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* Posts by Anonymous Blowhard

254 posts • joined 25 Mar 2013

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Cops and spies should blame THEMSELVES for smartphone crypto 'problem' - Hyppönen

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Obama's Snooping

"the NSA, CIA, and FBI are all part of the Executive Branch which is headed by the President and operate under his direct and total control"

Or could it be vice-versa? Politicians only have power if they get elected, and you can't get elected if your opponents get help from TLAs about your vices and indiscretions; democracy has more to fear from uncontrollable secret agencies that have huge resources and no accountability than it does from a relatively small number of terrorists with less fire-power than an NRA convention.

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Facebook storage techies: We sift through your family snaps to find 'warm BLOBs'

Anonymous Blowhard
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400 billion photos?

That's more than 600 for every cat on the planet!

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Flies WANT beer booze and now we know why - yeast

Anonymous Blowhard
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Joke

Bar Flies?

(Title may contain joke)

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Revealed: Malware that forces weak ATMs to spit out 'ALL THE CASH'

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Eh?

"Am I missing something here?"

What you're missing is the level of violence employed by Mexican criminals; physical access is locked down and the machines are probably compromised by bank staff using standard criminal persuasion techniques:

Gangster: "Put this USB stick into every machine you service this week; or else we'll kill all your family, and then kill you and then ask your replacement to do it".

ATM Technician: "OK!"

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Adobe spies on reading habits over unencrypted web because your 'privacy is important'

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: DPA vs EULA

Don't worry, the EULA will be fine once Theresa May's got us out of the ECHR; then the "DP" in DPA will just mean that you're getting fucked from both sides: Government and corporations.

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UK reforms on private copying and parody come into force

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: The real issue.

The real issue is that they're greedy idiots who are out of touch with their customers; you know, the ones paying for music in the first place.

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Apple blacklists tech journo following explicit BENDY iPhone vid

Anonymous Blowhard
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You should be apologising to George Lucas! And then to Steven Spielberg again for mistaking him for George Lucas!

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Music-mad Brits drive up hardware sales too – claims BPI

Anonymous Blowhard
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"As of yesterday, individual punters in the UK will get a copyright exception allowing them to make a private copy of a music CD, a privilege permitted by the EU."

Bloody interfering Brussels bureaucrats, taking away our sovereign rights not to be able to do something!

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Apple, Google mobe encryption good news... for TERRORISTS – EU top cop

Anonymous Blowhard
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"Making the failure to hand over passwords/keys on request a criminal offence covers that one (lucky us in the UK)."

And once Theresa May has abolished that pesky Human Rights Act, they'll be able to torture the keys out of you!

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Supercomputer water-cooling comes to solar power

Anonymous Blowhard
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Does anyone involved have a modular firearm made of gold?

http://jamesbond.wikia.com/wiki/Solex_Agitator

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Want to see the back of fossil fuels? Calm down, hippies. CAPITALISM has an answer

Anonymous Blowhard
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@ NumptyScrub

"I'd argue that the completeness of that as a solution is merely one of scale"

And that was my point about scaling; how much area of solar collection is required to provide enough hydrogen to replace the UK's natural gas consumption?

Don't get me wrong, I'm very much in favour of using technology to solve environmental issues, and replacing natural gas with hydrogen would be a very good start for reducing the UK's carbon emissions and achieving energy security. I just know that small scale experiments don't always scale to the required capacity that easily; it often takes decades of development, which these days is compounded by years of legal proceedings to resolve IP battles.

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Stop

"Yes, I know, hydrogen is difficult to get"

It's not difficult to get, but it is difficult to store and distribute when compared with hydrocarbon fuels; so being able to make hydrogen using solar power and then make electricity from hydrogen is not a complete solution.

And scaling these technologies is usually the problem; a few years ago bio-fuels were all the rage, until it was pointed out that there isn't enough farmland to grow enough to replace even a fraction of the fossil fuels that we use.

Economists love to count chickens before they're hatched, so don't go encouraging them.

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Windows 10: One for the suits, right Microsoft? Or so one THOUGHT

Anonymous Blowhard
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WTF?

What about Windows 9?

Did they need to distance themselves from Windows 8 that much?

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Cut-off North Sea island: Oh crap, ferry's been and gone. Need milk. SUMMON THE DRONE

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Wouldn't it be easier to train dolphins

Wouldn't it be easier to drink black coffee?

