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* Posts by Down not across

330 posts • joined 21 Mar 2013

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Pimp my lounge and pierce my ceiling: Home theatre goes OTT

Down not across
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Re: time to seperate switching amplification and processing

I think a lot of TVs can achieve this already, having an optical output that can act as passthrough for whichever HDMI input is active at the time

If only we could get reasonably priced TVs without all the 3D/app/smart/etc gubbins and just bunch of HDMI inputs (not the meagre 2-4).

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Processors and HDMI

I finally upgraded it when it became useful to have a lot of HDMI connections, and then I had to buy an AV receiver, adding a tuner I never use, and front channel amps I never use, because no one seems to make stand-alone processors any more.

Hear hear!

I'm still clutching on to my AVC-A1D that I bought back when it was released and refuse to upgrade although I would love to have bunch of switchable HDMI inputs. Yes it is only 5.1, however it sounds absolutely great (both music and movies).

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Intel unleashed octo-core speed demon for the power-crazed crowd

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Re: Cheesburgers and "The Cloud" !

Given all of that I think it's safe to say that this is a product for people that are both rich and a bit stupid.

Oh, so just because you don't need it or deem it value for money, means that ones who do are stupid? It may sound strange but different people have different needs and and some people will have workloads where this CPU would be very suitable for.

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Software bug caught Galileo sats in landslide, no escape from reality

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Re: Must have been an emotional moment

Ok. Have an upvote for the Star Wreck reference.

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Bright lights, affordable motor: Ford puts LED headlights onto Mondeo

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Re: Daytime running lights in Canada

My cheap-o Toyota Camry automatically shut the headlights off when I killed the engine and opened the door. I've yet to find an American car that can do that.

Jeep Grand Cherokees have had adjustable delay on how long to leave lights on for after switching ingition off at least since 90s. I'm sure there must be others.

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BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes

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Money saving options

"We have added extra money-saving options for low-income customers and for customers who only want a phone line for calls."

That's all fine. What I'd like to see is money saving option customers who only want phone line for ADSL and don't want voice capability.

I didn't think they even did lines for only phone calls (except the poor unfortunate people on DACS.

However BT would rather shove their various voice "Options" down punters throats even if customer really only wants/needs the line for DSL.

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Fast And Furious 6 cammer thrown in slammer for nearly three years

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Re: Sir

I understand that almost everybody here probably download music and movies illegally, but at least, don't try to assert it's right and those people who steal for your downloaded should get little punishment because otherwise your download sources will drain and you're too coward to steal yourself...

When did anyone infer that upoading the movie was right? The point is it is not stealing. It is copyright infringement. I don't recall anyone even suggesting that infringement wouldn't be financially damaging.

As for the examples in your post, I'm afraid they're rather poor.

Posting someone's private photos online is not stealing, but has potential to break number of other laws depending on the exact case.

Stealing the Porsche is still stealing whether you leave a Trabant in its place or not.

Assuming everyone here downloads music and movies illegally is bad generalisation. Since you've been here long enough (judging by having a badge) you would know that actually in general commentards are not advocating privacy at all and more for the content owners to provide content in convenient and reasonably priced manner. I think you will find that a lot of commentards are payhing for their content via services like Netflix or Lovefilm.

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Best shot: Coffee - how do you brew?

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then use semi or fullfat UHT/Longlife Milk not fresh milk (it enhances the taste)

Err. NO.

Matter of taste of course, but UHT is disgusting and vile and makes coffee taste horrible. If fresh milk is not available, then black is the way to go (assuming half decent coffee).

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TV transport tech, part 2: From sofa to server at the touch of a button

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Thank you

Thank you for the very interesting 2 part series. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Nice of VM to be fairly open about how it all works.

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you can look at your broadcast schedule, go back in time and pick the asset you want to catch up and it directly launches the BBCiPlayer app. Clever stuff.”

Erm. No. If you didn't have to suffer the horrible iPlayer, and would just stream the BBC stuff natively that would be clever stuff.

