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* Posts by Denigor

93 posts • joined 3 Jun 2013

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We're BFFs AGAIN, say AT&T and Netflix after penning peering pact

Denigor

Re: Isn't peering....

The term peering doesn't imply any particular payment structure on its own, so asymmetrical traffic is fine (one party pays).

Tier1 to Tier1 interconnects are payment free though.

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Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE

Denigor

I believe the next hype-level inbound is '8k'.

The hype is that at 8k your eye cannot tell the difference any more.

For me, I just think 8k has nice natural-extension-upwards ring to it.

Curved screens are a weird TV hype. 'Here's a screen where you *cannot* see all the action from all your furniture'. Really??

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Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash

Denigor

Re: I just wonder

I don't think Dell is holding on to the bitcoins and gambling on them going up or down. They are changing the Bitcoins to cash immediately. This is why Coinbase is involved. If they wanted to hold onto the bitcoins, they'd not need to involve a currency exchange. I'm not an expert, but this is how I read it.

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10Gbps over crumbling COPPER: Boffins cram bits down telco wire

Denigor

Re: Dumb concept - stop being lazy and just run the fiber to the home

I think the cost of putting up telephone poles around the place and stringing to houses would outweigh the cost of just digging up driveways, in the UK,

I think it's great that in some places cables can be 'strung up through the trees' though. Absolutely agree that where it can be done, do it..!

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Denigor

Re: why not take it all the way in.

I do think it would be cool for operators to offer FTTP where residences are prepared to pay their own costs for the access trench, or dig/provide it themselves to some standard.

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T-Mobile boss: 'High and mighty' Verizon and AT&T are 'raping you for every penny you have'

Denigor

IN the subtitle of this article it says 'Trail' instead of 'Trial'.

A 7 day ipphone trail sounds good though. I picture it as some sort guided tour around Cupertino hotspots.

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Reg probe bombshell: How we HACKED mobile voicemail without a PIN

Denigor

This might not entirely be the fault of the voicemail providers.

The originating line switch which accepted the access connection (from your VOIP line - but could as easily have been a Basic Rate ISDN or a Primary Rate PBX interface) should be marking the originating line identify as *untrusted* (user provided not screened) That is, unless it has gone through screening in which case it can become trusted.

If the originating service provider isn't doing things properly then when the call is being passed to the voicemail provider (terminating exchange) they could be acting on the incorrectly marked fields.

Another number to use is the Network Number. In the UK, at least, this should always be provided by the originating service provider and be trusted (public can't change it). Ideally this is the number that should be used for voicemail access/validation, where possible (but there are other complications with this).

Either way, EE and 3 should not allow non-PIN authentication if originating CLI can't be trusted to be network screened/provided. Shame on the *Test Teams* within Three and EE for not picking up on this. O2 and Vodafone proved it can be done right, so why can't YOU?

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Whaddaya mean, NO REFUND? But I paid in Bitcoins! Oh I see...

Denigor

I'm impressed that this article recognises a legitimate use of Bitcoins - for purchasing - rather than just as a get rich quick scheme.

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Borked Bitcoin bunker MtGox in administration: Lawyer seizes control

Denigor

I bought some bitcoins online. I was able to use them to buy some computer stuff online from abroad (second hand), which promptly arrived (and all works!).

So, for me, the bitcoins were very easy to use and therefore have value to me, beyond the cost of the purchase.

Bitcoins are not just 'collectables' as you seem to call them. I'm not collecting any of them. Just using them as I would any useful tool.

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Anatomy of OpenSSL's Heartbleed: Just four bytes trigger horror bug

Denigor

So having been caught out by this problem, will those organisations using these open-source libraries start examining the source updates to ensure they are secure?

Will they pay other organisations to validate the source for them, if they don't have the expertise in-house?

I only ask because surely the real problem will be if everyone sighs about the bug and updates their systems, but then learn nothing from it and just hope it doesn't happen again.....

