* Posts by Don Dumb

332 posts • joined 20 May 2013

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Tim Cook's answer to crashing iPhone sales: More iPhones

Don Dumb
Holmes

Features like Siri?

I only ever saw/heard people use Siri the first time they got an iPhone or on comedy shows. In the last few years I haven't ever seen or heard of anyone using Siri. I have known of people using voice control*, like phone dialling from the car or from their headset while walking but never bothering with Siri.

If that's an example of the amazing new features (which are several years old) that are going to get people buying new or second iPhones, then the market has matured and sales will slow down. There's been nothing new of any real significance for several generations, in any phone, just slow iteration. There's little need to upgrade other than because the phone is broken, slowed down by OS updates or now a bit too small. With Apple prices people aren't keen to splash cash every couple of years unless necessary and it is becoming less necessary each year - no matter how much Apple tell us "it's a game changing changer change".

This doesn't mean that smartphones or Apple are dead, but just like TVs we buy them to last 5+ years not until next year. There's nothing wrong with that but electronics firms have got used to massive sales and haven't quite had the guts to tell their investors that it won't last for ever.

* - Siri and voice control on iPhones aren't the same, the phone's commands "dial mum" can be driven by voice with Siri turned off, it was present before 'Siri' was even a thing

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Beer merger dwarfs EMC/Dell

Don Dumb
Stop

Re: Can't say I really like any of them..

@Unicornpiss - expect most of the microbreweries have been brought out by these two goliaths over the last few years. Have a look at the full list of beers they own and you'll realise there's actually very few that aren't owned by them.

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Pokemon Go DDoS claim

Don Dumb
Terminator

Not just Poodlecorp

'OurMine' also claim to have taken down the login process today, of course they only have good security in mind. Which is why they claim that “No one will be able to play this game till Pokemon Go contact us on our website to teach them how to protect it!”

Of course, OurMine could have volunteered that lesson to Niantic but OurMine would rather charge for that lesson.

No, I didn't think it was at all like a protection racquet either.

In truth, it is difficult to estimate whether this is a malicious DDOS or just insufficient server capacity for the demand.

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Wannabe Prime Minister Andrea Leadsom thinks all websites should be rated – just like movies

Don Dumb

Re: What a choice

@alain williams - "So stop pissing about and abusing the numbers."

I'll concede you have a point as I suspect my pissing around with the referendum semantics has obscured the point I was making. Please allow me to clarify:-

The referendum, rightly or wrongly, is considered as a 'mandate' by many politicians and commentators as many did vote. But no one voted for, and very few will be able to vote for, Theresa or Andrea to carry out that mandate, let alone run the whole bloody country.

I wasn't really objecting to the result of the advisory referendum being considered a mandate, I was objecting that the party election for PM is considered an acceptable way to award the job of head of government and chief exit negotiator. We should now have a general election as neither the leader we voted for nor the leader of the leave campaign voted for are doing the job of leading the country or the leave negotiations.

NB (offtopic) - Yes, I am would suggest that the number that didn't vote to change should have been considered as remain (it is government policy) but I acknowledge we can't do that after the result.

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Don Dumb

Re: What a choice

@AC - Not a majority of the population but of the general electorate. My point was that many were prevented from voting and less than half of those who actually could vote demanded change against the government advice and policy.

I know the Leave Vote won under the rules of the referendum, but it hardly delivered a clear mandate. And this party election for PM isn't giving that mandate either.

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Don Dumb
FAIL

Re: What a choice

@codejunky - UK adult population ~61 million. Number of people who voted out ~17 million, number of people who didn't vote out ~44 million. Which number is the minority?

I didn't say general electorate, deliberately.

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Don Dumb
Megaphone

Re: The obvious problem with this

@Alister - Not sure why the downvotes, it's proven to be too easy to sell stupid to Dumb Britain -

Every day millions of webpages are desperately trying to get into the UK, flooding into *our* servers, clogging up *our* infrastructure, taking away browser space from decent, hardworking UK webpages. Some of them are even written in Arabic.

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3
Don Dumb
Terminator

I can see it now....

@Charlie Clark "But hang on: Britain could decide to leave the internet, couldn't it? That would keep all that nasty stuff out."

