* Posts by Down not across

680 posts • joined 21 Mar 2013

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My plan to heal this BROKEN, BREXITED BRITAIN

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Re: Ha ha

Don't forget on Friday morning, Germany picked up the bill for the whole EU.

Err. No. UK is still member of EU, it hasn't even triggered Article 50 yet. And even when it does, it is still member until the divorce is complete.

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25,000 malware-riddled CCTV cameras form network-crashing botnet

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Facepalm

@Dadmin

These are extra conveniences that are OPTIONAL. You don't need the camera on the open Internet 24/7. NO ONE DOES! Putting a shitty little device out there, and one you have no clue to its' operation, is not a thing. Period.

I hate to break your bubble, but do not know what other people's requirements are. As for clue of its operation, the user may well have a clue of its operation and has installed it in good (if somewhat misplaced) faith that the device is fit for purpose and reasonably well designed.

It is not the end user's fault that most manufacturers products are like swiss cheese when it comes to security. The responsibility of the robustness of the firmware is with the manufacturer not the end user.

As for rest of your trolling rant, tempting as it is its not even worth responding to.

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Parliament takes axe to 2nd EU referendum petition

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Re: Democracy in action...?

So my only wish is that the geriatric majority which brought us this vote takes the responsibility proportional to the way they voted. So when the emergency budget axe falls (and looking at the FTSE it will within 2-3 weeks), instead of raising taxes we FIRST: CUT the pensions; SECOND: CUT all treatment for diseases prevalent in the 60-90 population in the NHS; THIRD: CUT from the budget share for care services.

Well, given that pension age has already been raised due to insufficient funds in the pension pot before the current financial situation, it would not seem too far fetched to see triple lock axed for starters.

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UK digi strategy on ice post Brexit results - sources

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Re: In a few years agricultural land could be a goldmine

Some of the Leavers are already admitting immigration won't go down;

Seems possible result. If UK wishes to remain part of the common market, it is likely to come with strings attached.

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Germany: If Brits vote to Remain, we'll admit Hurst's 1966 goal was a goal

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Re: Brits--gift from America if you vote to remain.

I can understand the feelings from 240 years ago. But Newark. Really? That really is cruel and unusual punishment.

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Why you should Vote Remain: Bananas, bathwater and babies

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Re: "Full disclosure: my startup OpenTRV has received funding from EU sources"

Can we hear from someone who doesn't have a vested interest?

Oh I see, so if someone has a vested interest (and they even go as far as declare it), they're not entitled to their opinion? Would you like to prevent them from voting as well?

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Fedora 24 is here. Go ahead – dive in

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Flatpack sandboxing

That tight sandboxing has meant that Flatpak-based apps are not yet able to pass data to other applications. For example, the Flatpak version of LibreOffice can't automatically open links in your browser.

Maybe it is just me, but I see that as a good thing.

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Lester Haines: RIP

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Pint

Thank you Lester, you will be missed

I truly enjoyed your articles and comments. You managed to brighten dull and grim days by your witty and humorous writing. Things won't be the same without you.

My most sincere condolences to your family, friends and colleagues.

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Microsoft buys LinkedIn for the price of 36 Instagrams

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WTF?

Why pay so much?

The software giant is paying $196 per share for LinkedIn, a $61 premium on the enterprise social platform's closing price on last Friday.

As if he $135 per share wasn't massive overvaluation of lot of hot air, but paying 45% over the share price just seems insane.

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No 10's online EU vote signup crash 'inevitable' – GDS overseer

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Re: Legal challenge to extending the deadline

The whole deadline is bit silly. If you're eligible to vote, why couldn't you be able to register until right before the vote with the caveat that if you leave it too late you might not be able to exercise your right to vote as you might not be included in the lists at your polling station.

Surely if both sides are truly behind the concept of letting people decide, then enabling as many as possible eligible voters to vote should be in their interests.

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Lexus cars suffer Purple Screen of Death – code bug turns the air blue

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Gee, we never had these problems on the Wonder Bar radios back in the day...

http://www.kingoftheroad.net/59olds/album/source/59olds221.html

I first read that as Wonder Bra radio... somewhat apt I guess given the link to the '59 Olds.

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Get ready for Google's proprietary Android. It's coming – analyst

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Re: Speaking as a consumer ...

Have you no sympathy for these poor creatures?

No.

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Cavium arms ARM bodies for fresh data centre compute charge

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Re: I want a big ass desktop chip

They should do a 32 core chip for Android desktops PCs.

Android lends itself well to multi-threading. It has an AsyncTask class, which makes multi-threading super-easy, plus all the usual threading stuff.

It's clear as day Android is heading into Desktop territory next.

