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* Posts by Down not across

308 posts • joined 21 Mar 2013

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We're BFFs AGAIN, say AT&T and Netflix after penning peering pact

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Peering

Given the recent articles about the spat between Netflix and Verizon (who by all accounts appears to have signed peering agreement) it seems uncertain how much this well help AT&T. Verizon seems to have done theirs in April and yet its customers report issues with Netflix. Sure some provisioning can take some time but three months? Also makes the public bickering somewhat odd if an agreement in place. I suppose that is where L3 come in being the carrier between the two.

Shall be interesting to see if AT&T fares any better than Verizon.

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14 antivirus apps found to have security problems

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Re: Point of Issue

Don't blame the C language please. Despite its age it is still an excellent language, it still has relevancy and it is the language of choice for most safety critical systems. The issue here is poor developers and/or their pointy-haired managers.

Quite.

"AV engines were often built in C which led to vulnerabilities like..." suggests the flaws are caused by the chosen language. The language used doesn't directly lead to vulnerabilities. Sure it doesn't hold your hand and it will let you you stupid things. You're expected to be able write decent code. Shouldn't be unreasonable to expent competent coding from company providing security software.

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Adam Afriyie MP: Smart meters are NOT so smart

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I actually thought about building an automated meter reader. We have an electricity meter with a flashing light and it would be easy to just count the flashes. I'm sure someone with EE skills could build a device that cost peanuts and ran on goodwill.

Indeed it has. Many times.

http://www.airsensor.co.uk/component/zoo/item/energy-monitor.html

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We don't need no new meters

If possible, we should look for a less expensive solution that gets the same job done. For example, rather than seeing your energy use on a wall unit, why shouldn’t you be able to view it online or through a mobile app instead? This would save us the estimated £228m cost of installing in-home display units (IHDs). Rather than installing a whole new meter, why can’t we just stick a small camera or reading device onto your existing meter which can regularly record and transcribe the current meter reading? And why can’t we just use an approved smartphone app for ad hoc readings today? This is now perfectly feasible and these readings should be accepted by the energy suppliers.

I'm shocked. Some sense finally. Replacing perfectly good working meters is pure insanity, not to mention the various issues should the meter be remotely controllable.

The simplest solution to instant readings for power companies (and far cheaper than new meter) would be using the existing induction pickups coupled with a small GSM (or other radio) that would periodically send updates.

Reading the meter optically is another (and perhaps more reliable) method and has already been done many times at hobbyist level. That dot on the wheel is rather easy to pick up (and saves trying to OCR the digits).

Also should you change suppliers, new supplier can provide their kit (or new SIM for GSM etc).

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NASA Mars rover FINALLY equals 1973 Soviet benchmark

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Heading for Marathon Valley

So the rover is controlled by Durandal? Better watch out for Pfhor. Maybe it turns out the planet is actually Lh'owon.

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HGST polishes Ultrastar SSD whoppers, stuffs with denser Intel flash

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Re: is it really enterprise grade

For enterprise grade I would be expecting SLC and not MLC.

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Bring back error correction, say Danish 'net boffins

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My bold prediction is that we will see some return to circuit switching to run alongside packet switching in our public networks. That would most likely take the form of an overlay network and traffic would be split out at edge routers. For some types of traffic, for some usage and routing scenarios, packet switching is awfully inefficient and difficult. At some point it becomes easier to just circuit switch that traffic than it does to try and engineer an illusion of circuit switching over a packet switched network.

You mean like MPLS that many (if not most) carriers and ISPs use these days?

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Indie ISP to Netflix: Give it a rest about 'net neutrality' – and get your checkbook out

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Netflix told us that, if we wanted to improve streaming performance, we should pay $10,000 per month for a dedicated link, spanning nearly 1,000 miles, to one of its "peering points" – just to serve it and no other streaming provider.) It then launches misleading PR campaigns against ISPs that dare to object to this behavior.

Well, Netflix is selling the product that needs that fat pipe so really they should foot the bill. On the other hand you could see it as the ISP footing the bill to better server its customers. However if the ISP foots the bill for the link then it should be able to do whatever it wishes with it. I don't see why Netflix would have any say what the ISP does with a link the ISP pays for.

