* Posts by Don Dumb

295 posts • joined 20 May 2013

Page:

US-CERT advice says kill Quicktime for Windows, quickly

Don Dumb
Facepalm

Quicktime is very much still there

Just checked Apple Software Update on my Windows box. Quicktime is there (although not checked). However the text on the description is fantastic. This is the first line-

"QuickTime 7.7.9 improves security and is recommended for all QuickTime 7 users on Windows."

Considering this is text pulled from their servers today, you would think Apple might want to be responsible and put some sort of health warning up front. But apparently no.

5
0

Dear Windows, OS X folks: Update Flash now. Or kill it. Killing it works

Don Dumb
Headmaster

Re: Get the content producers to kill it

@To Mars in Man Bras! - iPlayer works on HTML5 without Flash now.

If you haven't got Flash it just works. If you do have flash, you can opt into their HTML5 beta and get the HTML5 feed instead. BBC News still uses mostly Flash though.

Grateful for your guide but it hasn't been neccessary since they started the beta

0
0

Adobe preps emergency Flash patch for bug hackers are exploiting

Don Dumb

Re: Flash Flushed

@theModge - if you remove flash from your system, iPlayer defaults to HTML5, no need to opt in at all. Unfortunatelt many of the videos in the news site are flash only - here's hoping the beta ends soon.

1
0

Bleeping Computer sued by Enigma Software over moderator's forum post

Don Dumb

Re: Anticompetitive

@Gordon861 - "Perhaps including Spyhunter as a special 'one time challenger' in the next AV-test might show how crap it is and end the case?"

Good idea, but I fear that has the danger of rewarding their bullying tactics and giving Spyhunter the air of legitimacy by being involved in a SPyware test at all.

I guess my point is - why should AV-test even give them the time of day? There might be other Spyware tools that don't get on the list that are more deserving than SpyHunter that haven't resorted to childish tactics to get noticed. Also, the AV-test result would then be itself the subject of litigation ('not fair', 'biased', 'badly carried out'). Most of these sites don't have the resources to contest litigation. If I was AV-test I wouldn't want to open myself up to that possibility if I didn't have to. And thus Enigma is self-punished by a lack of recognition from independant sources who don't want to touch them.

2
0
Don Dumb
FAIL

Re: I tried to give a f**k...

@ForthIsNotDead - "I tried to give a f**k...

...but failed."And then you even failed at that as you gave enough of a f**k to post a comment.

21
0
Don Dumb
FAIL

"You can't spell 'dishonorable', without 'honorable'"

@AC - "I would never buy a security product with *Spy* in the name. You are just asking for trouble."

But what about an anti-spyware tool? Would it not be more meaningful to have the term 'spyware' and therefore 'spy' in the name?

Would you avoid an anti-coagulent as you would be worried they will clot your blood?

5
0
Don Dumb

Re: Anticompetitive

@Andy Taylor - "Enigma say that not including affiliate links to Spyhunter as well, Bleeping Computers are anticompetitive."

But are they specifically *prevented* from becoming an affiliate? Or do they simply *choose* not to be. It isn't anti-competitive to not advertise a company that chooses not to advertise through you*, if they are being quoted exorbitant rates (compared to Malwarebytes) then they might have a point - but I doubt it.

Furthermore, as the Bleeping Computer page points out, 'AV-Test' doesn't include Spyhunter in its list of regularly tested anti-spyware applications to determine its relative success rate against its peers. If Bleeping Computer has to advertise SpyHunter, along with Malwarebytes, then they have to advertise *every* piece of software that *claims* to be an anti-spyware tool. And thus AV-Test would have to test all of those software tools also. I'm going to guess that the particular tools that any review or advice site tests or advertises is entirely their choice, they aren't under any obligation to present an exhuastive list.

<CarAnalogy>A Car magazine doesn't have to review *every* hatchback in its hatchback roundup review does it? And they will have car adverts, but not for every car they review.</CarAnalogy>

* - Apologies for the multiple negatives in one sentence.

13
0
Don Dumb
Facepalm

Striesand Effect? No we haven't heard that album,

This story links to the 'bad review', the bleeping computer forums flash up on entry a fundrasing page, which links to the same 'bad review' and my guess is that this will get attention in other national news outlets (as they do show an interest in companies undermining public created content on the web).

All Enigma Software has managed to do is aggressively promote comment on how bad they are.

You'd think that at some point, someone might learn the lessons of the Striesand Effect.

And that's before you start to ask, why does anyone have an obligation to give a good review rather than a bad review? (even though it's not a review at all) And how is it even 'advertising', so as to be falsely advertising?

