - it becomes very appealing.

You and I clearly have very different ideas of what is appealing.

The words "as-a-service" are like a warning bell attached to the end of any product telling you that the "whatever" that's being "as-a-serviced" won't work out of the box the way it's supposed to and will somehow end up costing more than the national debt by the time you've got it set up to be _almost_ as good as the one you had before.

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LA schools want multi-million Apple refund after kids hack iPads

theOtherJT
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Re: Inventory management: - TEXTBOOKS

Older than I look, younger than I feel ;)

Still, this was the better part of 15 years ago now, and most of our teachers then were still using rebound copies of books from 20 years earlier. Largely this was because they didn't trust the new ones to contain anything more useful than a list of examinable facts, and seemed to think it was important to teach the kids to understand the subject matter and from this exam passes would follow.

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theOtherJT
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Inventory management: We've heard of it...

When LAUSD bureaucrats subsequently demanded kids return the tablets, only two thirds were actually handed back.

...and they don't have records of exactly who has them? Or a signed agreement from a parent/guardian who agreed to pay for it in the event of loss / damage?

When I was at school we weren't even allowed to take TEXTBOOKS home without having signed for them, what's wrong with these people? Kids BREAK things. It's practically a defining characteristic.

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Life after Nokia: Microsoft Lumia 640 budget WinPho blower

theOtherJT
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Re: GUI madness

So, they've moved from forcing a phone UI that no one wanted onto the desktop to forcing a desktop UI that no one wants onto the Phone... Something is seriously wrong here.

Desktop UI. Phone UI. Separate products.

Come on Microsoft, you've managed to get them both right individually; stop getting them wrong in combination.

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Verizon to world: STOP opening dodgy phishing emails, FOOLS

theOtherJT
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No defense against willful ignorance.

We get about a user a month ends up having their account closed because it suddenly starts sending a few thousand emails a second. Every time they show up in the office with this "What's going on here?" face on and say something like "But you told me you needed my password so you could validate my mailbox!"

We make everyone read the "how to spot a phishing email" thing when they sign up for an account.

We send out stock reminders 3 times a year.

We send out specific reminders every time someone falls for a phish.

The trouble is that the vast majority of our users don't _care_ about computers, don't _care_ about email and don't _care_ about security - at least until the day they end up getting their account locked and a stern talking to by one of the IT security team.

If people are going to type their passwords into random websites because an email in broken English from a random Albanian email address told them to, there's not a great deal we can do to stop them.

could we have an automatic detection of when the sender and the Reply To names/domains are different and instantly class that as Criminally Suspect ? With a popup when clicking on such a message that reads something like "The address of the sender and that of the reply to are not the same. This is generally a sign that the message is spam or may originate from a criminal source. Are you sure you want to open this mail ?"

Only problem is that that happens all the time.

The last thing we need is something popping up and spooking the users when they get an email from it-announce@[nameofbusiness].uk with a reply to of it-support@[nameofbusiness].uk

It's a feature that would just immediately get turned off by 99% of sysadmins in response to user complaints.

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Motorola Mobility loses another patent suit to über-troll Intellectual Ventures

theOtherJT
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I blame the jury.

No, really, I do* How on earth could they not strike this down for obviousness given that there are about a bazillion examples of prior art? The only explanation I can think of is that they just didn't care and wanted to go home as soon as possible.

*unless the jury aren't allowed to do this - my understanding of US court procedure is a little vague. If this is within the judge's power, then I blame them instead.

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Euro THERMONUCLEAR REACTOR PROJECT is in TROUBLE

theOtherJT
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Oh just give them a blank cheque already.

Yes, that's right, lets further delay something important the world desperately needs. If everyone would stop trying to score political points off it and just concentrate on BUILDING THE DAMN THING it wouldn't be so far over budget!

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Make up your mind: Microsoft puts a bullet in Internet Explorer after all

theOtherJT
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Re: Not going to be just the NHS.

Allow me to set a scene:

The comedy begins with some important high level managers who have macs. They love their macs and insist that any future software we buy has to run on them. Of course, they're not going to buy macs for everyone in the institution (would tarnish the halo) but they've heard the word "cloud" and think it sounds jolly exciting and so the best thing would be for everything to run there. Browser interfaces are the way the world is going dontchaknow?

