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* Posts by Anonymous Blowhard

132 posts • joined 25 Mar 2013

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BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Laptop! Lucky bastards

Serves you right for not attending the consultative meetings in the back car-parking basement

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Banks slap Olympus with £160 MEEELLION lawsuit

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Arseburger...

It won't be in the banks' interests to kill-off Olympus; they probably will be happy with a payout in shares if they can't get the cash (that they've already written off and recouped from their other customers).

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UFO, cosmic ray or flasher? NASA rules on Curiosity curiosity

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Now with added JFK

"Some people forget that some rocks are shiny."

and that the secret is to bang the rocks together...

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Gov cheerleader Sajid Javid gets nod from PM to park in Miller's spot

Anonymous Blowhard
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Rigorous Selection Process

Dave: Will you do whatever I say?

Sajid: Yes!

Dave: You're hired!

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Dell Wyse Cloud Connect: Pocket Android desktop

Anonymous Blowhard
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So about twice the price of a Raspberry Pi (factoring in el-cheapo WiFi and bluetooth dongles for the Pi) but not as good?

I might be interested if it was half the price (50 quid say).

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Tamil Nadu's XP migration plan: Go Linux like a BOSS

Anonymous Blowhard
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Could be Linux's big break

This probably makes a lot of sense for an Indian organisation, the relative cost of upgrading to another Windows version would be a lot higher than for, say, a UK company. Support skills in India will be cheaper, but again this is relative so maybe a similar cost to UK organisations.

For UK companies though, the cost of upgrading hardware/software is trivial; the person sitting in front of the PC is costing 15,000 GBP per-year minimum. The desk and chair the PC and user sit on, together, probably cost as much as a low-spec PC. The main issue is how much lost productivity the organisation has during the "learning what's different" phase.

With Windows 8, Microsoft made that last bit much higher than previously and this was a major error; It won't kill them, but after such a solid product as Windows 7 it makes corporate IT very unlikely to upgrade until something more work-oriented is delivered.

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Brit game devs WILL get tax relief for, er, EastEnders Game and Legend of Slough

Anonymous Blowhard
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"Milk Float Simulator" anyone?

'nuff said.

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Hey frumious Reg gamers: BANG-or-SNATCH? We look at Second Son and Thief

Anonymous Blowhard
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Pirate

I'm waiting for the HMRC edition of "Thief"

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Forget sledgehammers – crooks can CRACK ATMs with a TEXT

Anonymous Blowhard
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"You'd hope that the bank employee whose job it is to fill the ATM would also check for unexpected changes to the ATM such as a USB cable leading to a mobile phone."

Who do you think is best placed to install a mobile phone into an ATM?

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MPs blast HMRC for using anti-terrorism laws against whistleblower

Anonymous Blowhard
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Doesn't RIPA limit HMRC to investigating serious crime; like tax evasion?

Did Mr. Mba owe any tax? If so, did he owe as much as Goldman Sachs?

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Blinking good: LG launches smart light bulb for Android/iOS

Anonymous Blowhard
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Hackers?

All your light-bulbs are belong to us!

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Bono bests Bezos in Fortune's 'World's 50 Greatest Leaders' list

Anonymous Blowhard
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World?

Is this really the "World's 50 Greatest Leaders" or just a list that Americans may have heard of?

Not wanting to insult the leadership qualities of some US citizens, especially in business, but this seems more like the "World Series of Leaders".

Just to be controversial, where did Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping and Kim Jong-un come in the list?

And what about Charles Montgomery Burns?

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Google's Larry Page: DeepMind 'discovered CATS on its own'

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: So they...

"Rather this than watching pr0n, the gods alone know how it would evolve then"

Two words:

"Demon Seed"

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MH370 airliner MYSTERY: The El Reg Pub/Dinner-party Guide

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Question

"How can you stop someone from cutting the wires??"

By putting it an unpressurised part of the airframe; but as others have posted there is always the potential requirement to be able to turn it off in the event of an electrical fire. Up to now no-one has designed tracking features into an aircraft on the assumption that the pilots may be "hostile"; same as before 911 you could get into the cockpit without having to break down an armoured door.

