* Posts by theOtherJT

232 posts • joined 6 Jun 2013

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Google robo-car suffers brain freeze after seeing hipster cyclist

theOtherJT
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Re: Track Stand? Bah.

As a motorcyclist who had just such a pillock fall off his stupid hipstermobile into the side of me at some traffic lights I'm with you all the way. I won't stop next to them now, they're idiots and don't know how dangerous what they're doing is.

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theOtherJT
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Re: What on earth is the point of a fixie?

You can do pretty awesome stunts on them, as well as ride them backwards :D

so... on roads? None at all, and in combination with clip-in shoes they're bloody dangerous.

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Roll up, roll up, as LG launches stealthy Bluetooth keyboard

theOtherJT
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For me they'd be a solution to the fact that you can't buy a phone with a bloody sliding keyboard anymore, and trying to do SSH on a touch screen whilst { on a train / at a family wedding you can't leave but work are cross / in the pub and hell if I'm going back to my office at 6.30 on Friday just to flush the webserver cache again } is a massive pain in the ass.

In a pinch you can use them to type emails that require more than the 2 or 3 sentences on can manage on a touch screen before wanting to smash it into pieces and feed it to whatever bastard decided that phones don't need LITTLE SLIDING KEYBOARDS.

TL;DR: I want my little sliding keyboard back :(

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theOtherJT
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Hmmm... not sure, personally.

I mean, it looks quite nice, but it still won't fit in a jacket pocket, which means it's going to have to go in a bag. If I've gone to the trouble of a bag, I've probably got a laptop with me and won't need it.

Maybe I'm asking the impossible given the size the actual keys are required to be in order for it to be any use, but what I really want is a keyboard that packs up to be about the same size as my phone so I can keep phone in left inside pocket and keyboard in right inside pocket, and leave the damn laptop bag at home.

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Scrapheap challenge: How Amazon and Google are dumbing down the gogglebox

theOtherJT
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Re: "Smart" TV's are a bad idea

I'm not massively against there being speakers - I just don't need them, and if someone were to manufacture a BGBTV and a BGBTV-S (for speakers!) model, and sell them at different price points, I'd be happy to buy the speaker free one for a bit less.

* Bloody Great Big TeleVision

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theOtherJT
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"Smart" TV's are a bad idea

My own TV set is one of the first generation VieraCast Panasonics; it never got iPlayer, and no longer has YouTube. I should be grateful, I suppose, that there were a couple of updates to its firmware, but these days it's really just used as a dumb monitor

Which was, lets face it, inevitable. This is why I'd much rather they left all that crap out and sold me a good screen with no pointless extras in the first place. Ideally I'd be able to buy one which doesn't even have speakers in it, seeing as how it's going to get attached straight to the 5.1 amp in the living room.

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Prognosticator, for one, welcomes our new robot work colleagues

theOtherJT
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Re: Wrong paradigm

Ok, you can back of the straw-manning now.

I don't know where this magical 8 hours came from, but if you went from 80 - which is dangerous and causes people to make mistakes because they're not sleeping enough, to 50 - you'd save lives, and if it took another 3 years to become fully qualified I doubt that would be the end of the world. Oh, and whilst we're on the subject who said anything about preventing people from training for any amount of time they chose to do so? Education and work. Not the same thing.

I also don't remember saying anything about everyone getting paid the same regardless of what their job is - a quick check would appear to be because I didn't, which was a relief because that would have been pretty silly.

As for emigration, why on earth would people leave here to go work longer hours somewhere else for the same pay? This would actually be a powerful driver for immigration if anything.

You put wages up, and you put working time down and efficiency improvements made by automating things makes up the difference, it's really not that hard a concept to grasp. The only reason it doesn't work like this is because a bunch of greedy bastards worked out that they could make the same efficiency improvements, keep wages and working time where they are, and pocket the difference thus shafting the workforce.

Once everyone earns enough money to support themselves comfortably I can't imagine there are enough people out there who are going to say "No, actually, I don't really want to get a decent nights sleep every night and spend some daylight hours with my family. What I really want to do is work an extra 20 hours a week so I can afford to buy a new car this year instead of waiting till next!" that it would actually make any difference.

I mean, if they existed they'd all be out there clamouring to have their pointless wasteful weekends taken away so they could get on with all that lovely high paying work... right?

People are working 2 jobs now not because they want to "Maximize their earnings" they're doing it because pay is currently so fucking shitty, and rent so insanely high that it's that or live on the streets.