55
0

Europe's Earth-watching satellite streaks aloft

Don Dumb
Facepalm

Re: Is this the sentinel...

@ac - "Is this the sentinel that comes with the 'correction' software to 'prove' the sea levels are rising faster and faster?"

You seem to be one of those people that have your own 'correction' software running. Yours is buggy.

7
4

All-American Apple challenges US gov call for iOS 'backdoor'

Don Dumb

Re: Letter target

@ac - "Shouldn't Cook be arguing the issue in the court?

Is this a case of not expecting to get much traction there on either legal or technical merits and hoping to get further with the "court of public opinion" and pressurize the court through the politicos?"

Well, they are also arguing the issue in the court.

I guess that Apple is ultimately answerable to its shareholders and it cares about public opinion which affects sales. Even though they are taking court action, it seems smart to explain to everyone, *before* a negative backlash, why they are fighting the court order.

2
0
Don Dumb
Stop

Re: To my mind... - Phil Kingston

@BenR - "Admittedly in this case, it's all a bit post hoc and arguably pointless"

I think people seem to mistakenly think the FBI is after the two (now dead) perpetrators. Rather I believe they want to review the phone to help establish whether anyone else was involved (also culpable) or whether the 'workplace dispute' angle is valid.

It certainly doesn't seem to me to be fishing to review the phone of a couple of mass murderers to establish any further background behind what really happened.

"If the authorities, be it the local police of some arm of the government security apparatus, has actually been to a court and got a court order, then isn't this exactly what most people have been asking for? Clear, accountable judicial process and a valid warrant for the information?"

Apparently what people kept asking for isn't what many people really want, if the comments on this story are anything to go by...

Personally, I agree that this seems acceptable. I can't see what more the government can be expected to do - there has definitely been a serious crime commited for which further investigation is in the national and public interest, they have got an open court order to help unlock the phone and the court order is specifically limited to getting assistance into getting into the phone in question.

3
0

Health and Safety to prosecute over squashed Harrison Ford

Don Dumb
Alert

Re: Are all employer liable?

@Cynic_999 - "So how does that work when the employer is the M.O.D. and the machinery in question is a machine-gun in hostile territory?"

"It shall be the duty of every employer to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable,"

Yes, the MOD does have to take reasonably practicable steps, even in war, this equally applies to the Police Force in shootouts, Fire Service in firefighting etc.

Google 'Coroner report MOD' and you will see examples where the government has been found to not have taken such reasonable steps, even in places like Iraq.

Basically, in a warzone (or police shootout) you can't stop your enemy shooting at you but you can take many steps to make it less dangerous -

intelligence to understand the threats/risks; armour protection to reduce the risk of the bullets causing damage; equipment appropriate for the situation & location; years of planning, tactics and training to reduce the chance of it happening and deal with the situation if it does; medical evacuation and support in place to treat injuries; desicion making that takes into account the risks (of say going on an assault) weighed against the need to act (do you need to do the assault? or with the intended approach?)

- if the employer (MOD, Police force, fire service, etc) hasn't done any of these to the level of 'reasonably practicable' then they will be found cupable.

The principle is that you cannot eliminate danger, especially in a warzone, so you don't make things more dangerous than they need to be. The key has always been - Understand the dangers, try and reduce them and consider very carefully about whether doing things are worth the risk that remains.

3
0

Zero. Zilch. Nada. That's how much Netflix uses its own data centres now

Don Dumb
WTF?

A familiar smell

"...made way to continuous delivery, engineering teams making independent decisions using self service tools in a loosely coupled DevOps environment, helping accelerate innovation."

Why is it that any statement involving the term 'DevOps' is mix of various buzzwords?

Even terms which have usually have meaning somehow lose any meaning at all in the context of a statement like this.

10
0
Don Dumb
Stop

Re: Single Source

@A Non e-mouse "So Netflix now have a new single point of failure: Amazon. Do you really want your entire business dependent on just one supplier?"

No only that but would you want that one supplier to be your direct rival?

15
1

Bank fail: Ready or not, here's our new software

Don Dumb

Re: Lloyds online banking

@AC - "Lloyds online banking...completely freeze for 30s+, repeatedly, waiting for the content. Content that's blocked by multiple browser plugins as unsafe for various reasons including coming from a different domain."

I had the same problems, so I'm going to assume you are using NoScript (which seems pretty sensible with a banking site) and have just found out how to solve this, without turning off NoScript.

You have to specifically whitelist ONLY secure.lloydsbank.co.uk without allowing all of lloydsbank.co.uk, this isn't the norm for NoScript. The site works fine now that I have done this.