I expect a number of changes to airline procedures to come out of this, whatever the actual explanation turns out to be.

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: What if it was ditched and sunk intact?

"it is extremely difficult to land a large jet on water under any semblance of control, to the extent that it has *never* been done."

Oh yes it has!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_Airways_Flight_1549

But it seems an unlikely explanation.

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GRAV WAVE TSUNAMI boffinry BONANZA – the aftershock of the universe's Big Bang

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: "expansion of space briefly exceeded the speed of light "

"Let's say you're walking forward inside a train moving at 200 km/h. Inside the train, in your reference frame, your walking speed is 2 km/h like it's always been, but to an observer outside the train it might seem as if you're walking at an incredible 202 km/h."

But if the train was moving at c (the speed of light) relative to an observer, it would seem to the observer that you're both moving at c; even though to you you're moving forwards along the train to the observer you're frozen still.

Relativity has wierd effects, but none of them (AFAIK) produce a measurable "greater than c" velocity for an object.

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Soon-to-be Facebook intern wins UK Cyber Security Challenge

Anonymous Blowhard
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"KPMG said it was cutting back on its sponsorship of the UK government-backed Cyber Security Challenge back in January after concluding the puzzle-based focus of the competition is failing to attract the right kind of potential recruit into the infosec profession"

It seems to be attracting people who are good, but aren't just in it for the money; maybe this is an indicator of what KPMG thinks are the "right kind of potential recruit"?

Maybe KPMG aren't the "right kind of company"?

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Wackadoo DIYers scissor-kick beatboxer

Anonymous Blowhard
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For anyone wondering why "demo" is in the list

"demo" has been redefined as:

n4: a type of conjuring performance in which software appears to work perfectly and ends with money vanishing from punters' wallets. See also "PowerPoint".

v: the act of convincing punters to buy software. See also "scam".

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Earth's night-side gets different kinds of neutrinos from day-side

Anonymous Blowhard
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Is SuperKamio Wii only or also on DS?

Are any politicians aware of the threat from neutinos coming from above (or below depending on time of day)?

Enquiring minds are bored with work already...

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Actually, there is an Arapaho word for 'pliers'

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Heresy ?

What do you use your pliers for?

Bending paperclips.

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UK.gov to train up 11-year-old cyberwarriors

Anonymous Blowhard
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Happy

Re: Obvious Star Wars reference

Trying to teach politicians what cyber security is, is a hiding to nothing.

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Obvious Star Wars reference

No!

Ender's Game!!!

The book, not the film (not seen it, but bound to be terrible in comparison though).

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Web inventor Berners-Lee: I so did NOT see this cat vid thing coming

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: my useless contribution

No-one "errected a digital Berlin wall between the realms of text and e-mail" they're separate because they work in completely different ways, they just look a bit similar to users.

SMS is a "push" system using the phone network to push messages to the device; email was a "pull" system requiring users to open an application that pulled messages from a mailbox. Push email is an add-on to email that has been developed in the Blackberry/smartphone era as a simpler way for users to get email.

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: And it's funny because

Only three sylables in Italian though

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Is the World Wide Web for luvvies and VCs – or for all of us?

Anonymous Blowhard
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You mean like AOL or CompuServe?

Companies always want to lock in the customer, or in the case of Facebook (and others) the product.

Maybe, in the Star Trek future, services like Google, Twitter and Facebook will be replaced by a web-based standard and users will have the freedom to choose the tools and UI for accessing the data without having to worry about who's serving it up.

Can't see it happening any time soon though.

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NSA's TURBINE robot can pump 'malware into MILLIONS of PCs'

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Interesting choice of words

They've been running "Operation Reaming Freedom" for the last decade...

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PM Cameron leaps aboard Internet of Thingies

Anonymous Blowhard
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Bongonomics

No doubt Dave thinks that we'll be able to mash up the software for all this in the "Year of Code"; if he thinks this is more valuable than actual engineering then he's "Weak of Brain".