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theOtherJT
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Re: Wrong paradigm

@Tom 38

Simple, you enforce the working time directive. I mean, we already have laws that say people can't be forced to work what are considered "exploitative" hours - although it seems that every large employer out there spends an inordinate amount of time finding ways around those.

The only place I see this being a problem is where we have a genuine skills shortage that can't be made up for because the jobs in question are too hard for the majority of people.

The most obvious example I can think of is doctors. We don't have enough doctors now, and we'd need to double the number of them we have to reduce their required hours by half. I don't know exactly how many doctors there are in the UK, but I'm pretty sure we wouldn't be able to double that number by economic incentive alone, seeing as doctoring is really difficult and already quite well paid. If there were a lot of people out there that were smart enough and motivated enough to do the job, presumably they'd be doing it already.

On the other hand, if education were treated as a source of important added value rather than an expensive luxury, and if everyone suddenly had 50% more free time, perhaps that's a skills gap we could fill in after all.

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theOtherJT
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Wrong paradigm

In reality, automation will spur the growth of many jobs - including some entirely new job categories.

No, it won't. It'll destroy jobs and force people out of work just like it's always done. The whole POINT of automating something is so a person doesn't have to do it any more, and if a person was cheaper and more efficient we'd let them carry on doing it.

The problem is more that everyone is convinced that the only way to live is by working 9 hours a day, and employers and politicians are more than happy to perpetuate that myth because it's good for short term gains and no one care about the long term consequences. In a more sensible world the more automation there was the less work everyone would have to do, but instead each individual who actually has a job does the same amount of work (or more!) and other individuals are forced out of work entirely.

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'Hans free' mobe gag crowned Fringe's funniest

theOtherJT
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Coat

How do you sell a deaf person a frog?

DO YOU WANT TO BUY A FROG?!

...works better out loud. Very loud, if possible.

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High-heeled hacker builds pen-test kit into her skyscraper shoes

theOtherJT
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If you let people into sensitive parts of your building unaccompanied...

...then you deserve whatever you get, frankly. If you don't work here then you don't get an access card that gets you into the server room and someone has to accompany you at all times. Hell, if you DO work here you probably don't get one of those. We only have 6 of them and that's one for each of the 5 IT staff and one "all access" pass kept in the break-glass-in-emergency thing for the fire department that sets off all the alarms if it's opened.

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Net scum respect their elders so long as it leads to p0wnage

theOtherJT
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Wouldn't even have to make the effort in a lot of places...

attackers go to some length to convince users to re-activate macros and ignore security warnings before running their malicious code.

We're forced to run quite a few of our machines with all the macro security settings turned off anyway because some of the godawful "web" software foisted on us by central management doesn't work if you turn them on :(

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Microsoft drops rush Internet Explorer fix for remote code exec hole

theOtherJT
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Re: "An even simpler fix is to use a decent bloody browser"

@Tannin

Well, that would be lovely, but unfortunately we have dependencies on external "web apps" which ONLY work in IE, so we're stuck with the damn thing until such times as everyone else gets their house in order too.

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PALE, MALE AND STALE: Apple reveals it has just ONE black exec

theOtherJT
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Given where their offices are...

...that would be pretty weird.

"I really hope The Reg staff is a minority white. Seeing that it is an international mag."

A quick google - and I admit it's pretty cursory, but it's not going to be that far out - says that the ethnic make ups of the UK (80.5% white) US (77.7% white) and Australia (92% white) would make el Reg a really out there statistical improbability if it was.

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FAIL: Windows 10 bulk patch produces INFINITE CRASH LOOP

theOtherJT
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And this, children...

...is why we have a testing pool before updates are allowed into production. You hear me Microsoft? Testing pool.

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Oracle pulls CSO's BONKERS anti-bug bounty and infosec rant

theOtherJT
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Doesn't surprise me.

Given how awful every Oracle product we're forced to run here is it feels like the entire culture at Oracle is abusive toward their customers.

Honestly, I get the impression that their entire business model revolves around winning contracts on name recognition alone and then once they've got you locked in, doing the exact minimum required to ensure that it's harder to change to another product than live with the problems the thing they sold you has.