Could be interesting. Although personally I'd rather use "standard" Linux distribution rather than Android.

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Re: Just the ticket

for the network data centre. That is some serious throughput for anything where the CPU isn't the bottleneck, and this is a lot of applications.

Very much so. And that is where Cavium has lot of experience on. No wonder then that network vendors (Juniper and Netgear come to mind) have quite happily used Cavium chips. For example the lowly dual-core Octeon 5020 running at 400MHz packs a fair punch on Juniper SRX210 (bearing in mind the price point and power envelope of the SRX210).

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Systemd kills Deb processes

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Re: Inevitable?

Systemd has too many fingers in the Linux pie. Whatever happened to "Do one thing and do it well"?

Lennart happened.

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In-flight movies via BYOD? Just what I always wan... argh no we’re all going to die!

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Re: Bandwith worries me

Assuming that it's only SD not HD, that's still about 2Mb/s per stream. And assuming 300 passengers, that's 600Mb/s (I'm good at maths, me).

If they are intending to replace the normal scheduled in-flight entertainment (and not foray into on-demand), then they could always just use multicast.

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Dropbox gets all up in your kernel with Project Infinite. Cue uproar

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Re: Leave my kernel alone thank you very much

If you don't trust them, why are you giving them access to your files in the first place?

I never said if I did or not.

As it happens, I did use them long time ago to copy/share some encrypted files across different platforms.

That is quite different from the trust required to give them kernel access.

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Leave my kernel alone thank you very much

“We’ve been running this kernel extension internally at Dropbox for almost a year and have battle-tested its stability and integrity,” Dropbox wrote, adding: “After careful design and consideration, we concluded that this kernel extension is the smallest and therefore most secure surface through which we can deliver Project Infinite.”

The statement continued: “We understand the concerns around this type of implementation, and our solution takes into consideration the security and stability of our users’ experience, while providing what we believe will be a really useful feature.” ®

Pardon me if your "consideration of security" does not convince me. Of course you would believe it to be useful feature. I don't.

That extension won't get anywhere near my kernel. Why, indeed I don't trust you and you won't get kernel access to my machine.

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Bank in the UK? Plans afoot to make YOU liable for bank fraud

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I can see a sudden rush of people going into their bank branch for transactions again, just like it used to be.

What branch? Oh you mean the one they closed down?

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US nuke arsenal runs on 1970s IBM 'puter waving 8-inch floppies

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Re: 8 inch disk storage

It would more make more sense to call 5.25" floppy a "shugart disk" (as opposed to 8") given that Alan Shugart's company introduced the 5.25" (SA-400) in mid 70s. Alan did work at IBM and Memorex before setting up his own company so he had roots in 8" disks in that sense.

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Re: Some Department of Commerce weather alert systems use Fortran

The aforementioned HP3000 had some nice DB extensions and function libraries....sniff...

Yes it had Image/3000 (later renamed to TurboIMAGE) which was rather good at the time. Yes the intrinsics were quite pleasant to use.

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Re: Some Department of Commerce weather alert systems use Fortran

Yep those HP3000s were really something.

They were indeed. I had much fun with MPE V's SPL (which was very well documented as most things were those days... HP had its equivalent of DEC's "gray wall" (the meter of few of ring binders full of useful documentation)). The built in image database was nice combination to COBOL.

The community around MPE was brilliant. Especially with MPE/ix as porting stuff was much easier (I had classic (with 7970 tape drive and some 7914 disks) so no POSIX for me.

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Hate Windows 10? Microsoft's given you 'Insider' powers anyway

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@ Boris the Cockroach Re: Hope the guy

You haven't worked out the three seashells yet then?

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India launches hypersonic space shuttle precursor

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Re: Model shuttle?

So basically this was somewhere between a real space shuttle and Top-Gear's Reliant Robin?

Such a shame that the Robin did not separate.

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Your next server will be a box full of connected stuff, not a server

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@Phil W Re: Modular

Quite. So really its just Compostable Gartner.

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Chaps make working 6502 CPU by hand. Because why not?

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Re: I'll really be impressed when..

They do a 6809 that runs at full speed. That was a proper 8 bit micro.

And it ran OS-9. Had much fun with that.

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Storage array firmware bug caused Salesforce data loss

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Re: Bugs, eh?

If Salesforce are using Oracle under the hood, I'd expect them to switch from block replication to RMAN replication. Each database transaction is either replicated, or it isn't.

That does not make sense. Recovery Manager (RMAN) is used for backups. Perhaps you meant DataGuard where you have the option of physical or logical standby. In any case the article didn't clarify whether the blocks were disk blocks or oracle (or other database) data blocks. If they were disk blocks, then that does open up a window for possible corruption. At least with transactionsl (from database perspective) you should in theory only lose uncommitted transactions.

