* Posts by theOtherJT

366 posts • joined 6 Jun 2013

Page:

iPhones clock-blocked and crocked by setting date to Jan 1, 1970

theOtherJT
Silver badge

No excuse for this.

I love the people trying to defend this one with "Well, we never thought anyone would do that? Why would anyone do that?"

I'm sorry, you give an end user the ability to enter a value into ANYTHING you fucking sanitize that value before saving it somewhere. Users are untrustworthy bastards who will deliberately break things!

3
0

When asked 'What's a .CNT file?' there's a polite way to answer

theOtherJT
Silver badge

A few from my RT mail queue:

I always particularly enjoy the ones with no data in the message body.

Subject: "Unable to open excel file"

Body:

Attachment: "${FILENAME}.pdf"

IT: "That isn't an excel file."

User: "I didn't realize there were other kinds!"

Subject: "Can't send any email."

Body: to anyone. Not even the help address.

IT: "..."

User: "Oh. It's working now."

Subject: "Is the server down?"

Body:

IT: "Can you please be a little more specific? We run a large number of services. What is it exactly that you're currently unable to do?"

User: "I don't know. It's down. I can't get at any of my files or anything."

IT: "Ok, I think the best thing is for me to come and see you. Can you please tell me which office you're in?"

User: "Oh, I'm at home today."

IT: "Ah, so the problem is with our remote access portal. Are you getting any error messages? It seems to be working from here."

User: "What's that? I just took the PC from my desk home with me last night and now nothing works."

14
0

Getting a grip on Puppet: A guide for beginners

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Useful but limiting

I've got about 1000 nodes running puppet here, and it is handy as a way to easily get packages on and off and do simple configuration, but for 90% of services there comes a point where you end up just creating a puppet File resource to deliver a bash script and then an Exec resource to run it, because the native ruby-like manifest language is such a bloody pain to actually write complex conditionals in.

2
0

For sale: One 236-bed nuclear bunker

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: preserving government

I had the misfortune to work on digitising the catalogue at my local library around the turn of the millennium. This involved actually pulling everything off the shelves and making sure it matched what it said it was in the card catalogue before updating the computer records.

One of the things I turned up at the time was a published collection of "survivability statistics" from the late 70s that it seemed everyone had forgotten about. Made for quite frightening reading. I seem to recall that given the high population density of the UK and locations of various "likely targets" the estimates were for about 98% casualties over the first year in the even of a "limited" (which they defined as "Not deliberately targeting population centres") nuclear attack. The initial casualties from the explosions/radiation weren't even the big numbers. What they expected to kill most people was starvation and disease after the national infrastructure broke down over the course of the first year.

2
0
theOtherJT
Silver badge

You're thinking of Vault 69...

1
0

BT broadband is down: Former state monopoly goes TITSUP UK-wide

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: Well we are no doubt minutes for a socital collapse here

With the internet at my house cut off, I don't have anything better to do. I don't have a mohawk right now, but I can supply my own leathers. I mean, it's this, or stay at work, right?

3
0

Rooting your Android phone? Google’s rumbled you again

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: This is not...

Indeed. But they didn't buy, they took out a lifetime lease. They only thought they bought because they didn't read the terms of the contract carefully enough. It's a bit like the difference between buying freehold and buying leasehold.

18
1

Stop the music! Booby-trapped song carjacked vehicles – security prof

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Translation:

"A firewall is not going to do it, the architecture is too complex and cost really counts to these guys"

"A firewall would totally do it, but they much prefer profit margin to building safe products."

...which has always been par for the course with auto makers.

1
0

Squeeze the banana to log into this office Wi-Fi

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Would probably be illegal here.

We have to have people sign for guest wifi accounts. We have to have a persons name attached to every account so we know where to direct the police should they ever request the peeping tom, sorry, "Security" information we're required to collect on everyone who uses our network. I'm told that after a long and expensive process our lawyers decided that we were probably liable to prosecution if we didn't, so anonymous access had to go :(

0
0

Gov must hire 'thousands' of techies to rescue failing projects

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: Nope

I'm sure that's not in line with current best-practice for synergistic personnel solutions in the modern workplace. I understood what you meant, for a start.

9
0

Pentagon fastens lasers to military drones to zap missiles out of the skies

theOtherJT
Silver badge

And the "drone" part helps how exactly?