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Déjà vu: Virgin Media jacks up broadband prices

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Re: I'm not surprised they are increasing their prices

I receive so many glossy brochures from them, sometimes ONE A DAY in the post. They must have spent tens of £ on me alone, and I'm just one of millions of their non-customers.

I am a customer (similar situation to another poster where DSL would barely support 2-3Mbit/s) so no choice. I get twice as much junk mail from them as non-customers since I get "To the householder" and addressed to me as well.

I have manged to convince them to stop them to constantly calling trying to flog their mobile. Hasn't affected junk mail but at least that doesn't interrupt like a phone call.

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Top Gun display for your CAR: Heads-up fighter pilot tech

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Re: Why?

Vic - yup, I know, I have one ;-) but it'd be nice to have it displayed in a manner that doesn't require my phone to be in one of those bloody windscreen suckers.

Well you could always toggle HUD mode on Torque and lay it on on anti-slip mat on your dashboard (assuming your dashboard is not unsuitably curved for that).

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Fifteen zero days found in hacker router comp romp

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Re: Joke Alert!

The D-link sometimes can't be accessed even by the owner with admin password and hardwired ethernet port, let alone by the wan access!

I had to needle-reset mine more than once because of this. But it was not the 865L.

I had couple D-Link APs/routers once upon a time (DWL-2100 or something along those lines) and they definitely had a habit of locking up after a while. Likewise they went through PSUs like mad. Come to think of it had some D-Link hubs/switches which also suffered from PSU issues. More than once had to have it replaced under warranty.

Do D-Links have PSUs that last longer than 9-12 months now?

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Looking forward to the end of Tuesday? You've patched this month's 37 Microsoft bugs, right?

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Re: The complexity of Adobe Reader is the main problem with it

By the same logic scripting should be removed from ms Office ..

It probably should.

However macros do have their places in spreadsheets. As they do to some extent in word processors (or we could go back to WordStar and MailMerge).

And of course nothing is ever enough. You start with some simple scripting capabilities. There are always some functionality that need to be added, and then some more. Vicious circle.

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Three floats Jolla in Hong Kong: Says Sailfish is '3rd option'

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Re: Maturity is beginning to appear

Because it had a physical keyboard, yes? Sometimes I still miss my old Treo.

Just make a modern equivalent of Nokia Communicator 9xxx dammit!

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Khronos unveils OpenGL 4.5, broadens OpenCL 2.0 language support

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Re: It's all in how you phrase it

I concur. The cross platform aspect is undoubtedly the most attractive developers enabling them to "have it all" bar consoles.

Making porting from DirectX to OpenGL as easy as possible is a good thing and hopefully will encourage studios in DirectX camp to at least support OpenGL if not completely switch over (like fair few used to do in the 90s and people chose which ever was better supported/faster on their hardware).

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Crypto Daddy Phil Zimmerman says surveillance society is DOOMED

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Re: basic premise faulty?

The man was inventing personal encryption in an era when encryption science was considered WMD. Not figuratively - literally. There were export controls on PGP which led to its development being moved out of the US.

Not quite WMD, but munitions none the less. PGP 5 was exported legally as a printed book (since export controls only applied to electronic format), which was then scanned and proofread as community effort. Having being part of he proofreading effort I can say that the OCR at the time was not great.

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Oracle Database 12c's data redaction security smashed live on stage

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Re: Hmmm not so sure

"Data Redaction does not prevent

privileged users from connecting directly to the database and running ad hoc queries that back into pieces of sensitive data ( ie. it does not stop exhaustive ad hoc queries or other inference attack ). "

You would need to utilise Oracle Database Vault to stop privileged users seeing sensitive data.

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Not a load of Tosh: 5TB 'surveillance drive' from Toshiba hits shelves

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Re: Toshiba drives are shit

I don't think they've made a good drive ever.

Dunno. I have bunch of old 20-40GB 2.5 and 3.5" drives that just refuse to die and they've been abused a lot.

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Verizon to FCC: What ya looking at? Everyone throttles internet traffic

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Re: guaranteed minimum connection

What they should have been selling were connections with guaranteed minimums rather than lines with some mythical "upto" speed.

