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* Posts by Don Dumb

127 posts • joined 20 May 2013

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Burnt out on patches this month? Oracle's got 104 MORE fixes for you

Don Dumb

No longer a concern

So glad I got rid of Java on my home machine a couple of months ago (after I changed the last piece of software that used it). Java was horrible software, had an annoying update installer and my computer is noticeably more responsive since I got rid of it, even though I always tried to disable the 'always running' bits of it.

Considering how much Oracle database software is used in large (especially public) organisations I do wonder how full of holes it is and how vulnerable important databases are.

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AMD unveils Godzilla's graphics card – 'the world's fastest, period'

Don Dumb
Thumb Up

Power & Cooling

@Eddy Ito - It's an interesting proposition. Build around the GPU rather than the CPU.

I like the fact that AMD have thought a bit about cooling and keeping the card quiet, often just a big noisy fan is the only cooling.

It would be interesting if the card's cooling system can be integrated with liquid case cooling setups, taking the liquid from the card to the case liquid cooling box rather than the GPU's cooling box. If so, using this as the base for cooling the CPU and memory would make for an interesting design.

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How Microsoft can keep Win XP alive – and WHY: A real-world example

Don Dumb

Re: I read as far as the $500k a year development job...

@janimal - Trevor's manpower and cost estimates are way, way out there.

I think that was the deliberate aim of Trevor's calculations -

as he needs to make some (big) assumptions, it makes sense to underestimate the amount Microsoft could make from support and overestimate the cost of providing it (including wages). As it is clearly finanically viable under these assumptions then it really is fair to say that it would be profitable and viable proposition.

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Hotmail-gate: Windows 8 code leaker pleads guilty to theft of trade secrets

Don Dumb
Facepalm

Re: Russian national?

@McHack - "He should immediately get himself back to Mother Russia"

I'm sure he would love to do that. Just a bit difficult when he is in custody without bail.

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Crashed NORKS drones discovered by South Korea

Don Dumb
Boffin

Re: I pity South Korea

"Having a border to North Korea must be like living next door to a violent and psychotic drug fiend."

What's worse is that it is more like the violent, paranoid and psychotic fiend next door is your ex who insists that you've not broken up, refuses to recognise any divorce procedings and constantly proclaims that all of the violence is really your fault.

Sad thing is I've known a few friends who have had to deal with people like this. Someone once told me about an abusive relationship she was in, every time he got mad and lashed out he would say to her "look what you made me do".

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Money? What money? Lawyer for accused Silk Road boss claims you can't launder Bitcoin

Don Dumb

Re: What's the point?

@Richard Pennington - "Given that Bitcoins are untraceable by design, what is the point of laundering them?"

The Bitcoins *ARE* the laundering.

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BT snatches crown: Soars to top of complaints list

Don Dumb
Thumb Up

Re: Not allowed to complain

@Sandpit

Was talking to a friend the other day. Her (elderly) mum has lost phone connection. BT kept saying "it will be fixed tomorrow" and then wasn't. She found out that the fix was Openreach doing some digging but also found a phone number for Openreach.

After talking to Openreach to try and find out what was going on the Openreach help desk rep asked which ISP she was from. When my friend said "no I'm the customer who wants to be reconnected" the rep went very quiet and clearly terrified said "but we aren't allowed to talk to customers!" - What a way to run a service - shield the people who can do anything from the customer, so nothing gets done.

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5 Eyes in the Sky: The TRUTH about Flight MH370 and SPOOKSATS

Don Dumb
Boffin

Re: Of course it's military... @Titus Technophobe

@AC - These classifications are also known as 'Handling Codes', which dictate how an individual within an organisation should handle, store or distribute documents or files (e.g Data etc)

Your along the right lines but you're not correct either, you are confusing different labels. I'll try and explain :-

Classification refers to the level of information security afforded tot he document.

Handling codes, or 'Handling Restrictions' to give them their proper title, go alongside the classification to denote who may (or may not) see the document (which is different from the level of classification the document has). Usually the handling restriction is usually a list of countries.

Caveats go alongside the classification and/or the handling restriction to denote extra information about why the document is classified or how to treat it 'Commercial' or 'Personal' could be two examples.

A Security label on a document could include many words, but the classification is the one that will always exist, even if it is just 'unclassified'. Handling restrictions, caveats, etc may or may not be included as appropriate but they aren't the same as the classification.

