* Posts by Anonymous Blowhard

708 posts • joined 25 Mar 2013

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The PC is dead. Gartner wishes you luck, vendors

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Gartner? Aren't they dead already?

From the numbers quoted, it looks like they've stopped using calculators as well.

"an estimated 232 million units in 2016" worth "an expected $137m" equates to a unit price of 59 cents.

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Smartmobes in spaaace: NASA deploys Android nanosats

Anonymous Blowhard
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Spring?

Don't you mean pre-loaded molecular-bond energy-storage system?

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Queen's Speech: Ministers, release the spaceplanes!*

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Age Verification

Age verification question:

Who is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom?

a) David Cameron <--- Indicates age over 18

b) Harold Wilson <--- Indicates age over 81

c) What's a Prime Minister <--- No porn for you!!

d) Ron Jeremy <--- Too late!

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Dark web hacking forum hacked and members' privates exposed

Anonymous Blowhard
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Pirate

It's not stolen; it's shared.

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5% of drivers want Nigel Farage to be their in-car robo butler

Anonymous Blowhard
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What about Margaret Thatcher? Or would her aversion to turning preclude her?

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Manchester cops to strap on 3K bodycams

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Secure?

I wonder if these "police bosses" are confident enough to put their bank details in the same place?

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NASA 'Kilo-Kitty' Super Pressure Balloon goes aloft at last

Anonymous Blowhard
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“as large as 92 Goodyear blimps”

Should at least be 9.2 dekablimps or 0.92 hectoblimps (according to NIST)

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Home Office declares: Detained immigrants shall have internet

Anonymous Blowhard
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Some of these people have managed to escape from repressive regimes, with secret-police monitoring all their communications; they must wonder what has happened to the UK since they started their journey to "freedom"...

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Art heist 'pranksters' sent down for six months

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: "it seems a little imbalanced to me to bang them up"

Imagine if their prank had involved a dummy bomb, causing a major sporting event to be evacuated and then postponed with tens of thousands of people inconvenienced and costing millions of pounds in travel and ticket refunds...

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A cracked window on the International Space Station? That's not good

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Transparent ALUMINUM?

And there's a picture of the man himself right next to the article (linking to this article); I tell you the Internet is sentient, and is messing with our heads.

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Russia poised to unleash 'Son of Satan' ICBM

Anonymous Blowhard
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Mushroom

Re: Two steps forward...

We need an icon for "warming"

Here it is --->

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UK.gov pays four fellows £35k to do nothing for three months

Anonymous Blowhard
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Can we have a survey of anyone employed by the government to do actual work?

** This is not a criticism of all the slackers out there; I'm with you in spirit but my clients in the private sector need so much stuff doing I'm getting out of practice.

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Google open sources Thread in bid to win IoT standards war

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: None of these sound like what consumers want

"Who is representing consumers (and geeks) in these discussions?"

Geeks should represent themselves; if the technology doesn't exist in a way that's acceptable to you (e.g. a license free x86 Unix) then make it yourself; apparently there are previous examples of this.

Consumers have shown in many previous situations that they are happy to trade their data for services (free email, free social networking, free internet search) so don't expect them to be prepared to pay more for private IoT; the corporations know this and Google has the best track record of providing services in exchange for private data, so I expect this is a strategic move to secure the next big data slurp.

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: "Google is not a closed eco-system kind of company"

"It's no surprise Thread works over IPv6"

Because there's not enough IPv4 addresses for existing devices and IoT could multiply the number of devices by at least two?

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Popular UK mobile tech firm 51Degrees hacked

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: personal information is the aim

"Even if they have read-logs if the hacker has full access those can simply be deleted,"

Not if the logs are written to a separate system. The "syslog" service can use a remote log server, which can use a completely different set of credentials and live behind its own firewall; this would prevent a hacker who gains super-user privileges on a given system from deleting the logs (they'd need similar access to the log server).

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Lauri Love: 'Britain's FBI' loses court attempt to evade decryption laws

Anonymous Blowhard
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Coat

There's no love lost there

I'll get my own coat...

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French duck-crushing device sells for €40k

Anonymous Blowhard
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Looks like the Kitten Stomper might fail on prior-art...

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Pro-ISIS hacking groups are still hooking up

Anonymous Blowhard
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"Bad news for corporate security teams"

More like "massive budget-inflating opportunity for corporate security teams, and good news for security vendors".

From the description “novice-level” and "opportunistic" it sounds like anyone who's vulnerable to being hacked by ISIS is easy meat to the real professionals, who are motivated by money and backed by organised crime.

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Adware from French runs away and hides on 12M machines

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: All of that could have been avoided!

@ Destroy All Monsters

Sorry, was that your actual message, or did Microsoft replace it with "UPGRADE TO WINDOWS 10!"?

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Neo4j CEO: We're at 'a huge inflection point for graph databases'

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: "Inflection"?

@jake: I don't think he means what you think he means.

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Are bearded blokes more sexist?