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Intel building Xeon into lapwarmers as designers, content creators call the shots

theOtherJT
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"Fake" i7s

Isn't this what the i7 was originally meant to be about? Server grade chips in user land? IIRC the first gen ones were just a direct rebrand of the Xeon of that time (complete with lovely 3 channel memory controller which they then inexplicably took away from us for another 2 generations)

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Cloud computing’s refuseniks: How long can they hold out?

theOtherJT
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"Security will have kept up with the hackers"

When has that ever been the case? Security is an arms race, and a key weapon my side has in that arms race is keeping things that matter in a nice big fortress that only people on our payrole can possibly touch. I DO NOT TRUST cloud companies to take care of my data. I don't know who works for them. I don't know who their other clients are. I don't know how good their separation of access is between their clients.

Moreover, I don't even know when some TLA has forced them to fork over my information. At least if we get a request for it here our legal team can fight it.

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Introducing the Asus VivoMini UN42 – a pint-sized PC, literally

theOtherJT
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Re: Linux?

No wonder Linux gets a bad press when manufacturers make such an unforgivable hash of it.

This is true. Every machine I've bought with Linux pre-installed over the years has been a mess. Dell and Lenovo have both tried to sell me machines with Linux on them, and the sample one has never worked well enough for me not to say "Um, no, I'll do it myself thanks."

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theOtherJT
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Footprint

I just had a quick look at the install footprint of Windows 7 on one of my desktops. It's 39 gig.

Windows alone would not fit on this thing's disk!

...but you know what? I'm not going to take that as a strike against Asus here. This is very clearly Microsoft's fault. There is NO NEED for an operating system to be that big. There just isn't. I mean what the hell is IN there?

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A close shave: How to destroy your hard drives without burning down the data centre

theOtherJT
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You want a shredder

Like this one

Position under the rack and install some remotely triggered solenoids that can pull the disks out of the frame so they fall in and crunch.

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Sengled lightbulb speakers: The best worst stereo on Earth

theOtherJT
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And yet I still want one... make that two.

There's something inherently appealing about the idea. Either side of my bed are 2 angle poise lamps. Now I've got the idea in my head that they could also be speakers I just really, really want them to be.

Maybe I'll have to build something myself, because there's plenty of room in those for some decent sized drivers...

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Apple goes to crapple in stock plunge kerfaffle: $113bn wiped off in days

theOtherJT
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Re: Root -1 money.

@Chet Mannly

If it's not gone (as in "no longer exists") then it must have gone somewhere - which is to say it moved. We should find it somewhere else, but we don't. It's just... gone.

Now sure, I get that a thing - any thing - is only "worth" what people are prepared to pay for it, so all we're really saying is that people are prepared to pay less for Apple today than they were yesterday but isn't that a bit... worrying? Especially when we're talking about this sort of money.

It's not a massive deal when you're talking about the little things, but $115bn is a lot. I mean, that's not far off the sort of money that it costs to run the NHS for a year. You could bail out a medium sized bank with that. It'd buy you the worlds second largest navy!

115bn here or there is the sort of money that makes a difference to a national economy and until yesterday there was the expectation that Apple was in some way "Worth" that much more than it is today. When money on that scale vanishes that doesn't just move Apple's share price, that changes things all down the line.

This is what I find disturbing about it. We place so much faith in "The market" and it rather looks like the market isn't very good at it's job - namely determining what things are worth.

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theOtherJT
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Root -1 money.

So, as of today 115 BILLION dollars doesn't exist that existed yesterday, without anything happening except a nebulous "they" decided?

I get that's basically how finance works these days, but doesn't that sound rather like proof that it sort of... doesn't?

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OFFICIAL SCIENCE: Men are freezing women out of the workplace

theOtherJT
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Might explain why we have no climate control in here...

I mean, you can't be accused of sexist climate policy when the policy is - and I quote: "The building management system maintains the internal temperature between 15 and 30 degrees at all times." with a footnote to the effect that if it's hotter than 35 degrees outside they ain't making no promises.

In other words, "Freezing in the winter, baking in the summer"

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Global spy system ECHELON confirmed at last – by leaked Snowden files

theOtherJT
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Re: ECHELON and 9/11

I agree... sort of. I mean, I agree about incompetent spooks and paranoid terrorists and the implausibility of conspiricy. I can't yet bring myself to believe that the state - either ours or the Americans - would be complicit in that monstrosity.

But... but... what would they be complicit in? Assisting to cover up child abuse because it puts a powerful person in their pocket for life? I'm pretty sure I could believe they'd do that. What about arresting Journalists and holding them without trial if they threaten to expose things that might weaken their powers? Is that impossible? Do we think they might be prepared to try people in secret courts on charges they can't possibly defend themselves against because they are also secret? Are we at a point where that could happen; where that has happened?