So a browser interface is specified in the requirements for the next big departmental software purchase. The managers in question, who have most definitely earned their salaries by turning up to this specific meeting, now exit stage left and are never heard from again.

Meanwhile the contract has gone out to tender and the lowest bidder (Which is to say "the least competent") wins it. In this contract a "browser interface" is specified, but it doesn't say any more than that, so to get the job done as quickly as possible a whole ton of legacy code is run through some fairly perfunctory translation to active-x, a crappy java app is knocked up and bish-bash-bosh we have an interface that runs in a browser.

The fact that it's a very specific browser - IE8 and below - and only on a specific OS (hard coded 32bit calls mean it barfs even on x64 Windows) and thus completely misses the original point of "should run everywhere" is considered irrelevant since all the staff who are going to actually use the thing are using 4 or 5 year old windows desktops anyway, the Macbook toting high level managers have already lost interest and fucked off, and the IT support staff are left to clean up the mess.

This worked perfectly well as native code 7 years ago. It would have been fine as an in-browser front end to some server side processing. What we actually have is some hybrid abomination where the native code version was forced into a java virtual machine so it could be run in a browser where it performs like shit and goes wrong all the time.

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theOtherJT
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Not going to be just the NHS.

Working for a higher education institution that will remain nameless, we've been forced to keep IE pegged at 8 and java at 6 (for which we have to pay for extended support) because a shit-ton of our admin software won't work with anything newer.

That would be bad enough were this "legacy" software, but it was purchased in 2012, by which time both of these products were clearly already end of life. Bad choices have been made all round.

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Chrome trumps all comers in reported vulnerabilities

theOtherJT
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Isn't the point of installing Firefox or Chrome to make that the primary browser instead of IE?

In our case at least it's just so that when we have to go and look at user's computers we don't have to use the ancient version of IE that our finance software mandates as a front end. Most of our users can't handle the idea of learning how to use more than one browser, so IE for one, IE for all :(

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Dutch companies try warming homes with cloud servers

theOtherJT
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Re: next up - hosted AirCons

Presumably they clock them down to trivial levels so they don't really make any heat in the summer? If they had a partner operation somewhere in the southern hemisphere this might make a bit more sense - otherwise their "cloud"* is going to be decidedly seasonal in its capacity.

*God I hate that word.

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theOtherJT
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Security implications here, surely?

Nice idea, but how do you stop the householder in question fucking with it? Security 101 again: If an attacker has physical access to your machine, it's not your machine.

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EU digital veep: If you like America's radical idea of net neutrality, you're in luck, Europe

theOtherJT
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Surely the point of net-neutrality is that we don't want there to BE any specialized services?

The digi-veep also said he could live with some so-called zero-rated services - the practice whereby mobile operators do not charge for specified volumes of data from specific apps or used through specific services.

This is EXACTLY what net-neutrality is supposed to prevent. It leads to a situation where $TELCO can launch their own streaming video/music service at "zero-rate", but charge consumers for access to anyone else's service, damaging competition on merit between service offerings. Alternatively where $MEDIACOMPANY can throw $TELCO a massive stack of money in order to offer their service for free, and putting their competitors out in the cold.

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Woman caught on CCTV performing drunken BJ blew right to privacy

theOtherJT
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5 years without a TV and still not missing it...

If this is indicative of the sort of thing that's on these days, it isn't making me feel any more inclined to get a new TV licence. (or a TV to go with it) I used to like Channel 4. What the hell happened?

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Windows 10 build 10041: 99 bugs on the wall, fix a bug, add a feature, 114 bugs on the wall

theOtherJT
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Re: Win10 still not quite there yet

It's Shift+F8 now. God knows why they changed it. It took me AGES to work that out the first time I encountered a user laptop with a boot loop.

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theOtherJT
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Coat

sing along!

Ninety nine little bugs in the code,

Ninety nine little bugs.

You take one down, patch it around.

One hundred twenty nine bugs in the the code!

...I'll get my coat.

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Apple's portable power podule patent promises paroxysms of fanboi joy

theOtherJT
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Re: I don't get it

I think we all long since accepted that the US patent office just stamps anything that it receives. The concept of "innovative" or "Non obvious" in regards to patents got abandoned quite some time ago :(

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Hackable media box based on the Raspberry Pi compute module: Five Ninjas Slice

theOtherJT
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I'm curious how it talks to the SATA disk - is there some dedicated hardware on that board, or is it just a glorified SATA->USB bridge.