"In 2012, the US Department of Defense cancelled its Boeing YAL-1 Airborne Laser Testbed [...] Now the Pentagon is investigating how to build the laser technology onto smaller drones that can loiter over a target for a long time"

And if they couldn't get it to fit in a 747 what the actual shit makes them think it's worth wasting the time trying THE EXACT SAME THING on something only a fraction of the size?

1
1

Bigger than Safe Harbor: Microsoft prez vows to take down US gov in data protection lawsuit

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Picking their principles

I'm very happy Microsoft are standing up and saying "No" to what are on the face requests of decidedly iffy legal standing to hand over data about non-US citizens held on non-US soil. On the other hand their stance with the Win10 data collection has been... less principled... to say the least.

One has to wonder why it is they've taken a stand on this particular issue. They obviously don't care about the sanctity of their users privacy or they wouldn't be so keen to collect so much data on them, and that being the case they must be doing this for other reasons. After all, no company - especially one as large as Microsoft - does anything that it doesn't expect to benefit from in some form or another. If this isn't about protecting our data from unwanted scrutiny, then what data is this about?

I'm just waiting for the other shoe to drop on this one.

0
0

UK govt: No, really, we're not banning cryptography

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Exercise in futility.

I'm going to keep posting my responses like this every time they talk about intercepting terrorist communications.

-----BEGIN PGP MESSAGE-----

Version: GnuPG v1

jA0EAwMCSYY6dO55cipgycAm5ZhaJhKgu95a6M6d9zaUfo6sQaPQGKlFN8Wg9LOG

U9J6TmvO6bW9P/qCreAa4PlUusF1LoSLpaDzp1vxd854QgsIyPG9dAzttUyViZqv

Fw+RX2rAUROQzeSuLpSpk78Qh9ArzB8bDFhf/suyvJu4kphpzWYr8wIds9hj/Y9v

LnypIEXe2vBD6iXB9/1jZ+ZLVt4vNXEqb+qWj+OVLFyKsoAoHteoQ620Aq6kAhlJ

9Ds+5QDUKJL39uLlLlmegIRtsnLJ/2XzaBSE+XDKWSL6Z9k4bgTHK1S07hG33ehS

PSYi5EH5Fow=

=QIrZ

-----END PGP MESSAGE-----

Key: thisremainspossible

11
0

Microsoft herds biz users to Windows 10 by denying support for Win 7 and 8 on new CPUs

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: So here's how you get around it

...and of course, add to that the fact that the machines we have now are SO FAST that there's no point updating them. I'm still getting by perfectly well on a desktop that's 7 years old in my office, because nothing I do there requires it to be any faster. Sure, one day it will pack up and I'll need a new one, but I have no need to update, and as long as I don't need to I'm keeping accounts happy by not requesting budget for it.

5
0
theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: Does anybody else think...

I'm sure they can. They just don't want to.

0
0
theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: Let me see if I'm getting this right...

Yeah, but CPU's don't really require drivers. This is what I'm confused by. The CPU needs to be able to run the OS kernel long before any drivers are loaded, so the only thing they could withhold access to is extensions like SSE, MMX etc, which one might well argue we don't actually care about most of the time, seeing as the ones we already have are quite adequate. If it's an x86 CPU, it's an x86 CPU... unless they've managed to get the CPU manufacturers to start making x86 CPU's that lie about what they can actually do when polled by the mechanism that Win7 and older use to determine what CPU they're running on.

0
0
theOtherJT
Silver badge

Let me see if I'm getting this right...

What they're saying is that because Windows 7 was engineered for older CPUs it requires various compatibility type stuff for newer ones, which MS will no longer be providing.

Now, if they're talking about things like SSE* and other extensions to the x86 (or x86_64) spec, that's fine. New stuff is invented, old OS doesn't know it exists, so won't use it - but that shouldn't stop the old OS from running, surely? It just means you don't get access to all the new shiny that the CPU can provide.

Unless they're pushing a version check into Win7 that checks what kind of CPU it's running on and then flat refuses to work unless it's a known good (in which case, don't install that particular update) the only way I can see them preventing Win7 from running on _any_ CPU that supports the x86_64 standard is for them to get the chip manufacturers to change the way the chip reports it's capabilities.