"Take back control of our internet" along with "Let's decide how to spend the £millions of fees we give to the W3C each year ourselves and free us from their burdensome 'standards' red tape."

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Don Dumb
Flame

Re: What a choice

@Voland's right hand - "What a choice"

And one that hardly anyone gets to make - it is only the Prime Minister after all.

There are faults with the US approach to democracy but one aspect that I like is that everyone knows who the person to take over from the President would be (the Veep) at the time of voting. So voters get to vote on the leader and their understudy.

No one in Britain voted for a government led by Theresa or Andrea (neither were Deputy PM). And yet one of them will apparently have the "mandate" to tear the UK out of the EU that a minority of the country voted for.

As much as I hate Boris, he was the person that lead the vote to leave, he should be the person to lead that exit, as it was his 'plan' that people officially voted on. (The - he shat in his bath he should wash in it principle.)

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6
Don Dumb
Paris Hilton

Why only the internet?

What annoyed me during the investigations into the media and the Leveson inquiry is that, for some reason some areas of the media are treated as sacrosanct and others are fair game for massive censorship.

The print media is a gradually dying form (old news) but for some reason any regulation of the print media would be 'tantamount to living in Pyongyang'. Preventing regulation of newspapers would be fine, if not for the fact that the very same print media are always happy to see television, radio, the internet, films and every other form of media be heavily regulated and often pre-emptively (such as film with the BBFC). Why should Television news be subject to far more government oversight than newspaper article?

I get annoyed at the double standard applied, it's as if everyone decided the phrase 'freedom of the press' should only ever be applied literally, so everything else gets regulation, pushed hard by the print media and the print media themselves get no regulation. That seems unfair being as many sources of information have taken over from newspapers, yet newspapers still sit on this strange pedestal.

If Andrea Leadsom wants to age rate the whole of the internet why doesn't she start with press articles? - sitting there in every newsagent poisoning human decency. Oh, because *that* would be wrong, so why should heavy regulation of the internet be any more acceptable?

Paris - because pictures of her and her ilk are often at child height on the cover of papers in a newsagent, that's all perfectly fine with Andrea of course.

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Teen faces trial for telling suicidal boyfriend to kill himself via text

Don Dumb
WTF?

@massivelySerial - "It's America. Even therapists have therapists."

Why is that a bad thing? - Doctors have Doctors you know

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The Great Brain Scan Scandal: It isn’t just boffins who should be ashamed

Don Dumb

Re: There's a flaw with this article

@Dave 126 - "There was talk of 'luvvies' ... in the article, but not of actors."

AO seems to use the term 'luvvies' in most of his articles, I noticed this a while back. Apparently he uses it as a catch all term to brand those with whom he disagrees. Considering that Andrew had a period of going out of his way to bash Stephen Fry, I can't help thinking he has a bit of a problem in this area.

Personally, I find Andrew's meandering style, interspersed with many irrelevant attacks on vague groups of people to be unpleasant and detract from the point supposedly being made. I don't mind that Andrew makes cases or points I might disagree with, that's healthy counterpoint and actually I welcome that, don't want an echo chamber here.

I've noticed that I know Andrew has written the article before reading it, simply from the headline and that isn't a compliment. This was also the case with Lewis.

Andrew - please continue to write here but bear in mind that you come across badly in these articles in a way which I like to think doesn't fairly reflect you. I give you the benefit of the doubt that the intention is to be entertaining rather than dry but to me the manner in which the argument gets presented often comes across more as more like a Fox News rant than a well written comment piece. Perhaps read your articles and ask yourself if they are as humorous as you intended or if you have been stretching too far to throw stones at "the luvvie intelligensia" or whichever loose ambiguous group you want to fight against.

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Chap fails to quash 'shared password' 'hacking' conviction

Don Dumb
Facepalm

Try again

@LosD - "I'm going to go with the dissenter here: As soon as it was willingly shared, it is "just" theft of confidential information."

It was NOT willingly shared by the organisation who owned the information and the computers that were infiltrated. In fact, it was specifically *against* their wishes as they had rules prohibiting the practice. That the employees were willing to share their logins does not constitute consent by the data owner.

It was still unauthorised entry, regardless of how easy the employees (accomplices?) made it.

