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* Posts by Rainbird

4 posts • joined 26 Mar 2013

iPads in education: Not actually evil, but pretty close

Rainbird

Re: Sheep

Wow, you must be in education to be that patronising. Yes, there is evidence that tablets can be of value (I wont argue the value of a specific brand, we just get into fan boi territory). There is also evidence that they have little value. To invest hundreds of thousands of pounds on a maybe is foolish. To bring our wi-fi infrastructure up to scratch is going to cost £100,000. If you do work in education you will realise that budgets of that size no longer exist and money we do have needs to be spent on basic things like toilets, furniture, flooring, stationery etc. I need maximum student benefit from minimum cost. Tablets don't meet that need. If you are not in the education industry I'm afraid you have no idea how skint we are.

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Rainbird

Re: Byz

Well met. I learned to programme and repair the Elliot 903 in it's military guise as the Elliot 920B. I'm an IT and computing teacher. I assure you I can programme competently in a dozen languages from Algol to C#. However my students (even the best ones) struggle as number bases and boolean logic are no longer in the maths curriculum (I learned both in junior school). I have to start from a very low base and although we have success with this group the less able drop out fast (it's an extra curricular voluntary class). Teaching simple block programming to a mixed class is less successful, they follow tutorials fine but can rarely develop their own code, it's a higher skill that they just don't learn from primary onward. My point....we seem to be in a system that doesn't support this type of learning AND punishes us if we get a C-A pass rate below 65%. If it looks like it will fail most IT teachers wont risk trying it.

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Rainbird

Re: Sheep

would have loved to stop the trial dead and spent the money wisely. I'm happy to see if everyone else fails (or succeeds) before committing thousands of pounds that may be better spent patching holes in the roof. The point is that ALL tablet devices are a luxury that public education can not afford until it has been shown to give definite benefits. We went for two thirds windows devices as the IT manger was more comfortable with those. The Android tablets have had lots more use however as we can write our own apps for them. I have a few colleagues in other schools who have been given iPads as an incentive and the vast majority struggle to know what to do with them. Personally I can get two Android devices for every iPad and that alone directs my spending advice.

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Rainbird

Sheep

IT teacher here. Bsc in Computing. 30 years experience as both hardware and software engineer. I was asked to formulate a school policy for IT development. My solution involved thin client equipped classrooms in each department with music, art/design and IT with custom spec PC's and Mac (that left a bad taste but there you go). A rolling programme of development that took into account upgrading and repair costs. My managers bought 30 tablets as a trial because I hadn't been forward thinking enough. They managed to avoid iPads because I lied and said they wouldn't "integrate with our network". The kids use them to play games and music mostly. The cost of the trial would have equipped a full classroom!. I was told we have to have tablets because the whole world is going that way and we have to follow or be seen as inadequate. All the research I showed them was ignored. I just seems that the managers in education are as stupid and ill informed as all the managers I worked for in industry. SHEEP.

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