This kind of ties in with the recent threads about the Netflix/Verizon spat on El Reg. There were discussions about where the "fault" lies and I did raise the question about peering arrangements and who actually should pay for what.

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Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in

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Blasphemy

or that there's a #sysadminday tweetup in your neighbourhood.

Real sysadmins don't use twitter. They use wall/talk.

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Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid: The plug-in for plutocrats

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kmpl? WTF?

Converting mpg to km/l makes no sense. In the metric world fuel consumption has always been in l/100km.

At a push I could've undestood making it mpl now that petrol is sold in litres instead of gallons in UK.

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US Social Security 'wasted $300 million on an IT BOONDOGGLE'

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Withholding information

"We find these allegations deeply disturbing, and if true, they suggest that your agency is attempting to mislead or withhold information from the Congress and the American public," the committee trio wrote.

Erm, isn't that what three letter agencies (are supposed to) do ?

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BMW's ConnectedDrive falls over, bosses blame upgrade snafu

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Re: we are doomed

Actually that pedal to the left is merely an interface to an electronic device - i.e. 'brake by wire' - for more and more vehicles on the roads. As are the shifter and shifter paddles, as have been most dashboard controls for years. I tremble for a moment every time I climb into my Bimmer, before I race off to go weaving between lanes, sometimes using my turn-signal-by-wire.....

For accelerator, that could be the case. For power steering, yes has been done. For brakes, I doubt it. Brakes need to be as failsafe as possible so they're usually hydraulic. Even if the servo assist fails they still work even though they would require significantly more force to operate.

The only place I've seen electric brakes is in trailers.

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Chips are down at Broadcom: Thousands of workers laid off

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Re: Double whammy for Oulu

That sucks. Really sucks. There are, I guess, bit over 100k or so in and around Oulu. So that's creeping up to nearly 1% additional unemployed.

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Games industry set for $5 BILLION haircut, warn beancounters

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Re: Xbone even more doomed

I would hate to be a Microsoft stock holder right now.

Have you actually looked at their share price for last month, year, even multiple years?

You'd hate to own some of this?

Any PS4 owner would actually really hate XBone to be doomed. Just like XBone owner would hate PS4 to be doomed. The competition is the only thing giving consumers some chance.

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Motorist 'thought car had caught fire' as Adele track came on stereo

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Re: Devil's advocate....

Having said that, I do tend to dig in the manual for interesting details if I have a few minutes, because especially the radio tends to have all sorts of gadgets that can get in the way, like when you're driving along happily with some nice music and THEN THE TRAFFIC ANNOUNCEMENTS COME ON IN TOP VOLUME prompting a frantic grab for the volume control (and a near heart attack). If you cannot find a way to adjust that announcement volume (and it's often seriously hidden) you're left with the decision to forego them altogether or live with the risk of a heart attack.. It gets complicated if the manual is not in one of the languages I speak, though :)

That just reminded of the Top Gear episode where Clarkson was testing the M5 and could barely get a word in edgeways with the satnav.

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Samsung looks to up Tizen market share ... by upgrading Galaxy Gear

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Re: Kies

"To get the new firmware, Galaxy Gear owners should download the appropriate version of Samsung's Kies software "

Stop right there. Anything involving Kies should not be attempted.

Could agree with you more. Never encountered such a steaming turd, except perhaps Sonicstage or whatever it was called.

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Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months

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Re: cue

cue a load of people saying they are holding out because they are waiting for a successor to the N9...

Perhaps.

I'd still like to see a decent modern version of Nokia Communicator. So it needs a usable QWERTY keyboard. I'd probably prefer the original clamshell/dual display over slide out keyboard. Doesn't matter if it's bit bulkier to house larger battery (or just give it two battery slots) so it'll be nice and steady on a table. Since its bit bulky maybe could fit full size USB port to easily plug a USB to serial converter in for console access.

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MARS NEEDS OCEANS to support life - and so do exoplanets

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Re: Not sure about this

I have a nagging doubt about confident assertions of planets' suitability to support life that seem to be based on the assumption that if a planet doesn't have an environment that behaves in just the same way as Earth's then it can't support life,

Ah, at least its not just me who gets miffed at this (at least as often potrayed by media) seeming ignorance that a different environment could well sustain life that has evolved in that environment.