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Wookiee! CHEWIE'S BACK in Star Wars Ep VII – blab Hollywood 'sources'

Denigor

Star wars is popular, i get that. but why does The Reg report on it?

I like these Star Wars updates, keep em coming. But if you are doing films then why not do updates for all the other cool films coming along too? And why stop at Star Wars films, why not branch into all the other Star Wars media whilst you are at it?

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Too late, Blighty! Samsung boffins claim breakthrough graphene manufacturing success

Denigor

Re: The real difference

Huh?

Anyone can patent an original invention, without having to make it. You don't even have to make a prototype. You can get away with just a good written description (drawings help).

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Denigor

Re: The real difference

I'm not sure the Apple heads, who are worth hundreds of millions each, will be vastly upset at losing out on this invention. I think they'll still sleep ok at night. :/

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Denigor

Graphene could make deadly strong filaments, invisible to the human eye, which would cut right through you if you walked into it.

urgh what a thought.

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I QUIT: Mozilla's anti-gay-marriage Brendan Eich leaps out of door

Denigor

If you work for an IT company, but you happen to prefer and use the products of a competitors' company when at home, then should you also resign?

This guy did NOTHING as CEO to further his private cause. He didn't use the power of the company, he didn't sack gay employees, he didn't ban pink screensavers.

If you did a great job at your workplace, and you were sacked by the lefty CEO because he heard you voted Republican/Conservative, would that be fair?

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IEEE signs off on 400 Gb/s Ethernet development

Denigor

Re: Sod that...

That would be a poor argument. When we went to 9600 the benefits were huge and obvious. It was definitely needed, not least of all because it reduced the cost of batch-data phone calls by so much....

Consumer demand drives vendors. Not the other way around. Exception being anything with an apple on it.

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Indosat fat-thumbs route announcements (again)

Denigor

I thought BGP router admins commonly deploy policies these days to ignore problematic announcements?

If <route increments within 5 minutes> exceeds <10> ignore

If route announcement from peer-as 12345 includes peers <not on peer whitelist> then ignore

The tier 1/2 providers with the neighbour relationships need to take some responsibility here, to police their direct neighbours At least a little bit. ?

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Soz, BT: All EE's 4G goodies still won't give you 'seamless voice'

Denigor

Re: Get your facts right

Is BT's 50MHz of spectrum enough to provide good coverage and bandwidth to large numbers of users inside and outside of tower blocks in central London, without having to have access points so often that it was be too expensive to deploy?

Qualifications: 'O' level in woodwork, 1988. And 50m swimming badge.

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Money? What money? Lawyer for accused Silk Road boss claims you can't launder Bitcoin

Denigor

Re: Chewbacca defense

Was he laundering money himself.

Or was he providing a website service, which could be used by other people. If they sold narcotics or laundered money through it, then the charge should be on them, not on him as the host.

I think they could charge him with some form of aiding and abetting.the laundering operation.

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'Catastrophic' server disk-destroying glitch menaced Google cloud

Denigor

But aren't the physical hard drives backed up elsewhere, in case they go up in flames or something?

so if any are deleted, they just pull them back off the backups. Right?

I know it's cloud, so distributed and virtual, but at layer 1 there must still be some backups somewhere.

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Apple to grieving sons: NO, you cannot have access to your dead mum's iPad

Denigor

Its data protection.

If Apple unlock this one without a court order that gives the security services some leverage. The NSA could argue that the IPAD they just took off someone needs to be unlocked, and is also a special case, and shouldn't need a court's approval to open.

Many on this thread have used an emotional arguement. It's an emotional case. But you have to step back and think if the implications. Apple are doing just this. They KNOW that they are getting bad press on this, but they KNOW that it can be far worse, in the long term, if they are seen to be an organisation who will sometimes allow data access without a court order.