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Symantec fires CEO Steve Bennett: To lose 1 chief is unfortunate, to lose 2 is OK, apparently

Don Dumb
Terminator

Denial?

Symantec - "to enhance our position as a market leader."

El Reg article - "the troubled security and storage giant."

I wonder which one might be true.

Come to think about it, I've seen much less bundling of Norton lately, whereas McAfee and others are still very conspicuous in bundles and corporate installs (that I have noticed).

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Whitehall and Microsoft thrashing out 1-year NHS WinXP lifeline

Don Dumb
Thumb Up

Re: Funding

@JurassicPark - "Unfortunately the failure of NPfIT seems to suggest otherwise. It was one aim of NPfIT to provide more purchasing power by amalgamating IT spend within England & Wales, but unfortunately the only real win was a national radiology imaging system."

That's a fair point but I'm aware there are other initiatives which work well to drive better returns. The government only recently realised that if it negotiated with Oracle as a whole government rather than multiples on a small level it could leverage much better rates on licences (used by across all departments to varying degrees). It makes sense to do this for Oracle and Microsoft and large suppliers of standard software but other software is much more difficult as the requirements probably vary much more between departments perhaps that was a problem with NPflT

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Don Dumb
Stop

@lost all faith - "Here's how it works outside of the Public Sector.

This needs to work on Win7 / Linux.

What, you say it can't? Well, you fix it, or we find a product that will.

End Of."

Bear in mind the uk public sector is not allowed to waste money (stop laughing). Take an MRI scanner for an example, what would you like the MRI scanner to do? MRI scans. Good.

Now, compare* - MRI scanner 1 costs £2M, and the supplier will support it for ten years at £50K per year = £2.5M for 10 years;

MRI Scanner 2 costs £4M, and the supplier will support it at a cost of £100k per year = £5M for 10 years.

Both scanners will do the job, so I'm sure you know which one you will buy right? And if you were in charge of a publicly funded budget your answer wouldn't be any different even if it ran ICL COBOL.

The simple fact is that the OS often just isn't the most important thing about the product you need and therefore any extra money you spend getting the OS you want is money that should be spent elsewhere. Especially when departments are having to close core services anyway.

Don't get me wrong I think the OS and core configuration should be seen as more important, lock in is a hidden cost. But I think you are being optimistic about how easy it is to find alternatives that exist and how little it will cost to purchase them. In some parts of government, the number of options for what you want may be very small as the subject area may be very niche and the kit expensive.

* - Disclaimer I have no idea if these are at all realistic costs. Merely numbers, pulled out my ass to serve an example.

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Don Dumb
Boffin

Funding

@Len Goddard - The end of XP has been known for years and those responsible for the back-end systems should have had them upgraded in good time. The NHS has enough financial and political clout to beat up on the PAS suppliers if the new versions are as bad as you say

No, the NHS doesn't have financial clout, it is a misconception that a large funding pot for health means big financial power. Unfortunately, the funding is split up amongst the trusts which are quite small entities. It it also hampered more in the last few years by the austerity measures, which drive tough decisions about what to fund and unsuprisingly they prioritised buying drugs and paying nurses over replacing systems that worked. Imagine the newspaper headlines, say two years ago, if a trust can't give heart transplants because they are replacing IT systems (that work). Like it or not fear of negative reporting (that will deliberately misrepresent the importance of IT support lifecycles) influences a lot of public sector behavour.

For me, the Treasury, Cabinet office and political strategy are more to blame - it is they who should have mandated moving away from XP, and possibly more importantly IE6, much earlier and provided specific funding for migration projects so that it didn't affect core output, acknowledging that wider governmental policy allowed XP and IE6 to become commonplace. It might not sound much but many people in government knew about the end of life, however getting funding approval from the Treasury would be nigh on impossible without it being mandated. The end of XP has been known for years but has been extended before, put yourself in the position of a hospital manager - this year do you upgrade the IT systems OR replace the aging ambulances?

I think it's unfair to blame NHS trusts (quite small in the grand scheme of things) for buying important IT systems that did their job, many years ago, when XP was the de facto standard. The fact that they locked themselves into a particular configuration, simply isn't as important as being able to get the system at a decent price.

I think now, having all of the difficulty with migrating and lock in, government departments are much more aware of the real price of lock-in but when there is limited funding, you can understand a decade ago, health trusts decidng to prioritise healthcare over IT strategy.

