* Posts by JLV

921 posts • joined 4 Mar 2013

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Official: Windows 10 has hit the 400 million device mark

JLV
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Re: Fool me twice

I haven't tuned out the ads/snoopware yet - mostly because it is a work-only machine and I refuse to put anything remotely private on Windows these days so I don't care overmuch if it snoops.

But your experience makes me wonder... can anyone recommend a configuration tool/script that reliably sets Windows privacy settings and can reapply them as needed when MS re-applies it preferred nosy configuration? Not necessarily something completely robust and able to manage a company's PC fleet. But something able to reapply your personal PC's configuration as needed, even if it needs a bit of user savvy to do so.

Seems like something a Chef or some modern declarative-based configuration engine might be able to do. Or something that could be done using Powershell.

Or, maybe even a set of registry entries, though that seems it would be brittle.

Preferably NOT a pure, opaque, executable - no need to trade MS's intrusive stupidity for what could possibly be a nice backdoor into your system.

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High rear end winds cause F-35A ground engine fire

JLV
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Re: "Not my fault..."

Think P-39 Airacobra, WW2 aircraft which was pretty advanced, quite innovative and intended for air combat. Instead it had pretty massive problems in that role and was instead shunted to mostly ground attack roles*.

some of it sounds familiar (wiki):

"in the event of heavy rain the pilot's forward view would be completely obliterated; the pilot's notes advised that in this case the door windows would have to be lowered and the speed reduced to 150 mph (241 km/h)"

However in 1940 aircraft design and production cycles were in months, not in decades. You could also still use the P39 to do other things. Most importantly there were plenty of very good planes, designed by evolution rather than committee, waiting in the wings to take over its role. For each P39 you had a Tempest or P51 design.

Or you could also pick the F104 Widowmaker, which required, IIRC an upside roll to eject downwards, at least in the beginning due to its big tail (see recent articles about F35 helmet and pilot necks). That thing was quietly canned some years down the line.

Point is - aircraft designs can and do fail, sometimes. There are tons of fighter designs that either were abandoned or put into different roles while a replacement was procured. It doesn't necessarily mean the original designers were incompetent or corrupt. They just failed, perhaps by being too innovative.

The difference is, we now refuse to acknowledge the problem and are in full Emperor's New Clothes mode. There is no alternative design to fallback on - the whole point of the F35 program was to source all the eggs with one basket to reduce costs. Lobbyists, and the rather clever spreading of the pork all over, means that the F35 is likely to trump a lot of military and budgetary logic before it gets canned.

Anyone wanting to chuck the F35 is a peacenik clueless idiot, runs the official party line.

And we have no plan B.

* even the Typhoon was, IIRC, originally more intended for fighter duty.

** also the wikipedia entry makes the P39 sound quite a bit more successful than I recall reading about it in the past.

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JLV
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Re: workaround?

>The various US services don't want it

link?

Are you sure the services want out of it? That would be very good news, and common sense. But I don't remember serving senior procurement-relevant members of the armed forces going on the record and suggesting to ditch it.

I am sure you can get dozens of anonymous pilots off the record. But the input from the boys and gals at the tip of the spear doesn't outweigh lobbyists, no sirree.

As far as the Marines go, they got the best end of it - the thing is crap partially because it is a multirole design saddled with all their requirements - so their incentive to bail is even less, they might as well pray that it will somehow muddle through into a decent aircraft at some point.

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Double KO! Capcom's Street Fighter V installs hidden rootkit on PCs

JLV
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Re: bit confused about the technical aspects

On reread - in linked articles, there seems to be an indication that Windows was making the users aware of the kernel access.

If that warning was displayed through normal Windows process vetting mechanisms - and not through some particularly savvy Windows user's configuration and system auditing - that would put the onus on users to run like hell, but perhaps kinda exonerates Windows.

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JLV
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Windows

bit confused about the technical aspects

>the capcom.sys kernel-level driver

Why is Windows structured in such a fashion that a game retailer's code can reach deep into its guts and pull off something like this?

I realize that malicious code can hack its way where it's not supposed to. That's true on Linux, OSX, Windows, whatever. If there is a vulnerability and the cracker uses it, game over. Don't trust code blindly.