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Denigor

Re: Well done

If I left my IPAD to someone in my will, and I didn't leave a password for it, then I would expect it to be wiped and not unlocked. What if there was information on there that I never wanted my family to see after my death? What if I knew that such information could destroy my family?

Apple are right to demand a court order. The information on there could be terrible, and there's nothing to prove that the owner wanted their family to see it.

BUT, it's clear that the owner wanted their family to use it. For this reason I do think Apple should provide an ability to WIPE a tablet back to factory settings in these circumstances, rather than unlock it.

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Murdoch dumps Microsoft, prepares to Hangout with Google

Denigor

Re: Well, that screws...

Or possibly different people are reading different articles?

Or possibly people change their minds based upon the context?

I recommend that you should a) not be so paranoid and b) stop caring about the votes. They don't make any real difference to the experience here.

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Nominet goes titsup after update to WHOIS tool

Denigor

Re: Nominet has dismissed the accusations as nonsense. ®

Is that it? Just £70K for a CEO role?

It's not very much. The CEO isn't there for the money then,at least that much is clear.

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Alcatel-Lucent and BT unveil super fat pipe, splurt out 1.4Tb per second across London

Denigor

I think purists can argue that the term 'broadband' is exactly right for this deployment, based upon the words intended original meaning (wiki quote:)

"The term broadband refers to the wide bandwidth characteristics of a transmission medium and its ability to transport multiple signals and traffic types simultaneously."

It's entirely true that "Joe Public" equates the term to access technology to the premise. But we know better, eh?

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Thanks for suggesting eBay should flog PayPal. It's not happening, CEO tells Carl Icahn

Denigor

How long before Ebay sellers can choose to accept payments through paypal in Bitcoins?

Today an auction cannot be held in Bitcoins. But if the seller wished Bitcoins to be used, then why not?

Paypal provides a nice service whereby payment can be returned if goods are not quite right. This would still be viable if they accepted bitcoins.

Only a matter of time.

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Network Solutions apologises for 'You just paid us $1850' email

Denigor

Re: So they are charging a fortune...

It's not the simplicity of the procedure that counts. It's the work behind it, and the volume.

We don't know how many change actions they get per day across their user base. If the Big named brands are making upwards of 700 changes per day between them, for example, , then that's a LOT of work to process with callbacks.

Further, they now how to put in and maintain the PIN infrastructure, charging mechanisms, SLA/KPI reporting, record maintaining, security procedures in the event of a problem, training for their admins, etc.

As always, the user sees a simple service and wonders why the cost is needed. There's a lot of work that goes into making something seem simple.

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KCOM-owned Eclipse FAILS to cover up the password 'password'

Denigor

Re: I'm sure I've worked there ...

It's good that you recognised the problem. Nowadays though,proving that you emailed the boss (so covered your a$$) isn't good enough in business. Your organisation still failed, regardless of fault.

That no action was taken means that either you didn't make the case clear enough to your boss (unlikely), or that you didn't try hard enough to raise awareness within other parts of your organisation.

We in IT must recognise when to go over our bosses' heads, or call a meeting with others to gain more support, or go direct to the Account with our concerns. It's harder to do and takes more effort and guts, but liek it or not that's what will make the business succeed rather than fail. Bosses aren't always right, and we in IT can't hide behind 'told you so' these days.

Hurts to say it, but it is true.

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Now we're cookin' on gas: Google crafts sugar-alert contact lens for diabetics

Denigor

Re: Would you put a beta product in your eye?

Well, yes I'd put it in for a Beta trial as I don't see it as invasive.

But the real advantage to me isn't the blood suger test. The real advantage is that the LED's can go on to help me find the bloody things when they fall on the floor. Just patent that part alone and they'll be onto a killer product.

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Apple fanbois make it 'official', hook up with Internet of Fridges Things

Denigor

MFI the car, for engine and performance management.