If you told Lloyds that their site didn't work properly they would simply tell you to turn NoScript off, which isn't particularly responsible behaviour IMHO. Considering that cyber is one of the big 4 threats to our nation, I can't help thinking that some good old fashioned regulation of what security compromises banking sites can and cannot allow is in order.

3
0
Don Dumb
Boffin

Project Manager empathy...

@AC - "Late delivery can incur penalty charges. Defective delivery never really does. It's a lesson they learned from government projects - even the quality is similar."

This.

Just remember people, everytime you join in the criticsm of a massively complex government IT project for lateness or cost overrun, you're fuelling the drive to deliver on time and cost, rather than on quality. Naturally the testing regime will suffer to satisfy this.

1
1

Who wants a quad-core 4.2GHz, 64GB, 5TB SSD RAID 10 … laptop?

Don Dumb
Boffin

Re: Weight.

@ZanzibarRastapopulous - 5Kgs is nowt you bunch of pussies.

Try running a half marathon with a 5Kg weight, I can assure you it is far from nowt

2
0

Hollywood given two months to get real about the price of piracy

Don Dumb
Boffin

Re: Reminds me of...

@Danny 14 - "the rule change was a nightmare as it now made borderline "chucking" harder to umpire (it was previously "obvious") however, the rule change was originally in good faith."

Putting aside the assertion that the rule was made in good faith (I'm not so sure) - The problem with legalising actions such as Muralie's, is that the umpires can't actually know if a player is bowling within the rules or not, they can merely cite the bowler as 'suspect'. This means that the only way to determine whether an action is legal or not is by taking the bowler to a laboratory and putting them through several tests, which can take many months. I think the rules are pretty screwed up if no one at the match is able to know whether a bowler is bowling legally or not, even with TV replays.

It is the equivalent of the Lawn Tennis Association writing a rule about the serve action that is so difficult to judge and then saying "so we can't actually know if a serve action is legal or not, therefore we will let a suspect player carry on for a few more tournaments and then test him at some point to see if he was playing within the rules or not".

Good faith or not, it's an abject failure to write rules for which the game can be decided and only be able to find out several months later if the bowler was bowling wihtin the rules or not IMHO.

4
0

Kids' TV show Rainbow in homosexual agenda shocker

Don Dumb
Facepalm

Re: Sentenced to zippy.

@Old Tom - "Po was red, Tinky Winky was purple and had a handbag"

Self fail. You are quite correct. If I recall, Po wasn't without controversy as she/he was the one played by a communist. That also got the tabloids outraged in the usual "commie beeb" style.

0
0
Don Dumb

Re: Sentenced to zippy.

@Teiwaz - "He'll be having a go at James and his magic torch next, or Mr Benn."

We get stories like this every year in the UK for us to laugh at. Anti-gay idiots in the US decried the Tellytubbies, the character Po was apparently "openly gay", the heinous charges being that 'she' carried a handbag and was purple (apparently that bit of the light spectrum is gay). The rest of us wondered how someone could look that hard for spurious clues of sexuality in a kids TV show.

Harry Potter was demonised for promoting magic and witchcraft, which apparently prevent kids from learning about Christianity.

Probably every kids show that isn't a bible story gets construed as somehow teaching kids to be the devil incarnate. These Pastors are seeing the things they 'despise' everywhere, in a way that wouldn't be at all an indicator of severe repression.

21
0
Don Dumb
Facepalm

Here we find a Daily Mail Journo in training.

"The BBC should have had its broadcast licence revoked for showing such filth"

That would be pretty harsh, considering it was an ITV show.

29
0

Donald Trump wants Bill Gates to 'close the Internet', Jeff Bezos to pay tax

Don Dumb
FAIL

Re: Solution: More free speech, not less.

@gazthejourno - "You're kidding. They [The Nazis] were the very definition of socialist when it came to the economy - nationalise, centralise, directed production. Look at VW: a private enterprise whose capital was effectively impounded and diverted into state-directed military production for the duration of WW2."

Perhaps you didn't do much history but the Nazis hated actual socialism. Other's have pointed out how they really operated and they purged socialists as soon as they could.

In respect of your point about VW, it is worth remembering that many nations nationalised critical production *during the war* regardless of political bent.

The whole "Nazi's were SOCIALISTS" mantra,seems to be pushed by right wingers in a bid to convince themselves that they aren't anything like that when so accused.

3
0

Domination: Crims steal admin logins, infect sites, drop Cryptowall 4

Don Dumb
Unhappy

Law enforcement?