That said, I think you make a good point about how government departments should negotiate contracts at the highest level (the parent department or ideally cross government) rather than each individual little sub-body contracting for their stuff themselves. In fairness, the UK government has actually learnt this over the last few years and, as the deal in this story indicates, is trying to place contracts at government level to leverage buying power (and save money in only having one contract negotiation). This is something that didn't happen 10 years ago, and is happening much more now with IT spending. However, in my opinion, it is much more than IT spending that should be rationalised up to the highest level. For instance, each police constabulary buys their vehicles themselves, you could save a lot of money if the Home Office brought police vehicles for all of the forces under one contract, lets face it most of them are exactly the same for each force.

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Ex-Autonomy boss Mike Lynch goes nuclear: Claims HP 'misleads' its own shareholders

Don Dumb

Re: coming out fighting

@Yes Me - Lynch is coming out fighting. That proves nothing about the facts of the case; it does suggest that he's not too afraid of the truth.

The suggestion that bullish behaviour is a sign of confidence in one's position, could just as easily be a simple confidence trick - i.e. bluffing.

It always reminds me of those people at work who try to get their way in meetings by being loud and confident about their position, rather than actually correct.

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PAF! MPs go postal over postal location data sell-off by Coalition.gov

Don Dumb

Re: Thus the Royal Mail owns it.

@Frankee Llonnygog - Solution - transfer PAF and the responsibility for updating it to the Ordnance Survey

Expect the OS isn't far away from the same result as Royal Mail - www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/news/article-2312853/Met-Office-Ordnance-Survey-slated-sale-amid-new-wave-expected-privatisations.html

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Don Dumb

Re: http://www.royalmail.com/postcode-finder

@D Moss Esq - Royal Mail's find-a-postcode site . . . 50 more [free] searches today

And that is simply carrying on from the publicly owned days. However, now the data is private - let's see how long it is before you can only search "at a fair price".

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Don Dumb
Stop

Re: Obviously..

Why should Royal Mail have been deprived of one of its assets (i.e. the PAF)

Again, Wrong. It wasn't the Royal Mail's asset, it was The Crown's, they are different.

The government can sell off any body or agency it wants, but that doesn't necessarily mean that all of the Crown owned assets *associated* with that body/agency have to be sold with them. They could have still managed the PAF while not owning it.

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Don Dumb
FAIL

Re: PAF 18 years out-of-date

Arguably, RM owns that data, the clue is in the name: Postcode Address File. Who do you go to to get a new postcode? Not some organisation in government. You go to Royal Mail.

Wrong. Public information, along with all public IP, may be managed by government departments or private institutions but is owned by The Crown not the particular department. This is a very clear difference.

Royal Mail may have updated and used the data but the data itself had value as IP and was Crown owned. Just because the postcode file is fundamental to their business doesn't mean it should be removed from public ownership and given to them.

And I don't buy the idea that RM isn't responsible for the fact that postcodes are crucial to the business of other public and private organisations. The government as a whole are responsible for this development through years of development (and probably promotion) of use of postcodes. Royal Mail was a part of, and later regulated by, the government and therefore shares that responsibility.

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Google slams Play Store password window shut after sueball hits

Don Dumb
Boffin

Re: Phone/Tablet?

If it was a phone, then surely the child could've also rang a premium rate number and racked up a bill for thousands without any control either

I'm not sure that's still true for a lot of phone contracts:-

Pay As You Go will obviously stop working after the pre-funded value has run out.

Pay monthly by direct debit - The last couple of contracts I've had, worked on a credit limit. The included minutes and texts were paid, however anything outside the allowance (premium numbers, etc), were added as charges to the account to be paid at the next direct debit bill. While they don't advertise the credit limit well (or at all), occassionally I would hit the limit in the month and have to make a payment outside of the usual monthly direct debit to be able to make calls that weren't included. The limit was between £30-£100 depending on the contract. Finding out that your car insurer has a premium (from mobiles) line for making claims and you've run out of credit to call premium lines was a particular annoyance.

I doubt many phone contracts these days just let you rack up a huge bill, without hitting a predefined limit. It isn't really in their interests to generate a bill the customer can't pay.