But is this what happened here? Seems like Windows is perfectly happy to play along - there is no indication of a vulnerability being used. "Just" a dishonest company - whose decision makers in this case should be liable for jail time for computer tampering, just as any old crook. Just like Sony's CD rootkit in fact. Is this really by design???

Or, am I in the wrong, and even on Linux you could do this crap without doing a kernel recompile? Or kernel module load of some sort, that you would need to agree to? Or, of course, an unpatched vulnerability - but that's still not by design.

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Zombie Moore's Law shows hardware is eating software

JLV
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Re: Nothing wrong with the chips.

>All a proper dev needs to do his job is

Think a bit. My domains of competence are Python and SQL, along with some more proprietary stuff.

Any time that I want to write fast Python code, I will often think of using dictionaries, aka hashmaps. Now, they are not applicable 100% of the time, but they are very, very fast. The, slow, Python interpreter mostly gets out of the way and calls highly optimized C that's been tuned for years and years. AFAIK the underlying implementation is a B-Tree type algo. A big part of writing fast Python code is knowing which built-in data structures to use to tap into the fast C stuff underneath.

Now, instead of being a lazy shit dev, I could take out my editor (I dislike IDEs, but disagree with you that that shows skill of some sort) and wrangle some C hashmap code myself. Even if I knew C well enough, would my code be as fast as that evolved over years by folk very much smarter than me? I think not.

You're gonna say "Lazy turd, using a scripting language". News to you, modern system languages are evolving towards having more or less built-in maps - Rust, Go, Swift have them. I don't mind system languages, I loved a quick dip into C a while back. But there is a lot of value in providing building blocks on top of even system languages. Who wants to implement a linked list? Who wants to use code with gratuitously hand-written linked lists, unless there is a very very good reason?

That's the power, and costs, of abstractions. I now how, and when, to use a hashmap, but I have little idea of how it is put together. I do know that Python speeds can go up by orders of magnitude when you know the little tricks.

Let's not even get into the abstractions involved with working on top of relational database. A good SQL coder will write stuff that is infinitely faster than a noob. Both have a limited idea, or interest, in knowing the rdbms internals, though the experienced coder will know about indices, NOT IN slowness, full table scans, etc...

Every so often people bemoan that software engineering (hah!) is nothing like say mechanical engineering. Now, by your metrics, does that mean the automotive engineer needs to design his own subcomponents (bolts, drive belts, brakes), each and every time? That would do wonders for both car costs and car quality, would it not?

No, we expect re-use there as well and don't call car engineers out for "just" assembling car components together.

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Pretending to be a badger wins Oxford Don 10 TRILLION DOLLARS

JLV
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good reminder

>The Ig Nobels are misunderstood as deriding rubbish science, but are actually about celebrating how even seemingly-obscure science gets us thinking.

The first time I heard of them was for, among other things, handing out an award for investigating the mathematical basis for ropes and strings tangling up.

Seems totally pointless, and well deserving of derision from the Trump/Cruz crowd for wasting tax payer money.

Until you think of how many accidents involve people or things getting caught up in tangled cables.

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Naughty Zuck: Facebook fudged its video ad numbers

JLV
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Well, to be fair, the fake blood tests company was a little closer to having real significance. Rather than whether Gillette overpaid their ads to sell 17-bladed razors to up and coming spotty teens.

Not that I disagree with you otherwise, +1. And I expect the ad buyers won't be amused.

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JLV
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Devil

Mr Cynic

What's even nicer is if you weed out <3 sec views for average time. But count them for total views stats.

Of course, I am just taking the piss here. Right?

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‘Penultimate’ BlackBerry seen on 'do not publish' page as fire sale begins

JLV
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Ex Z10, now a using a Classic, with keyboard. Love it.

I don't like Android much - tried a Nexus 5 for a year - so I may go back to iPhone :( when this one bites the dust.

I don't need apps much - just good enough phone and sms. Email, browser. Preferably a keyboard. And _good_ batteries. <$700. And an audio jack :)

I might have bothered trying WinPhone once, not nowadays though.

Too bad - BB10 is very nice except for apps. Fast, battery friendly, stable, nice discoverable UI. But they were just too late to the party. Oh, and pretty lame online knowledge bases to look up answers from - so be ready for that if you do pick up a bargain - which I'd still recommend otherwise long as you make sure it fits your needs.

