* Posts by Byz

85 posts • joined 26 Mar 2013

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Software firms are over-valued, says Huawei

Byz

You can do...

The best requirements gathering, the best design...etc

But if your code is crap then it is all a waste of time, good coders are worth their weight in gold (or even saffron)

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Would Apple godhead Steve Jobs have HATED the Watch?

Byz

Short memories

I remember when the iPhone was announced everyone said it was too big, the trend was for smaller phones and it was too expensive.

Then the iPad was announced everyone said it was dead in the water as MS couldn't sell the concept and that it was just a big iPhone.

Apple watch ugly (Vogue have already disagreed) no-one needs one (I've been using a pebble for 9 months and it is really useful on a packed London train)...blah blah blah.

Time will tell.

What has made me really me laugh is the IT people being asked their opinion who have said it is not stylish (these guys are very fat, sweaty and have the dress sense of an IT bloke), it is not us in the IT crowd who are going to make or break this produc (I know many IT friends who have windows 8 phones)t, it's the public and from what I've heard already they might do well again.

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Byz

Re: Would Apple godhead Steve Jobs have HATED the iWatch?

Even if it wasn't next day it would be (if you read his biography)

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iOS phone phlaw can UNMASK anonymous users on social media

Byz

We'll you read wrong

It is quite clear that the leak is through third party apps like chrome.

Do you actually program iOS apps?

Or is are you just holding your finger in the air and seeing which way you think the wind is blowing?

You can only use a web view via a native app, and then fire off the URL as an action from the webview.

Google is blaming Apple here for an app that it wrote, whereas safari (written by apple) doesn't have this issue (yet uses the same web view). QED Google has written there app to the same standard as usual which is as water tight as sieve !!!

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Byz

Re: There's no such thing as a secure platform...

Indeed a very good comment.

If you have a Turing complete programming language (and both Objective-C and Swift are Turing Complete) there is always a way to subvert the system. The problems get caught in the testing.

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Byz

Well you'll have to write a native app first :)

Do you want to sign up for some training courses?

then you have to decide if you want to do it in Objective-C or Swift

:D

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Byz

Nothing new

'The document also explains that something called the "tel URL scheme is used to launch the Phone app on iOS devices and initiate dialing of the specified phone number."'

This has been there for years all the way back from iOS 2

I have written apps that open maps and then find a route or make phone calls and they have never prompted, however my apps have to go via the App Store so are screened first (obviously this is as good as the screening), also if Apple discover you are doing something not allowed they take down the app.

If you jailbreak your phone and download an app from another source you on your own and where these native apps are likely to be lurking.

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Dead letter office: ancient smallpox sample turns up in old US lab

Byz

That is a dodged bullet :o

Had that got out it would be a nightmare!

When DNA analysis was done on smallpox it shared more hits with human kind than anything else, Smallpox is our natural predator. We have had 40 years of absence in the most of the world it is uncertain if there is any natural resistance left (maybe some of us who were immunised).

Smallpox has the ability to dismantle our immune system, if it got out in a big city it would be similar to what happened when it landed in the new world :(

I was immunised against smallpox as a baby in the 60's and the vaccination caused terrible eczema (I was covered from head to foot) the vaccination for people susceptible to eczema and asthma is almost as dangerous as catching smallpox itself.

I hope it never gets out as we could not scale up vaccine fast enough. My father who was a medic used to tell of an operation where the patient had smallpox and the theatre staff were unaware. No-one survived exposure even though some were vaccinated as they were exposed to such a high dose of the virus.

The stuff of nightmares :(

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New Apple iOS to help fanbois thwart Wi-Fi network spies

Byz

Re: iBeacon

Well I've written a couple of apps that use I beacons, so unless you make your phone an iBeacon or carry one around with you you can't be tracked by them.

Next the phone can only pretend to be one beacon at a time so if you have two apps trying to set up the phone as their own iBeacon with different ids then you will get a clash between the apps.

In your scenario you are saying that Apple will monitor which beacons you go by (however you need to know what iBeacon ids your looking for) and send the data back, well in theory yes this could be possible, however in practice most iBeacons run on Batteries which don't last as long as most producers claim and there are not many mains powered iBeacons on the market (though you could build one with a Raspberry Pi as per the Reg article http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/11/29/feature_diy_apple_ibeacons/). so it would be a hell of a lot of maintenance for very little gain.