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TP-Link abandons 'forgotten' router config domains

Don Dumb
Flame

So I take a closer look at my router login page...

My router (Archer C2) is one of the devices affected, the old link resolves to tplinkwifi.net, hopefully this was within my network but in any case I haven't logged into it since the last firmware update and have now updated my bookmark.

What's really annoying is that, TP Link had a few ways to notify me - the page where the updates are downloaded or the frontpage of the router update. But instead they have done this silently, leaving many open to hijacking. It realy didn't need to be that hard, especially considering they have produced firmware updates recently.

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Dixons, UK's fifth 'emergency service', brushes off Brexit scare stories

Don Dumb
Terminator

Burying the lead

Chief Exec Seb James also said that:-

"We're going to see lots of screaming and shouting, but my message to my team is to absolutely make sure we do everything in our power to ensure our leaders get access to the single market and make sure we heal the rifts that this debate has caused in our society,"

So all the bullishness is dependant on the UK staying in the single market - that's a fairly big risk right there.

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Europe's UK-backed Unified Patent Court 'could be derailed'

Don Dumb
Facepalm

Winner of the "I'm not racist, but..." award goes to..

"Our young are not necessarily yuppies, can't afford to buy and are unable to find homes to rent because they have been taken by "deserving" immigrants straight from the back of the lorry.

Oh & by the way I'm not a racist, just a realist."

Those people getting off "the back of the lorry" aren't *EU* citizens are they? No you're not a racist at all. You seriously think that by getting out of Europe it will change non-EU migration? And this despite the fact that EU countries already take in many more refugees than the UK. What Leave papers were oddly quiet to note is that the Leave campaigning Employment Minister Priti Patel was suggesting Vote Leave to asian communities as a way to increase immigration from the subcontinent.

Are you sure that all Leave voters really want the same thing? Without a second referendum we won't know if the negotiated deal is really what all 52% voted for.

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Don Dumb
Stop

Re: Sigh

@batfastad - "Thanks 1.1%"

That is Cameron's fault, he got to set the rules of the game and somehow set the rules up in the opposition's favour

- He could have incldued 16/17 year olds or delayed the vote as late as possible to allow the demographics to swing his way; he could have set the bar at 67% majority and/or 75% turnout; he could have included permanent-resident non-UK passport citizens (those allowed to vote in local elections). Any of these would have improved his chances. Yet he was so unjustifiably confident that he didn't do any of these and we are all now paying for his hubris.

TL:DR - Don't get upset at the result, get upset that the game was rigged.

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My plan to heal this BROKEN, BREXITED BRITAIN

Don Dumb
Boffin

Re: Parliamentary Sovereignty

@TheTick - "No, it wasn't politicians that said we would leave the EU. It was the people, and we spoke clearly."

No we the people didn't. It wasn't *the people*, it was the *electorate* and not even half of that - 17m is a lot smaller than 64.1m (the rough population of the UK). The electorate is roughly 46.5m and well over half didn't insist on change, so parliament hasn't had a clear mandate from "the people". Furthermore, many people within the electorate were excluded (EU citizens can vote in local but not national elections, so they get taxation without representation)

As others have said, sane countries make sure that mandates to change are based on very clear results (like 2/3s majority) - 52% of 72% of 73% of the population (back-of-fag-packet maths) is not a clear statement from the people.

I'll concede that against the rules of the referendum the desicion was to Leave the EU and that has to be honoured to keep any shred of credibility for democracy. But what does "Leave the EU" actually mean? Are you sure that everyone who voted Leave had the same idea of what they were voting for? All that has happened is a desicion to commence a vague re-negotiation of our EU membership. We could have our position chnage from 'member' to 'associate' with no material change in

Consider that no one actually stated which bits of the EU we would leave and which we would keep, no promises were made, not apparently even on the side of buses. There is and never was any plan that was endorsed by the vote. Many want out of the single market but that's not what Boris is saying it means. There are likely many different views of Leave voters of what they wanted when they said leave. Some wanted out of the ECHR, which isn't even part of the EU; some want to divert the gross payment from the EU to the NHS, which isn't going to happen because it was never true. Some expect us to become another Norway, but to other Leave voters that will be betrayal.