You could also use third party (well, was until Oracle bought them) product like GoldenGate for transactional replication if you feel so inclined

Disclaimer: Freudian or not, I initially typed GoldenFate ..make of that what you will

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Microsoft and Hewlett Packard Enterprise salute EU flag, blast Brexiteers

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@soulrideruk

If we do stupidly vote to leave, will an EU country offer us pro-euros (particularly us who have spent a good few years living in other European countries) an offer of Asylum?

I suppose the easiest option would be Emerald Isle given its vicinity and language (and being RHD in case you want to keep your current car).

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CSC grabs pistol, plays employment paintball with P45s

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The American Dream

Seems to be what every US headquartered company does. Even if they're profitable, their growth might be below the street's expectations and the solution if of course to cut costs. What better way to cut costs than sack some people to save on the wage bill.

Are there any companies left that don't do at least two rounds of redundancies a year?

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Verizon gets activated IO to its cloud

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Re: then

Does look a bit like they don't really know what it is they want to do. Try bit of everything and see if it makes any money, and drop it if it doesn't.

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Cloud security 101: Get a little more intimate with your provider

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Mushroom

"DevSecOps"

“Some are calling this new paradigm DevSecOps, which I would describe as using agile, cloud-based technologies to address security issues.”

Stop the planet. I want to get off.

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Sysadmin paid a month's salary for one day of nothing

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Re: Sticky platters

When we powered the systems back up, the domain server (which had never been powered down before in several years) wouldn't boot because its HDDs wouldn't spin up.

Fortunately, some gentle percussive maintenance eventually unstuck them and we could continue working; an upgrade was quickly scheduled in.

I had that quite a lot with some Convergent MiniFrames with Micropolis disks. Ended up having a rubber mallet in the toolkit. Obviously frustrated kick could work too, but had the risk of being too hard, or causing other damage.

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EU commish: We smacked down O2/Three but we didn't take it 'lightly'

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number of operators

Elsewhere in the EU (and less relevantly, globally) there's been a significant reduction in competitiveness when the number of mobile network operators drops below four.

Which is rather simplistic view. One large operator with 3 considerably smaller operators doesn't necessarily mean better competition than 2 large operators.

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First successful Hyperloop test module hits 100mph in four seconds

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Re: Los Angeles to San Francisco route comes in at $6bn

What happens when it fails, and passengers are trapped in a vacuum with the next car hurtling towards them at Mach 1? How long does it take to plasma cut them out? How much energy to evacuate the tube after maintenance?

No worries. In hyperloop no one can hear you scream.

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Verizon worker strike now in its third week

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Re: @Mephistro

I stand corrected. Whilst there are few points mentioned, there is an awful lot that isn't mentioned. Perhaps futher details of the contract / proposals are not for public consumption especially since whole contract is still in dispute.

Of the 7 points on that link only two stand out (freezing pension accruals and reduction of disability benefits) as unfair.

"Elimintating job security" ? Seriously? So someone actually has contractual job security? I thought that only happened in civil service. For most people job security is the length of notice period.

The stuff about call centres and contracting work seem like normal business which any company would be free to arrange how they see fit.

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@Mephistro

We don't know if the offer is utter crap or not. Neither side has given (that I would have seen) out anything other than very vague comments about the core of the dispute.

This looks to be more about unions and the power they may or may not wield and coporations getting increasingly unhappy about the unions than about the contract.

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Re: Good on 'em!

t's the people vs. the giant corporations, and it's a scary battle. Let's hope the human beings win out over the mega-corporations. We can't beat them at the ballot box anymore, so maybe we can hurt them with strikes, at least.

It is uneven battle. The human being never wins. I suspect the strike probably hurts all the other employees (either not unionized or in other roles) more than it hurts the company.

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ZX Printer's American cousin still in use, 34 years after purchase

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Re: Good tip

That reminds me I need to stock up on thermal fax paper for my HP150 touch screen's integrated thermal printer before thermal paper becomes too difficult to source.

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Cavium snubs MIPS, picks 64-bit ARM for next-gen network SoCs

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Is Netgear going to use this new Cavium on their next flagship VPN routers? The SRX5308 is using a Cavium MIPS.

That's likely to be wait and see. Seems a distinct possibility since they're using the single core CN5010 in the SRX5038. Based on my experience with Juniper's SRX210H the Cavium (SRX2010H uses the dual core Octeon 5020, but clocked at 400MHz vs 700MHz on Netgear) it gives pretty good bang for the buck.

I believe the Netgear is Linux based whereas JunOS of course is based on FreeBSD so in either case I suspect support for ARM should not be any major issue.