To be honest you may as well just use GPS and if your that worried it might be worth investigating buying one of these http://zapatopi.net/afdb/ ;)

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Byz

Re: iBeacon

iBeacons don't track you it is the app on the phone that sees the iBeacons. All iBeacons are is low power bluetooth transmitters that transmit an id and you program your app to see certain ids.

So if the app is tracking you de-install it, you have control.

Whereas with MAC address scanning it is done without your knowledge, thus you have no control.

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Apple: We'll tailor Swift to be a fast new programming language

Byz

Re: Just what the world needs

I train Objective-C it is currently one of the most used languages due to the app store.

I've had a look at swift and it is similar to Scalar, so it will be straightforward for coders to convert.

It seems to remove all the brackets :)

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Concerning Windows Phone and its relevance to the larger business

Byz

Re: A couple of problems with this

Bet your not a FTSE 100 CEO then ;)

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Google sees Microsoft's iPad bet, raises with fondleslab Docs and Sheets

Byz

I hate apps tied to different clouds

The big thing now seems to release an app that can only work with your cloud :(

This is the equivalent of having to have a separate disk drive for each program you run on a computer!

I've downloaded office for iPad but don't use it as I haven't got a 365 account, I'd rather use Dropbox or iCloud.

The best apps give you flexibility of use and I don't begrudge a fee for that usability, but I'm dammed if I'm going to pay an annual fee to store stuff on a cloud that I never wanted to use in the first place :(

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BBC hacks – tweet the crap out of the news, cries tech-dazzled Trust

Byz

All style no substance

The BBC used to be a place where the researched things thoroughly. The great shows like the Burke Special, Horizon (before it was dumbed down), tomorrows world (I know it could be crap at times)...etc

Now what they put out on horizon would have taken up 5 minutes 20 years ago, the amount of recaps, pre-caps...etc

The news is based on reading an article on wikipedia half the time and when they are not doing that they are placing articles in the news to subconsciously suggest things about the next article, while sweeping their own dirty laundry under the carpet :(

In the past I've had to complain numerous times about blatant inaccuracies and it is only after you complain about the initial reply that they take it seriously. They should rename it the ministry of misinformation :(

My kids don't watch it because they have brains and 90% of the current output is either written for the in-crowd by the in-crowd or to brainwash the masses with Eastenders :(

Mr Grade (the one who cancelled Dr Who...etc) has a lot to answer for.

The BBC used to be great for its output, whereas now it is pretty on the eyes but doesn't make your brain do any work, that's why they don't attract the young I only watch out of habit, but when my brain engages i change channel or put on some music (If you have cable or satellite go and watch PBS some great documentaries).

:(

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Chinese patent app tries to own Wine on ARM

Byz

Code patents are a nightmare

This is a classic example of business stealing others work, thank goodness they don't apply in the UK :)

I'm sure I wrote programs in the 70's and 80's that I could have held to whole industry to ransom with, however I just was just delighted to come up with something new and original, that can't be patented.

Even today it is fun when you come up with a solution that is better than solution you can find on stack overflow etc.. and the joy of sharing the solution with your fellow coders is it's own reward (had one recently that was infinitely simpler and efficient than any other solution, it was just neat and I was very pleased shared it straight away) :)

This is what helps innovation where people share ideas and build something better, thank goodness Sir Tim had the same view with www.

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Samsung narrows counter-claim against Apple in US

Byz

Part of claim 27 is quite specific on hardware to be used

"The microcomputer 411 for controlling the transmission rate stores a constant amount of MPEG1-formatted data in a buffer memory 412. The formatted data is passed through an interface circuit 413 and a card connector 414 and reaches a harddisk drive 415. The card connector 414 is configured on the PCMCIA standards and thus contains 68 pins. The harddisk drive 415 is sized to a memory card and subject to the PC card standards defined by the PCMCIA (Personal Computer Memory Card International Association)."

I don't remember a PCMCIA being used on an iPhone (maybe on an apple newton that predates the patent).

:o

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Samsung Gear splurge skews smartwatch market Google’s way

Byz

Well had a pebble since Christmas

One or two issues with lost connections with my phone but generally a very good experience :)

when I'm on the train and i get a message/email I can see if it's worth getting the phone out to read.

Also if I get a phone call it shows who it is from and I can either pick it up or reject it by pressing a button on the watch.Additionally notifications and calendar reminders are also forwarded.

I gave a pebble also to one of my children and they've liked using it as well.

It works with both iOS and Android :D

The pebble is simple but what it does it does well, I can recommend it.