I can't believe I'm agreeing with Jeremy *unt, but that is how fucked up things are. The right and democratic thing to do is now undertake Article 50 negotiations and then have another referendum on whether to enact the deal struck with the member states. I suspect many Leave voters won't like any deal because it wont go anywhere near far enough for what they thought 'Leave' meant, while others will be worried it gets rid of things they thought wouldn't be touched. This referendum result shouldn't be seen as a mandate for Boris to just negotiate any deal he wants and then enact it without a specific endorsement for that deal from the public.

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'Leave EU means...' WHAT?! Britons ask Google after results declared

Don Dumb
Facepalm

Re: So how long before ...

@agurney - "No, petrol will be cheaper, the Leave campaign promised to remove VAT from fuel."(Emphasis mine.)

Oh god, you're one of the people that actually believe a promise made by Vote Leave.

You're probably also expecting the NHS to get £350M per week more - you might want to see what they said after the result.

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Don Dumb

Re: "I'm sure I heard passing references to Polish delicatessens"

@John Presland - "Dip in. There's some good stuff there. Try Krakowska sausage and Bryndza cheese."

I would offer my vote for the many large sausages that are fantastic on a BBQ, Keilbasa my favourite and the tray deserts are fantastic.

An aside - These were intorduced to me at a barbeque by a Polish friend and her Scottish boyfriend who had been living here for well over a decade, without her family (you know taking our working man's accountancy jobs ). It's something I love about living in modern Britian and I fear that this is something we are going to lose. Certainly I have many friends who are terrified that they will have to get married or fight to apply for a passport simply to cary on living and working here as before.

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PM resigns as Britain votes to leave EU

Don Dumb
FAIL

This isn't democracy.

"It's called Democracy*. Sometimes you get your choice because the majority agree with you, sometimes you don't because the majority don't."

The majority didn't vote to leave, it was 17m people, in a country with over three times that number.

Taxpaying permanent residents in the UK weren't allowed to vote, UK citizens permanently resident in the EU weren't allowed to vote, under 18s weren't allowed to vote. The game was rigged for Leave, amazingly by someone campaigning to stay (Cameron)

This wasn't a majority decision, as others have pointed out, to make such a massive jump into the dark with such a tiny percentage lead is nothing less than reckless. I hope the next few years of complete uncertainty is worth it.

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Don Dumb
Coat

"Vote Yes for London Independence! And Scotland while we'r'e at it."

Take us* with you!

'Us' = Bristol, Bath and Cheltenham

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Don Dumb
Childcatcher

Backward not forward

Less than half the electorate voted to leave, with the voting age held at 18 (unlike 16 with the Scottish referendum) and apparently that is enough to force the UK to leave.

Looking at the demographics of the vote it would seem that the older the group the more likely the vote to leave, with the youngest groups voting to stay - pensioners, owning property outright, deciding to gamble on the future of the young. No one knows what is going to happen, so it is a complete gamble, especially with many not knowing if there is anything to gain.

One wonders what the result would be if it was held two years later.

It genuinely upsets me today that so many of my friends, who have lived and worked here for years are now facing the fact that the UK might decide they are no longer welcome, partly because they didn't get UK passports as they didn't need to.

NB - Although the worst aspect is the prospect of seeing Farage's smug face forever and the knowledge that now we "have control" the people going to take it aren't going to make things better.

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Mandarins plotted to water down EU data protection regs

Don Dumb
Unhappy

Re: And these are the people...

"Roll on 1984"

The value of the pound has already been there today...

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Kill Flash now. Or patch these 36 vulnerabilities. Your choice

Don Dumb

Re: Killed.

"possibility of Auntie charging to use iPlayer...Doubt the beeb will be in any hurry to do so though."

Sigh, again with this.

iPlayer does have an HTML5 feed, you don't need flash for iPlayer. It's the BBC News videos that are unwatchable without Flash.

That they don't extend HTML5 to news is utterly baffling, considering that they have actually done this for mobile apps.

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Lester Haines: RIP

Don Dumb
Pint

RIP

I'm sure many have already said it but I will nonetheless add my thanks to Lester and my condolences to his loved ones.

He has made his mark and I am personally grateful to Lester for being one of the people that made The Reg the enjoyable mix of both serious and frivolous.