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Does this float your boat? Dead Steve Jobs to hijack yachts from BEYOND THE GRAVE

Anonymous Blowhard
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Prior art? How about actual products?

"The electronic control system is coupled to, and receives information from, sensors that collect environmental information (e.g., wind speed, wind direction, water depth, etc.) and/or system status information (e.g., engine speed, transmission settings, etc.) for the vehicle (e.g., the vessel)."

This sounds like the functionality of the fifteen quid Bluetooth widget I bought from Amazon to receive "system status information (e.g., engine speed, transmission settings, etc.) for the vehicle" using the free "Torque" application on Android:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B009NPAORC/ref=sr_ph?ie=UTF8&qid=1411112242&sr=1&keywords=bluetooth+elm+obd2

So the system monitoring is already performed by CAN-BUS and I think some aspects of remote control of vehicles (cars, aircraft, boats, ICBMs) via a tablet may be ruled out on safety grounds. Remote control of small vehicles by tablet/phone is already available:

http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/beewi-wifi-camera-scara-bee-buggy-n65qt?gclid=CNHKmvHh7MACFdMbtAodkyQAUw

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Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: I don't like it.

Cash is expensive; businesses have to pay for cash to be transported, they have to pay for insurance based on the amount of cash they may be holding, they have to pay banks to count it etc.

So the cost advantage of using cash versus cards is actually small, or nil, or a disadvantage.

Cards have some risk to businesses, through fraud, but better than having a gun shoved in your face.

Cards also have advantages to consumers as well as businesses, they're convenient and widely accepted and if you inform your bank promptly then even losing them or having them stolen doesn't cost you anything.

I'm not convinced about NFC payments though (via card or mobile) how is this safer than Chip and PIN?

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Well there you go

Absolutely; only a small amount of huffing and puffing necessary.

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Drones CAN'T deliver goods ... oh. Air traffic control system backed by NASA, you say?

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: bit skeptical

I think the point of the research with NASA is to develop option 3 as a national ATC system for drones.

Obviously if/when an ATC system is implemented, all drones will have to be FAA (for USA) certified to operate correctly within the ATC system.

This will suddenly confront the drone makers with a lot, but not all, of the regulation and cost of manned aircraft, so drones will be less cost effective, but probably still worthwhile.

It's the same as manned flight; back in 1900 you didn't have to get your manned flying machine FAA certified and your pilots qualified to work within the air traffic control environment.

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Give us a digi-Czar and more bureaucrats, begs UK tech-services biz

Anonymous Blowhard
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Trust the UK?

In order for the UK to be "a world-leading trusted domain for data protection" we need to close GCHQ; I don't think anyone interested in the protection of their data is going to trust a country whose government has so much capability, both technically and legally, for accessing data.

And if it's cock-up rather than conspiracy that you're wanting to avoid, then choose a "trusted domain for data protection" based on its past performance rather than its ability to create well-meaning sound-bytes.

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A SCORCHIO fatboy SSD: Samsung SSD850 PRO 3D V-NAND

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Return of the Ramdisk?

" what happens to all your lovely data if there is a power failure when it is still trying to write to the disk?"

Probably similar to a conventional HDD which can also cache writes for performance; although some SSDs use a set of capacitors on the circuit board to provide enough juice to complete the cached writes; so a sort of built-in UPS.

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Is your cloud server in the same bit barn as your DR site?

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Eh?

"Do you pay some money for AWS and then start asking exactly where they host things and trying to figure out if there are shared datacentres? No, you trust them."

Trust but verify.

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Chinese 'Sogou Explorer' browser sends URLs to parts unknown

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: The researchers seemed surprised.

5-eyes?

The forces of freedom don't need to spy on your browser; they've already made your ISP do it for them, and you're paying the ISP's bill plus 20% VAT to cover the Government's costs.

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Motorist 'thought car had caught fire' as Adele track came on stereo

Anonymous Blowhard
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"But wouldn't it be easier to simply switch it off or to a different radio station?"

In the hope they were playing "Fire Brigade" by The Move?

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Finally, a USEFUL smart device: Intel boffins cook up gyro-magneto-'puter bike helmet

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Solution in search of a problem

"crash-notification tech doesn't have to be wearable. If it was any use it would already be fitted to cars"

Quite a few manufacturers already have this as part of the on-board services; linked to the air-bag deployment.