No, I don't believe the NSA brought down the twin towers. I am positively terrified that if they're not controlled now, some descendent of that agency might be prepared to do something like it in the future... and I'm terrified of all the little baby steps they might take on their way there.

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theOtherJT
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Re: Nice article...

@Grikath

A person only slightly more cynical than me might suggest that they did know, and saw an opportunity to be exploited where any non sociopath would see a disaster to be averted.

I still don't believe that's the case, but for every day that passes I'm more and more concerned that the reason for this is more that I don't want to live in a world where that sort of thing is true, and less that it's ridiculous and utterly implausible.

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No, Microsoft: Your one-billion Windows 10 goal is just sad ... really sad

theOtherJT
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"Operator error"

This is probably as important a factor as any. We* are inclined to actually take a bit of care of our computers. We care that they run right. We care that they're secure. As such, our Windows machines typically don't have all the sorts of problems that average users pan Windows for. Microsoft could make this easier for us, to be sure, but all that most people see - and therefore what most people talk about - is the UI, so they constantly fiddle with that rather than fixing the things that make us angry.

So, we get cross at Win10 for not fixing the things we care about, and for making the things we don't care about, from our perspective, worse. Everyone else gets cross because things are different and anything different is something to learn and they didn't want to learn anything in the first place.

* Reg readers, "technical people" in general

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theOtherJT
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Re: Beg to differ

I always assumed it was just that most people historically didn't give a shit about computers. Windows won the workplace and because they had one at work, they got one at home.

Possibly less true now than it was 15 years ago, but there's still got to be a shit-ton of older people who are only using Windows because it's what they were forced to use the first time out and never cared enough to switch.

I'm comfortably OS agnostic since my first computer was a Vic20, when I was at high school it was all Acorn RISC machines, a brief flirtation with iMacs (the CRT ones) at college, and then it's been Windows everywhere I've worked from then on. My desktop now runs Debian, but then I'm a sysadmin, so hardly typical.

If you didn't grow up through all that and your first exposure to personal computing was at work some time in the Win 9x era - which a quick staff room, coffee break, chat around here seems to suggest a lot of people's was - then why would you know or care about your OS? You just go with the "brand" that you've heard of and are unlikely to change unless forced to.

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Jeep breach: Scared? You should be, it could be you next

theOtherJT
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CAN bus? Do. Not. Want.

Yet another reason for me to stick to driving old cars / bikes.

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Neat but narky at times: Pebble Time colour e-paper watch

theOtherJT
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Yeah, but see, he thought "Why would any one want a computer, they don't do anything normal people would ever do."

I'm looking at this thing and thinking "Why would I want this, it only does a small subset of things that I can _already_ do, and it does them less well than the thing I already use to do them."

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Contactless card fraud? Easy. All you need is an off-the-shelf scanner

theOtherJT
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Re: Attack of the clones

Possibly we're misunderstanding one another here, sugarbear*

I'm not worried that someone is going to wirelessly snoop my card. I'm worried that someone is going to clone my card by other means - as actually happened to me a few years back - and it's going to be basically impossible for me to prove to my bank that I'm not the one ringing up the massive bar tab.

Maybe they'll be kind and refund me anyway - but that wasn't my experience last time. It was a bit of a pain.

What you seem to be saying is that the chip in the contactless ones is harder to copy than the one in the old chip-n-pin style ones, is that so?

* last time, I promise, but your handle is cute and makes me smile every time I say it!

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theOtherJT
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Re: Attack of the clones

Ok, sugerbear*

So, I borrow your contactless card in the pub and go get your round in for you. I don't need your pin, I don't need your address, I just press the card against the reader the nice barman points at me, and I paid for some beers with your card. Job done. Beers for the both of us.

Now lets say I take your card without asking. I can still do this. You'll get wise pretty soon, because you'll notice your card is missing and cancel it, but I have at least that long to enjoy tasty, tasty beers on you.

If in that time I can successfully clone your card and get it back to you so you don't know I've got a copy - A thing we know to be possible because it happens already - then I can keep paying for things with it as long as I never go over £20 and the place I'm buying from supports tap-to-pay, right up to the point your next bank statement rocks up and you notice that you've been spending an awful lot more time in the pub than is plausible for someone earning an honest living.

So, sugearbear**, at what point do I need to start predicting numbers in this scenario?

* This was worth it just to say that...