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California takes a shot at mobile 'killswitch' mandate

Byz

Read as

Kills Witch

I thought they'd stopped doing that after Salem :o

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Stephen Fry rewrites computer history again: This time it's serious

Byz

how many iDrones bought shiny shiny on recommendation of his?

Not many as he also recommended the Windows phone and not many of them have been bought either ;)

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Knox vuln is Android not us, says Samsung

Byz

It depends where the network encryption is being carried out.

"the Knox environment provides a virtualised secure container that's meant to protect sensitive data from attack"

Given that this is virtualised will mean that it has to communicate at some point to the underlying OS and then Hardware via the implementation stack.

Keeping anything virtualised secure is a real nightmare as the MITM can be implemented by hacking the environment that provides the virtualisation.

Hardware encryption is usually more secure (as long as there are no bugs) as the encryption and de-encryption are carried out in hardware not in software.

Additionally Java has been a horror show on the security front for many many years now (I hear Java 7 is much much better, but only time will tell) and given that parts of Android's implementation was based on Sun's original implementation (which was a watertight as a tea strainer) there may be some very nasty surprises buried deep (that have not been thoroughly stress tested).

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Pesky protesters FORCE GOOGLE STAFF INTO THE SEA

Byz

I wonder if...

They are using android phones to organise the protest :D

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Pre-Xmas phone numbers: Apple slips, Windows Phone grabs 1 in 10 new sales

Byz
FAIL

So this is a waste of time

"but the fourth quarter is traditionally Apple's strongest, and the three-month period didn't include a full three months of iPhone 5S and 5C sales"

So given that many people buy Christmas gifts in the three week before, what is the point of drawing conclusions?

Such as "Android claimed 55.7 per cent of the market, and iOS 30.6 per cent, with Windows Phone at 10 per cent".

Since you don't have all the data, absolutely a waste of time!!!

Once all the data is collected then give the figures

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Samsung: Ta-da! We made $7.8bn. What do you mean you expected another BILLION?

Byz

Re: The problem they've got...

"You clearly haven't done any kind of development."

UI and UX design are not just about using tools, it's about trying things out with testing apps for different people and not thinking of things from a developers perspective.

Also I have done loads of development and overhauled apps for companies as the original developer had made a real pigs ear of the UI and UX.

I will often build an app and then road test it with friends and family on different formats for a few months, it is amazing how many points come out and sometimes you have to go back to the drawing board (literally). What works great on a phone can look bare and empty on a tablet (or slightly larger phone), whereas when you scale down apps you often need to remove or rethink how to present it in a smaller format.

If however you just bang out apps you don't think about these things, the difference between an ok app and a great app is that developer/designer have thought about the form factor first.

So you can carry on believing I haven't done any development, however maybe you should consider that some developers take pride in what they develop and like others to enjoy the UX :)

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Byz

The problem they've got...

is that they were trying to make the brand appear more exclusive on the high end phones.

However as they run Android it makes it hard to distinguish high end from low end, if Samsung could get some traction on their own OS then it might be a possibility. Also as their strategy for handsets is to make just about every conceivable combination they end up with the same issue that Apple had in the mid 1990's (you can't give a good reason why one model is better than another) this means that profits per model become lower due to the economy of scale.

As Android is available to all handset makers if someone brings out a much better android phone then it become hard to counteract the threat (given that there is an annual cycle of new models), Nokia ended up in this situation.

Lastly as a developer with android you have to make a choice as to which handset format you will develop for (as there are so many formats) thus it is hard to get the same apps for all handsets. You can see this problem with the Galaxy gear watch as it will only work with a very small selection of Samsung phones.

And as for different being able to run the latest version of Android on your phone/device don't even go there..

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Seoul-blackening disappointment for Samsung backers as stock droops

Byz

Re: @AC

Andy Scott said "The fingerprint reader sounds great until you learn it can be bypassed by entering the the 4 digit pin."

or you could turn on the options in settings to use a password instead of a 4 digit pin, you can then make it as long as you want and hence more secure :D

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HP: We're axing 29,000 workers? Add another 5,000 to that

Byz

Re: I'm a little bit surprised you mention Dell

AC said

"As for the post MS world, I wouldn't bet my house on it. The staggering amount of legacy MS Office documents in medium/large organizations makes me skeptical on this matter."

This is true, however each user thinks they can sort it out and most organisations pay a pittance for IT staff to maintain them :(

Unfortunately the 2000's have seen companies trying to commoditise IT skills by offshoring, paying lower wages, calling us nerds...etc

Also most IT jobs these days tend to be what we used to call "Computer operator" jobs.

