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* Posts by Mk4

8 posts • joined 16 May 2013

Life after server-side flash: What comes next?

Mk4

Is this really what you think about storage?

Hi Dave,

You might have noticed that Samsung is making 3D NAND chips right now, and Toshiba and SanDisk are joint funding a 3D NAND fab in Japan. Martin Fink (HP CTO) has recently said that memristor DIMMs will be launched in 2016 and be in full production by 2018. So I would say that 3D NAND just won. If there was ever a race between them. Which there certainly hasn't been for at least a year.

BTW - NAND in it's current design is page access memory and memristor seems to be word (byte) access so can replace main memory. So they aren't really competing for the same use anyway - one is a disk replacement and the other is non-volatile main memory.

You should be interested in this stuff. For example a switch to non-volatile main memory will allow complete change in the way data is used. Think ccNUMA but accross a whole data centre (or wider).

It is a hugely interesting time in the world of storage at the moment. Articles like this do a massive disservice to a vibrant and fascinating area of IT, and one that should be supported by this esteemed organ.

Cheers

Mark

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US Attorney Gen latest to roast Apple, Google mobe encryption

Mk4
Alien

The enforcement agencies don't make the laws...

But they would like to, and in some cases have or tried to (e.g. GCHQ IMHO). There is a constant drum-beat globally on this "paternal care of the people" idea. This is trying to, and in recent cases has, circumvented the accepted normal law making process. Trying to influence vendors seems to be yet another way to circumvent normal law making processes. I agree with many of the other comments, and I would really like to do something to help to stop this. Any good ideas? (orgs to send some cash to?)

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Home Depot ignored staff warnings of security fail laundry list

Mk4

Re: Security dept. is there to serve the business

Yes, additional laws or other regulation is one option that can be used to get businesses to meet a higher level of security. But the drawbacks are it's a pretty blunt instrument (you have to find a law that can be applied to all companies) and there needs to be a check for compliance. That last point on checks on compliance is a very significant one - it looks like PCI DSS rules were not complied with in this case and it seems over a number of years. But this was not detected, so we can deduce that no-one checked properly or perhaps at all. That's a pretty damning inditement of the credit industry, and illustrates that laws and regulations are not going to help if there is no effective enforcement.

Businesses understand risk - they take risks all the time. The risk to the corporate reputation seems to have been realised in this case and there was an attempt to take action, which was too late. To me that looks like the risk became very obvious to the leadership, but at too late a stage. Making the business risks clear to management early on is the right way to go and if the business decision is to do nothing then it's a business risk the management have decided to take.

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Mk4

Security dept. is there to serve the business

This might be a somewhat unpopular opinion but at the end of it all, it's a business decision. I agree with Mark 85 - there is going to be a political fight over who to blame and if there isn't a solid paper trail showing the security department made all the right noises (and it sounds like they did) the blame can be laid on some security staff (right or wrong).

It's time security folks joined the rest of the IT world in a thorough understanding that they need to justify what they do. Simply telling businesses "you need to spend this money to get this new thing" will never elicit the desired response from a security perspective. I remember mainframe and VMS operators about 15 years ago tellling businesses they "needed another million" and being surprised to be asked why. Ho hum, the wheel turns.

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You - vendor. Pin your ears back, I've got some things to tell you

Mk4

Hmmmm - vendors listening to the customer.

It's a novel concept. Not sure your average vendor is going to understand.

The rash of "new technologies" coming from companies small and large in the last year leaves me wondering if anyone in these companies acutally remembers why they are making this stuff in the first place.

I'm sure everyone has a jolly good time making new things and sales drones get all excited and dribble on themselves thinking about the bonuses they are going to get selling them. But in the end, we have to actually use this stuff to support real-world workloads and no vendor is making my life any easier.

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Forget the mobile patent wars – these web giants have patented your DATA CENTER

Mk4

Re: I'm going to use patents to paralyse the west

You just made me laugh out loud in the middle of the library where I should be working :-)

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Company selling you out? You've been TUPE-ed

Mk4

Lasted 5 years ... death of a thousand cuts

I got TUPEd from an industry job to an IT service provider. One thing about TUPE was that it enabled the IT SP to ignore the handover contract signed by my old employer and the new. We were supposed to get regular pay rises but never got them - the new employer always said that they were only obligated to deliver an existing equivalent package. They even tried to say that it mean't they were not allowed to offer an increase in remuneration. You can argue with an HR department bod all you like (I did) but in the end you have to get a lawyer or shutup and do something more constructive than waste your time on legal shenanigans with a a company that doesn't want you.

I like some of the other comments - treating it like a massively extended notice period in retrospect would have been the best thing to do (a year at most). 5 years was too much - and left me and a couple of others saying "all the good people left already - what does that make us! :-)". Now I've moved I can see how far down I fell and I'm going to have to spend at least a couple of years hard work getting back to the skill level I used to be at.

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EMC's ViPR: Is it really that venomous?

Mk4
WTF?

EMC late to the party?

NetApp has WFA which seems to be doing something at least similar to ViPR and of course there is also CDMI to stitch together heterogeneous storage subsystems into a coherent service. Having VMware in your back pocket is a nice way to make a link between the storage and application platforms, but then again VMware has an API too, which could just makes it an orchestratee rather than an orchestrator.

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