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Work harder to stop online child abuse, MEPs tell EU states

theOtherJT
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Re: A general sense of unease...

Kinda what I was getting at with that last paragraph. The police seem to get told how they may and may not use the time they have. Actual investigations that might lead to important people ending up behind bars seem to be discouraged in favour of token gestures like this.

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theOtherJT
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A general sense of unease...

Perhaps this is my personal unease with regards to all attempted censorship coming through, but it does feel a bit like they might have missed the point here... and more worryingly perhaps intentionally so.

What they're saying - as far as I can tell - is that the national police forces of member states need to work harder to combat child abuse... fine, sure, but the focus on the internet seems... misguided to say the least.

"There is child abuse on the internet" - well, yes, I imagine there is in terms of people grooming children for abuse in chat rooms and the like, or blackmailing children into performing sexual acts in front of webcams, but I'm pretty sure that's not what they actually mean here.

What they seem to mean is "There are depictions of child abuse on the internet" - that is, pictures and videos of children being abused. That's also certainly true, but it does rather feel like the wrong part of the equation to be making a fuss over.

It's classic "Treat the symptom not the cause". Surely what we want is for the police (nationally and internationally) to be investigating, finding, and arresting the people who actually took these photos/videos in the first place. We want them catching the people who are doing the grooming, or the blackmailing, or indeed the straightforward raping and videoing. That would be the _cause_ of the proliferation of this sort of thing.

Trying to remove things from the internet is just an exercise in futility and we all know it. You can spend forever playing whack-a-mole with dodgy websites and peer to peer networks (whatever it is they're pedaling) but you'll never kill them all, and if you know that's not going to work, are you not better off doing something else?

I know it sounds heartless, especially with such an emotive issue, but the fact is there are limited resources available here. I fully agree there should be more. I think we'd be better off if the police had more time to spend protecting the vulnerable - which surely is what they are actually for - but whilst this sort of pronouncement sounds very pro-active on the surface, the more I think about it the more it looks like papering over the cracks rather than repairing the foundations.

Digging into the cause, however - seriously investigating the people who create this material - that would seem to involve the police looking in places that they are discouraged from doing so.

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Should online pirates get the same sentences as offline ones?

theOtherJT
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Re: When is theft not theft?

It might not be the best definition, but there's still an important difference between depriving someone of a thing they have (theft) and potentially depriving someone of something they might have otherwise had, but currently don't.

If I break into your house and steal your record collection, it's gone. You can't have it and me have it both. If you're a recording artist and I break into your computer and copy your work and then release it on the internet I have done something quite different - deprived you of future earnings, presumably from people who would have paid for your work who now won't.

Now, for sure that's A crime (and I agree totally with what you said upstream about the more correct response appearing to be paying a fine) but it's not the same crime, and it's not sensible to conflate the two. You really don't want the law treating "did" the same as "might in the future do"

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Filthy – but sadly frothy – five door fun: Ford Focus 1.5 Zetec

theOtherJT
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Middle aged spread...

One thing you didn't mention here is how claustrophobic the cabin has become. That centre console is HUGE and really eats into the space in the front. I'm on the tiny side, and I still found it intrusive. If you're a bit more substantially built I would expect this to be really rather uncomfortable in the front. The visibility is nothing like as good as the old one too, and that wasn't exactly brilliant. The whole car is much bigger than you think it is too - although that seems to be a modern disease that most cars share. Despite being quite cramped on the inside it's actually _wider_ than a MK2 Mondeo., never mind the old focus.

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theOtherJT
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RE: Just a couple of things if you are thinking of buying a Focus.

It's a HORRIBLE engine in something the size of a focus. My mother just traded in a Mk 1 1.6 focus for the new ecoboost one, and the old one was infinitely nicer to drive.

It's fine when it's rolling, but moving off is a nightmare. Until the turbo spools up it feels like you have about 60bhp, at best, and the new focus is most definitely not a small car. Every roundabout becomes a bit of an adventure. You have to thrash the hell out of the poor thing to make it move and that just makes driving it tiring. It would probably be more economical with a bigger engine in it because you wouldn't have your foot buried in the floor all the time to make it get it's lardy arse in gear and move!

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Hated smart meters likely to be 'a costly failure' – MPs

theOtherJT
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Angel

SSshhhh.