"Zaharia says the campaign is "extensive" and operates from six bulletproof hosting servers in Ukraine."

Genuine question - We've identified the servers, so why can the Ukrainian government not simply go there and pull the servers out of the wall?

Or does Zaharia mean "the difficult bit of Ukraine which doesn't really have a government"

1
0

Star Wars Battlefront: Is this the shooter you’re looking for?

Don Dumb
Happy

Re: Move along

@dogged - "I'm not interested in multiplayer-only games. I don't have enough time to get good at them and frankly, being bawled out by foul-mouthed 13 year old for not pwning sufficient face is not a pleasant use of my time."

I have no interest in multiplayer for similar reasons.

I think I could be enticed if there was some sort of league hierarchy system, much like there is in sport (in Britain at least). Everybody starts at the bottom level and if they are good and win a lot, they get moved up into a higher level. That means that those of us that play for a few hours at the weekend (at most) stay in the bottom level and are well matched against each other. Those who are good, or put the hours in, play against those who are also good. You could have many levels, with the pros at the top and us losers at the bottom. You wouldn't be able to play against those in higher or lower levels unless you enter a special cup or 'open' competition.

Perhaps those of use that don't want to interact with 13-yr olds, can then form side-leagues at the relevant level. Or even have age-group levels, people only play in their age groups unless they are good enough to progress, in which case they are good enough to play with good (or older) players anyway and don't get in our way when we just want to have fun. (That also could sell to the 'think of the children brigade')

It seems that gaming is in its infancy and the structures of established UK sports like rugby and football, would work well in gaming if they could be managed in the same way.

7
0
Don Dumb
Happy

Re: ... most perfect slice of Star Wars yet

@thomas k - "Really? More perfect than KotOR 1 or 2?"

I've just had the pleasure of playing through KotOR again, as it has been re-released for the iPhone. What a wonderful game, easily the best Star Wars games and still one of the best RPGs. It really upsets me that they could have made such engrossing stories in that universe in these two games and yet completely screwed up the films by trying to stick to closely to the original films (which never happened btw)

1
0

I've lost the remote! Fury as Samsung yoinks TV control from its iOS app

Don Dumb
Thumb Down

Re: Have got an older Samsung TV

@TheFirstChoice - "I've got an older Samsung (non-smart) TV - they just abandon any form of support for them, even when they're still current models and they could update the firmware"

Your's is a different experience to mine, I have a 2012 mid-level Samsung Smart TV, I have had may updates over the last few years, the most recent system firmware being April 2015 I believe.

The UI is still filled with many shitty needless apps (I only want a few - iPlayer, Youtube, All4 & Netflix) but gradually some of the bloat has receeded. What they haven't upgraded or even got close to working is the DLNA service. The TV can barely find anything on the network and the Samsung AllShare application is awful, didn't work at all - that application hasn't been updated since before I even brought the TV.

That said, Samsung do seem to be generally pretty awful at updating their software on most things, certainly a premium smartphone should be updated for several years after being discontinued, especially considering the sensitive personal data held on most phones, the frequency of attacks and the vunerability that using any moble device naturally entails (frequent use of untrusted networks, connections to untrusted devices, etc).

They aren't the worst company but aren't great and they have few excuses to be so much better than they are.

1
0

Windows 10 growth stalls during October

Don Dumb
Stop

Re: Interested to see how this turns out...

@alain Williams - "Partly because Linux is not counted properly. A week ago I bought a new laptop, it came with Windows 8.1 installed; I immediately upgraded it to Linux Mint - but it will be counted in the statistics as another MS Windows 8.1 installation."

I don't think that's true, I beleive the stats are based on web usage, so if you didn't use 8.1 to access the web* but did use Mint then only Linux would be counted. The problem with these stats is that it can't count those machines not connected to the net. If anything that means WinXP (many manchines unplugged from the net) is most under represented.

* - or at least the site(s) that are used to collect the stats

16
0

TalkTalk incident management: A timeline

Don Dumb
Stop

Re: A TalkTalk customer says...

@Quotes - This might be stating what you already know but I'm pretty sure you haven't been contacted by TalkTalk there, you're a victim of the hack. The hackers have your phone number and name from the hack and are phishing for to get whatever other info they need. Imagine there's many people working through the data contacting the gullible/naive/week to get 'missing' data.

This is why it doesn't matter that 'not everyth bit of customer data has been taken' as once you have some, you can start targeted phishing. You know they are a talktalk customer, so can pose as talktalk and work from there. I wonder how many TalkTalk customers have been contacted by phone by "TalkTalk" in the last week, who have then lost money....