What is amazes me is that companies get a real shock when they want someone to write some code for them as they don't realise that to write good code you need skills and experience.

Sure you could get a kid straight out of college (who'll only have learn't Java/python if your lucky) they will be cheap, however it'll be crap and when you need new features it will not be easy as it was not designed for expansion (I've had to pick up a few of these, they are unmaintainable and usually need to be completely rewritten).

Also these days IT departments are run by people who've been on a one week Prince 2 training course (if your lucky) and wouldn't know the difference between a computer and a kid's Vtech toy.

Happy New year :(

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Byz

The biggest upheaval since the early 1990's

It's sad for HP employees, but the world is changing rapidly.

The iPhone is almost 7 years old but it set in motion changes that couldn't have been foreseen then.

In the late 1980's I worked on various DEC/Digital hardware and languages, the future seemed certain 10 years later it was all gone :(

The PC swept all before it (which was a very sad) so I had to retrain to look after NT servers.

The same now is happening to the PC as most tablets do most of what the average person needs.

Luckly I retrained a few years ago (Phew!).

Happy new year all and make it your new years resolution to have up to date skills (don't fight it go with the flow!).

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Apple loses sauce, BlackBerry squashed and Microsoft, er, WinsPhones (Nokia's)

Byz

No mention of Galaxy Gear watches?

This was a massive mess up, very expensive but not much benefit.

I got a couple of pebbles for the family for Christmas to try them out and at $150 a shot they are not bad.

No touch screen, but great when your out and about shopping so that you don't need to hear your phone to know that the rest of the family have finished clothes shopping and you can go home :)

Just getting the SDK to start programming them should be fun :D

All of us have found the pebble very useful a good product from a kickstart project and a decent product, plus doesn't need charging everyday :)

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Microsoft wields turkey knife, slices Surface to $199 for Black Friday

Byz

Investment opportunity

If you buy one and the heat problem doesn't emerge then you might be able to sell it for more in 50 years time due to rarity (since so few are selling).

There again maybe not :)

Spend the money on Beer it'll be more fun!

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RIP Comet ISON: ???-2013. We hardly knew ye

Byz

Not dead yet

It had it's tail blown off by the backend of a CME

but it's still there see

http://www.spaceweather.com/images2013/28nov13/rip_anim5.gif?PHPSESSID=p823u13ssjo1d2idu682mf9m66

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Boffins boggled by ORB-shaped electrons

Byz

The good old boring standard model

The standard model is so accurate yet we don't know why.

I remember when studying physics at university in the early 1990's my professors bemoaning the standard model as "Boring" and hoping for new theories to come onto the scene (string theory was all the rage then).

However Roger Penrose came and gave a lecture and pointed out that Quantum mechanics was a "great theory" as it was precise to 10 to the power 8, however he then pointed out Relativity was "outstanding" as voyager had shown it was correct to 10 to the power 16.

Here in lies the problem for modern physics, physicists love quantum mechanics and want to unify it with relativity, however relativity is pretty boring compared to quantum mechanics, this suggests that underlying reality may be a little more boring (as gravity is the more accurate theory), plus Quantum mechanics does not handle Chaos theory very well (it breaks QED and Richard Feynman was working on this problem just before he died), but in relativity chaos is the order of the day.

I'm beginning to warm to the idea that we are all a holographic projection from the outside of the universe (derived from black hole theories) as this would make us have to re-evaluate our whole mindset as we'd be living in a simulation (which might explain why the standard model is so accurate and boring), physicists would then need to start reading more Plato and the field of study would get its old name back "Natural Philosophy".

Plus we'd need to find out who or what is running the simulation and the implications for our very material lives :o

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IT'S patent WAR: Apple, Microsoft vs Google, Samsung, Huawei

Byz

Re: Sad, sad people

Trouble is that FRAND would not apply to linking searches with adverts as Google is a virtual monopoly when it comes to search engines, so FRAND only benefits Google.

Google wiped vitally everyone out when they weren't paying anything so making it FRAND would raise the price and Google would have even bigger advantage on search engines.

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Byz

Re: Oh pleasepleasepleasepleaseplease!

Trademarks are related to the industry your in

Rockstar games are in software and games.

This lot are under Patient Troll

Different trademarks :o

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Byz

Re: @Byz

@Byz

I was all set to give you a thumbs up. But you had to put the last paragraph in there and ruin it.