Everyone keep quiet! If they keep this up the way it is, none of us will ever have to pay for our 'leccy again! We can just shift it onto next door's bill ;)

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Samsung Galaxy Note Edge: A side swipe at smartphone design

theOtherJT
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so...

It's a notification area/button set that you press with the thumb if you're holding the phone in your right hand...

Any particular reason why we couldn't do that without a curved screen? Or make it configurable so it can go on either side, for that matter.

I mean, maybe that's a nice ui tweak, but I don't really see why we need special hardware for it.

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He can't give it away FAST ENOUGH: Bill Gates richest man in world again

theOtherJT
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Re: It's long been observed ..

Well, sometimes you do.

It seems mostly to be a matter of where the money is thrown. Giving money to actual poor people has a decent track record of solving poverty on a personal level - that is to say it often succeeds better in getting those individuals out of poverty and keeping them out than drip-feed type "support" programs.

What it doesn't address is the factors that caused them to end up in poverty in the first place of course, and no, throwing money at that seems to rarely help. It tends to just vanish into bureaucracy and/or corruption.

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$250K: That's what Lenovo earned to RAT YOU OUT with Superfish

theOtherJT
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Re: Suckerfish

Perhaps. Perhaps not.

We order abut 100 machines a year, and were about to switch to Lenovo, now we decided not to. I don't see us going there next year either.

It wouldn't take so many businesses to do the same to actually hurt them. I mean, we're a pretty small fish, but there are people out there who measure their purchases in thousands of units who might be thinking the same way.

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MP resigns as security committee chair amid 'cash-for-access' claims

theOtherJT
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"Rifkind - who denies any impropriety"

...

What world does this joker live in that he can do that with a straight face?

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The Revenue achieved RECORD numbers of e-tax returns ... by NOT shifting to GOV.UK

theOtherJT
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Same as any website...

You let a "Designer" anywhere near it, they break it.

Ever since that dick Ive made such an enormous name for himself by dumbing down Macs, the mantra in design is "If I don't need it, remove it. If you need it, remove it anyway."

We had no end of things removed from our website in the last refresh in order to make it "Cleaner and more attractive" with the justification that they were rarely used anyway. Of course, no replacement was implemented for the few people who _did_ use them, no matter how rarely, because it would spoil the "look and feel" of the site.

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Hoping for spy reforms? Jeb Bush, dangerously close to being the next US prez, backs the NSA

theOtherJT
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Flame

Re: A well-timed statement of any kind from dear old W.

Presumably it is precisely because they operate under the impression that the country is a business that they fail to run it well.

When you think about it, a successful business maximizes profit whilst minimizing cost. Ok, working out how to do that with any real business is usually pretty hard, but the principle is simple enough. People will pay you for whatever it is your business does, and your job is to do that as cheaply as possible to make the difference between what you're paid and what it costs as big as possible (and in your favour, obviously.)

So, to improve profits, you either raise prices - which in business would scare off customers, so that's a bad thing - or cut operating costs.

And here comes the problem. A government has costs which remain broadly static. There's a lot of expensive shit that _has_ to be paid for, and that's an end of it. The military, the police, national infrastructure, healthcare (what of it the US has)... all these things need paying for, and whilst for sure there's a shit ton of waste in the way the US goes about that, there's not so much that operating costs can really be made much smaller. Not without utterly ruining the product that is - which of course is what we generally think is happening when we look at the state that the US is in these days and what people are getting out of their government in terms of service to the public.

So, if you can't cut costs, you have to raise the price - and Republicans are ideologically opposed to doing that because they're still thinking like the government is a business, and raising the price scares off customers.

This is of course, nonsense. The "Price", when one is buying government, is "Taxation". Republicans like cutting taxes not increasing them but with a government, unlike a business, raising taxes doesn't scare off the customer because the customer has NO CHOICE but to pay them!

Every time the Republicans refuse to close a tax loop hole they're effectively letting those people making use of it get their product for free, which if you're in an actual business would be considered insane. Every time they lower the tax rate, they're reducing the price of their product - makes perfect sense if you expect price reduction to increase sales, but YOU CAN'T INCREASE SALES OF GOVERNMENT. It's a monopoly. It has a fixed subscriber base. Short of bulk immigration - something they are ALSO OPPOSED TO - there's no way to increase your total sales when your product is "government".

