* Posts by Down not across

657 posts • joined 21 Mar 2013

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India launches hypersonic space shuttle precursor

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Re: Model shuttle?

So basically this was somewhere between a real space shuttle and Top-Gear's Reliant Robin?

Such a shame that the Robin did not separate.

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Your next server will be a box full of connected stuff, not a server

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@Phil W Re: Modular

Quite. So really its just Compostable Gartner.

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Chaps make working 6502 CPU by hand. Because why not?

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Re: I'll really be impressed when..

They do a 6809 that runs at full speed. That was a proper 8 bit micro.

And it ran OS-9. Had much fun with that.

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Storage array firmware bug caused Salesforce data loss

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Re: Bugs, eh?

If Salesforce are using Oracle under the hood, I'd expect them to switch from block replication to RMAN replication. Each database transaction is either replicated, or it isn't.

That does not make sense. Recovery Manager (RMAN) is used for backups. Perhaps you meant DataGuard where you have the option of physical or logical standby. In any case the article didn't clarify whether the blocks were disk blocks or oracle (or other database) data blocks. If they were disk blocks, then that does open up a window for possible corruption. At least with transactionsl (from database perspective) you should in theory only lose uncommitted transactions.

You could also use third party (well, was until Oracle bought them) product like GoldenGate for transactional replication if you feel so inclined

Disclaimer: Freudian or not, I initially typed GoldenFate ..make of that what you will

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Microsoft and Hewlett Packard Enterprise salute EU flag, blast Brexiteers

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@soulrideruk

If we do stupidly vote to leave, will an EU country offer us pro-euros (particularly us who have spent a good few years living in other European countries) an offer of Asylum?

I suppose the easiest option would be Emerald Isle given its vicinity and language (and being RHD in case you want to keep your current car).

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CSC grabs pistol, plays employment paintball with P45s

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The American Dream

Seems to be what every US headquartered company does. Even if they're profitable, their growth might be below the street's expectations and the solution if of course to cut costs. What better way to cut costs than sack some people to save on the wage bill.

Are there any companies left that don't do at least two rounds of redundancies a year?

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Verizon gets activated IO to its cloud

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Re: then

Does look a bit like they don't really know what it is they want to do. Try bit of everything and see if it makes any money, and drop it if it doesn't.

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Cloud security 101: Get a little more intimate with your provider

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Mushroom

"DevSecOps"

“Some are calling this new paradigm DevSecOps, which I would describe as using agile, cloud-based technologies to address security issues.”

Stop the planet. I want to get off.

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Sysadmin paid a month's salary for one day of nothing

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Re: Sticky platters

When we powered the systems back up, the domain server (which had never been powered down before in several years) wouldn't boot because its HDDs wouldn't spin up.

Fortunately, some gentle percussive maintenance eventually unstuck them and we could continue working; an upgrade was quickly scheduled in.

I had that quite a lot with some Convergent MiniFrames with Micropolis disks. Ended up having a rubber mallet in the toolkit. Obviously frustrated kick could work too, but had the risk of being too hard, or causing other damage.

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EU commish: We smacked down O2/Three but we didn't take it 'lightly'

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number of operators

Elsewhere in the EU (and less relevantly, globally) there's been a significant reduction in competitiveness when the number of mobile network operators drops below four.

Which is rather simplistic view. One large operator with 3 considerably smaller operators doesn't necessarily mean better competition than 2 large operators.

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First successful Hyperloop test module hits 100mph in four seconds

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Re: Los Angeles to San Francisco route comes in at $6bn

What happens when it fails, and passengers are trapped in a vacuum with the next car hurtling towards them at Mach 1? How long does it take to plasma cut them out? How much energy to evacuate the tube after maintenance?

No worries. In hyperloop no one can hear you scream.

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Verizon worker strike now in its third week

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Re: @Mephistro

I stand corrected. Whilst there are few points mentioned, there is an awful lot that isn't mentioned. Perhaps futher details of the contract / proposals are not for public consumption especially since whole contract is still in dispute.

Of the 7 points on that link only two stand out (freezing pension accruals and reduction of disability benefits) as unfair.

"Elimintating job security" ? Seriously? So someone actually has contractual job security? I thought that only happened in civil service. For most people job security is the length of notice period.

The stuff about call centres and contracting work seem like normal business which any company would be free to arrange how they see fit.

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@Mephistro

We don't know if the offer is utter crap or not. Neither side has given (that I would have seen) out anything other than very vague comments about the core of the dispute.

This looks to be more about unions and the power they may or may not wield and coporations getting increasingly unhappy about the unions than about the contract.