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Team Cymru spots 300,000 compromised SOHO gateways

Anonymous Blowhard
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Alert

Re: Remote access

Many of the (better) routers have internet and wireless access to the management interface disabled by default; but check to be sure.

Also a good idea to change the IP address range of the LAN so it's not the obvious 192.168.1.x or 192.168.0.x but make sure it's still an RFC 1918 address:

https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1918

The JS attack can still get around this if the infected machine is on the wired LAN though; another good reason for using NoScript.

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Traditional RAID is outdated and dying on its feet

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Eh?

"IBM is outdated and dying on its feet."

I suspect that any company with almost 100 billion dollars revenue and with more Nobel prizes than a lot of countries will be around long after most of us, you included, are dead and buried.

IBM doesn't sell much to consumers, a bit like Boeing and Airbus, but what it provides for business users is hard to replace; IBM has seen off most of the would-be pretenders to its big-data throne (DEC, BULL, HP, ICL etc.) and I can't see any competitor eating their lunch in the near future. The only credible rival in this space is Oracle (+Sun) and they are less than half the size of IBM.

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Pine trees' scent 'could prevent climate change really being a problem'

Anonymous Blowhard
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So it's OK to spray my 'pits as long as it's pine scented?

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Apple throws sueball at China's patent office over Siri clone

Anonymous Blowhard
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"Im sure the problem here is apply really invented it and for some reason delayed putting in the patent application"

So if the Chinese compnay got a patent approve in 2004, and Apple invented it before, then assuming that it took a couple of years to develop, Apple must have created Siri before they started developing the iPhone?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPhone

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Cable thieves hang up on BT, cause MAJOR outage

Anonymous Blowhard
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My point about terrorism is that destuction of infrastructure by thieves has similar consequences to actual attacks on infrastructure; direct loss of life is not neccessarily a terrorist objective (even the IRA experimented with infrastructure attacks and economic terrorism) and there can be serious secondary effects due to loss of communications e.g. if it's over a wide area then there will be people attempting to call for emergency services during the outage who won't be able to get through (although this is mitigated somewhat by the availability of alternate communications channels like mobile telephones).

The EU identifies communications in the critical infrastructure that could be targetted by terrorists:

http://europa.eu/legislation_summaries/justice_freedom_security/fight_against_terrorism/l33259_en.htm

Many of the villages around where I live have had this happen on several occasions; the current laws on theft and criminal damage don't seem to be a deterrent.

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Anonymous Blowhard
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They should treat this as terrorism; okay, the objective isn't to intimidate the public, but the overall result in loss of services is similar, and has a big impact on people's ability to conduct business.

If terrorists started to attack the comminications infrastructure in this way I think we'd see a more pro-active response by gorvernment and the police.

Until there's a dis-incentive for this kind of crime, in the form of effective detection and heavy punishment, then it will not stop. The perps are too stupid to tell the diference between copper and fibre so will keep at it, even when or if the network is 100% fibre (unlikely if telecoms companies are wasting resources replacing stolen infrastructure).

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Rise of the Machines: Robot challenges top German player at ping-pong

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Strategies

I wonder if it's psychotic enough to work out it can CRUSH HIM IN ITS REMORSELESS METAL GRIP!!!

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No, pesky lawyers, particle colliders WON'T destroy the Earth

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Aren't these couple of loons...

@LarsG

"we have scientists messing with stuff like this"

People seem to forget that the energy involved in our BIGGEST** particle accelerators is TINY compared to naturally occuring (unless it's aliens shooting at us) high energy particles that hit the earth EVERY DAY!!! They're called cosmic rays; scientist would love to use then for experiments, but you can't steer them in front of the detectors so we make do with our puny machines.

If "high energy" physics experiments were going to destroy the world then it would already have happened as a result of cosmic ray events.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_ray

** Check the bit about cosmic rays being 40,000,000 times more energy than the LHC

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'Wind power causes climate change' shown to be so much hot air

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Consistent

I think you mean that our weather sucks.

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Eurocops want to build remote car-stopper, shared sensor network

Anonymous Blowhard
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Already been done...

I think it's already been done for some US models, but it's part of the manufacturer's anti-theft systems.