** Still funny.

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theOtherJT
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Attack of the clones

Ok, you're going to struggle to buy thousands of pounds worth of goods with this - but surely the real way to abuse this system is with a cloned card and just keep paying for little things? Keep a stack of them and never pay for your tube journey again. Never pay for your petrol again (only fill up 1/4 of a tank at a time). Never pay for your round in the pub again... That's what has always really worried me about this contactless thing. Just because it's a small amount of money per transaction doesn't mean someone couldn't systematically steal a lot from you before your next bank statement arrives - I mean, who actually checks theirs daily to make sure it all lines up?

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An EPIC picture of Earth, sunny side up, from one MEEELLION miles out

theOtherJT
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If you're interested...

High res picture

Pretty amazing to think this was taken from a million miles out.

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Apple Watch is such a flop it's the world's top-selling wearable

theOtherJT
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Solution in search of a problem

All "smart" watches are, as far as I can see. If they worked as a total replacement for your phone then perhaps just perhaps they would be more convenient than carrying that around, but they don't. Even in the rare cases where the android ones can be used to make phone calls, the inherent limitations of the screen size makes them a bloody pain to use.

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The roots go deep: Kill Adobe Flash, kill it everywhere, bod says

theOtherJT
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User pushback

I'm sure part of the problem here is the users. Don't get me wrong, Flash is an open wound, but it's only installed on any of my machines because of the incessant braying from office staff if I take it away from them. Some of those staff out rank me and I have to comply, but nothing here NEEDS the bloody thing.

We're going to struggle to make this go away until we can properly educate people about what a terrible idea it is having it in the first place. Sadly it's not people like you and me who get to chose if we run it or not. We _know_ how bad it is. We need to do a better job of getting that message over to everyone else.

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Reddit CEO U-turn: Site no longer a bastion of free speech – and stop posting so much hate

theOtherJT
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Head -> Sand.

I still maintain that there's nothing to be gained by pretending that opinions, no matter if you find them repulsive, don't exist. I don't want to be part of a society that says "You may not think this". I'd like to be part of one that says "You should not think this" and that's a very different thing.

If everyone is doing their jobs right - and I do mean _everyone_ from the politicians to the teachers to the parents to the friends and neighbours - then this sort of thing goes away on its own. I see these sorts of subreddits as a sort of social barometer. You can measure our success as a society by what is in them and how many people agree with it.

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Bloodthirsty Microsoft prepares for imminent 'major' job cuts

theOtherJT
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Re: Perhaps this is to disguise some other bad news?

It's not the steaming turd W8/W8.1 was nor is it as vomit inducing as Server 2012.

In principle, probably not, but in execution it's looking scarily like it might actually be worse. Instead of a Moskvitch built like a Bentley*, it looks like we might be getting a Bentley built like a Moskvitch. All good stuff in theory, but bits keep falling off and breaking all the time.

*Although their track record on build quality isn't exactly perfect...

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KILLER! Adobe Flash, Windows zero-day vulns leak from Hacking Team raid

theOtherJT
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Re: "Ask to Activate"

Which every single one of my Windows users would just immediately click "OK" to because they get a million pop up windows a day during the normal functioning of their Windows machines, so have just gotten used to that being a thing they do :(

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We tried using Windows 10 for real work and ... oh, the horror

theOtherJT
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This start menu... thing...

The more I think about it, the more I think this is actually a mistake that happened a long time ago and we're just perpetuating it.

I mean, what is the start menu, really? It's an application launcher. A way to start programs. I used to do that by navigating to the place in the filesystem where the program was and typing "programname.exe"

That was a bit tiresome, so I started putting .bat files in one "run" directory that had full paths in them to launch all my programs from there.

Then we got a gui, and shortcuts and a start menu that was basically just that directory full of bat files. That was fine. It solved a problem I had - how to get to programs quickly.

Then, somewhere, something went terribly wrong and the "Start menu" acquired a life of it's own. It suddenly started trying to do things OTHER than start programs. It would appear to still be doing it.

Let's face it, Microsoft, I start a program in your desktop metaphor by clicking on it. All I want from a start menu is a convenient list of things to click on. Can I please, PLEASE just have that back?

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150,000 angry Redditors demand Chairman Pao's head on a spike

theOtherJT
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Re: Really?

I will. /r/sysadmin, /r/linux and /r/drupal have been pretty helpful to me over the last few years.

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theOtherJT
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Point. Missed.

Ms. Pao says that the most virulent detractors on the site are a vocal minority, and that the vast majority of Reddit users are uninterested in what unfolded over the past 48 hours.