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Apple quietly launches next-gen encrypted file system

Don Dumb

@AC - "if it wasn't for BBC iPlayer (which uses *&%$ Adobe Air) my machine would now be Adobe free."

If you're willing to watch through streaming rather than downloads, you don't need the iPlayer application and can just use the iPlayer website which is using HTML5 (if you disable or remove Flash).

Alternatively, there is getiplayer which worked the last time I used it.

Now if only they extend HTML5 to the rest of the BBC (particularly the news section).

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It's [insert month] of 2016, and your Windows PC can still be owned by [insert document type]

Don Dumb

Re: The obligatory question

For me the updates had become magically 'unhidden', but they were unchecked and in the optional updates group. So a mere check of their Knowledge Base descriptions and they were promptly re-hidden again.

For what it's worth, I haven't needed any other tools than simply not allowing or installing the pesky Win10 related updates every month.

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Microsoft splashes Virtual Reality-slinging 'Scorpio' Xbox

Don Dumb
Pint

Yeah, thanks for that picture

Now all I have in my head is the Bond theme-esque song about Hank Scorpio at the end of that episode

"And on Friday the canteen serves German beer.

He loves German beeeeeer"

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Get ready for Google's proprietary Android. It's coming – analyst

Don Dumb
Holmes

If it's true

"Technology analyst Richard Windsor says that a highly confidential internal project is underway"

Clearly not *that* highly confidential then - Unless of course it's bollocks.

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Cyber burglars love to pillage Euro businesses they've pwned before

Don Dumb
Joke

He just hasn't worked out how to switch off the camera or the fingerprint scanner.

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Why everyone* hates Salesforce's Marc Benioff

Don Dumb
Stop

Re: Why is Hillary election propaganda being posted here?

"The vilification of the Trump Voter as know-nothing flyover country hillbilly seems to be reaching new levels of hysteria."

But I thought Trump said there was "too much political correctness?" - clearly that must only be when attacking women, muslims, latinos and everyone else who isn't Trump.

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Watchdog snaps: Privatise the Land Registry? What a terrible idea!

Don Dumb
Go

Re: UK is really going to the dogs.

Dogshit, as seen on pavements

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Got a Fitbit? Thought you were achieving your goals? Better read this

Don Dumb

@AC - "They don't measure continuously, fitness machines only measure when you have a firm grip on the electrical contacts and that's not possible during vigorous movement."

Those HRMs are terrible, fortunately most gym machines I've seen will accept data from chest strap HRMs (Polar, Garmin, etc) that are much more accurate, the chest strap just pairs with the machine. In my gym, all of the cardio equipment have the metal grips for monitoring but the gym staff hand out chest straps sensors when people are trying to do actual heart rate based training,

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Don Dumb
Stop

Armchair doctor?

@ckdizz -

"the only person that should have a heart rate of 50 in the middle of the day is an endurance athlete, which he is most certainly not."

That simply isn't true, IMO Looking at heart rates in this overly narrow way is like using BMI to determine obesity. Testing someone's heart rate after telling them they may have a medical condition, is a great way of getting a higher reading.

Resting heart rates can differ greatly - <boast>while I'm in good shape I'm not an elite athlete, I was hooked up to a heart rate monitor at the hospital not long ago (so I assume was accurate) and my resting heart rate was 37.</boast>

There are many things that affect heart rates apart from cardiovascular training, age, sex, diet has a massive effect, stress levels, simple genetics, lifestyle.

I'm guessing your friend perhaps doesn't drink much tea, coffee or alcohol? Perhaps he doesn't eat much red meat or foods that are bad for cholesterol levels? Does he walk to work? - Many factors.

None of this is to say that Fitbits are accurate but that heart rates do vary greatly in perfectly healthy people, much like BMI.

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Galileo satnav fleet waxes orbital

Don Dumb
Thumb Up

So we will have the satellites...

Can anyone point to how many Car sat navs and which consumer gear is ready to receive the signals or do we have to wait a generation to actually be able to use the service? I notice that my iPhone can pick up GPS and Glonass but I will probably replace it by the time the constellation is in service, would be nice (although not that important) if it also picked up Galileo.