0
0

Ransomware victims: Just pay up, grin, and bear it – says the FBI

Don Dumb

Re: you *are* able to get your data back?

@wierdsmith - "If these criminals took the money and failed to deliver the hostage data back, then no subsequent victim is going to pay them knowing they will get nothing for the money."

Except that people don't like to state that they paid ransoms and thus wouldn't like to admit they paid a ransom that didn't work.

It would seem that there are some stories of ransomware ransoms not resulting in decryptions. An indication - https://blog.kaspersky.com/cryptolocker-is-bad-news/3122/ "It comes as no surprise that a few infected users that paid the ransom are saying that they never received the decryption key in return"

Because many groups use ransomware, one could make a lot of money without having to give out decryption keys, as somany will payout in desperation in case they are held by a group that does decrypt. It is still a case of putting a lot of trust into a group that doesn't deserve it.

0
0
Don Dumb
Stop

Re: you *are* able to get your data back?

@1980s_coder - "No, because in this case once the data has been de-crypted, you should do a fresh, full backup of everything, (just as you should have done before for forensics), re-install OS and applications from read-only media, or digitally signed sources, and finally manually restore your configuration files and user data, after looking through them to be sure that they are safe and uncompromised."

You misunderstand me. Yes, one *should* do as you stated, but considering many companies have gotten into this situation and didn't had good backups, what are the chances they don't do anything or everything that you list? Just look at some of the examples above.

Many small organisations barely had the money to pay the ransom, I'm betting they had terrible sysadministration before, that got them into the mess and they wont have the resources or nous to properly prevent the situation afterwards.

Most organisations that do as you state proably wouldn't have gotten a ransomware problem in the first place (because they had good security, long term offline backups, etc). I'm betting most organisations that do get ransomware infections they can't clear up without paying ransoms are still good targets after they have had to pay the ransom. Just cows to be milked.

0
0
Don Dumb
Terminator

you *are* able to get your data back?

@AC - "The price you pay for not having back-ups, I guess. Just be glad you're able to get your data back."

That assumes that paying the ransom *will* actually get your data back. There's nothing stopping the perpetrators from simply pocketing the money and going silent. It's amazing the amount of trust people place in faceless, ruthless, criminals who have no incentive to actually do what they are claiming to. Considering some organisations can barely afford to pay the ransom, paying the ransom without any confidence that you will get your data decrypted really is taking a risk.

Especially as a smart criminal could simply give the decryption key, while remaining present on the network and re-encrypting the data again (perhaps they already have), for another payout in a year's time. Before you know it there's an unhealthy protection racket going. I'm betting that a small organisation that gets badly hit by a ransomware attack would doubtful be completely secured after the cleanup, which probably wouldn't completely cleanup the mess, the best targets are the ones who you've already hit.

<evil thought>The best time to hit an organisation with a ransomware attack would be just as they are rebuilding the network and storage following a previous ransomware attack, then you can be sure that all data is within the reach of the attack. You probably wouldn't even have to leave the network, just stay low in a rootkit somewhere on a network device, biding your time.</evil thought>

2
0

Malvertisers slam Forbes, Realtor with world's worst exploit kits

Don Dumb
Boffin

Re: responsibilities

dan1980 - "Take a restaurant found to be serving food that makes their customers ill. If it's in the handling and storing and preparation of the food then the case is clear - it's the restaurant's fault. But what if the cause was bad produce from the supplier?"

The analogy is a good one but there is a bit of a flaw when think about who the customer is in each situation.

Putting aside criminal responsibilities for a moment, the responsibility a restaurant has is between itself and those it enters into a contract with (the customers and suppliers), the supplier is merely a subcontractor in the contract to provide its customers with a meal. Therefore, if you have been given dodgy food in a restaurant, it is the restaurant that should reimburse you. The restaurant might then attempt to get those damages back from its supplier (who may then go to its supplier, etc) but that isn't the concern of the customer. The customer doesn't have any contract with the food supplier.

So yes, the restaurant should have standards about the quality of the food supplied as they are expected to deliver a standard of quality to their customers. Basic supply chain and subcontracting.

However, the problem with this is what is the contract that is being entered into? You're not paying for the website like you are a meal.

I'm sure the websites would claim that they are not delivering adverts to their readers, they are delivering news stories to the readers and eyeballs to *their* customers (advertisers). This would be like the restaurant giving you food free of charge but in return they just simply play the radio (and the radio pays them for this) and if your ears are damaged by the adverts on the radio, well that's not their responsibility its the radio station's.