If you want the profit margin up, you put the price up, not down.

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theOtherJT
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"Sure Sadam Hussain was a ruthless bastard, and a lot of his people suffered under his regime, but I'm not convinced that Iraq "post-democracy" is a better place to live with the lack of security, rise of religious power, and enormous society & infrastructure damage."

Sadly it seems that there have basically only been 2 lasting periods of stability in that region for the last hundred years.

1: Under Sadam Hussain, because he had anyone who didn't do as they were told shot.

2: Under British colonial mandate, because we had anyone who didn't do as they were told shot.

Neither says particularly good things about either the people in charge or the realities of living there.

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After Brit spies 'snoop' on families' lawyers, UK govt admits: We flouted human rights laws

theOtherJT
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Alien

I for one welcome our new Cthulean overlords...

When I read this sort of thing it's almost enough to make me wish Charles Stross wasn't writing fiction.

I mean if the Stars Are Coming Right then at least this would feel justified.

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Windows 10 for phones: Stepping towards the One True Windows

theOtherJT
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I'd be quite annoyed if MS's drive for universal apps made for universally crap apps.

It's a danger to be sure.

What it mostly demonstrates tho is the importance of separating the UI from the underlying actions, even when writing pretty basic apps. What they really need to be doing is promoting a Windows 10 API that defines how you write an abstraction layer. You write one back end, and then as many front ends as are required for different classes of device that just call your back end code.

It should be obvious to everyone that an interface for a 5" display with touch controls and an interface for a 24" display with a mouse+keyboard just _have_ to be different. "Write once run anywhere" isn't magic. Give us good tools to make crafting the UI easy on multiple devices and as long as the back end code compiles for all device classes we should be laughing.

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Raspberry Pi, meet face: You're probably NOT Blighty's biggest PC maker!

theOtherJT
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Regardless of if they're actually the biggest selling of all time, 5 million units for what so many dismissed as a niche hobbyist product in 3 years is an astounding achievement.

I think we'll be finding pi's in unexpected places for decades to come - there's 4 here silently acting as serial -> network bridges for the machines that spit out the access cards for the car park!

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Got $600 for every Win Server 2003 box you're running? Uh-oh

theOtherJT
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Well, I guess that answers the question of "what to do about the finance software" then. They'll totally just suck it up and pay that.

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It's not the cloud: The problem lies between the chair and the computer – Gartner

theOtherJT
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Re: Which private cloud is this?

"Private cloud"... Or "Server room" as we used to call it.

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theOtherJT
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I still don't get this whole cloud thing.

Services run on servers. Servers are in racks. If the rack is here, then I can go prod it if it's doing something I don't like. If it's somewhere else, I have to rely on someone to do that for me.

Just feels like a silly word for "Outsourcing" to me.

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Free WiFi coming to UK trains ... in two years

theOtherJT
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So who's actually paying for this then?

The good news is that the Department of Transport has found £50 million "to ensure WiFi is available on selected services from 2017."

Really? Because I thought that would be for the train operators to fund. Why are we paying profit making entities to provide a service that apparently we're legislating into their contracts that they have to provide?

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Skin colour's irrelevant. Just hire competent folk on their merits, FFS

theOtherJT
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Re: How to accurately measure diversity?

I've just been refusing to answer the bloody things for years. Unless I'm going in for medical treatment - where it is plausible that my ethnic background might actually make some sort of difference - it's completely irrelevant and I'm not playing.

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Why 1.6 million people will miss Microsoft's Windows Server 2003 date with fate

theOtherJT
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Re: win2k3, win2k8, win2k12

God ain't that the truth. The number of times I've been told "We can't shut it down for an update, it's a core system!" and had to get them to give me that in writing because I'm not carrying the can for what happens if we get screwed after a CVE has been published and then we didn't respond to it.

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theOtherJT
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Re: Rockin' hard place.

"A business problem is the challenge that in many cases the current servers continue to run fine, are reliable and haven't had a problem in the last 18 months... therefore why should they be changed now? Computers are tools and one shouldn't have to replace working tools."

The problem is that is only partially true. It's like expecting to use a Model T Ford as a long distance taxi on the motorway. Now a Taxi is a tool, and a Model T could be a taxi, so yes, it's possible and you could argue that it's doing everything you require of it vis-a-vis moving a small number of people from one place to another, but it would be seriously inconsiderate to everyone you're holding up and bloody dangerous to yourself and your passengers.