@Tom 13

Like patent gambles win some, you lose some ;)

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Byz

Re: WTF?

@Carl

Someone has mentioned it below it was the algorithm use in zip compression.

There was also one involving a chip made by casio at some point

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Byz

Re: WTF?

Patents are not there to stop people using technology (and never have been), they are there to make sure the owner of the IP gets paid when others use it and they can exercise that right at any time they see fit as long as the patent is not expired. This is why patents have an intrinsic value.

There was a case ten years ago about a compression algorithm that was patented in the US (wouldn't be allowed in the UK) loads of people had been using it for many years and IP owner then decided to extract the money once everyone was using it :o

This is also why WWW is used rather than gopher (which was common when I started using the internet at university) the IP owners of gopher would not promise never to extract a fee, whereas Sir Tim Burners-Lee persuaded CERN (after a lot of arm twisting) to promise never in the future to extract a fee and the rest is history.

All these companies would have known what they were doing (as they all have huge legal departments), but were gambling that the patent would not be enforced (as they probably had deeper pockets than Nortel). Unfortunately the gamble didn't pay off and it's time to pay the piper.

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'Tablet' no longer means 'iPad': Apple share PLUMMETS below 30%

Byz

Re: Shipment doesn't mean...

I wasn't talking about childish things like "winning" or "losing" (or "My dad is bigger than your dad").

I was making the point that shipment doesn't mean used.

:)

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Byz

Shipment doesn't mean...

Sold, activated or used.

Microsoft shipped loads of surfaces but they didn't sell very well and even though our company has one it sits in the cupboard, so it isn't being used.

I've got friends with various android tablets (bought cheap) they used them for a few weeks and gave up (due to the horrid screen interaction), most of them now either use an iPad mini or went back to their laptops.

I'd treat these figures with a big rock of salt.

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BBC announces plans to spend your cash on digital goodies

Byz

Install...

Risc OS on a Raspberry PI and they can go back to the 80's and do the BBC Micro again :)

BBC Basic could ride again :)

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Be prepared... to give heathens a badge: UK Scouts open doors to unbelievers

Byz

history will teach us...

Quite a lot :o

Having read through this their is a lot of "soundbites" which don't stand up to historical examination.

I like Mark Twains comment that "History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes"

What we have to watch in society is we are going through another 1930's where people are slowly being indoctrinated into secularism and hatred for different people in society (they get blamed for all societies ills), if you read George Orwell "Animal Farm" you will see how this happens.

George Orwell is really interesting to read as 1984 is the inevitable consequence.

I remember being told in the 1970's by an old man I knew who lived through both World Wars that the most important thing we learnt was "Tolerance" over the last 40 years I've seen this being eroded by the state.

It is so sad that the lessons my grandparents and parents (all dead now) learned through the bitter experience living through many horrors and man's inhumanity to man is being so easily forgotten and being dressed up as equality, whereas it is actually not that at all :(

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Byz

Re: @Khaptain

"almost all wars are based on religion"

First world war - nope

Second world war - nope

Crimea war - nope

Boer war - nope

Napoleonic Wars - nope

American war of independence - nope

Vietnam war - nope

Korean war - nope

Hundred year war - nope

Franco-prussian war - nope

Indian wars of conquest by the British - nope

The opium war - nope

Roman civil wars - nope

Punic wars - nope

Greco-Persian Wars - nope

Peloponnesian War - nope

...etc

Most wars are caused by grabbing other resources or taking out another power (as with Rome and Carthage).

Also the casualty rate of non-religious wars is far higher as they have been carried out in the industrial age, so there is an industrial rate of killing plus civilians die as well.

Often religion is used as a pretext but that is politicians being cynical to get people on side. Stalin did this in the second world war by re-opening churches, as soon as the war was ended he shut and demolished them.

Unfortunately if you do some digging through history you find out that statements such as "almost all wars are based on religion" don't stand up to scrutiny - nice soundbite but it's an urban myth, so please don't perpetuate it as it is just brain washing.

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Byz

Re: It's a good start.

Half my Family lived in the USSR, my Father escaped before the borders were shut.

I visited my Family the USSR in 1990 just as it was crumbling I am pleased to live in a society where I can be myself.

I saw where many churches had been demolished and the only people who went into a church that was standing were women, as men were frightened that they would lose their jobs. It was a very interesting experience that I'll always remember.

True freedom is being able to associate freely with others and hold ideas/beliefs without harassment.