I think a better lever to encourage websites to do their job properly is criminal responsibility - do websites have a legal responsibility to ensure that the Computer Misuse Act (or non-UK equivalent) is not violated by content delivered on their site? I would argue that they do and that malvertising is very much a violation of 'anti-hacking' laws. If torrent sites are considered responsible to not link to torrents that violate copyright then news websites are even more responsible for adverts that their pages direct the reader's browser to download. If Cyber is the big national security threat then why aren't police forces prosecuting websites that assist in unlawful computer hacking. A few prosecutions and I can guarantee any major website will be vetting advert agencies very closely.

2
0

It's still 2015, and your Windows PC can still be pwned by a webpage

Don Dumb

Re: Anyone have a clue about...

KB3083324 - it is stated as an update to the Windows Update Client. It doesn't say what the update improves about Win Update but considering WinUpdate has been taking ages lately, I'm comfortable installing it.

0
0

The 100GB PHONE! Well, it has shades of Chrome, so not quite

Don Dumb

Re: A 'whopping' 100GB

@John Robson - "Yes, apple - SD cards *do* exist, and are useful..."

I agree it's really annoying that Apple don't just put in an SD card slot and SD cards (in non-Apple phones) were what I was I was reffering to. But then at least Apple do give an option for decent storage. I wanted the Nexus 6 but alas Google assume everyone can simply use the cloud all the time for everything.

6
0
Don Dumb
WTF?

A 'whopping' 100GB

So if I understand correctly that's 28GB less than my iPhone and the storage is not actually connected to the phone?

So if I want to get hold of anything that isn't on that phone I'll have to hope it's connected to a decent signal (and I have enough data allowance) or a good trustworthy wifi (increasingly rare outside my house).

One of the apps I use that holds a lot of data is the Sat Nav, I don't use it that often but when I do, I'm rarely near a good signal.

I understand many don't need large storage but like me many also do. Considering that everything else datawise seems to be growing why is it so difficult to put storage in (or allow additional in) mobile devices?

This seems to be using an amazingly complex solution to solve a very simple problem.

24
0

Ecuador and Sweden in 'constructive talks' – just don't mention Assange™ by name

Don Dumb

Re: @AC ...

@Doctor Syntax -

Of course he could argue that time spent in the Embassy counts towards any term of imprisonment in the same way that time on remand does.

He could argue that, but he is there voluntarily. A fact I'm sure any Judge would be quick to point out.

4
0

FORKING BitcoinXT: Is it really a coup or just more crypto-FUD?

Don Dumb
Terminator

Re: What's always puzzled me is, where are the fraudsters?

@Tim Worstall -

I can think of a couple of ways in which a small team (someone who actually understands the psychology of financial markets and a couple of tech heads) could wander off with a couple of $10s of millions by Christmas.

It would even, probably, be legal. And yet I can't see this being done, or at least we're not hearing about it. [emphasis mine]

If you assume that there is a small team of people, well versed in psychology and technical matters, smart enough to game (legally or otherwise) a market to make several million. Why would you assume that you *would* hear about it?

If these people are that smart they would hardly make a song and dance about it would they? Especially as soon as the cat is out of the bag they wont make any more money.

Also the relevant cryptocurrency and exchange markets would hardly want to make a big deal of how their systems can be gamed so comprehensively, so they aren't likely to be giving press releases either.

Could it not be quite possible that these 'big clearout wins' have happened and the winners have simply not advertised the fact or have deliberately kept quiet to avoid the authorities? Let's face it, someone did well out of Mt Gox and I can't imagine they are keen on anyone knowing whether legal or not.

Lottery winners with brains don't inform the press how rich they suddenly are.

4
0

BACS Bank Holiday BALLS UP borks 275,000 payments

Don Dumb
Boffin

Re: I feel sorry for

@Martin Summers -

What's that got to do with something beyond their control? How else are they meant to pay them, it can't be cash, cheque would clear a week after they got it and they could be paid by BACS quicker on a second attempt anyway.

Don't know who has the legal liability but speaking as someone who worked in a payroll office a decade ago. Payroll teams can pay people with same day payments using a system called 'CHAPS' (don't know what the acronym stands for). It's a relatively high level of effort required for each payment so it isn't something that can be done for too many people. Therefore a small payroll team could have sorted it for their employees this morning and the employee's bank would have the money by mid-afternoon.

However, the difficult thing would be that on Tuesday the BACS payment would hit the employee's account, so they have now been paid twice and then you then have to get the money back. This is always really hard for both the payroll droid and the employee. It's probably better for all to simply underwrite any fees or liabilities the employee has due to late salary payment rather than try and get a second payment out today.