I have to assume that very early in the boot process Windows tries to determine what the CPU is capable of by running some instructions, and if it doesn't get answers it likes it'll stall with "Unsupported architecture" or similar.

So, for this to work, despite being x86_64 capable, at that point these new CPU's say "Sorry I don't know what you want from me. I'm an x86_64_Forced_Upgrade" at which point Win7 will go "Well, as far as I can tell this isn't an x86 compatible CPU, so I give up"?

*Whatever version of that we're on by now

5
0

After-dinner Mint? Stylish desktop finale released as last of the 17 line

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: Linux & Games

Part of the problem is fear on the part of AAA game title publishers that encouraging native Linux ports will lead to rampant piracy. A lot of them seem uncomfortable with the idea that you, as the customer, might actually have access to the filesystem in your PC and as one of those weird "Linux people" might know enough about computers to circumvent their copy protection mechanism. These are people who are much happier with the idea of a PC as an appliance (hence the direction of Windows As A Service and as little access to the hardware as possible) and would much rather everyone only released for consoles.

Fortunately, Valve have seen straight through this nonsense and have enough standing as a publisher in their own right these days to carry a lot of high quality games with them. We can but hope that they will continue to do so.

1
0
theOtherJT
Silver badge

My only problem was the installer

Which when I tried to install Mint over Christmas was inexplicably missing the ability to do MD raid or LVM. I imagine most won't notice, but it was a bit of a pain having to drop to a shell and do it all by hand. Clearly the tools are there, seeing as... well... I was able to drop to a shell and do it by hand :/

3
0

Murderous necrophiliac kangaroo briefly wins nation's heart

theOtherJT
Silver badge

It's almost as if you can't apply human values to animals...

Cartoons lied to us I say!

9
0

2015 was the Year of the Linux Phone ... Nah, we're messing with you

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: No one really cares what their OS is.

Actually, my desktop runs Debian, but that's by the by. Unless you work in a technical field, or are just a massive nerd (and there's nothing wrong with that, I'm with Wil Wheaton on that one) there's no reason why you should know or care what your OS is, is all I'm saying.

0
0
theOtherJT
Silver badge

No one really cares what their OS is.

I mean, normal people. Not people like us commentards.

No, really, they don't care. They shouldn't have to care. Computers, tablets, smartphones - these things are tools. They do a job (all right, many jobs) and they should be judged on how well they do that. The software stack matters WAY more than the OS does in terms of getting the job done, and that's all about the user experience. How hard was it to make it do what you wanted. That's what people care about, and Linux isn't always great at that.

Maybe there are good ideological reasons for Linux (and FOSS in general) being better than Windows or OSX, but they're still going to take a back seat to "getting the job done" in any real situation. Once you have to live in the real world with deadlines and deliverables and release targets and all that shit, then ideological purity goes straight back in the the bottom of the wardrobe along with the bong you have left over from college as a cute reminder of how "free" you used to be.

Don't get me wrong, I like Linux. I think it's a perfectly acceptable Desktop operating system FOR ME because it does all the things I want it to do, and it does them no worse than any other OS. I like the fact that it allows me to get a bit more up close and personal with my hardware and start tinkering with things too, but lets be honest here, normal people don't want to do that either. Normal people have better things to do with their lunch hours than benchmark different filesystem configurations and see if they can improve the iops performance on their NAS.

Certainly Linux could be better, but then basically everything could be better. If these "Year of linux on the..." arguments spur anyone into improving little bits of the user experience here and there then that's great, but I don't really feel the need to get too excited about it.

16
0

Server retired after 18 years and ten months – beat that, readers!

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: Power Supply Work

As for prolonged power supply work, never heard of a generator?

Yup. We were reliably informed that it was totally capable of supplying enough juice to run the entire building, never mind the entire server room for the 2 days that the mains would be off due to works in the street.

I'm told you could hear the bang it made when they flipped it over and let it take up the load from nearly a mile away.

1
0
theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: I find this one a bit difficult to believe

I have seen what happens when the standard Molex power connectors used for old IDE drives, which should not be reversible, are reversed nonetheless.

Wow. How much brute force and ignorance was required to get one of those in backwards? They're hard enough to connect the right way around!

11
0

Stephen Hawking reckons he's cracked the black hole paradox

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: Would you like another dimension with that, sir!