As The Firm parodied: It's life Jim, but not as we know it.

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Banning handheld phone use by drivers had NO effect on accident rate - study

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Re: re : James 51

As do I occasionally but the police don't seem to be doing much about that either.

Ah, that makes alright then?

It's still against the highway code.

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Cisco's first 8 Tbps MONSTER router goes live at Telstra

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Downtime

The NCS 6008 consumes “60 per cent less power per gigabit of traffic” than the core routers it replaces, the carrier says, and has a smaller footprint. Its faster update and boot, Telstra says, will help reduce downtime.

Surely better way to reduce downtime is to ensure alternative routing is available whilst the router is getting its update/rebooting...

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Students hack Tesla Model S, make all its doors pop open IN MOTION

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Joke

Let me just pullover to turn on the lights...

Zhejiang University students have hacked the Tesla Model S with an attack that enabled them to open its doors and sun roof, switch on the headlights and sound the horn.

Well, I'd be pretty miffed if I couldn't open the doors (ok, perhaps not doors whilst in motion), sunroof and operate lights and horn. Having to pull over to open/close sunroof or turn on/off lights would be rather annoying.

And horn not working whilst moving kind of defeats its purpose (which is not to lean on it in stationary traffic whilst car ahead has nowhere to go anyway).

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Want to beat Verizon's slow Netflix? Get a VPN

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Re: A glimpse of the future...

This is what Verizon wants the future to be, pay them their danegeld, or they slow you down to a crawl.

So do AT&T and Comcast. Easy to see why, they are looking to cash in on the big content providers. Not to mention there are conflicts of interest with their own content services. As usual it is all about money.

Net neutrality is important. The best/easiest would be FCC reclassification, but I'm not convinced they have the cajonas to do it. Wheeler threw the threat of reclassification out there and now is backpedaling so fast the dynamo on the bike generates -48V

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Re: Raise your hand if surprised...

FCC is collecting opinions until Sep 10th I believe.

The FCC's draft rules propose banning ISPs from blocking users' access to websites or applications but allowing some "commercially reasonable" deals between content providers and ISPs to prioritize delivery of some web traffic.

Is throttling same as blocking. In users view it no doubt is. Whether FCC thinks so is another matter. Guess they'll do that as "prioritizing" traffic.

FCC should just reclassify as telecommunications service, which is something AT&T, Comcast and Verizon are vehemently opposing. That would kill their planned cash cow.

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Re: Probably, but not necessarily ...

Not defending Verizon, who should not be dragging their feet over this issue, but this VPN situation could occur 'accidentally' if the guys VPN goes via another route not usually congested with Netflix traffic.

Quite. Which is what I tried to point out in some posts. So far all parties have blamed another party as is quite common in corporate world. Let's face it at least one of the parties is lying, or not telling the whole truth anyway. In order to be objective (yeah this is the Reg, what am I thinking!) I was considering options that might explain the situation.

Obviously not commenting on allegations does not help as it is easily interpreted as "damn, got caught. Can't talk out of this one". Of course considering Verizon's stance on net neutrality and lobbying against it is another nail in this coffin.

If anything this is good example what is likely to happen should the opponents to net neutrality win. First its some high bandwidth entertainment. Anyone think it'll stop there? No, didn't think so either.

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I can't see how it can go through another "uncongested route" as it still has to make it out of my ISP.

Because due to peering and transit agreements there are often more than one route of the ISP.

Your VPN endpoint is unlikely to be your final target (that you were getting to without VPN) and hence could end up routed differently.

So you could easily end up with a route, with more hops, that is ungongested and with better throughput.

Now this is not to say ISPs don't cap things. Many cap stuff like BT etc. Some are upfront about it. some are not.

As you pointed out it can be fairly obious if it is a case of limit/throttling rather than natural congestion.

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What's inside AMD's life-support machine? A big pile o' PlayStation 4s and XBox Ones

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Re: We owe a lot to AMD .. but there's a limit

My first x86 AMD was 486-DX2 (iirc) later replaced with DX4. The K6 series was rather nice although bit lacking in floating point and not as good as the original NexGen design it was based on. I did build a K6-2-450 machine but eventually replaced with Intel as much software wanted Intel's SSE rather than K6-2's SIMD.