No ISP is likely to offer guaranteed minimum anytime soon. Linespeed (or the equivalent) is too dependent on conditions. That means that for fixed line (assuming DSL here) each customer would have to have "its own product" depending on what speed their line supports. With wireless it would be even worse since the connection parameters would constantly fluctuate.

The "up to", frustrating as it is to customer, makes sense for an ISP as a single product that can be sold. Having said the ISPs could (not that they ever would) price the "up to" product with "up to" price that matches the line speed and thus if you're at end of a wet string you would pay less.

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Meet Solaris 11.2, where SDN means 'Software-Defined Net profit'

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Re: Larry finally realises....

Shudder at the thought.

Or perhaps McNealy should've bought Juniper instead of StorageTek.

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Free 2004-spec AS/400 pops up in the cloud

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Re: It's still surprisingly popular in Germany

So far every large furniture store I've seen had one, as well as some large electronics stores.

And why not. It just worksTM

Bit like the recent news of OpenVMS living on. VMS clusters still trump most if not all recent clustering solutions.

New is not always better. Sometimes older tested and tried robust solutions are still the best (for the intended purpose anyway)

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We're BFFs AGAIN, say AT&T and Netflix after penning peering pact

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Peering

Given the recent articles about the spat between Netflix and Verizon (who by all accounts appears to have signed peering agreement) it seems uncertain how much this well help AT&T. Verizon seems to have done theirs in April and yet its customers report issues with Netflix. Sure some provisioning can take some time but three months? Also makes the public bickering somewhat odd if an agreement in place. I suppose that is where L3 come in being the carrier between the two.

Shall be interesting to see if AT&T fares any better than Verizon.

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14 antivirus apps found to have security problems

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Re: Point of Issue

Don't blame the C language please. Despite its age it is still an excellent language, it still has relevancy and it is the language of choice for most safety critical systems. The issue here is poor developers and/or their pointy-haired managers.

Quite.

"AV engines were often built in C which led to vulnerabilities like..." suggests the flaws are caused by the chosen language. The language used doesn't directly lead to vulnerabilities. Sure it doesn't hold your hand and it will let you you stupid things. You're expected to be able write decent code. Shouldn't be unreasonable to expent competent coding from company providing security software.

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Adam Afriyie MP: Smart meters are NOT so smart

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I actually thought about building an automated meter reader. We have an electricity meter with a flashing light and it would be easy to just count the flashes. I'm sure someone with EE skills could build a device that cost peanuts and ran on goodwill.

Indeed it has. Many times.

http://www.airsensor.co.uk/component/zoo/item/energy-monitor.html

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We don't need no new meters

If possible, we should look for a less expensive solution that gets the same job done. For example, rather than seeing your energy use on a wall unit, why shouldn’t you be able to view it online or through a mobile app instead? This would save us the estimated £228m cost of installing in-home display units (IHDs). Rather than installing a whole new meter, why can’t we just stick a small camera or reading device onto your existing meter which can regularly record and transcribe the current meter reading? And why can’t we just use an approved smartphone app for ad hoc readings today? This is now perfectly feasible and these readings should be accepted by the energy suppliers.

I'm shocked. Some sense finally. Replacing perfectly good working meters is pure insanity, not to mention the various issues should the meter be remotely controllable.

The simplest solution to instant readings for power companies (and far cheaper than new meter) would be using the existing induction pickups coupled with a small GSM (or other radio) that would periodically send updates.

Reading the meter optically is another (and perhaps more reliable) method and has already been done many times at hobbyist level. That dot on the wheel is rather easy to pick up (and saves trying to OCR the digits).

Also should you change suppliers, new supplier can provide their kit (or new SIM for GSM etc).

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NASA Mars rover FINALLY equals 1973 Soviet benchmark

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Heading for Marathon Valley

So the rover is controlled by Durandal? Better watch out for Pfhor. Maybe it turns out the planet is actually Lh'owon.

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HGST polishes Ultrastar SSD whoppers, stuffs with denser Intel flash

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Re: is it really enterprise grade

For enterprise grade I would be expecting SLC and not MLC.