Of course. That's totally true. Reddit has millions of users and probably 99% of them are simple consumers who have never posted anything, and probably never will.

This is totally beside the point because without the 1% who do post things - and given how vocal they've gotten, it really does look like they DO care about what has happened in the last 48 hours - then there's no content posted for that 99% to consume, at which point they will leave and it'll all be over.

Don't. Provoke. The. OPs.

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Awoogah: Get ready to patch 'severe' bug in OpenSSL this Thursday

theOtherJT
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Somewhere between terror and joy

It's wonderful to watch these patches rolling in now. Ever since heartbleed the patch train seems to have been unstoppable. People are finally looking at OpenSSL with a properly critical eye and fixing it.

On the other hand... we've all been using this thing in this state for YEARS. I clench up a bit every time a patch is announced in case it's another scary one.

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Wanna go all Gandalf – YOU SHALL NOT PASS – on Windows 10?

theOtherJT
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Re: OK, but is this really relevant?

Probably 99% Linux and a handful of Macs. This is pretty similar to where I am. Large academic institution that provides desktops for scientific computing (which basically means Linux or you spend the rest of time fighting with cygwin) and then a few Windows boxen for the admin staff who are stuck with centrally mandated java apps that only run under IE, and a similar number of Macs for the senior management you can't say "Fuck off, you'll use the standard template desktop like everyone else" to.

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Microsoft rushes out latest Windows 10 build. 300 fixes? Pff, whatever

theOtherJT
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Re: Press start, type network connections

NO! God damn it NO!

How many times do we have to hit UI developers with a CP/M manual before they get this one? If I have to type something into a GUI to find the thing I want they have FAILED at their job. I can type for convenience. I can type for speed. But the GUI is there to be DISCOVERABLE. I need to be able to find things when I don't know what they're called or where they live.

If I don't know where a thing is and have to resort to pointing and clicking around to find it, then the success of the design can be directly measured in the number of interactions I have to make * time each one takes where the lower the final number the better.

You can really cock this up in two ways:

The "Windows 2000 server" way: Have one page, but it's got 20,000 options on it. I'll get lost scrolling around in there trying to find the damn thing I'm looking for. I find it eventually but it takes too damn long.

The "Windows 8.x" way: Click through 20 pages with only 2 options on each having to constantly branch and double back. I'll probably assume I'm going the wrong way and give up before I find what I want.

There is an optimum balance for this - I reckon MS were closing in on it as they moved from NT3 toward XP, but have been moving away from it again ever since vista.

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Linux Mint 17.2: If only all penguinista desktops were done this way

theOtherJT
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re: It looks a lot like Windows XP.

Yes. And That's a good thing. XP was pretty usable. I mean, it was a horrible bloated undead corpse under the hood, but the bit the faced the user was pretty easy to understand, and now we've had 15 years of XP to get good and used to it, it's _really_ easy to understand.

TBH this is pretty much exactly what I want from my OS. Reliable *nixy underbelly, simple functional UI... which I guess is why I already run Mint 16 on my laptop, and will probably be upgrading to this pretty soon.

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Crowdfunded beg-a-thon to bail out Greece raises 0.003% of target

theOtherJT
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Per head of population....

There's ballpark 500,000,000 people in the EU, right? Which means every single one of them would have to throw Greece about €500 to pay this down.

Put another way, Greece has somehow managed to run up a debt of about €21,000 per head of it's 11ish million population?

I'll freely admit I'm not any sort of economist, but I don't see how they're going to convince anyone that that's a good value proposition there.

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LG's six-sided battery to take smart watches into new timezones

theOtherJT
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Wasted space

I'm still waiting for someone to work out that they can put the battery in the strap. Most watches I've owned the strap was a series of linked flat pieces of metal anyway.

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Will a datacentre be driving your car in 12 years' time?

theOtherJT
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Cold. Dead. Body.

Over my, etc.

I've done the whole commuter stop-start hour of hell thing, and I can see why you might want your car to do that for you, but even if it did nothing would convince me to move back outside of the city and do go through that waste of time again every week day.

I _like_ driving. I live in the middle of Oxford for gods sake, and you'd have to be certifiably insane to choose to drive around here as a means of getting from point to point. That's not why I do it. I own a car and 2 motorbikes for the purpose of going places far away and enjoying the process. Pick the one most appropriate to the prevailing weather. Sometimes I just go get lost in the back-roads for an afternoon because it's fun.

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