The trouble we have here - and I imagine the same is true in most places - is that we have a layer of management who can't wrap their heads around the pace of change in IT. A 20 year old car probably isn't terribly different from a brand new one in most cases. A 40 year old car is still recognizable and does pretty much the same things (albeit slightly less well). Even a 60 year old car could be reasonably expected to more or less work in the ways we're still used to... There's still plenty of Austin TX4's still on the roads being taxi's today, nearly 60 years after they were first designed.

By the time you get back to the good old Model T with it's weird controls, complete lack of safety equipment and hopeless top speed it's obvious that it's no longer fit for purpose - but we had to go back nearly 100 years for that. The idea that the same thing might happen in only the 12 years since Server 2003 was released just doesn't fit in some people's heads, and until something _does_ go badly wrong, they're not going to be able to accept that it can.

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theOtherJT
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Re: Rockin' hard place.

Absolutely. This is how we got screwed, and are still getting screwed. We have some "web apps" that only work on IE6 - you know, just trivial things like payroll and HR management. We've been operating a running retreat from these things for years. First by forcing people to use an XPmode VM, then when XP ended, RDP to a 2003 terminal server.

I have no idea what we paid for them originally, but the way finance talk about it it seems to be somewhere in the region of what it cost to occupy Iraq, and no one wants to even consider what it'll take to have them (and the now hundreds of gigabytes of arcane database back-end that they're connected to) re-written to something fit for the 21st century.

It seems that the only way they're going to get changed is _after_ something terrible happens and we get sued for some truly horrific data leak. Everyone seems to acknowledge that it's a matter of "when" not "if" but it takes 5 years just to complete the consultation phase of a project to change something this size around here, and there's no sign that consultation will even start until the deadline for change is in the past.

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Russian revolution: YotaPhone 2 double-screen JANUS MOBE

theOtherJT
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Re: It is a pity I recently updated the "fleet"

Good question. I recently got a Z3 compact - not in small part because of how good the battery life is - a completely e-ink (or whatever this screen tech actually is) phone would be quite appealing, especially as a work "on call" device.

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$10,000 Ethernet cable promises BONKERS MP3 audio experience

theOtherJT
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Re: Any lawyers in?

I reckon you could. Some of the claims made here are provably false, so at the very least it's false advertising. The cable _isn't_ directional, and you could prove that at the network layer. The same bit-stream is going to be delivered at either end no matter which way around the cable is.

You might be able to get away with saying "This particular woo woo makes music sound better!" because the claim is so vague as to be impossible to prove, but if you're saying "This particular woo woo makes music sound better because it does X" you better be able to prove that it DOES do X, and any half way competent networking engineer would be able to testify in court that it absolutely bloody doesn't.

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theOtherJT
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Any lawyers in?

At what point does selling something like this become fraud?

It's an ethernet cable. It has to be an ethernet cable, or it wouldn't work. At what point does describing it as a Magical Flying Unicorn that will solve all your audio woes with the Power of Rainbows* become legally actionable misrepresentation?

*Because that makes as much sense as what they've _actually_ marketed it as doing.

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France enacts law to block terror and child sexual abuse sites

theOtherJT
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/Sigh.

So, once again we respond to an attack on personal freedoms with an attack on personal freedoms. Always so successful.

When will people finally learn that the way to deal with the crazy isn't to pretend it doesn't exist? Stopping people saying things doesn't stop them thinking them. It's a good thing to hear people shouting about beheading infidels or whatever the particular stick they have stuck up their ass is.

Nothing is achieved by suppressing the shouting if the underlying sentiment remains. Trying to keep people from talking about it doesn't make it go away, it just simmers, until suddenly it's springing up unexpected from somewhere and the next thing you know some poor bastards are getting shot in the street.

Perhaps the ones talking about overthrowing the state have legitimate grievances (and if they don't now - start suppressing their right to speech and they soon will) Perhaps they're just nutters. To be honest I don't actually care, because the solution to the problem they present is the same either way:

Listen to them. Know who they are. Know what they want.

Then you decide if you need to either arrest them or possibly - just possibly - stop doing whatever godawful shit it is you're doing that is winding them up in the first place.

Either way, trying to keep them quiet is _never_ the answer.

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