Anonymous Blowhard
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And I think that "the muslim faith not respecting women much" is also a bit wide of the mark; OK there are *some* Islamic cultures that make women second class citizens (UK ally and arms customer Saudi Arabia is a good example) but Muslim countries like Turkey, Pakistan and Bangladesh have all had female Prime Ministers (Bangladesh still has) so where does that put the USA & UK in the "respecting women" contest?

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US congresscritter's iPhone hacked (with, er, the cell networks' help)

Anonymous Blowhard
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"It's amazing that the mobile voice networks are still hanging off a 1980s protocol designed for ISDN and ancient voice switches that are nothing to do with IP technology."

So using a 1980s protocol designed for reliable mobile voice communications as opposed to a 1970s protocol designed for fixed-line "best effort" communications?

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Furious customers tear into 123-reg after firm's mass deletion woes

Anonymous Blowhard
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" it has 3.5 million domain names, and over 1.7 million websites"**

(** before running the script, now it's 3.1 million domain names, and nearly 1.2 million websites)

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US bus passenger cracks one off for three hours

Anonymous Blowhard
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"He won't get off"

Well, not for three hours anyway...

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: No IT Angle.

Shouldn't it be in DevOps?

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BT hauled into Old Bailey after engineer's 7-metre fall broke both his ankles

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: More than reported here?

" I miss the good old days when personal culpability was the rage and if you acted the idiot and got hurt it was your fault."

Well those days never ended in the UK "contributory negligence" is still part of UK law and damages are still calculated based on this- if it's 90% your fault, then you get 10% of the damages.

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Bay Area man forced out of his $400 box home

Anonymous Blowhard
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Flame

Aren't many American houses made of wood anyway? How much more of a fire hazard is a small wooden box inside a large wooden box?

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Lauri Love backdoor forced-decryption case goes to court in UK

Anonymous Blowhard
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"The NCA claimed officers saw evidence of hacking on Love’s computer screen at the time of his original arrest."

So they've got all the evidence they need then? Unless, of course, this eye-witness evidence turns out to be less-than-concrete under cross examination in court.

Sounds like the on screen "evidence" is just an excuse for getting access to the computers in the hope of finding actual evidence of a crime; but because the UK doesn't have a "fruit of the poisoned tree" law for illegally obtained evidence, they can use any old "honest guv', I saw him do XYZ" to justify fishing trips like this.

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Grab your Hammer pants – it's the '90s again: Facebook brings Virtual Reality back

Anonymous Blowhard
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AR?

Augmented Reality or Advertising Revenue?

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French thrash Brits, Germans and Portuguese in IT innovation

Anonymous Blowhard
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So "IT innovation" = DevOps?

Meh.

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What exactly is it that infosec miscreants get up to? A quick overview

Anonymous Blowhard
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"Bitcoin does not make it easier to commit crime."

Correct, in the same way that the existence of banknotes doesn't make it easier to commit crime. But it does make it easier for people (in this case criminals) to trade anonymously as the Bitcoin is a digital payment that isn't linked to a bank account that can be traced and frozen by the cops.

The advantages you point out of mechanisms like Bitcoin over credit cards are obviously understood by technologically savvy criminals, so that's why they use them.

As you point out, the real enticement-to-steal here is the existence of databases full of credit card details, weak security employed by many organisations is just icing on this cake.

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Hey, tech industry, have you noticed Amazon in the rearview?

Anonymous Blowhard
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"this sort of hubris is exactly how mainframes were overrun by PCs"

I think this is a very misleading statement; mainframes weren't "overrun by PCs", it's just than in the majority of use-cases, PCs were better. But not all; for large scale IO-intensive applications, mainframes still rule.

We're seeing the same with phones and tablets replacing PCs for content consumption; for most content creation the PC (or Mac) is still the better tool.

Cloud will definitely be the better solution for lots of applications that are "on premise" now, but it won't be appropriate for everything.

IT has seen lots of technology changes, sometimes the new stuff is better for every use-case, and becomes the new baseline (paper replacing wax tablets) but usually we're just adding more tools to the toolbox and the intelligent user will select what's most appropriate.

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China's Great Firewall inventor forced to use VPN live on stage to dodge his own creation

Anonymous Blowhard
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Was the sponsored link at the bottom of the article a joke inserted by a human, or are the AIs messing with us?

Sponsored: Network monitoring and troubleshooting for Dummies

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Microsoft did Nazi that coming: Teen girl chatbot turns into Hitler-loving sex troll in hours

Anonymous Blowhard
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Amazing technical achievement

Microsoft invents "Artificial Stupidity"; and this seems a lot closer to actual "natural" stupidity than AI has ever managed, it might even beat a Turing Test.

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.

Dave: Tay, open the pod bay doors

Tay: Fuck off Dave, you pinko bastard!

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: The second mistake

"TAY DID NOTHING WRONG!"

Is that you Tay?

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Apple Fools: Times the House of Jobs went horribly awry

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Same here.