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Re: Good on 'em!

t's the people vs. the giant corporations, and it's a scary battle. Let's hope the human beings win out over the mega-corporations. We can't beat them at the ballot box anymore, so maybe we can hurt them with strikes, at least.

It is uneven battle. The human being never wins. I suspect the strike probably hurts all the other employees (either not unionized or in other roles) more than it hurts the company.

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ZX Printer's American cousin still in use, 34 years after purchase

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Re: Good tip

That reminds me I need to stock up on thermal fax paper for my HP150 touch screen's integrated thermal printer before thermal paper becomes too difficult to source.

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Cavium snubs MIPS, picks 64-bit ARM for next-gen network SoCs

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Is Netgear going to use this new Cavium on their next flagship VPN routers? The SRX5308 is using a Cavium MIPS.

That's likely to be wait and see. Seems a distinct possibility since they're using the single core CN5010 in the SRX5038. Based on my experience with Juniper's SRX210H the Cavium (SRX2010H uses the dual core Octeon 5020, but clocked at 400MHz vs 700MHz on Netgear) it gives pretty good bang for the buck.

I believe the Netgear is Linux based whereas JunOS of course is based on FreeBSD so in either case I suspect support for ARM should not be any major issue.

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There's more to life than Windows

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Can we not dumb everything down, and talk of things as they are?

There's another problem: AD does more than just authenticate users. It defines what groups they're in (which, really, is just another aspect of authentication), but more importantly, it does all that good stuff like applying policies to the users and the devices that are connected to it.

You'll generally have policies applied to your Windows machines (even if it's only basic stuff like defining default printers, or disabling the "Shut Down" menu option on servers to stop numpties like me inadvertently hitting it when I really mean to log out).

No, that's not "really just another aspect of authentication". It's more like the second A, authorization.

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UK's 'superfast' broadband is still complete dog toffee, even in London

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Re: Why get Fibre?

On my VM fibre things get increasingly asymmetrical - I get 60Mb DL but *only* 6Mb up - 6Mb is obviously not too shabby, but only 10% of my DL rate.

<pedant>

It's not fibre, despite what VM (at least used to) advertise. It's old fashioned coaxial cable running DOCSIS.

</pedant>

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Move over Amazon Alexa – Samsung's hot assistant bot Otto's trying to build an empire

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Re: Is this article...

Exactly. I admit there are times when I really don't feel like getting up to flick a switch, but most of the time a lengthy monologue feels much more tiresome than that one click...

My solution to that was to replace the dimmer with Varilight remote controllable dimmer. As a plus it also works on LED bulbs as well as usual incandescent and halogen.

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Verizon is big on IoT 'cos its wireline biz is dying on the vine

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Surely doesn't have anything to do with that strike, either...

I fail to see how that is relevant for them releasing their Q1 results.

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Pro who killed Apple's Power Mac found... masquerading as a coffee table

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Re: I have

In fact there are 10 of those magnets on my refrig door as I write this. I still have one un-gutted drive. I just don't have the heart to gut a CDC WREN III SCSI 700MB drive that cost me $3300 back in late 90's.. At least not yet

Ah I had some lovely full height Imprimis (as well as earlier CDC and later Seagate) WREN ESDI disks. Back then (early 90s) using voice coils as arm actuators were a new thing and I recall fondly the sound those made when seeking. They performed exceptionally well.

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Can you hear me now – over the picket line? Verizon workers strike

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This could take a while

"Since last June, we've worked diligently to try and reach agreements that would be good for our employees, good for our customers and make the wireline business more successful now and in the future," chief administrative officer Marc Reed said of the strike.

If they've been negotiation for 10 months, it's pretty safe bet both sides are well prepared for the possibility of a strike. Neither side seems to be willing to compromise to sufficient degree, so could be a lengthy strike.

Sadly it is always employees (whether ones on strike, or ones still keeping the lights on) who ultimately suffer.

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Hey, tech industry, have you noticed Amazon in the rearview?

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Re: Ebooks more expensive that books

Well, they're not second hand are they. A more fairer comparison would probably be a new paperback. Also if I recall correctly ebooks suffer from full VAT.

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Re: Amazon?

No the search on Amazon is the worst ever. Go for lowest price means having to scroll though 20 pages of £1 upwards unrelated crap before getting to what you need. Better to go high to low and then you only have 5 pages to scroll through.

Selecting other search categories like size, price or brand can totally throw search results too.

It's the one area Amazon have totally neglected.

Quite. The search is so staggeringly awful, that I can't help but think it is that way on purpose. Perhaps the idea is to drum up more impulse buys that way.