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Bring back error correction, say Danish 'net boffins

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My bold prediction is that we will see some return to circuit switching to run alongside packet switching in our public networks. That would most likely take the form of an overlay network and traffic would be split out at edge routers. For some types of traffic, for some usage and routing scenarios, packet switching is awfully inefficient and difficult. At some point it becomes easier to just circuit switch that traffic than it does to try and engineer an illusion of circuit switching over a packet switched network.

You mean like MPLS that many (if not most) carriers and ISPs use these days?

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Indie ISP to Netflix: Give it a rest about 'net neutrality' – and get your checkbook out

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Netflix told us that, if we wanted to improve streaming performance, we should pay $10,000 per month for a dedicated link, spanning nearly 1,000 miles, to one of its "peering points" – just to serve it and no other streaming provider.) It then launches misleading PR campaigns against ISPs that dare to object to this behavior.

Well, Netflix is selling the product that needs that fat pipe so really they should foot the bill. On the other hand you could see it as the ISP footing the bill to better server its customers. However if the ISP foots the bill for the link then it should be able to do whatever it wishes with it. I don't see why Netflix would have any say what the ISP does with a link the ISP pays for.

This kind of ties in with the recent threads about the Netflix/Verizon spat on El Reg. There were discussions about where the "fault" lies and I did raise the question about peering arrangements and who actually should pay for what.

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Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in

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Blasphemy

or that there's a #sysadminday tweetup in your neighbourhood.

Real sysadmins don't use twitter. They use wall/talk.

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Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid: The plug-in for plutocrats

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kmpl? WTF?

Converting mpg to km/l makes no sense. In the metric world fuel consumption has always been in l/100km.

At a push I could've undestood making it mpl now that petrol is sold in litres instead of gallons in UK.

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US Social Security 'wasted $300 million on an IT BOONDOGGLE'

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Withholding information

"We find these allegations deeply disturbing, and if true, they suggest that your agency is attempting to mislead or withhold information from the Congress and the American public," the committee trio wrote.

Erm, isn't that what three letter agencies (are supposed to) do ?

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BMW's ConnectedDrive falls over, bosses blame upgrade snafu

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Re: we are doomed

Actually that pedal to the left is merely an interface to an electronic device - i.e. 'brake by wire' - for more and more vehicles on the roads. As are the shifter and shifter paddles, as have been most dashboard controls for years. I tremble for a moment every time I climb into my Bimmer, before I race off to go weaving between lanes, sometimes using my turn-signal-by-wire.....

For accelerator, that could be the case. For power steering, yes has been done. For brakes, I doubt it. Brakes need to be as failsafe as possible so they're usually hydraulic. Even if the servo assist fails they still work even though they would require significantly more force to operate.

The only place I've seen electric brakes is in trailers.

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Chips are down at Broadcom: Thousands of workers laid off

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Re: Double whammy for Oulu

That sucks. Really sucks. There are, I guess, bit over 100k or so in and around Oulu. So that's creeping up to nearly 1% additional unemployed.

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Games industry set for $5 BILLION haircut, warn beancounters

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Re: Xbone even more doomed

I would hate to be a Microsoft stock holder right now.

Have you actually looked at their share price for last month, year, even multiple years?

You'd hate to own some of this?

Any PS4 owner would actually really hate XBone to be doomed. Just like XBone owner would hate PS4 to be doomed. The competition is the only thing giving consumers some chance.

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Motorist 'thought car had caught fire' as Adele track came on stereo

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Re: Devil's advocate....

Having said that, I do tend to dig in the manual for interesting details if I have a few minutes, because especially the radio tends to have all sorts of gadgets that can get in the way, like when you're driving along happily with some nice music and THEN THE TRAFFIC ANNOUNCEMENTS COME ON IN TOP VOLUME prompting a frantic grab for the volume control (and a near heart attack). If you cannot find a way to adjust that announcement volume (and it's often seriously hidden) you're left with the decision to forego them altogether or live with the risk of a heart attack.. It gets complicated if the manual is not in one of the languages I speak, though :)

That just reminded of the Top Gear episode where Clarkson was testing the M5 and could barely get a word in edgeways with the satnav.