They don't just turn the engine off though, they turn the power down gradually via the engine management, like if you were running out of fuel.

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UK internet filtering shouldn't rely on knee tappers, says Tory MP

Anonymous Blowhard
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I don't know about knees, but politicians of both left and right leanings seem to love this shit; and neither variety seems to grasp that it won't fix anything, its just whitewash to keep mumsnet off their case.

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Volunteers slam plans to turn Bletchley Park into 'geeky Disneyland'

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: fish museum

Then you'd probably enjoy a trip to "Barometer World":

http://www.barometerworld.co.uk/

Or, failing that, try "Badgerland":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Museum_of_Everything#Badgerland

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Is Google building SKYNET? Ad kingpin buys AI firm DeepMind

Anonymous Blowhard
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So a smart heating control is worth 8x more than AI technology? Maybe the AI will be used to help their aquisition strategy?

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/01/15/google_nest_buy_analysis/

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KC engineer 'exposed unencrypted spreadsheet with phone numbers, user IDs, PASSWORDS'

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: FFS

That's what I thought; KC's broadband division, Eclipse, uses an ISP assigned username (that looks like an email address, but isn't) and ISP assigned password to authenticate the ADSL connection.

The user's account with Eclipse has a completey different set of credentials that are chosen by the user.

I'm presuming that the engineers have access to the ADSL connection parameters to help them fix problems like the user resetting his router to factory settings.

This is a bit of a non-story, helped along by KC's poor response to the customer.

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High Court derails Google defence in Safari browser stalker cookie brouhaha

Anonymous Blowhard
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Check their tax returns!

From the tax they pay it's obvious that they don't exist in the UK so the law can't apply to them.

And Apple users pay for the privilege of having their data slurped by Apple; they don't want freeloaders like Google getting it for nothing!

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UK.gov declares digital success as PR, food shops redefined as 'tech' businesses

Anonymous Blowhard
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So you're a "technology" business if any of your employees uses a computer? Maybe they can do this with other sectors, then any business that provides company cars will be a transport business?

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Three offers free US roaming, confirms stealth 4G rollout

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: 3 are great...

I'm not sure where you get the poor coverage, but my experience of has been pretty good. The only buildings I can think of as being bad are my in-laws,who have some metalised insulation in their loft that kills all signals, and a few factory buildings, which are also of metal construction.

Coverage in airports and road networks seems to excellent; but I can't comment on rail and "wilderness" areas other than bits of Devon where no-one gets a signal.

I work for a Danish company, and often visit Scandinavia, so the no-roaming charges for Denmark etc. is a nice bonus.

I used to be with Vodafone and couldn't get signal in the centre of my nearest city, Lichfield (which isn't exactly a built up area, but it's not the Gobi Desert either). All networks have some poor coverage areas, but my experience of Three is that my phone works pretty much everywhere I want/need it to.

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OHM MY GOD! Move over graphene, here comes '100% PERFECT' stanene

Anonymous Blowhard
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Meh

I'll believe it when I read about it in the Morny Stannit

(c) M&W

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Chester Cathedral smites net in Wi-Fi SMUT OUTRAGE

Anonymous Blowhard
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More like justify their surfing porn in work time...

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Wolfram's new equation: Mathematica+RPi=child geniuses everywhere

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Mathematica on a Pi????

Some people are never satisfied; you offer them a free box of tools, and they complain that you didn't give them the whole tool-making factory.

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Meet Stuxnet's stealthier older sister: Super-bug turned Iran's nuke plants into pressure cookers

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Remember people "cyberwarfare" is a game for *any* size and number of players.

"Now we have the brain race."

Oh dear; from what we've seen of government IT, the MoD and its suppliers, the UK is screwed.

The MoD couldn't get malware written for an operating system within the lifetime of the software; they've probably just completed equipping themselves with an attack for the PDP-11.

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BT Openreach boss QUITS to quench ambitious thirst

Anonymous Blowhard
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Pint

Arse!

This probably means I can now look forward to "up to 10 cubic metres per day" of water, only to get a couple of litres.

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