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Didn't you know? Today's Patch Thursday! Adobe splats hijack bug in Shockwave Player

Don Dumb

I'm guessing there's some corporate training packages still using Shockwave plugins. From what I've seen the online training materials are usually never updated updated monstrosities. Now usually Flash or Silverlight based but I seem to remember ours were Shockwave.

What I don't get is why they can't be just HTML based, all they usually do is click through a linear set of information pages and videos and then have a quiz at the end. Rarely do they seem complicated enough to justify putting them into flash.

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Actually, there is an Arapaho word for 'pliers'

Don Dumb
Alien

Obligatory Pratchett quote

Clarke's third law states that "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

Ah, Yes but "Any sufficiently advanced magic is indistinguishable from technology" - Pratchett

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O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay! Friday is Pi Day

Don Dumb
Paris Hilton

Re: Like so many other web stories, this only applies to America.

Especially as in the UK we are much smarter to make today Steak and BJ day.

Paris - 'natch

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Wireless charging standards war could be over 'as soon as 2015'

Don Dumb
Stop

Mission Accomplished!

the market should have decided by 2018, but I think it'll be closer to 2015," John Perzow, VP of market development for the WPC, told The Register.

Man selling product says "don't buy any competing products, they're going to lose, buy mine, we've already won" shocker!. This so harks back to Goerge W Bush on the Aircraft Carrier.

Dear El Reg - It would be helpful if a more independant source could give an opinion, or a reply from the opposition sought. Otherwise this just seems like a lifted WPC press release masquerading as a news article.

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Square-kilometre radio telescope wins millions in UK funding

Don Dumb
Thumb Up

ESS in Sweden

@Tom Womack.

Thanks. I thought that it seemed way too large to fit into Jodrell Bank. Upon reading the Sceince artilce link, it seems that the UK commitment is only a part of the €1.8 billion ESS cost, which also is not clear in the article.

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Does Apple's iOS 7 make you physically SICK? Try swallowing version 7.1

Don Dumb
Thumb Down

Just want one fix

It doesn't look as if they have fixed the app refresh problem - https://discussions.apple.com/message/23192445#23192445

Unless the "improved performance on iPhone 4" helps to address it

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Hey, MoJ, we're not your Buddi: Brit firm abandons 'frustrating' crim-tagging contract

Don Dumb
Boffin

IPR policy

Doesn't the IP generally reside with the producer _unless_ the contract explicitly states that it is to be transferred to the client?

UK Government policy is to generally allow the IPR to remain with Industry (the producer) as industry are better placed to exploit the IP and therefore the contract is a more worthwhile investment for the taxpayer.

However, if there is a specific reason to do so, contracts can state that the IPR produced under the contract is owned by the taxpayer. Specifically anything produced under the foreground of such the contract is Crown IPR.

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Facebook gobbles WhatsApp for SIXTEEN BILLION DOLLARS

Don Dumb

Re: Maybe 15.55bln too much

@omnicent - Is text messaging so expensive in the rest of the world?

£12 per month gets you unlimited texts in the UK - factor in international text conversations.

My ex used to WhatsApp her friends in the US, Norway and other places, from the UK, often in 2, 3 and 4-way chats. I wouldn't want to try working out how much that would cost in international text messages.

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HELL is other people ... Thousands play SAME Pokemon game on TV. Mayhem ensues

Don Dumb

Kosher?

Nintendo is particularly touchy about licensing of their IP and the use of their games - is emulating the game and connecting up to a chatroom not going to get the coordinator in legal hot water?

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Wii got it WRONG: How do you solve a problem like Nintendo?

Don Dumb
Unhappy

Re: Opened up the casual gaming market

How far can they push this alleged endless fondness for their tedious franchises that is probably more reliant on people who grew up with them in the 80s and are now *parents* with happy memories than it is on today's kids? (***)

Seriously, Zelda is *old* now:-

But that's just the problem, bring out a good HD console with Mario Kart and I'm interested. Bring out a (properly) new Zelda with good reviews and I'm interested. Hell, remake Ocarina of Time in HD (like they did with Windwaker), I'd buy the console today.

But Nintendo neither have good games out for the Wii U to hook people like me in, nor do they have anything tangible to get people who were already happy with their Wiis and see no reason to upgrade.

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Don Dumb
Stop

Re: the créme de la créme of gaming aristocracy

@irongut - And, who the hell are Link and Samus Aran? I've been plying computer games since Pong and I've never heard of them.