Athlon really rocked when it was released. Over 1GHz and Intel had nothing that could touch it. For quite some time. It was kind of like poor man's Alpha with its EV6 bus. Still have a 1.2GHz Thunderbird around.

After that it was downhill for AMD in terms of desktop performance. It had the edge on price. I had couple of boxen with Athlon IIs that were later upgraded to Phenom IIs. Multithread performance was pretty good, but on single/dual thread (like games for example) they were clearly behind Intel's Core. Having said that still good value in terms of "bang for the buck".

Even with the higher cost I find at the moment i5 and i7 are better choice than AMD for most situations especially if discrete graphics are used.

For a low-cost/low-power the APUs are still a decent choice and do offer better integrated graphics performance than intel.

TLDR; IMHO AMD has for now lost the desktop race, but is viable contender in the embedded/highly integrated market.

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Oh girl, you jus' didn't: Level 3 slaps Verizon in Netflix throttle blowup

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Re: RE: Level3 speaks 'up'

About a week ago, I posited that the problem has 3 potential bottle neck spots, the transit provider's outbound ports, the interconnect to Verizon VerLIESon, or with VerLIESon's inbound ports.

Well, it seems that the culprit, at least according to Level3 is VerLIESon.

Who wouldda thunk that???

Indeed you did. And refreshingly you also mentioned the various points where the problem could be.

I'm not in the slightest surprised L3 denying blame and shifting it to Verizon. All players so far have made sure their version is "It's not me, its the other guy". So far Netflix is blaming Verizon, Verizon is blaming L3 (or so it appears) and L3 is blaming Verizon. L3's complaint about the ports sounds perfectly feasible.

Whilst Verizon seem to be running out of rope here, there is something that has not (and most likely won't be) been disclosed and that is what the peering arrangements between L3 and Verizon are?

L3 are blaming Verizon for not adding more ports. Who should pay for those ports? The fact that they may exist doesn't mean they are of no cost. What if it would be up to L3 to pay for the extra ports? I'm not saying this is the case as I have no idea of what their arrangements may be, just that things may not be so clear cut.

Bottom line is any company will avoid being blamed and would try to shift the blame if it could.

Likewise as has been posted by many on this thread there certainly are conlficts of interest with regards to some services and competition.

Oh and why sell yourself short and devalue your post with the childish namecalling.

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Microsoft's Black Thursday: XBox Live goes down as XBox Studio canned

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Been having constant issues logging into XBox live ever since XBox one launched on any of my XBox 360's.

How many times they need an email address for confirmation I really dont know?

That "give us yet another email address" farce started long before XBone launch.

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Don't put that duffel bag full of cash in the hotel room safe

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Re: Wheel barrows

The sack is brilliant. Disguises the obvious :-)

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Seventh-gen SPARC silicon will accelerate Oracle databases

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Re: Are these the SPARC or the T processors

I've had nothing but scalability problems with the T range of processors.

Whilst they look good on paper with loads of threads, we have found that for a heavily loaded

transactional systems, they perform like a dog.

This is not exactly news.

However to give Oracle some credit, the T-series has gotten better with each iteration. T5 (and to largee extent T4) are much better than their predecessors. Not perfect by any means, but considerably improved.

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Re: Resiliency Model

I'm still diving into it with Oracle and don't have full details, but some of the resiliency issues I'm investigating seem to be related to the PCI bus design, which is very CPU related.

Well, there certainly are design issue especially when it comes to virtualisation where for example T4 didn't allow for very resilient design as it had only one PCI root complex, whereas T5 has two and thus enables more complete virtualisation of the hardware which makes a difference since Oracle's current resiliency model tends to revolve around virtualisation.

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SPARC 7?

So, we're going from current SPARC V9 to SPARC 7 ..very logical.

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Seagate chances ARM with NAS boxes for the SOHO crowd

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Re: hp microserver...

Yes, but you can have zfs on the HP microserver.

Yes indeed, however its memory will need upgrading to get ZFS to work in any meaningful way.

Which effectively raises its price (yes, I know it was different poster, not you who mentioned the price) from the 150 significantly especially since it would be sensible to carry on using ECC memory.

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Re: hp microserver...