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Samsung looks to up Tizen market share ... by upgrading Galaxy Gear

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Re: Kies

"To get the new firmware, Galaxy Gear owners should download the appropriate version of Samsung's Kies software "

Stop right there. Anything involving Kies should not be attempted.

Could agree with you more. Never encountered such a steaming turd, except perhaps Sonicstage or whatever it was called.

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Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months

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Re: cue

cue a load of people saying they are holding out because they are waiting for a successor to the N9...

Perhaps.

I'd still like to see a decent modern version of Nokia Communicator. So it needs a usable QWERTY keyboard. I'd probably prefer the original clamshell/dual display over slide out keyboard. Doesn't matter if it's bit bulkier to house larger battery (or just give it two battery slots) so it'll be nice and steady on a table. Since its bit bulky maybe could fit full size USB port to easily plug a USB to serial converter in for console access.

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MARS NEEDS OCEANS to support life - and so do exoplanets

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Re: Not sure about this

I have a nagging doubt about confident assertions of planets' suitability to support life that seem to be based on the assumption that if a planet doesn't have an environment that behaves in just the same way as Earth's then it can't support life,

Ah, at least its not just me who gets miffed at this (at least as often potrayed by media) seeming ignorance that a different environment could well sustain life that has evolved in that environment.

As The Firm parodied: It's life Jim, but not as we know it.

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Banning handheld phone use by drivers had NO effect on accident rate - study

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Re: re : James 51

As do I occasionally but the police don't seem to be doing much about that either.

Ah, that makes alright then?

It's still against the highway code.

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Cisco's first 8 Tbps MONSTER router goes live at Telstra

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Downtime

The NCS 6008 consumes “60 per cent less power per gigabit of traffic” than the core routers it replaces, the carrier says, and has a smaller footprint. Its faster update and boot, Telstra says, will help reduce downtime.

Surely better way to reduce downtime is to ensure alternative routing is available whilst the router is getting its update/rebooting...

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Students hack Tesla Model S, make all its doors pop open IN MOTION

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Joke

Let me just pullover to turn on the lights...

Zhejiang University students have hacked the Tesla Model S with an attack that enabled them to open its doors and sun roof, switch on the headlights and sound the horn.

Well, I'd be pretty miffed if I couldn't open the doors (ok, perhaps not doors whilst in motion), sunroof and operate lights and horn. Having to pull over to open/close sunroof or turn on/off lights would be rather annoying.

And horn not working whilst moving kind of defeats its purpose (which is not to lean on it in stationary traffic whilst car ahead has nowhere to go anyway).

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Want to beat Verizon's slow Netflix? Get a VPN

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Re: A glimpse of the future...

This is what Verizon wants the future to be, pay them their danegeld, or they slow you down to a crawl.

So do AT&T and Comcast. Easy to see why, they are looking to cash in on the big content providers. Not to mention there are conflicts of interest with their own content services. As usual it is all about money.

Net neutrality is important. The best/easiest would be FCC reclassification, but I'm not convinced they have the cajonas to do it. Wheeler threw the threat of reclassification out there and now is backpedaling so fast the dynamo on the bike generates -48V

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Re: Raise your hand if surprised...

FCC is collecting opinions until Sep 10th I believe.

The FCC's draft rules propose banning ISPs from blocking users' access to websites or applications but allowing some "commercially reasonable" deals between content providers and ISPs to prioritize delivery of some web traffic.

Is throttling same as blocking. In users view it no doubt is. Whether FCC thinks so is another matter. Guess they'll do that as "prioritizing" traffic.

FCC should just reclassify as telecommunications service, which is something AT&T, Comcast and Verizon are vehemently opposing. That would kill their planned cash cow.

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Re: Probably, but not necessarily ...

Not defending Verizon, who should not be dragging their feet over this issue, but this VPN situation could occur 'accidentally' if the guys VPN goes via another route not usually congested with Netflix traffic.