Oh dear god. You mean you've been playing games for many decades and yet you've never heard of Zelda?

Stop whatever you're doing. Go out. Get yourself a Wii or a Gamecube or even a Wii U. Get a copy of Ocarina of Time and enjoy the best experience a game can give. It might be low def, but it's still perfect.

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Tinfoil hats proven useless by eleven-year mobe radiation study

Don Dumb
Flame

Re: Perhaps there's something in it.

@AC - There have been several cancer cases all linked to proximity of a mobile phone for long periods e.g. A women who kept a mobile phone in her breast cleavage and had cancer located by the phone antenna RF lobes.

Oh For Fuck's Sake - Yes, because no woman ever had breast cancer in the breast cleavage before the mobile phone came along. The incident rate for breast cancer in the UK is 1 in 8 during a female's lifetime. I'm suprised there's only been one case of absolutely coincidental cancer. Your anecdote is almost evidence that modible phones reduce cancer risk as you have only one example.

Your comment is proof that no matter how much something is studied, science is still no match for anecdotal evidence. Coincident is expected when dealing with things as prevalent as mobile phones and cancer. That's why you have to do studies with large sample sizes.

My grandfather took an anecdote every day for 60 years and he lived till his late 80s.

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Don Dumb
Alert

Re: You'll never convince...

@Terry 6 - ...... the ones who want to believe that Wifi/mobile phones/MMR/Fluoride etc. are somehow unnatural and dangerous. And anything "natural" is good.

Depressing isn't it? And the most annoying thing is their definition of 'natural', not the same as a physicist's definition I'm sure.

Friend of mine recently posted a story on Facebook about people having problems with vaccinations, it had senior medical leaders (many immunology Profs), being quoted as saying "vaccine x has y problems". They were clearly having concerns with particular aspects of specific vaccinations or aspects of a particular country's vaccination policy. None were saying "vaccination is wrong".

Nonetheless my friend (who naturally administers homeopathic medicine) considered this justification to give the comment "vaccination - seems to be you either believe in it or don't". Of course, the truth was that he doesn't believe in it and was hoping to turn it into a 'religious' debate rather than that admit that there isn't any doubt about vaccination working.

As Prof Brian Cox says, the danger of apparently 'harmless' beliefs like astrology or homeopathy are that they drive people to doubt science and to spurn proper medical advice.

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Rotten to the core: Apple’s 10 greatest FAILS

Don Dumb
WTF?

Re: How is iTunes not on this list?

iTunes isn't really a failure if it makes a ton of money is it?

Good or bad it still succeeded.

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Don Dumb
Thumb Up

Re: IOS 7 issues +1

I thought it couldn't just be me. I always put it down to iOS7 being more power hungry and me running a 4S (smaller memory size). Either way it's pretty awful OS engineering as something like the fixed state of a webpage should be easily stored without having to refresh every time I return to the page. Doesn't iOS shift background apps to something akin to moving background apps to swapfile.

This is definitely worth some digging by El Reg. iOS7 has had so many problems.

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New Forum Wishlist - but read roadmap first

Don Dumb
Mushroom

Re: Hey, Don Dumb ...

Shit, piss, fuck, cunt, cocksucker, motherfucker and tits are all valid here. This is an adult forum. Get used to the idea ... or maybe you should fuck-off back to nanny-ville ...

Well, you clearly *are* an adult.

I'm quite happy with swearing and I will sometimes in posts. But I don't always feel the need to and being an adult I know when its appropriate and when it isn't. I used the term 'BS' rather than 'Bullshit' as I'm guessing The Reg would probably use the former if they actually did introduce an icon. Notice they don't have a "What The Fuck?" icon.

Only a 5 year old thinks tits and piss are swearwords.

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Don Dumb
Facepalm

@Jamie Jones

I suggested that on this very same page!

I do apologise. Consider my post a second for your suggestion.

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Don Dumb

A couple of requests:-

I've made the point in a recent comment to an article, but as this is the proper place to make suggestions:-

I think a 'BS' (we all know what that means) icon would be helpful. Many of the less useful comments are simply made up opinion stated as fact. It would be fair to highlight such perceived nonsence with a Bu**Sh*t (if that helps) icon. Nothing else seems to be appropriate.

I also agree that it is time to retire the Paris icon. as - a) it is only surving to boost such celebrity and b) it does seem to be an unfair targetting of someone none of us have likely ever met.