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UK competition watchdog gripes to Brussels about Three-O2 merger

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Pointless

"The only appropriate remedy that would meet the criteria that the Commission is bound to apply... is the divestment – to an appropriate buyer approved by the Commission – of either the Three or O2 mobile network businesses, in entirety, or possibly allowing for limited ‘carve-outs’ from the divested business."

Doesn't that make it pretty pointless... buy something only to be forced to sell it. I guess you could, in theory, sell the other "business" without customers but could be difficult to find a buyer.

The "approved by the Commission" bit says it all really.

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Read America's insane draft crypto-borking law that no one's willing to admit they wrote

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Re: Um, doesn't this blow a hole

Well, quite. Anyone remember how difficult it was to get an uncrippled version of PGP outside the USA, when it's export was banned?

Having been part of the OCR proofreading effort (OCR was pretty poor in those days) of the printed source code I can answer with resounding yes I remember all too well.

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Microsoft drives an Edge between Adobe and the web: Flash ads blocked

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Re: Memory and Procesor Use

If they actually cared about system resource use, they would not have bundled the invasive unwanted service which is Cortana.

But then they'd lose all that juicy data.

For what its worth Cortana does appear to require you to sign in with MS account. So it seems like easiest way to stop Cortana from running is to not bother with MS account.

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Managing infrastructure, a newbie's guide: Simple stuff you need to know

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5 of 7 ain't bad I guess

1. Draw a hardware obsolence timeline

Agreed. Know your hardware and support status (and cost of the support/maintenance contracts as the hardware ages.

2. Standardise your networking

Bringin it down to one might not be the best choice. Never have your eggs in one basket. Also with more than one vendor you have a safety net if anything happens to the vendor (or its products), you are in stronger negotiation position with the vendors if they know they have competition and tendering does not in any way guarantee a sale. Also often there is difference in vendors' offerings and one vendor's products might be better choice for a particular situation.

I do, however, agree that you should try to limit number of vendors.

3. Look to the cloud

Can't agree with that. Yes, it can be the correct solution to some applications/situations but in most cases it just isn't. Simple lithmus test is: "Can you survive without it?" No? Well why would you then trust a third party that may or may not be there tomorrow. And this is without going to the obvious security implications. Also, don't understimate the cost of reliable and fast enough connectivity to the cloud provider.

4. Integrate your applications

This sounds like a biggie, but actually what I'm getting at is that you should integrate the authentication for as many of your applications as you possibly can.

You assume that they lend themselves to easy modification of authentication. Legacy applications tend to be cans of worms and changing things (if even possible in the first place) can be extremely costly. In many cases you will not get any ROI (real or imagined).

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White House flushes away court-ordered decryption like it was a stinky dead goldfish

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Re: Whose court?

Passing a law that says "companies must help the government recover data from phones upon lawful demand" is going to be a lot easier for politicians than passing a law that says "companies must design their products so they possess the technical means to recover data upon lawful government demand". Such a law would be without precedent, and would have a chilling effect on companies choosing to domicile in the US, causing irreparable damage to future high tech R&D in this country.

I wouldn't be so sure. Not such a big jump from CALEA (especially if we're talking mobile phones) ..in the eyes of politicians drafting more daft laws.

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Inflatable space podule set for orbital trial

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Re: Huh?

This is nothing new, though as the IT industry has been doing that for years in describing drive capacities in terms of unformatted vs usable space.

Annoying as it might be, it is because drive manufacturers report size in decimal SI units (the prefix being 1000 and not binary 1024 that you might expect).

Disclaimer: I don't agree with drive vendors choice either, but it does have some arithmetic merit.

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Brits rattle tin for 'revolutionary' hydrogen-powered car

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Joke

Re: Gullwings

On the other hand, as Tesla and deLorean both discovered, gullwings are _heavy_ - which is not something you want on an ecowarrior-mobile.

That's why you want an old Bricklin SV-1 with powered doors.

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Nest bricks Revolv home automation hubs, because evolution

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What would have been better would have been if they'd published an API for the devices, allowing people to choose to run their own servers, or pay for the convenience of having Google do it for them.

That would be too useful (if you're in the market for one of these gadgets).

Having said that, that would be the nice/honorable thing to do if the backend is being discontinued. I'm surprised someone hasn't reverse engineered the protocol. If the server is hardcoded in the controllers, then you'd of course also need to run your own DNS to override to point to your own server.

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Flying Finns arm octocopter with chainsaw

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It annoys me always when I see professionals start a chainsaw with the first pull, but they keep them in shape. Also they don't seem to pull but sort of drop the the chainsaw down.