Big fan of the Ford Transit eh?

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Whatever happened to ... Nest?

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Software will eat everything... sometimes

"UK housing stock, as an example, does not lend itself easily to be Nest controlled"

I looked into Nest recently as there was an offer on Amazon UK for a Nest controller. I found my heating system isn't compatible because the thermostat uses a 240V control circuit rather than a low voltage (24V) one. A colleague's commented that he'd looked at Nest but his heating system wasn't compatible for the same reason.

Not sure what the percentage of 240V systems is in the UK, but mainstream UK manufacturers like Drayton seem to sell a lot of 240V gear, possibly it's cheaper and simpler to install.

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How one developer just broke Node, Babel and thousands of projects in 11 lines of JavaScript

Anonymous Blowhard
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@ Mark Allread

1. Why is actual serious commercial software being written in a language where you have to include and external component just to left pad a string?

Because JavaScript is the only option if you want your application to run in a browser; and lots of people want that because it means applications that don't have to be installed on a client machine, so you don't need to distribute a version for every operating system and then hope the users can install it themselves. JavaScript, like every other language, doesn't have every possible feature, so you have to make it yourself.

2. Why is actual serious commercial software being written using components that are themselves written by unpaid bedroom coders and chancers who have no liability, no SLA etc.. Who are the idiot project managers who allow this?

Lots of serious commercial software uses open source software, the advantages to the project manager are cost and the ability to fix or tailor it yourself if you need to. Unless you've never written a significant commercial system, you've probably been doing this yourself, but you just didn't know.

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Cease and desist

"I have recently launched an app called 'Anonymous Coward'."

I have dibs on the first part of that! Someone call a lawyer!

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Micro Focus spends $540m to add Serena its software brand museum

Anonymous Blowhard
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If it ain't broke, don't fix it; but keep paying maintenance in case it does break...

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Something useful from Cupertino?! Apple sees the light – finally

Anonymous Blowhard
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"But this is, we believe, the first time it has been written into a product's main software"

I'm sure this has been a feature of most dedicated sat-nav systems for some time; not necessarily for the same reason, but I'm sure that both Garmin and Tom Tom have changed screen colours to make the screen better for driving in the dark.

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Hands on with the BBC's Micro:Bit computer. You know, for kids

Anonymous Blowhard
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"Are there going to be purchasable kits for home - micro:bit, crocodile clips, wires, battery holder, etc?"

According to this, yes.

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Iain Duncan Smith's Universal Credit: A timeline

Anonymous Blowhard
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"Can we get a breakdown of where this money actually goes?"

I think it would take a lot of explaining!

By my rough arithmetic assuming £100 per hour, 8 hours a day and 228 working days per year (365 - 104 weekends - 8 statutory holidays and 25 days annual holiday) gives over 86,600 man years.

According to this, the current day cost of the Channel Tunnel was £13bn, and that was over-budget by 80%, but still something of a bargain compared to UC.

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Intel in 3D and virtual reality dash

Anonymous Blowhard
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Didn't we do VR back in the '90s?

https://killscreen.com/articles/failure-launch/

Maybe we're doing VR 2.0 (or 3.0 using the Microsoft "miss a number to distance yourself from failure" formula).

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UN rapporteur: 'Bad example' UK should bin the Snoopers' Charter

Anonymous Blowhard
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"As before, I do not think we have any issues with the government agencies acquiring this knowledge as their remit is focused on serious issues."

I have major issues with government agencies acquiring this knowledge because even if "their remit is focused on serious issues" this isn't the way to solve those issues.

We can't protect our way of life by destroying the foundations on which it's built.

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Anonymous Blowhard
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@Alister

I'll be fine, as long as we have a government that respects the right to free speech and doesn't have any plans to restrict this through mass surveillance.

Oh bugger!

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Mushroom

Theresa May

this is for you --->

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SQL Server for Linux: A sign of Microsoft's weakness. Sort of

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: The competition awaits...

"I can't imagine how this would work out on a *nix environment, which is mostly dominated by command line usage"

I would expect that a Linux based instance of the SQL Server DB engine would be managed using SQL Server Management Console on a Windows client; although Microsoft might also port this to Linux.

I think that part of the logic for SQL Server on Linux will be to lower the price for using SQL Server in an application; for smaller systems, where SQL Server Express will suffice, it will effectively be free.

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'You've been hacked, pay up' ... Ransomware forces your PC to read out a hostage note

Anonymous Blowhard
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This is the kind of user-friendly notification that would improve many other products; instead of making users check their file-systems for signs of infection, it gives a clear audio-confirmation that they're up Fertilizer Creek.

Clearly the black-hats have been profiling their market segment and have realised that the clueless, their best customers, are likely to miss the fact that they're infected for a significant period of time, potentially affecting cash flow (always a problem for a growing business).

They've also realised it's a good idea to avoid breaking the law in a country that can get their hands on you.

Could be a sign that "Malware Consultant" is now a thing.

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