My other suggestion would be to have an identifier to the parent comment within a reply comment, perhaps something like "In reply to <username> <subject title> posted <date-time>" in the comment header. That way we could work out what the reply is responding to when there is nothing to work that out from. Particularly when there are so many levels of comment that one reply doesn't directly follow the original comment.

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CERN outlines plan for new 100km circumference supercollider

Don Dumb
Thumb Up

Re: Is that really the best place to build these things?

@Steven Roper - "To which end, wouldn't they be better off building it somewhere flat (like the Australian outback for example)"

Not only would those affects be minimised but if they putting it somewhere flat and uninhabited (like Australia) they wouldn't have to dig at all would they? Just lay the ring on the ground - that would be an awful lot cheaper.

If they need some earthly protection above the tube then they could cover it with spoil from a local mining operation (which is vast in Oz I beleive). Either way it would be a hell of a lot cheaper and simpler to lay a ring on the ground and cover it than drilling down 100m under France and Switzerland.

Doesn't the EU already have observatories and space vehicle launching sites outside of the EU? If so, then why couldn't they also build their collider outside.

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Google views, reviews YouTube viewers' views with view to killing off spam shams

Don Dumb
Go

Re: People READ the reviews on YouTube?

@Winkypop People READ the reviews on YouTube?

That's like sorting through a garbage can.

I guess some people do that too.

Well, Adam Buxton has managed to build a large part of his BUG music video comedy show around reading out some of the Youtube comments, its incredibly funny. I've seen it several times live and the TV show is now on Youtube itself, certainly worth a view - http://www.bugvideos.co.uk/home/adam-buxton-s-bug-tv-series-now-on-youtube-.go

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Apple's STILL trying to shake off court-imposed antitrust monitor

Don Dumb
Stop

Re: Bang on...

@AC - "It's well known that Apple don't pay huge sums to lobbyists in Washington"

Is it now?

We need a bullshit icon for Sergent Colonesque comments like this that try and strengthen obviously made up, unevidenced opinion with pub talk like "a well known fact".

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UK picks Open Document Format for all government files

Don Dumb
FAIL

Re: Seen it before

@localzuk - government departments don't have to pay attention to this edict. Only the department of the Minister in question does.

Errr, nope. This is the Cabinet Office, the department effectively in charge of how all government departments are run. That's why the government standards hub is part of the Cabinent Office. At the moment, it is only a 'recommendation' and doesn't *have* to be followed. However, if the Cabinent Office *mandate* something, all government departments do have to adopt such a mandate.

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THOUSANDS of UK.gov Win XP PCs to face April hacker storm... including boxes at TAXMAN, NHS

Don Dumb
Boffin

Re: @Neil Alexander

It's not just the beancounters though - "I'm sorry Mrs Smith, you can't have your pacemaker because we are paying for an upgrade to the computer system"

Imagine what that would do when Mrs Smith goes to the press - the trusts have difficult desicions to make, especially when their budgets are getting cut.

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Furtive ebook readers push Hitler's Mein Kampf up the charts

Don Dumb

The bigger Question is :

Who the hell is making money from Mein Kampf?

I don't think it's that weird to want to read it, out of sheer curiosity if nothing else but I do think it is pretty reprehensible to be fine with making money out of it.

Who is profiting from the sales of this book?

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You... (Sigh). You store our financials in a 'Clowds4U' account?

Don Dumb
Go

Re: @Don Dumb IT can be a pain in the arse too

@Phil O'Sohpical - "And you think that emaiing company information to a private gmail account is better?!."

No I don't, and I entirely agree with your point. The places I know take information very seriously. We don't allow use of email (or messaging of any kind) through any non-company service or netowrk, unless of course it is specifically intended to another organisation.

I was just replying the the fairly loose idea that the problem could be solved by simply using a USB stick. I agree, until people see IT failures as important as fraud (it is when it's personal data) then people (and mgnt) won[t take this seriously.

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'Leaked' iPhone 6 pics will make cool fanbois WEEP - it's a PHABLET

Don Dumb
Happy

Re: I don't care what it looks like

@Frank Bough - Thanks, I was beginning to think that it was only me. I haven't upgraded from my 4S for the same reasons as you but apparently that makes us responsible for the downfall of society.