The HP microservers are great. I particularly like the USB socket on the mobo allowing usb stick to be plugged in internally to be used for booting. The AMD Neo might not be a powerhouse but enough to run a fileserver (certainly FreeNAS runs without any issues).

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When the robot rebellion comes, this Jibo droid will BORE you to death

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Kibo

I first read it as Kibo and wondered what is James Parry getting into now.

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Run Oracle? Want to sleep tonight? Then sort these 113 patches

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Re: That's how "unbreakable" their products were

To be clear, their core database is a damn good fine, if equally expensive, product. The rest is most... well, if you have used them, you know better.

I disagree. Databases are like operating systems. They all suck. Just in different ways and amounts.

Whichever RDBMS you pick, it is a case of you win some you lose some.

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Listen: WORST EVER customer service call – Comcast is 'very embarrassed'

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Re: Hmmm

Comcast are losing a customer who has been loyal for a decade and it is really useful for a company to understand why the customer is leaving so they can offer incentives to retain the customer or fix anything they are doing wrong. This dude could have been a lot more cooperative and got his service cancelled a lot quicker of he wasn't so obstructive.

Yes of course it would be useful. However the customer is under no obligation whatsoever to give a reason for terminating the service.

Obstructive? Hardly. All he was trying to do was to cancel the service regardless of the CS rep talking all over him repeating the same sales pitch over and over again without actually listening to what the customer was saying. Excellent way to ensure that the customer is lost forever and will not ever come back.

It is truly astounding he managed to stay as calm as he did. I think most people would have lost it.

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BMW i8 plug-in hybrid: It's a supercar, Jim, but not as we know it

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Re: Super car?

While a very interesting car, not sure I would compare it to a supercar like a 458 or MP-12C. Looks more like competition for grand tourers than out and out supercars

I agree. Definitely comfortably in the GT category. Not quite a supercar IMHO.

Guess we need to wait and see what Mi8 will be like :-)

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Verizon points more fingers at Netflix: It's YOUR pals slowing data

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Re: All agreed what the problem is...

WRONG!!!

Take a second look at that diagram.

You have:

Netflix transit provider's outbound port ----> interconnect -----> Verizon's inbound port

and conversely:

Verizon's outbound port ----> interconnect ----> Netflix's transit provider's inbound port

Everyone seems to agree that there is a problem with the first traffic flow; but the question begs:

EXACTLY where is the bottleneck?

Is it at Netflix's transit provider's OUTBOUND PORT?

Is it in the interconnect itself?

Or is it at Verizon's INBOUND PORT.

I'm not blind. That diagram does not contain enough information to tell EXACTLY where the bottleneck is. All I was saying (and yes I should've been more clear on that) was that the diagram doesn't firmly say the issue is with Verizon, as it is just as likely to be Netflix's provider.

I did make the wild assumption that the coloured arrows are part of Netflix's chosen provider (since all Verizon infrastructure is in the shaded box "Verizon IP Network"). Based on that it seems highly likely that the issue it outside Verizon's control. And no that does not rule out possibility that the Verizon endpoint is not capable of sufficient bandwith for the link but that seems rather unlikely.

An example that may help you 'get this'

You have a desktop PC with a gigabit LAN card; but you are stuck in an old building that has only Cat 3 cable, and you connect to a slower Fast ethernet (100Mbs) switch.

You would EXPECT to get 1 gigabit performance because you have a gigabit card, but you won't? Care to guess why, and determine what is causing the rate to be limited??? If you guess that you are stuck at 10Mb because of the old Cat 3 cable you may very well be right; but in NO WAY will you get a gigabit because of the Fast ethernet switch.

Yeah 'I get this' that you're making assumptions on my knowledge of networking. Look laddie, don't try to teach your grandma to suck eggs. Mkay?

The question remains: "WHO has the bottleneck"? You have infrastructure from potentially 3

different companies, with 3 different investment priorities, someone needs to 'step up'.

That is valid assertion. I did at no point mean to infer that would not be the case. I was merely pointing out that there were number of comments "X needs to spend money on its network" without any real knowledge if the issue is with X's or Y's (or indeed possibly Z's if there is another carrier involved between the two parties) network.