0
0

The modest father of SMS, who had much to be modest about

Don Dumb
Go

Re: Its a miracle that the MNOs allowed SMS to be available to subscribers

@Uberseehandel - "As a tip to anybody doing this today, I'd say store all your phone numbers with the full international dialing prefix (+44 for Britain), and make sure that the contacts are stored in the handset, not on the SIM. That way when you cross from, one country to another, you simply swap SIMs and advice those who need to call you of your new number by SMS."

I agree that it's good practice to save numbers with the international dialling prefix.

My tip to save roaming costs - 3. My contract is with 3 Mobile. They cover some countries with an 'at home' provision, all calls back to the UK and all data consumed simply comes out of the contract allowance as if you are at home in the UK. I've been abroad a few times and spent very little on phone calls as mostly I'm phoning home or using data. It has eliminated one of the annoyances with travelling.

1
0

Han Solo to get solo prequel flick in 2018, helmed by LEGO men

Don Dumb
Boffin

The really annoying thing is>>

I'm playing again through the Knights of The Old Republic (KOTOR) game, as it has been rereleased on iOS. It reminds me just why the prequels were so bad and these spinoffs are going to be shit - they are too closely wedded to the characters and events in the Original series.

Both KOTOR (and it's buggy sequel with the deeper plot) were set in the Star Wars universe but at a different time, so the never ending battle between Sith and Jedi was in still in full tilt as it had been for several millenia, the same planets and species were present but the characters and events were very different. This allowed the writer to be so much more free with his plots and the events didn't have to be pigeon-holed into simply setting up the proper trilogy. The characters were free to be themselves not just early versions of people in the trilogy and therefore the depth and humour they displayed was so much better. He didn't have to go around trying to explain everything with psuedo-science, he could just get on with telling story.

Lucas could have set many Star Wars films in the universe, divorced from the era the original films were set and could then have made many, many films each with their own storylines, characters locations and technology, much in the same way that Bond films have become. This would have allowed for better (or worse) films and wouldn't have tained the original series. The desire to set everything with the same characters in the same era just constricts far too much and gradually erodes the respect of teh original films.

Hell, the trailer to The Old Republic was far better than the prequels ever were.

0
0

Giant FLYING SPACE ROCKS could KILL US ALL, warns Brian May

Don Dumb
Thumb Up

Re: Welcome to the 19th century

@Wzrd1 - "El Reg realizes that it has an audience in the US"

I get that El Reg has a US audience to cater for but surely that still is largely a tech and scientific audience, which even in the US, I would expect to understand and use metric. Considering this is about space and even NASA uses metric, you would have thought that El Reg wouldn't have seemingly gone out of its way to use Imperial (which I have just realised the US calls 'English').

0
0
Don Dumb
Facepalm

Welcome to the 19th century

"800 square miles", "120 ft across.", "travelled at 33,500mph", "heated the air to 44,500°F", "28,000 feet above the ground"

Oh FFS Reg. You're writing about astrophysics on a tech website and yet you give all the measurements in imperial. I should expect better but El Reg seems more and more like a Top Gear spin-off every day.

20
8

Trump carded: Wannabe prez's hotels 'ground zero' in banking breach

Don Dumb
Facepalm

Only this?

@DougS - "If he said something like that, he'd look stupid"

Because otherwise, everything else he says makes him look like a real genius!

5
0

Hubble spots Pluto's moons are a chaotic mess of tumbling rock

Don Dumb
Joke

Re: "We are learning that chaos may be a common trait of binary systems,"

@Betacam - "The 3 body problem is why physicists rarely indulge in threesomes." - Well, that's what they would say.

Like many problems physicists deal with, finding reasons to reject threesomes is very much a theoretical exercise.

5
0

WikiLeaks offers $100k for copies of the Trans-Pacific Partnership – big biz's secret govt pact

Don Dumb

Re: Amongst other dodgy deals....

@Winkypop - "the tobacco industry dearly wants an end to Australia's highly-successful Plain Packaging laws"

And tobacco is going to great lengths to prevent other countries from introducing similar laws, using incredible litigation and strong-arming methods.

In Australia, one tobacco company tried to prevent the plain packaging law change by suing the Australian government for 'unlawful trademark seizure' using a trade agreement between Hong Kong (where they had moved their business) and Australia, on the basis that removing their label from a cigarette box is trademark seizure against that trade agreement. The methods they use on smaller, poorer countries is simply bullying.

As is often the case these days, John Oliver did a piece on this in February - Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Tobacco.

6
1

So what would the economic effect of leaving the EU be?