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There's more to life than Windows

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Can we not dumb everything down, and talk of things as they are?

There's another problem: AD does more than just authenticate users. It defines what groups they're in (which, really, is just another aspect of authentication), but more importantly, it does all that good stuff like applying policies to the users and the devices that are connected to it.

You'll generally have policies applied to your Windows machines (even if it's only basic stuff like defining default printers, or disabling the "Shut Down" menu option on servers to stop numpties like me inadvertently hitting it when I really mean to log out).

No, that's not "really just another aspect of authentication". It's more like the second A, authorization.

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UK's 'superfast' broadband is still complete dog toffee, even in London

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Re: Why get Fibre?

On my VM fibre things get increasingly asymmetrical - I get 60Mb DL but *only* 6Mb up - 6Mb is obviously not too shabby, but only 10% of my DL rate.

<pedant>

It's not fibre, despite what VM (at least used to) advertise. It's old fashioned coaxial cable running DOCSIS.

</pedant>

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Move over Amazon Alexa – Samsung's hot assistant bot Otto's trying to build an empire

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Re: Is this article...

Exactly. I admit there are times when I really don't feel like getting up to flick a switch, but most of the time a lengthy monologue feels much more tiresome than that one click...

My solution to that was to replace the dimmer with Varilight remote controllable dimmer. As a plus it also works on LED bulbs as well as usual incandescent and halogen.

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Verizon is big on IoT 'cos its wireline biz is dying on the vine

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Surely doesn't have anything to do with that strike, either...

I fail to see how that is relevant for them releasing their Q1 results.

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Pro who killed Apple's Power Mac found... masquerading as a coffee table

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Re: I have

In fact there are 10 of those magnets on my refrig door as I write this. I still have one un-gutted drive. I just don't have the heart to gut a CDC WREN III SCSI 700MB drive that cost me $3300 back in late 90's.. At least not yet

Ah I had some lovely full height Imprimis (as well as earlier CDC and later Seagate) WREN ESDI disks. Back then (early 90s) using voice coils as arm actuators were a new thing and I recall fondly the sound those made when seeking. They performed exceptionally well.

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Can you hear me now – over the picket line? Verizon workers strike

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This could take a while

"Since last June, we've worked diligently to try and reach agreements that would be good for our employees, good for our customers and make the wireline business more successful now and in the future," chief administrative officer Marc Reed said of the strike.

If they've been negotiation for 10 months, it's pretty safe bet both sides are well prepared for the possibility of a strike. Neither side seems to be willing to compromise to sufficient degree, so could be a lengthy strike.

Sadly it is always employees (whether ones on strike, or ones still keeping the lights on) who ultimately suffer.

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Hey, tech industry, have you noticed Amazon in the rearview?

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Re: Ebooks more expensive that books

Well, they're not second hand are they. A more fairer comparison would probably be a new paperback. Also if I recall correctly ebooks suffer from full VAT.

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Re: Amazon?

No the search on Amazon is the worst ever. Go for lowest price means having to scroll though 20 pages of £1 upwards unrelated crap before getting to what you need. Better to go high to low and then you only have 5 pages to scroll through.

Selecting other search categories like size, price or brand can totally throw search results too.

It's the one area Amazon have totally neglected.

Quite. The search is so staggeringly awful, that I can't help but think it is that way on purpose. Perhaps the idea is to drum up more impulse buys that way.

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UK competition watchdog gripes to Brussels about Three-O2 merger

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Pointless

"The only appropriate remedy that would meet the criteria that the Commission is bound to apply... is the divestment – to an appropriate buyer approved by the Commission – of either the Three or O2 mobile network businesses, in entirety, or possibly allowing for limited ‘carve-outs’ from the divested business."

Doesn't that make it pretty pointless... buy something only to be forced to sell it. I guess you could, in theory, sell the other "business" without customers but could be difficult to find a buyer.

The "approved by the Commission" bit says it all really.

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Read America's insane draft crypto-borking law that no one's willing to admit they wrote

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Re: Um, doesn't this blow a hole

Well, quite. Anyone remember how difficult it was to get an uncrippled version of PGP outside the USA, when it's export was banned?

Having been part of the OCR proofreading effort (OCR was pretty poor in those days) of the printed source code I can answer with resounding yes I remember all too well.

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Microsoft drives an Edge between Adobe and the web: Flash ads blocked

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Re: Memory and Procesor Use

If they actually cared about system resource use, they would not have bundled the invasive unwanted service which is Cortana.

But then they'd lose all that juicy data.

For what its worth Cortana does appear to require you to sign in with MS account. So it seems like easiest way to stop Cortana from running is to not bother with MS account.

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