I think the idea of smart helmets is a good one though; a helmet offers enough space to mount the sensors and the "smartness". The fire-fighter helmet is the most obvious application, but probably using something like Wi-Fi to link back to a fire truck or mobile control centre or Thunderbird 1.

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It's official: Brit parents want their kids to be just like Steve Bong

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Who the heck is Steve Bong? I never heard of him before!

If only there were an easy way to find out information like this; perhaps some kind of machine that could find things on the Internet? Eureka; I've invented the Find Machine! Call Steve Bong!

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Apple, FBI: YES we're, er, looking into the NAKED CELEBRITY PICS. Aren't you?

Anonymous Blowhard
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Long passwords are easy

...as long as you stick to words, and use more than one.

I used a similar scheme to the one you describe, and then I read this (posted by another El Reg forum user a few months ago):

http://xkcd.com/936/

I'm not ashamed to say I was embarrassed by this revelation, and have started to apply the principles to my passwords. Unfortunately a lot of sites insist on relatively short passwords.

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Samsung Gear S: Quick, LAUNCH IT – before Apple straps on iWatch

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: "a battery life of up to two days"

Why not charge as you move using Seiko Kinetic or Citizen Eco-Drive?

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Ice cream headache as black hat hacks sack Dairy Queen

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: "US Secret Service had been in touch after initial waffle"

The article doesn't say what flavour ice cream they had on their waffle.

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LOHAN wrapped in vinyl as Kickstarter campaign hits £18,000!

Anonymous Blowhard
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#LohanDonkey is Trending

That'll consume your bandwidth faster than a journalist can consume a free drink...

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Huawei: 'Tizen has no chance', Windows Phone is 'difficult'... it's Android all the way

Anonymous Blowhard
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Twice as keen on Africa compared to The Middle East?

"particularly looking to Africa, The Middle East and Africa."

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Six of the best gaming keyboard and mouse combos

Anonymous Blowhard
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Cherry Keys

Interesting to see that many of these keyboards are using Cherry mechanical keys.

They look a bit pricey though, however there is a benefit to using quality components and I can testify to the longevity of the Cherry keys; my 16 year old son is a keen FPS player and his weapon of choice is an ancient Cherry keyboard that is older than he is (my wife stopped using it about five years ago because it is beige and it took up too much desk space, she's had two keyboards since then).

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US Copyright Office rules that monkeys CAN'T claim copyright over their selfies

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Too Late Now

If he hadn't told the story, then it wouldn't have been a story at all; the only thing about this picture that makes it stand out from a million other monkey pictures is that it was taken by the monkey.

He should shut up and ride the publicity, not whine about what people owe him. In this case the monkey is the one looking smart.

And where does the US Copyright Office get the authority to deny a hard-working simian his rights to his artistic creation? Specist bastards! Someone get that monkey a lawyer!

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IBM boffins stuff 16 million-neuron chips into binary 'frog' brain

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Reinventing the flat tyre

"or may not fire when they "should" (?anyone got a good term for this -- ironically, I can't think of one!?)."

I think the legal term is DUI

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Tiny transforming bots: Meet these self-assembling 'thoughtful' droids

Anonymous Blowhard
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I, for one, welcome our flat-pack robotic overlords!

etc.

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Microsoft OneDrive tip-off leads to arrest over child abuse images

Anonymous Blowhard
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Thin end of the wedgie?

As much as I'm in favour of locking up criminals like this, I'm not sure that having cloud storage monitored is a good thing.

In this case the T&Cs say Microsoft can do this, so it's optional to use or not use their service based on knowing this; but politicians will be quick to extend this and make it mandatory for all cloud storage providers to monitor their users; after all, they only have to say the words, and then it's SEP to implement. And what about feature creep? Maybe your bank statements and financial data could also stand a quick scan, in case you're money laundering?

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Brit kids match 45-year-old fogies' tech skill level by the age of 6

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: DON'T PANIC

"there's no need for middle aged programmers to be waving Java manuals in their kids faces or telling little Johnny that he's useless because he can't compile a Linux kernel."

Yes there is!

Grab your pitchforks and light up those torches!!!

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UK.gov eyes up virtual currencies, fingers red tape dispenser

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: The problems with bitcoin, as seen by governments

1. You can't regulate it. You cannot block a bitcoin transaction. The only thing you can regulate are things like exchanges and the businesses accepting bitcoin. If more and more people start to use only bitcoin for their entire transaction and not exchanging their coins for fiat currency there will be less and less to regulate.