If I buy a (European) car this year I assume I wont be able to benefit from this. How long before we can directly benefit?

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Google asks the public to name the forthcoming Android N operating system

Don Dumb
Coat

Nutmeg

As in - it goes between your legs?

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US-CERT advice says kill Quicktime for Windows, quickly

Don Dumb
Facepalm

Quicktime is very much still there

Just checked Apple Software Update on my Windows box. Quicktime is there (although not checked). However the text on the description is fantastic. This is the first line-

"QuickTime 7.7.9 improves security and is recommended for all QuickTime 7 users on Windows."

Considering this is text pulled from their servers today, you would think Apple might want to be responsible and put some sort of health warning up front. But apparently no.

5
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Dear Windows, OS X folks: Update Flash now. Or kill it. Killing it works

Don Dumb
Headmaster

Re: Get the content producers to kill it

@To Mars in Man Bras! - iPlayer works on HTML5 without Flash now.

If you haven't got Flash it just works. If you do have flash, you can opt into their HTML5 beta and get the HTML5 feed instead. BBC News still uses mostly Flash though.

Grateful for your guide but it hasn't been neccessary since they started the beta

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Adobe preps emergency Flash patch for bug hackers are exploiting

Don Dumb

Re: Flash Flushed

@theModge - if you remove flash from your system, iPlayer defaults to HTML5, no need to opt in at all. Unfortunatelt many of the videos in the news site are flash only - here's hoping the beta ends soon.

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Bleeping Computer sued by Enigma Software over moderator's forum post

Don Dumb

Re: Anticompetitive

@Gordon861 - "Perhaps including Spyhunter as a special 'one time challenger' in the next AV-test might show how crap it is and end the case?"

Good idea, but I fear that has the danger of rewarding their bullying tactics and giving Spyhunter the air of legitimacy by being involved in a SPyware test at all.

I guess my point is - why should AV-test even give them the time of day? There might be other Spyware tools that don't get on the list that are more deserving than SpyHunter that haven't resorted to childish tactics to get noticed. Also, the AV-test result would then be itself the subject of litigation ('not fair', 'biased', 'badly carried out'). Most of these sites don't have the resources to contest litigation. If I was AV-test I wouldn't want to open myself up to that possibility if I didn't have to. And thus Enigma is self-punished by a lack of recognition from independant sources who don't want to touch them.

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Don Dumb
FAIL

Re: I tried to give a f**k...

@ForthIsNotDead - "I tried to give a f**k...

...but failed."And then you even failed at that as you gave enough of a f**k to post a comment.

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Don Dumb
FAIL

"You can't spell 'dishonorable', without 'honorable'"

@AC - "I would never buy a security product with *Spy* in the name. You are just asking for trouble."

But what about an anti-spyware tool? Would it not be more meaningful to have the term 'spyware' and therefore 'spy' in the name?

Would you avoid an anti-coagulent as you would be worried they will clot your blood?

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Don Dumb

Re: Anticompetitive

@Andy Taylor - "Enigma say that not including affiliate links to Spyhunter as well, Bleeping Computers are anticompetitive."

But are they specifically *prevented* from becoming an affiliate? Or do they simply *choose* not to be. It isn't anti-competitive to not advertise a company that chooses not to advertise through you*, if they are being quoted exorbitant rates (compared to Malwarebytes) then they might have a point - but I doubt it.

Furthermore, as the Bleeping Computer page points out, 'AV-Test' doesn't include Spyhunter in its list of regularly tested anti-spyware applications to determine its relative success rate against its peers. If Bleeping Computer has to advertise SpyHunter, along with Malwarebytes, then they have to advertise *every* piece of software that *claims* to be an anti-spyware tool. And thus AV-Test would have to test all of those software tools also. I'm going to guess that the particular tools that any review or advice site tests or advertises is entirely their choice, they aren't under any obligation to present an exhuastive list.

<CarAnalogy>A Car magazine doesn't have to review *every* hatchback in its hatchback roundup review does it? And they will have car adverts, but not for every car they review.</CarAnalogy>

* - Apologies for the multiple negatives in one sentence.