If you can run mathematics forwards, but not backwards, then you're violating determinism.

Well, ok, but running backwards black holes are spewing matter into the universe from beyond their event horizon all the time. I don't see why that's any more weird than things just suddenly coming into existence with no obvious cause. All we're really saying is that on the other side of that... thing... there's something we know bugger all about because we can't measure it in any way. That might equally apply to the event horizon of a black hole, or the surface of space-time itself as far as I can tell - but then I'm not a theoretical physicist.

1
0
theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: Would you like another dimension with that, sir!

If Information is lost then you can throw out determinism. You'd have effect without cause because the cause

Don't we already have that tho? We have no idea where these particle pairs come from in the first place - they just seem to spontaneously spring into existence. We don't know why radioactive substances decay when they do either. We can do some statistical analysis on them and say that "well, in X amount of time half of it will be gone" but we can't say which half, or why it will be that half not the other, it just... happens.

I thought determinism was already a pretty much abandoned concept at this point. Some events do appear to be genuinely random.

2
0

BBC risks wrath of android rights activists with Robot Wars reboot

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: High Tech? Nope just will it burn

The thing is with the rules being what they are (weight limit of 100Kg, no explosives, fire/plasma throwing, or projectile weapons on the grounds of them being far too dangerous) robot wars ended up pretty much a solved problem. You mount a big gas-ram under a flippy thing and just throw the opposition around. There's no need for it to get higher tech. That level of tech was already basically unbeatable.

10
0

Beware the terrorist drones! For they are coming! Pass new laws!

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: aircraft

My point isn't that an aircraft will be downed. I expect a modern engine to ingest a drone without causing the aircraft to crash.

My point is that such an event quickly gets people on board the side of a government hoping for sweeping new powers.

I agree completely. IIRC they test jet engines by firing frozen turkeys into them out of an air-cannon* I don't see any little commercial sized drone doing more damage than that. You've correctly identified the problem: People are idiots :(

*If that's not true, please don't correct me it'll shatter a hilarious mental image I've had for years!

2
0
theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: Don't mention the war!!!

How do you legislate against these?

I'm pretty sure that's already going to be illegal. I have no idea what specific law applies, but I believe there is such a thing as "Conspiracy to cause explosions" which sounds like it would cover it.

1
0
theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: aircraft

it's getting to the point where consumer gadgets in the hands of these same people might eventually cause the equivalent of a bird strike

Which planes can take. Bird strikes are a thing we know happens. Not a lot of crashes because of bird strikes

at which point expect everyone to go nuts and the government to get what they want.

And here you nail the crux of the problem. People are idiots :(

3
0
theOtherJT
Silver badge

Terrorism is easy...

...which is why I remain utterly unconvinced that it exists, at least in the form we're having blasted at us by the government all the time.

If there really were organized cells of secret agent grade terrorists out there - as opposed to a tiny handful of disaffected radicals with delusions of martyrdom - we'd be seeing hundreds of deaths a week, but as it stands large scale attacks like occurred in Paris last year are crazy, astonishingly rare.

Oh, and did those people use sophisticated technological solutions to kill people? No. They bought some cheap assault weapons and shot up some crowded places. That's trivial to do. Basically any idiot can do that, and even that involved actually getting hold of guns, which is at least moderately hard this side of the pond. Think how much damage you could do simply by deliberately driving a few cars off of motorway bridges into the traffic below. That's a guaranteed death toll - not to mention the economic damage done by closing the motorways - and all you need to pull that off is a copy of autotrader and 500 quid for a 15 year old banger.

Seriously, terrorism is easy. Given that we don't have bodies piling up in the streets practically daily, we clearly don't need more laws to protect ourselves from people who might do those sorts of things because either they don't exist, or the laws we have are already sufficient to catch them before they kill anyone the vast majority of the time.

10
0

Rejoice, Penguinistas, Linux 4.4 is upon us

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: "Until you don't need to pull up the command line..."

I agree with you that if you are at any point forced to use a CLI on a desktop operating system, then one cannot consider that operating system fit for purpose. See my feelings on the Windows 8 way of administrating Secure wireless connections for example.