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Don Dumb
FAIL

Re: I don't care what it looks like

@DijitulSupport- What the hell are you on about?

"I get the whole "i've made a backup of my music collection" I really do"

No you don't because that isn't what I'm doing, it is nothing to do with backup, where did you even get that idea? I have my music originally stored on my computer and also wish it to be listened to where I am, hence on my phone. Why would you even think I'm talking about backup when I said nothing of the sort.

Why on earth would you see "being able to carry over XXGb of music" ever be the primary concern when buying a smartphone?

Firstly I didn't say it was a primary concern but why wouldn't storage be a factor with a *smart*phone (aka computer phone). If you were just making calls with your phone, you wouldn't need a smartphone at all. I happen to want the same music I own on my phone as it doubles as my iPod.

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Don Dumb
Stop

Re: I don't care what it looks like

@cambsukguy - I don't think you bothered to fully read my comment.

I know I can't hear the difference between lossless (in this case Apple Lossless) and a decent lossy bitrate, especially when played back through a phone. The lossless music on my computer is reencoded to a lossy bitrate (by iTunes) when synced to my phone. I'd just rather have a bit more storage and not even bother needing to convert, just have everything in lossless and keep it simple.

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You're fired: Lord Sugar offloads faded PC builder Viglen to XMA

Don Dumb
FAIL

Re: I wonder

@Lars - Are people forced to call you by your name?

I assume you are in the US and the US isn't any different.

Remember, Lords and Ladys are the members of the upper house of the legislature. Don't Congressmen and Congresswomen get the title Congressman or Congresswoman? and Senators get the title 'Senator', Governors get the title 'Governor' and so on. The UK actually has less of this as our Members of Parlimament don't have titles other than Mr, Mrs & Dr. ALthough Cabinent members do get addressed as 'The Right Honorable'.

The likes to think it has no class system but it seems like the US is in big denial.

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Don Dumb
FAIL

Re: Lets be honest

@c:\boot.ini - "Anything that accepts the "sir" title is scum, period."

Whoa, that's a pretty sweeping statement -

Winston Churchill, David Attenborough, Edmund Hilary, Paul McCartney, Tim Berners-Lee, Terry Pratchett, Ernest Rutherford, Steven Hawking, Isacc Newton, Tanni Grey-Thompson, Ernest Shakleton - I could go on for ages of Knights and Dames that are very deserving. You say they are all "scum"?

Accepting a Knighthood doesn't mean you're posh. I know many people who are posh do get them but unlike a peerage (Lord, Lady, Baron, etc) the Knighthood is given by the British state for things done or acheived, they aren't a birthright.

Lots of countries have state honours, they might not have the same names as the UK, nor does anyone else seem to give out titles but that doesn't change that it is the state's way of showing gratitute for something that has perceivied to be of benefit to the nation.

For christ-sakes Nelson Mandela had an honourary Knighthood, he was hardly posh was he?

If accepting Knighthoods makes you scum them so would accepting the Nobel prize?

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What is Violin Memory's sacked CEO still doing on their board?

Don Dumb
Stop

Re: Gates and Ballmer are still on Microsoft's board...

Not a fair analogy -

Gates and Ballmer both *voluntarily* moved from the CEO position . Gates after he had built Microsoft to the biggest computing company in the world, Ballmer has been less successful but still the company hasn't exactly collapsed. Gates in particular has a right to influence the appointment of CEO.

Basile on the other hand was *terminated*, by the board, from Violin after it lost 60% of its value. He is hardly going to have the best interests of the company in mind when it has just fired him.

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EE and Voda subscribers to get 2G and 3G INSIDE the Channel Tunnel

Don Dumb
Meh

Re: How about on UK train lines?!

I have to say I'm not sure how I feel about this. My daily train commute of 30-50min, goes out of coverage for about half the journey and I have never come across Wifi on any train I've used. Lack of coverage when I'm sitting still and could listen to internet radio or watch the cricket or something is certainly annoying and it would be great to get good coverage.

However, on the downside - almost everything modern rolled out on the National network is awful, especially in the FGW areas as I am (TheCloud station wifi is almost pointless). Crap technology investment has been seen by the rail companies as a way to show 'improvements' to the network to mask the lack of any new rolling stock and a poor train service.

So I guess if there is money to invest, some more trains would be preferable. That and I'm happy that people don't try and make phonecalls that often.

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