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Don Dumb
Facepalm

Striesand Effect? No we haven't heard that album,

This story links to the 'bad review', the bleeping computer forums flash up on entry a fundrasing page, which links to the same 'bad review' and my guess is that this will get attention in other national news outlets (as they do show an interest in companies undermining public created content on the web).

All Enigma Software has managed to do is aggressively promote comment on how bad they are.

You'd think that at some point, someone might learn the lessons of the Striesand Effect.

And that's before you start to ask, why does anyone have an obligation to give a good review rather than a bad review? (even though it's not a review at all) And how is it even 'advertising', so as to be falsely advertising?

55
0

Europe's Earth-watching satellite streaks aloft

Don Dumb
Facepalm

Re: Is this the sentinel...

@ac - "Is this the sentinel that comes with the 'correction' software to 'prove' the sea levels are rising faster and faster?"

You seem to be one of those people that have your own 'correction' software running. Yours is buggy.

7
4

All-American Apple challenges US gov call for iOS 'backdoor'

Don Dumb

Re: Letter target

@ac - "Shouldn't Cook be arguing the issue in the court?

Is this a case of not expecting to get much traction there on either legal or technical merits and hoping to get further with the "court of public opinion" and pressurize the court through the politicos?"

Well, they are also arguing the issue in the court.

I guess that Apple is ultimately answerable to its shareholders and it cares about public opinion which affects sales. Even though they are taking court action, it seems smart to explain to everyone, *before* a negative backlash, why they are fighting the court order.

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Don Dumb
Stop

Re: To my mind... - Phil Kingston

@BenR - "Admittedly in this case, it's all a bit post hoc and arguably pointless"

I think people seem to mistakenly think the FBI is after the two (now dead) perpetrators. Rather I believe they want to review the phone to help establish whether anyone else was involved (also culpable) or whether the 'workplace dispute' angle is valid.

It certainly doesn't seem to me to be fishing to review the phone of a couple of mass murderers to establish any further background behind what really happened.

"If the authorities, be it the local police of some arm of the government security apparatus, has actually been to a court and got a court order, then isn't this exactly what most people have been asking for? Clear, accountable judicial process and a valid warrant for the information?"

Apparently what people kept asking for isn't what many people really want, if the comments on this story are anything to go by...

Personally, I agree that this seems acceptable. I can't see what more the government can be expected to do - there has definitely been a serious crime commited for which further investigation is in the national and public interest, they have got an open court order to help unlock the phone and the court order is specifically limited to getting assistance into getting into the phone in question.

3
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Health and Safety to prosecute over squashed Harrison Ford

Don Dumb
Alert

Re: Are all employer liable?

@Cynic_999 - "So how does that work when the employer is the M.O.D. and the machinery in question is a machine-gun in hostile territory?"

"It shall be the duty of every employer to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable,"

Yes, the MOD does have to take reasonably practicable steps, even in war, this equally applies to the Police Force in shootouts, Fire Service in firefighting etc.

Google 'Coroner report MOD' and you will see examples where the government has been found to not have taken such reasonable steps, even in places like Iraq.

Basically, in a warzone (or police shootout) you can't stop your enemy shooting at you but you can take many steps to make it less dangerous -

intelligence to understand the threats/risks; armour protection to reduce the risk of the bullets causing damage; equipment appropriate for the situation & location; years of planning, tactics and training to reduce the chance of it happening and deal with the situation if it does; medical evacuation and support in place to treat injuries; desicion making that takes into account the risks (of say going on an assault) weighed against the need to act (do you need to do the assault? or with the intended approach?)

- if the employer (MOD, Police force, fire service, etc) hasn't done any of these to the level of 'reasonably practicable' then they will be found cupable.

The principle is that you cannot eliminate danger, especially in a warzone, so you don't make things more dangerous than they need to be. The key has always been - Understand the dangers, try and reduce them and consider very carefully about whether doing things are worth the risk that remains.

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Zero. Zilch. Nada. That's how much Netflix uses its own data centres now

Don Dumb
WTF?

A familiar smell

"...made way to continuous delivery, engineering teams making independent decisions using self service tools in a loosely coupled DevOps environment, helping accelerate innovation."

Why is it that any statement involving the term 'DevOps' is mix of various buzzwords?

Even terms which have usually have meaning somehow lose any meaning at all in the context of a statement like this.

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