Where I disagree is that "Linux" is in that state. These aren't "Linux" problems. They're "Linux distribution" problems. There's plenty of good GUI tools to manage a Linux desktop, it's just a matter of if your distribution actually ships them, which frequently they don't. That leads to instant frustration on the part of a regular end user, who quite reasonably expects to be able to do these things without first delving into the package manager and installing another tool.

"Linux" is ready for the desktop. It's been ready for a while. The holdup is getting that one magic distribution that includes everything that anyone might conceivably want and in such a way as it's not overwhelming. We don't have that yet.

11
3
theOtherJT
Silver badge

Virgil 3d

This is officially Very Cool. Has anyone actually tried using this yet - what level of feature completeness are we looking at here with regards to getting access to hardware acceleration from the GPU right inside a VM without having to resort to direct pass-through to a dedicated card, does anyone know?

3
0

Confirmed: How to stop Windows 10 forcing itself onto PCs – your essential guide

theOtherJT
Silver badge

"Redmond isn't dumb"

Bold statement. There's a surprising amount of evidence to the contrary, and you have to admit they do have a history of committing utter howlers worryingly frequently.

8
1

Smartphone hard, dudes, like it’s the end of the world!

theOtherJT
Silver badge

\m/

I turned up to work seriously hung over this morning because of... um... reasons. Steel Panther have just made it feel like it was all worth it.

2
0

Windows 10 phones are not dead yet. Acer, Alcatel OneTouch just made some new ones

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: Continuum

Give it a few years. I expect to actually see this all over the place when very slightly mobile workers such as myself get bought a company phone instead of a company laptop. Once it actually works (assuming it ever does - which I'll admit isn't a shoe-in) this is something that would keep many, many accounts departments very happy as they get to reduce the number of devices they have to shell out for.

8
3

'You're updated!' Drupal says, with fingers crossed behind back

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Why am I not surprised?

I've learned to really, really hate Drupal.

Everyone knows the worst part of software (and by extension web) development is having to maintain someone else's code.

Drupal Core - such as it is - isn't terrible. The trouble is the core doesn't really do anything except provide a horrifically complicated framework for writing extensions. By the time you've added enough modules to do what you wanted (which are frequently buggy, terribly documented, and not quite a match for what you wanted anyway) the whole thing has become a creaking pile of hacks-upon-hacks which are just waiting for an opportunity to fall over, so you end up writing even more modules to try and patch it all up.

This inevitably leads to having to read the source for all the modules you're trying to make play nice with one another, and by the time you're done with that and have written half a dozen "glue" modules to keep it all together (which you now have to maintain because there's a decent chance that some future update will break them) it's taken longer to get everything working than it would have done to write the entire site from scratch because everything you've written has had to be contorted around all the other crap that you didn't write and don't really understand.

What you're left with is something that's not only frighteningly fragile because it's made from 300 different components by 200 different authors, at least half of which haven't updated them in 2 years and probably never will, but also dog slow because the chain from "request" to "render" has to pass through every single one of those things.

</rant>

8
0

ISPs: UK.gov should pay full costs of Snooper's Charter hardware

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: "UK.gov should pay"

I'm not so sure about that.

If every ISP put a line item on your bill "Expenses related to government spying" and all announced a 10% increase in monthly contract price the day the legislation takes effect, that would probably be more obvious to the population than silently paying for it out of our taxes, which are already pretty incomprehensible.

24
0
theOtherJT
Silver badge

On a side note...

Could you stop with the images full of text please? They're incredibly hard to read.

7
0

The Register's entirely serious New Year's resolutions for 2016

theOtherJT
Silver badge

What did I just read?

There's a... voice... to the Reg. When it's on form it feels like a lesson from that one slightly elderly teacher who knew damn well that the world was changing but didn't have to like it. The one that was going to go on doing things their way because they were too good at their job to get fired for it. The one possessed of an acerbic wit which everyone feared getting turned on them, but loved to see directed at others. The one that could pour scorn with the very, very best of them and knowing that made any praise received so much more valuable because you could be utterly sure it was sincere.

On your best day 'Reg, collectively, you sound like that.

This, on the other hand... well.

I see the author is marked as "Team Register" which feels apt for something that reads like it was actually written by committee. A committee that was a bit reluctant to... well... commit. It feels like the sort of press releases you get from a really expensive PR department when they have something unpleasant to say but have no choice but to release it. Sure, the message is in there, somewhere, but the purpose of the statement was to obfuscate it not to promote it.