Quite. Which is what I tried to point out in some posts. So far all parties have blamed another party as is quite common in corporate world. Let's face it at least one of the parties is lying, or not telling the whole truth anyway. In order to be objective (yeah this is the Reg, what am I thinking!) I was considering options that might explain the situation.

Obviously not commenting on allegations does not help as it is easily interpreted as "damn, got caught. Can't talk out of this one". Of course considering Verizon's stance on net neutrality and lobbying against it is another nail in this coffin.

If anything this is good example what is likely to happen should the opponents to net neutrality win. First its some high bandwidth entertainment. Anyone think it'll stop there? No, didn't think so either.

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I can't see how it can go through another "uncongested route" as it still has to make it out of my ISP.

Because due to peering and transit agreements there are often more than one route of the ISP.

Your VPN endpoint is unlikely to be your final target (that you were getting to without VPN) and hence could end up routed differently.

So you could easily end up with a route, with more hops, that is ungongested and with better throughput.

Now this is not to say ISPs don't cap things. Many cap stuff like BT etc. Some are upfront about it. some are not.

As you pointed out it can be fairly obious if it is a case of limit/throttling rather than natural congestion.

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What's inside AMD's life-support machine? A big pile o' PlayStation 4s and XBox Ones

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Re: We owe a lot to AMD .. but there's a limit

My first x86 AMD was 486-DX2 (iirc) later replaced with DX4. The K6 series was rather nice although bit lacking in floating point and not as good as the original NexGen design it was based on. I did build a K6-2-450 machine but eventually replaced with Intel as much software wanted Intel's SSE rather than K6-2's SIMD.

Athlon really rocked when it was released. Over 1GHz and Intel had nothing that could touch it. For quite some time. It was kind of like poor man's Alpha with its EV6 bus. Still have a 1.2GHz Thunderbird around.

After that it was downhill for AMD in terms of desktop performance. It had the edge on price. I had couple of boxen with Athlon IIs that were later upgraded to Phenom IIs. Multithread performance was pretty good, but on single/dual thread (like games for example) they were clearly behind Intel's Core. Having said that still good value in terms of "bang for the buck".

Even with the higher cost I find at the moment i5 and i7 are better choice than AMD for most situations especially if discrete graphics are used.

For a low-cost/low-power the APUs are still a decent choice and do offer better integrated graphics performance than intel.

TLDR; IMHO AMD has for now lost the desktop race, but is viable contender in the embedded/highly integrated market.

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Oh girl, you jus' didn't: Level 3 slaps Verizon in Netflix throttle blowup

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Re: RE: Level3 speaks 'up'

About a week ago, I posited that the problem has 3 potential bottle neck spots, the transit provider's outbound ports, the interconnect to Verizon VerLIESon, or with VerLIESon's inbound ports.

Well, it seems that the culprit, at least according to Level3 is VerLIESon.

Who wouldda thunk that???

Indeed you did. And refreshingly you also mentioned the various points where the problem could be.

I'm not in the slightest surprised L3 denying blame and shifting it to Verizon. All players so far have made sure their version is "It's not me, its the other guy". So far Netflix is blaming Verizon, Verizon is blaming L3 (or so it appears) and L3 is blaming Verizon. L3's complaint about the ports sounds perfectly feasible.

Whilst Verizon seem to be running out of rope here, there is something that has not (and most likely won't be) been disclosed and that is what the peering arrangements between L3 and Verizon are?

L3 are blaming Verizon for not adding more ports. Who should pay for those ports? The fact that they may exist doesn't mean they are of no cost. What if it would be up to L3 to pay for the extra ports? I'm not saying this is the case as I have no idea of what their arrangements may be, just that things may not be so clear cut.

Bottom line is any company will avoid being blamed and would try to shift the blame if it could.

Likewise as has been posted by many on this thread there certainly are conlficts of interest with regards to some services and competition.

Oh and why sell yourself short and devalue your post with the childish namecalling.

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Microsoft's Black Thursday: XBox Live goes down as XBox Studio canned

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Been having constant issues logging into XBox live ever since XBox one launched on any of my XBox 360's.

How many times they need an email address for confirmation I really dont know?

That "give us yet another email address" farce started long before XBone launch.

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