I want to be able to diagnose engine conditions, faults etc without having to go to a garage or buy a specialist cable to plug into the engine somewhere. I want to sit in my front room, with the car parked outside, look at my laptop or phone and see why the engine is displaying a warning light.

I want to be able to gather the running data , possibly GPS positions and speeds from my car when it's outside my house, so I can track journeys, fuel economies etc. I want to see performance over time, to look for indicators of faults developing. I want to be able to look at the logs of all engine management changes, wirelessly, told to me by the engine itself.

And of course, I want it to all be highly secured.

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Fine! We'll keep updating WinXP's malware sniffer after April, says Microsoft

Denigor

Re: *just* 14 more months to upgrade?

What is it your tablet can't do?

Keyboard/mouse/dvd - plug in USB ones.

Run some XP32 software that can't run under 7/8 - install XP on tablet under VM player

Is your tablet an IPad? - There's bound to be some way of running XP on it as it's all intel.

I wonder if anyone offers 'XP in the cloud' yet. The full XP experience forever, via a browser ! :)

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THOUSANDS of UK.gov Win XP PCs to face April hacker storm... including boxes at TAXMAN, NHS

Denigor

Because IT departments put inthe budget for the upgrade each year for the past 4 years. Each time it was declined because of lackof funding, driven by central government spending cuts.

IT do what has to be done. But even they can't just do it for free.

Edit: Oops. What he said above me :)

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Samsung Nexus S beats Galaxy S III – at detecting GAMMA RAYS

Denigor

Of course Samsung phones are best for this. They have to be ready for anything given their neighbours to the North.

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Is your IT department too tough on users?

Denigor

My primary problem with IT is that companies rarely seem to want IT to be truly accountable for the ti9me it takes to do (desktop) support.

It takes ages to fill out the forms to state a support problem. Then they remote desktop to my machine, ask me to show them the problem, then sit and fiddle with it, trying stuff out for an hour. Meanwhile, I'm doing no productive work.

SO I ask them to provide me the code to book my time to for this 'IT fix' hour. They don't provide it to me. So our company doesn't 'see' how much user time it is taking for us users to help IT fix the desktop problems.

Make users book time to an IT code for all time spent helping IT fix issues. That would make IT costs rocket, so companies would start investing better in IT to reduce the problems it's so costly to support.

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Take off, nuke 'em from orbit: Kill patent trolls NOW, says FTC bigwig

Denigor

Re: The outlook for the economy in East Texas

Today patents are worht a lot on the books of the companies that invented/placed/own them.

However, if the trolling companies no longer have reason to buy patents then the demand for them decreases, reducing their value. Some innovation companies will need to put provisions in place for such legislation to pass, because their asset values are going to take a bit hit. It's likely started already, I wouldn't buy patents alone with this uncertain future.

I hope the legislation passes, but it's only a first step.

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Well done for flicking always-on crypto switch, Yahoo! Now here's what you SHOULD have done

Denigor

Something weird happened with Yahoo mail servers. The DNS to their .co.uk servers stopped working, and we had topoint all our clients for incoming mail to .com instead. Seemed to happen over this switch.

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Space Station bags extra 10yrs of life as SOLAR STORM scrubs resupply

Denigor

Without the ISS we'd have one less location for stranded astronauts to go to when hit by satellite fragments.

... ok yes I know :) Don't get me started on how un-scientific THAT film is.

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Data caps be damned, AT&T says providers can pay for mobile broadband

Denigor

Re: What a CROCK

As it's such a profitable industry to be in, why isn't there more competition trygin to get a slice of the pie?

Is it because it's so hard to get established in the first place?

The UK is far less geographically spread-out and therefore costs are far lower then in the US. Perhaps this makes it harder to enter the market?

I just don't get why the leading capitalist country in the world has such high pricing, and competition isn't driving cost downwards. Happy to receive recommended reading material to understand this better.

Also, does USA have any 'free' mobile service providers now? (like 'ovivo' in the UK) ?