Don Dumb
Stop

@AC - >>"And a good thing it is too. It's an essential part of the balance, to have some power in the hands of a group that doesn't need to care about getting re-elected and can genuinely do what they think is best for the country. Neither side has total power."

If you're happy with that, then fine, no system is perfect. But then you can't criticise the EU for being in many ways no different. We (the British) often complain about the lack of democratic accountability in the EU, while completely ignoring the same thing here.

My point wasn't to say that we neccessarily change everything, or even perhaps anything, but that we have to be consistent in what we ask for.

>>"Also a good thing. Can you imagine the shambolic Italian-style results if we had a coalition government"?

Nothing like Cherry-picking an example is there? What about the "shambles" in Germany, Finland, Denmark, Japan, and so many others?

It's amazing how insular the British can be in their knowledge (yet we still feel justified poking fun at the US for their knowledge of the world). The British seem to think that we would be inventing Coalition governments in the UK for the first time. They've been going fine in many places for decades, even in places we look up to for good governance. The reason we think of coalition as chaotic is we only ever hear about the chaotic ones, the rest "just work" so don't become newsworthy.

3
2
Don Dumb
WTF?

Re: Don Dumb

@Matt Bryant - Your comment paints you as a complete loon, devoid of any ability to understand statements made by others or the points they are trying to make.

Firstly - who are "the watermelons"? I have no idea who they are but well done for using obscure slang terms that completely hide what you are trying to say and who you are actually reffering to.

Secondly - "I'm not surprised you want to try and redirect attention away from the EU given that it one of the few places the Greens have any power, and cutting Britain off from the EU's interference would terminate the Greens in the UK."

You know nothing about me and yet are somehow "not surprised" by what you have *assumed* to be my intentions. Why do you assume I am a Green Party supporter?

I used the *example* of the disparity in electoral support for the Green Party and their parlimentary power, simply because it was an example of a lack of real democracy in the UK, it could have easily been the Lib Dems or UKIP but I chose The Green party simply to serve as an example because the proportion of vote was similar to the proportion of the House Of Lords the CofE controls.

If you're happy with a particular national religious sect having more control than an elected political party, that's fine. But may I suggest you'd perhaps like to live in Iran?

No, I thought not (see - I can make sweeping assumptions about you too)

4
2
Don Dumb
Terminator

@Chris Miller - "How do I get rid of stupid fonctionnaires in Brussels who decide these matters for the EU?"

If you want democracy in the EU, let's start with actually having one in the UK.

How do we vote out the Queen, Prince Charles, and the rest of their family? You can't honestly believe that they have no influence at all. They get weekly access to ministers and the minutes of these discussions are never made public.

Then let's look at Parliament - The current government (and most of the governments before it) had only 37% of the vote but somehow get a majority in the house of commons. Some parties had millions of votes and yet their representation in Parliament is in the single figures (when there are 650 seats) - a vastly smaller share of power than their proportion of their electorate.

And once you've sorted the Head of State and the House of Commons, you still have to deal with the House of Lords, for which none have been elected and in fact*, 26 places go to serving Church of England archbishops and bishops. That's right, the Church of England gets 3.2% of the upper house and yet the Green Party had 3.9% of the vote in a general election and get a single seat, 0.15%, in the lower house. You might be an atheist and wonder how an unelected religious group gets so much more power than an elected political party to decide upon legislation in a coutnry that claims to be a democracy.

If you want to clean up, start at home, until then we're just throwing stones from our glass houses. The EU isn't very democratic and I agree that this should be changed but the EU is depressingly still far more democratic than the UK.

* - because I've just looked this up and was shocked myself.

8
11
Don Dumb
Go

Re: The UK can leave

@h4rm0ny -

">>the EU, I will be glad in many ways. It will be more easier imposing barriers to nice practices like the ones that give us the "mad cows"
Incorrect. It is easier to carry out trade barriers when you're a big entity with a lot of leverage than when you're a small one."

h4rm0ny - I think you might be violently agreeing with the OP. My understanding of what JahBless wrote is that he/she is not in the UK and would want the EU to impose those barriers, against the UK when it leaves (Rather than the UK doing it to the EU). I think you essentially explained why this would be possible (and why it would be unwise for the UK to voluntarily leave a large and powerful trade block.)

5
0

Traumatised Reg SPB team barely survives movie unwatchablathon

Don Dumb

Re: How about a Nicolas Cage marathon shitfest?

@Steve Davies3 - I wouldn't put Nick Cage on a complete ban. He's had to make bad films partly to pay the bills but there are a few good films with him giving good performances - if you haven't seen Adaptation, that is worth viewing and he is genuinely very good in it.

1
0

Page:

Forums