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BitTorrent not to blame for movie revenues, says economist

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However I constantly feel shafted by doing things "the right way", if I were to download these it'd be easier than visiting a shop, I wouldn't have to put up with forced, unskippable, irrelevant trailers and piracy warnings.

Like you, I have over the years amassed quite a collection DVDs and BluRay disks (and in my case quite a lot of LaserDiscs). My pet peeve is also the forced anti-piracy "Do not steal" "It's illegal to.." warnings and lately trailers as well that you're forced to watch.

Treat your customers like criminals and eventually they will become such.

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Re: Its a shame really

What we need is a free "cinema box" at home. Something we hook up to the TV for special occasions. You pay a fee and you watch your film and you can even rate it. No interruptions from noisy neighbors in the next aisle, no mobile phone distractions and no fuss or overpriced snacks.

Ok its not free, but lot of us have Tivo or Sky box which does PPV.

So the technology is pretty much in place. All that would be needed is for the films to be available at theatrical release time.

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Re: Add the 3d farce

Also irritating is, at least for those people not blessed with living in a native-english-speaking-country, are subtitles. They get in the way and distract you from the movie, even if you are perfectly capable of understanding the spoken english.

It could be worse....it could be dubbed.. At least with subtitles you can still hear the original dialogue.

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Airbus promises Wi-Fi – yay – and 3D movies (meh) in new A330

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Re: What about the AIR quality

Running the air conditioner properly costs money. Airlines hate spending money.

Anyone remember the days when the rear of the plane had smoking section? Remember what the air was like back then? Ice cold, and very fresh.

Banning smoking in flights saved airlines tons of money as they could dial the aircon right down.

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Re: It's all very wonderful

I don't buy the painful aspect of air travel. We cross oceans or continents in days. Sure, we get a bit squeezed and the food is dodgy. But people have never been able to travel so far, so fast, for so little. A little discomfort is worth it. And I'm a hefty 6'3" with shoulders wider than an economy seat, aka the bloke you don't want to sit next to.

You don't. But many do. I absolutely refuse to entertain thought of long haul flight in cattle. Been there done it (enough times). No more.

As you say, for you the little discomfort it worth it. Fair enough. For me it is not.

If it wasn't so easy to travel so far, so fast, for so little would be travel as much as we do. Do we really need to travel quite as much as we do. I would argue that lot of business travel (execs of a multinational company for example want to jet around the offices around the world to spout some crap that nobody believes nor wants to hear) especially when plenty of money has been sent on VC equipment.

Well if you can't fit into your seat, I'm sorry but then you should be required to buy two. Or airlines need to revisit their seat designs to ensure people fit them.

What always gets me is the safety briefing with the directions to kiss your ass goodbye...with the seat pitch that is impossible for most people.

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Popular password protection programs p0wnable

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Re: Anyone using any web based password manager is just an idiot.

As it happens no. USB devices are not forbidden. That could change of course.

Also valid point about tablets/phones. I have considered password managers that are multiplatform in which case I could sync when required (or use UTG on the phone/tablet).

I didn't in any way mean USB stick would be perfect solution, just that for me it works and is preferable to storing somewhere outside my control. I do appreciate not everyone is in the same situation.

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Re: Anyone using any web based password manager is just an idiot.

And what good would that do me when I'm away from my desk?

I have my password manager of choice and its data on a USB key. It goes where I go.

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Microsoft's Lumia 930... a real HANDFUL

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Re: er, specs?

Whilst I do agree that we do like full details, from pure user experience viewpoint (as "first fondle" suggests) the cpu/gpu/ram etc don't matter. If the device behaves well without niggles and feels nippy to use that is what really matters.

As for comparing cpu/ram of completely different platforms that utilise the hardware somewhat differently is kind of pointless.

Battery life of course is important and quite comparable

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Apple: No, China. iPhone is NOT public enemy number 1

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Quite.

I think we've all seen it too many times that consumer electronics companies deny any data being collected (as in sent back to the company) until they get caught and can no longer deny it.

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New Doctor Who episode leaks online as proper trailer debuts

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Re: Yup...

I would've thought they'd done something after the first leak.

Guess not. Or if they did, certainly not enough.

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LG unfurls flexible SEE-THROUGH 18-inch display

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Re: Borgmobile

Or you some chavs using this instead tint film on their chavmobile to taunt the driver behind.

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