In short, I've read this twice, and I'm still not entirely sure what you're trying to tell me, only that I don't think I like the tone of voice I'm being told in.

53
0

Remembering those who logged off in 2015

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: Passed on, passed away...

Where do they go? What do they do? Who do they do it with? Do they have broadband?

Actually he answered this quite comprehensively in Soul Music. They go where they expect to go!

From the cartoon adaptation but the scene is basically the same in the book.

He goes into it in several others too iirc.

1
0

Trustworthy x86 laptops? There is a way, says system-level security ace

theOtherJT
Silver badge

"legislation may come to the rescue."

"Drawing a parallel between the development of human rights and the development of secure personal computers, Rutkowska suggested legislation may come to the rescue."

Unfortunately the sorts of people in a position to actually exploit the vulnerabilities she's talking about here are exactly the sort of people who don't give a damn about legislation, and when they do get caught breaking the law are in a position to make sure it's the law that changes, not their behaviour.

6
0

MPs question value of canning Raytheon from e-borders

theOtherJT
Silver badge

If you've got 1.1bn to spend...

Then surely the smart thing to do is spin up an entirely new company for the duration of the project? Hire a project manager, get them to hire a senior staff, get them to recruit some programmers. Do absolutely everything in-house and if it does all go sideways you can just dissolve the company and make everyone redundant without it costing 35 million in lawyers and hundreds more million in "Contract termination fees"

Who the hell is negotiating these contracts anyway?

2
0

Press Backspace 28 times to own unlucky Grub-by Linux boxes

theOtherJT
Silver badge

If an attacker has physical access to your machine...

...it's their machine.

Not going to get too excited about this one.

0
0

After Death Star II blew: Dissecting the tech of Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens

theOtherJT
Silver badge

30 years is nothing

"The X-wing is a cool design, but in the 30 years since the end of Episode VI, it seems odd that no-one has come up with at least some more outstanding modifications."

The F18 Hornet entered service in 1983, over 30 years ago now, and is still going strong. Yes, there have been other planes since, but it does it's job so well there are hundreds of the things still flying all around the world.

The Nimitz class first came into service around 1975 and the first replacement "Gerald R Ford" class are only just under construction. Hell, the B52 bomber has been in service since the FIFTIES and is expected to stay in service until some time around 2040.

Military gear can have a very long life cycle - especially if it was expensive.

16
0

Microsoft extends Internet Explorer 8 desktop lifeline to upgrade laggards

theOtherJT
Silver badge
Unhappy

I know what we'll be doing shortly after the Christmas break then...

...and no, it won't be "Upgrading everyone to IE11".

It'll be cleaning up the mess we inevitably get into after we're told that our web-apps still aren't compatible with any browser except IE8 and an "updated version" will be available in the new year. Like we were told in December 2014.

And 2013.

1
0

Puppet jerks into life, hugs Microsoft and orchestrates apps

theOtherJT
Silver badge

"in Puppet code"

It's not even clean ruby.

Puppet syntax is _weird_ and makes me miserable almost daily :(

0
0

Microsoft drops internal PowerShell tests on GitHub

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: Um?

Mandatory:

https://xkcd.com/1597/

1
0

Is ATM security threatened by Windows XP support cutoff? Well, yes, but …

theOtherJT
Silver badge

Re: Why is this a problem?

Because sometimes we find flaws in things that let you escape from the secure mode in which you're supposed to be trapped. Sure, I'd hope that with a cash machine that wouldn't be possible, but sometimes really _weird_ shit gets through.

I heard a story of a PoS terminal many years ago where one of the custom buttons on the unit mapped directly to shift. Hold down for 8 seconds and up came the "Do you want to turn on accessibility mode?" dialogue, which brought the start menu to the foreground with it. From there one could get at the "Run" menu and bad things happened.

Again, I'd hope that you couldn't pull such a trivial trick on a cash machine... but you never know. All it takes is for someone to work out that you _can_ and then it's just a race between the machine being robbed dry and the bank taking it out of service if there's no patch available.

1
0
theOtherJT
Silver badge

How many ATM's are properly updated anyway?

I genuinely have no idea - but do we really believe that every ATM running XP is getting security patches applied immediately upon release every time?

22
0

Page:

Forums