Capitalism isn't ideal but being told what you can or cannot believe or say in a public arena is a very slippery slope and this is slowly happening :(

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Apple's new iPhones dope-slap Samsung in US

Byz

Re: 5S and 5C impressive for different reasons

@JDX

The trick is to scan you finger print the way you naturally use it, so my thumb is at 45 degrees to the phone.

It takes multiple scans and then gets you to roll you finger (or thumb) around so it gets a larger scan.

Then it just works :o

It is so convenient that it seems that the phone is not locked, I am actually impressed (having tried other finger print scanners in the past), best I've seen and no-one else has been able to unlock it :)

Plus the slow motion video is also fun 120 frames per second.

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Byz

5S and 5C impressive for different reasons

I have a 5s (as if you've seen previous posts I train people in app programming and app writing, so I need one - that's what I tell the wife :o) and the fingerprint scanner is a real game changer as you you don't need to type in a passcode (only been using it 3 days and boy does it make a difference). Before I used it I thought the difference would be negligible.

The 5c has made one of my teenage daughters offer money towards buying one for her as a Christmas present (normally she is so tight with her money she'd make Scrooge look like a philanthropist).

So even though it didn't seem to be much of a change I think Apple has tapped into something here that wasn't obvious.

Now that I've used a 5s for a few days I wouldn't want to go back to typing a long password any more.

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Third of Brits now regularly fondling their slabs, say beancounters

Byz
Stop

look at the web logs

You often get these surveys based on how many units have been sent to suppliers so it is hard to know if they've actually been sold.

Last year we had a situation where if you bought a phone you got a tablet free (how many got used?).

As tablets are mainly used for 3 main activities (browsing, email or games), hits on websites are a far better guide to the amount of tablets in circulation.

I know a number of web admins at different sites (so I get a good view of what is being used in different sectors) and from their feedback there maybe tons of Android tablets out there but they are not being used for web browsing. So are they being used as just cheap games consoles?

Also Apple are the only tablet manufacturer that tells you the numbers delivered into users hands rather than shipped to suppliers, so some Android tablets could be sitting on shelves next to windows RT tablets ;o

Remember a month ago we were being told that peak Apple had been passed (based on surveys) and then the iPhone 5s/5c shipments were released and the wisdom of the surveys looked like foolishness.

Having said this I have no doubt that Amazon tablets are doing very well as they are trouncing other E-readers (Other E-readers are now being heavily discounted in the bargain bins).

Empirically a large rock of salt needs to be taken with any of these surveys (plus who are the organisations paying for them).

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Google smacks Surface with free Quickoffice for Android, iOS

Byz

At this rate...

Office is going to go the same way as VisiCalc and WordPerfect.

They dragged their feet about windowizing their interface and lost market share to office.

As less PCs are being sold and surface is a damp squib Office is now losing market share to both QuickOffice and iWorks, to the point where outside the desktop they'll be irrelevant :o

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'Kissing couple' Trojan sent to slurp fanbois' data... Syrian Electronic Army fingered

Byz

Re: Now that OSX is becoming

On Macs you don't have root privilege unless you enable it.

Thus a Virus cannot gain root, without the user actually turning it on (Question have you ever used UNIX?).

So a virus could do some damage but it never gains root access thus cannot actually take control of the whole system.

On PC's (including NT derivatives) you are Administrator out of the box unless you make a new user account (I know this as I used to be a windows System Admin for some very large companies). The average PC user doesn't know this and always login (if they've even set up a login) as Administrator.

Thus from pure logic alone you can deduce that User interaction is required to wreak your security on a Mac, on PC's it's already been done for you.

I'm not bashing PC's I'm telling you what the security situation is.

:)

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Byz

Re: Now that OSX is becoming

However UNIX has been tested for longer :)

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Byz

Re: Now that OSX is becoming

Viruses install themselves without the need of a user (because the system is vulnerable)

Trojans rely on the weakest security link Humans.

Macs are just a shell around BSD UNIX. UNIX from it's inception was designed to run on networks and thus if configured correctly is very secure (as it has had over forty year of bug fixes). The internet was built on UNIX.

PC's were never designed to run on networks and this has always been their Achilles heal. PC's only really started using the internet in the 90's (as Microsoft didn't like the internet and had it's own version MSN) prior to that I had to use either UNIX or VMS.

:)

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Byz

Re: Now that OSX is becoming

DOH!

this is a trojan not a virus!!!

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