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Has Intel side-stepped NGOs on conflict minerals in its chips?

Denigor

Do all these materials come from source via a smelting facility?

I just wonder if there's a market yet providing material which comes from elsewhere, such as recycling.

I didn't know that these materials hadtrace elements remaining within them in such quantities to allow source-location identification. That is cool. But the point does remain, that if a man with a bucket dug the stuff out of the ground willingly, and he makes his living from doing that, then withthis method he is going to be penalised as he'll be 'tarred with the same brush'. I'd have thoguht?

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Ten classic electronic calculators from the 1970s and 1980s

Denigor

What was the first calculator watch?

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Time travellers outsmart the NSA

Denigor

Actually our future descendants will know how to travel back in time.

The problem will be, that they won't find a way to alter their spacial-position at the same time. Therefore all their travel-back attempts will land them in the middle of the void of space, not where their start point used to be. Their planet, solar system and galactic arm hasn't yet reached the point at which they started their journey.

There's loads of them floating around out there somewhere, deep frozen....

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Antarctic ice shelf melt 'lowest EVER recorded, global warming is NOT eroding it'

Denigor

Good article posted, and links look good too (for when I have time). But for entertainment value the second page provided much more interest than the first .

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Vodafone dodges UK corporation tax bill - AGAIN

Denigor

yes. But I think that it was seen as an act of mercy more than one of investment :)

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Denigor

Re: Isn't this the same Vodafone...

I'm no tax expert, but I expect that a portion of that £22billion will be paid to the taxman as individuals' capital gains tax.

Only a small portion though, because many of the benifactors won't be UK residents or UK organisations so won'tpay UK tax.. Further, many will use some means to show no net capital gain, to avoid paying any tax onit. I know I would.

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Unlocking CryptoLocker: How infosec bods hunt the fiends behind it

Denigor

Offer a reward

Offer a $<multi> million reward and amnesty for information leading to the capture and prosecution of the offenders.

Some of those involved will have no qualms about turning in the rest of their group to get a life of anonymous luxury on some hot island for the rest of their days.

Once the identitied are know do not leave it up to the US to distribute justice. Instead, deal with the Russion authorities and have them take care of matters. For they are far more scary in their approach to making an example of such people.

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Cryptolocker copycat ransomware emerges – but an antidote is possible

Denigor

Re: @WatAWorld --- With all the NSA and GCHQ spying going on, why haven't they identified this guy ?

I think the NSA will be looking at this.

The reason being that they have to be ready in case this happens to more sensitive systems in future.

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Sky broadband goes TITSUP ALL DAY, thwarts Brits' Xmas web shopping

Denigor

I am incredulous of the fact that Sky network can go down to a single geographic point of failure.

I mean, if it were a single exchange site or content provider site then I'd expect some disruption. But a single point of fibre/cable failing? At the metro/access layer surely they still have east/west resilience?

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Mandela memorial. Yup, let's SNAP A SELFIE, say grinning Obama, Cameron

Denigor

Re: Context is everything....

I took my information on the 'bad' things Mendela did from Wikipedia, so far. It says that he tried to avoid civilian casualties during his terrorist Bomb/sabotage activities.

I'm interested to read more to decide for myself what he was like so recommendations for websites/information would be appreciated. I can use a library with old fashioned paper too if it comes to it. I expect there'sat least one biography that covers these aspects of his life without bias.

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Poker ace's vanishing hotel laptop WAS infected by card-shark – F-Secure

Denigor

Re: Dyes and Markers, Bats and Nails

Wow. Change to decaf.

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How UK air traffic control system was caught asleep on the job

Denigor

Re: Redundancy

Yes, telephone exchanges have been able to hot-upgrade (and hot-patch) since the early 90's without even dropping calls in progress. Further, they can roll back software releases without dropping calls in progress too.

It was largely driven by threat of damages (mainly in the US) if a 999/112/911 call was dropped as a result of an intentional maintenance action.

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