"In China, buying bitcoins with yuan is subject to restrictions, and bitcoin exchanges are not allowed to hold bank accounts."

3. You can't seize bitcoin. You can't freeze their wallet. If they have bitcoins, they can continue to buy things. Freezing a bank account to dry up resources for people not behaving exactly like the puppets the government would like them to be gain greater freedom, which is of course unwanted.

"In October 2013 the US FBI shut down the Silk Road online black market and seized 144,000 bitcoins worth US$28.5 million at the time."

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitcoin

I'd agree with point 2) though; but in the end the existing financial institutions will end up trading in crypto-currency just like they do in anything else. As far as consumers are concerned, the lack of protection for transactions will probably scare the majority of them away. If hybrid systems, with consumer protection and support from retailers, are developed, then it will be by the existing players as they already have the infrastructure and marketing power.

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Unhappy

Re: Missing a vitial point

I think you're missing the point that anything the State says is subject to state snooping is subject to state snooping.

If the State decides that crypto-currency transactions are subject to some kind of regulation then they only need to ask you to declare them, like an Income tax return; yes, you can lie, but then if they catch you out they can fine you and/or send you to jail.

"Death and Taxes" applies even in the digital world.

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Why do Reg readers deserve the big bucks? Here's why...

Anonymous Blowhard
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Mordac

'nuff said.

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Russia, China could ban western tech if they want to live in the PAST

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Do you think they care?

But wouldn't the blueprints contain "whatever it is they are afraid of"?

Even if some of the technology is tainted, they can get around most of the problems by using off the shelf components to build systems and develop their own operating systems and applications based on open source software.

The only issues is cost, and both Russia and China will have economies of scale plus the benefit of driving their country's IT sectors through state funded R&D, and profits will stay in the country, and pay tax to them, rather than out of the country where they fund western governments.

In the past, it was isolationism that stunted Russia and China's technology industries, they can avoid this by allowing their technology industries to continue trading with the rest of the world.

We're not in the 1970s any more, these countries have highly developed technology infrastructure, from education through to design and even manufacturing.

Question: The West, Russia and China; which one of them can't put a man into space?

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Edward Snowden's not a one-off: US.gov hunts new secret doc leaker

Anonymous Blowhard
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Amazing!

680,000 suspects and only 220 convictions over the last decade (http://www.thewire.com/politics/2013/04/civilians-courts-vs-military-courts-terrorism/64489/).

These guys are way better at slacking than I am! It's like were being guarded by an army of Wallys.

On the other hand, maybe it's just too easy to get on the list? I demand a more exclusive terror watch list!

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Watch this Aussie infosec bod open car doors from afar

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: How useful is this?

But the problem is that this year's "$1000 dollars worth of kit and spend 30 minutes hacking it" gets repackaged into a box you can buy for $10 on eBay and only needs the time it takes to push a button; technology proliferation in the criminal community is fast because it's a money making business.

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HUMAN RACE PERIL: Not nukes, it'll be AI that kills us off, warns Musk

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: The Human Spanner In The Works?

This was already done as the novel "Computer One":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_One

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China: Our approved vendor list – Kaspersky, Symantec AREN'T on it

Anonymous Blowhard
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Antitrust?

If ever a word fitted the situation perfectly...

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Your fitness tracker is a SNITCH says Symantec

Anonymous Blowhard
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This could be extremely dangerous!

e.g. your partner is away for a week and your Sexometer (tm) is registering you as 1.2 orgasms per day for that period.

Think of the rabbits!

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GCHQ names the Hogwarts for Hackers

Anonymous Blowhard
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I feel safer already

Not!

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Ex-despot Noriega sues: How dare Call of Duty make me look like, like...

Anonymous Blowhard
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Bastard!

"It is clear to game players that his [Noriega's] character and others that are based on real-life figures are fantasy"

Because in real life they're a lot more evil!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_Spadafora (Warning: makes unpleasant reading)

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FORGOTTEN Bing responds to search index ECJ ruling: Hello? Remember us?

Anonymous Blowhard
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Bing Bong!

Isn't being "found" by Bing as good as being forgotten?

Anyway, I'm off down the library to get some old newspapers, that may have articles mentioning me, filed away in a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying "Beware of The Leopard".

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Listen: WORST EVER customer service call – Comcast is 'very embarrassed'

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Just tell them you've sold your house

Up-voted; as always, the "way of the weasel" can overcome any obstacle!

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