Yanking the cord is hard work. Much better to keep hold of the handle of the cord and let weight of the chainsaw do the work.

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Bash on Windows. Repeat, Microsoft demos Bash on Windows

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Re: Following in its father's footsteps

As one of a small number of people using Unix in the late 70's when VMS came out one wondered 'Why on earth didn't DEC make VMS like Unix' (rather than the clunky RSX11 extension it was). In the following years there were a number of 'Unix like wrappers' over VMS, which did not prosper.

But they didn't really make it like Unix. Let's face it fair number of people were happy with TWENEX (sorry...I mean TOPS-20) and actually turned to UNIX when DEC killed TOPS-20 off in favour of VMS.

I'm not fussed, I like both and VMS turned out pretty well. I still prefer VMS clusters over most other attempts at clustering.

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Re: How is this different?

I never understood Cygwin.

Just use Linux. It won't spy on you and runs smoothly on much less powerful hardware.

One reason could be to make a corporate desktop/laptop more usable.

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Re: other way round isn't it

Write a couple of systemd units that have dependencies on other components.

then follow any systemd guide on how to analyse and improve the boot sequence.

After a week tell me you want to go back to upstart.

I've done the equivalent with Solaris SMF where I needed more than init scripts (which was still supported in that Solaris version if that is what you wanted to use).

I've looked at systemd guide. I've looked at what systemd does. I've reinstalled Centos 6 without any trace of systemd.

For most dependencies that I have, init scripts are perfectly sufficient. The system only gets rebooted on kernel upgrades (or due to powerfailure (yes I should replace the batteries on the UPS)) so time it takes to boot is largely irrelevant. Having said that, it boots off SSD very quickly.

For me /etc/init.d approach works perfectly well and has all the flexibility I need.

I have no need for systemd's claimed benefits.

If it works for you, great. Glad you're happy. I have no problem it being an option for people who perceive benefit from it.

It doesn't offer benefits to me, so I don't want it shoved down my throat.

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Re: "by far the fastest adopted version of Windows ever"

Linux owns every space except desktops. From the tiniest embedded devices, cell phones, servers to supercomputer clusters on earth, and is the #1 OS in space and on mars.

Not really. I have far more other OS on my servers (FreeBSD,OpenBSD,SunOS 1.x and 5.x (Solaris for you youngsters), Ultrix, OSF/1,HP-UX, VMS and quite a few other more esoteric (these days at least) environments but you get the picture). The closest thing to non-proprietary network kit (in my house) would be running JunOS (based on rather old FreeBSD underneath) not taking into account some pfsense boxes.

I am, of course, only speaking for myself but just my by own kit refuting your claim of every space. Why, yes perhaps I am splitting hairs, but the point is there are a lot of kit out there that is in no way Linux based regardless of increasing adoption of Linux.

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Google tried to be funny, cocked it up, everyone thought it was a bug

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Re: Just tangentially related...

Oh I don't know. One of the emoticons looks suspiciously like a smiling poo.

It does bear some resemblance to Mr Hankey.

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Intel's Broadwell Xeon E5-2600 v4 chips: So what's in it for you, smartie-pants coders

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Re: 3.5

Clock speed is far more important for anything I do than the number of cores or any of the other fiddles.

Sun found that out the hard way with Niagara (and later T3). Looked nice on paper, but in the real world (except for some quite specific workloads) it turned out not such a great idea . T4 was the first one that actually worked fairly well.

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Seagate intros Innov8: A USB-powered 8TB external hard drive

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Re: Is it really 8TB?

I suspect it is 8TB unformatted as drive manufacturers report sizes, ie 1TB = 1,000,000,000,000 bytes as opposed to 1099511627776 bytes that you might be expecting.

In addition to to the TB/TiB difference you will also have the usual loss of capacity due to formatting.

(yes, it annoys me too even though 1TB being 10004 is mathematically (decimal) correct, being an old fogey the binary 10244 is what would seem more logical)

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Oh, sugar! Sysadmin accidently deletes production database while fixing a fault

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@1980s_coder

Are we supposed to laugh at this? Seems like an extreme case of simply not being up to the job or a company hiring idiots instead of professionals to save a few pennies.

Pathetic.

You never made a mistake in your life?

These things happen. They shouldn't., but they do. It's fairly safe bet he/she isn't likely to repeat that mistake any time soon.

Much more of an issue is how the company dealt with the incident and communicated it.

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That's why I like "reload in X", or "conf t revert timer X" (if on IOS 12.4 or later on a supported device (or better yet use the IOS' archive feature to archive configuration versions))

JunOS of course has "commit confirmed X"

Yes, of course I've locked myself out editing an ACL remotely. Once. Hence the above.

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Re: it's so easy

It's taking a bit longer to restore because they've just discovered the backups have been broken for the last year.

Which is why, if the data is important at all, you do fairly frequent test restores.

Depending on your flavour of database it may even support some sort of validate without acually having to restore, in which case you do frequent validations (and still the occasional actual real restore to ensure it really can be restored).

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True believers mind-meld FreeBSD with Ubuntu to burn systemd

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Re: Haters gonna hate

When the best solution the web can offer to NFS startup dependency hell is to add "sleep 30" before looking for rpcbind, you know your system startup is in a bad way. And I thought Solaris SMF was bad...

Oh and wasn't systemd supposed to be the silver bullet that fixes those odd startup issues. Oh well..

Yeah Solaris SMF could be, how shall I put it, 'interesting' to work with.

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Re: Haters gonna hate

...

Now that systemd is in more and more distros configuring Linux will be the same on all of them - rather than having to use (and figure out) each distros utilities.

On a unix like system configurations are text files in /etc. Ok, if different flavour uses different version of a particular daemon, the configuration file might be slightly different. Usually easily resolved with quick check on its man page

I like journald and the power it holds with everything logging to it. I love the boot times but that's less

I like syslogd and the way it just is there and logs to a text file.

important when I only reboot to update the kernel. I like that when I insert a USB thumb drive it can automatically FSCK it if needed. These are all little things but when you put them all together they make a huge difference to usability.

Glad it works for you. I prefer to know if there is an issue with a media and choose myself if I want to run fsck on it or not. I really don't want something like Windows' "This SD card is blank, would you like to format it" ...to automatically format without giving me the choice to realise I plugged in a wrong card that had different filesystem (ie not FAT or NTFS) on it.

Its strange that the people who complain most loudly about systemd have no qualms with either util-linux or busybox. As for all the hate directed for Poettering - he's actually trying to improve Linux, whether you agree with him or not. If you really disagree with him do what the UbuntuBSD or Devuan folk have done - create a better alternative.

What does busybox have to do with this? It's mostly for embedded systems.

I'm sure Poettering in his own mind thinks he is improving Linux. In my humble opinion he is killing it and completely misunderstanding the unix philosophy.

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Oracle fights Russian software policy with Postgres smear

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Upgrade

Into this hostile and/or complex environment strides Oracle with a document (PDF) that Russian outlet Ведомости (Vedemosti) says was sent to a number of large government and private concerns, some of which are considering or engaged in Oracle-to-PostgresSQL upgrades.

I like how the article say it is an upgrade.

Given how buggy 12.1 is, I am not convinced reliability is one of the better points.

TCO? Really? Even if you pick some paid for enhnacements to PostgreSQL, I think the cost will be several magnitudes lower than Larry's offering.

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Domino's trials trundling four-wheeled pizza delivery bot

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Smells Like Napalm, Tastes Like Chicken

The AU$30,000, 190kg machine, was dreamt up in Dominos research labs and designed by Sydney military robotics firm Marathon Robotics which has supplied live-fire training bots to the Australian Army.

So is it Leela or Durandal?

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One in five PCs will be a tablet with detachable keyboard by 2020

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Re: And also in the interests of fairness

I brought my Lynx 10 with a detachable keyboard and never remove it. Spec wise it's almost identical to the Asus Transformer T100 and half the price - it's the cheapest full x86 notebook I've ever owned.

Which is great if you're happy with the provided OS. Not so great if you're not as that (unless I'm mistaken) is BayTrail which tends to be 64-bit CPU hobbled with 32-bit UEFI which makes substituting a different OS bit awkward. Not necessarily impossible.

The later Cherry Trail is more appealing as I believe they tend to be fully 64-bit. Of course even then there is still the question how well the hardware is supported in replacement OS of choice.

Either way, with often 10hr+ runtime, they're not that bad successor for the old netbooks.

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Mighty Soyuz stands proud at Baikonur

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Re: Horizontal assembly

It has the advantage of making rattling noises when put upright so you know there's a spanner or engineer left in there.

Wouldn't the engineer sound more like "ow!...thump!..ow!..thump!" ?

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Brits seek rousing name for polar research vessel

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Re: OK, I probably have diferent ideas of Arctic state of the art

Clever bit of design :- put the reactors up front and if the ice get's a tad thick tell the engineer to set the reactors to 110% and just wait a while till the hull glows reddish..

I think ABB Azipods are still probably more useful approach.

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