Duopoly now :(

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Robot overlords? Pshaw! I ain't afraid of no AI – researchers

JLV
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no robo killers, but...

what about jobs?

General-availability specialized AI has a pretty massive potential impact on jobs. Take our friendly auto-pilots for example. Once Tesla and the like have good-enough auto driving capability (i.e. once they achieve significantly less mortality risks than human drivers and once the legal framework - insurance and manufacturer liability - around it has matured), then what?

Along with capability to down quite a few at the pub and have the car drive you back, expect less taxi drivers and less truck drivers.

You can generalize that type of impact, in the 30-50 year time frame, to a whole lot of jobs. There will be jobs that will be pretty safe - masseurs, chefs, nurses, etc... There will be plenty of creative type jobs that will need top-flight humans to assist the AIs. There will be jobs that don't have the numbers to justify crafting AIs for them. There will be jobs where human dexterity will remain paramount.

But it still leaves a lot of potential replacements.

Or, to put it slightly differently - we ain't necessarily dreaming about benevolent AIs like in Banks' Culture. I agree with the article that self-awareness is still quite far off. If anything, the success of machine learning is probably slowing down research in "real AI".

But Bank's "benevolent socialism" bit, where we all live a life of leisure enabled by our AI underlings? I don't think our societies are yet grasping the challenges that potentially quite limited job requirements could bring.

See for example https://www.amazon.com/Race-Against-Machine-Accelerating-Productivity-ebook/dp/B005WTR4ZI

I am quite aware of the lump-of-jobs fallacy trap. I mostly agree that it's a trap - even though modern research is starting to recognize that, in a given country, some displaced workers will be net losers, even as society as a whole benefits. But wholesale AI to replace mundane humans tasks is another kettle of fish.

No one wants to go back to Victorian times and slave all day. Nor do I think AIs doing work is necessarily a bad thing. Or avoidable. But nothing tells me that Banks' rosy future of self-confident yet clever idlers is more likely to happen than just generalizing today's unpleasant impact of long-term joblessness to a large proportion of the population.

Unless we start thinking about how to make it a positive transition. Signs ain't good - Western military planners are still stuck thinking pilots will be needed for another 20-30 years, despite the massive risks inherent in getting it wrong.

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Oracle: Delayed Java Enterprise Edition 8 to land 'within the year'

JLV
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Trollface

>All eyes will now be on JavaOne

Maybe not quite that many, judging by the lack of comments to what would be big news, IF J2EE was not yesterday's jam in general.

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T-Mobile USA: DON'T install Apple's iOS 10, for the love of God

JLV
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The curse of 10?

First Windows 10, then this.

I sure hope the Linux kernel goes up to 11.

FWIW, the Muse meditation aid folk also sent out a warning about iOS 10 issues.

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Using a thing made by Microsoft, Apple or Adobe? It probably needs a patch today

JLV
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Re: Software development

Good points. Not to mention that most of that, rather impressive, list only makes sense to aggressively patch (and research) in the context of widespread exposure to public networks - ie the Internet. Ditch the Internet* with your time machine and apps have a considerably easier life, security-wise.

Ah, the good old days.

* ditch Flash? Now that's more doable.

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'What this video game needs is actual footage of real gruesome deaths'

JLV
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Re: I take it this is not the People Eating Tasty Animals group....

Maybe he means the frying bacon smell is what makes him regret being vegetarian?

And... since you've mentioned being Jewish further down, I'll take your bacon, just to avoid your lapsing into sin/temptation ;-).

You're welcome.

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JLV
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Re: I take it this is not the People Eating Tasty Animals group....

I suspect that even PETA is not really expecting to have the game changed.

(cunning plan) making this unreasonable request means media coverage, leading to some people, apparently not us robust commentards though, feeling guilty about bacon.

Foiled!

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JLV
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Here's an idea, PETA, write your own damn game, then you can decide on its contents.

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US Marine Corps to fly F-35s from HMS Queen Lizzie as UK won't have enough jets

JLV
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Good analogy, except the dog costs more than the penthouse and has serious congenital defects rendering it unable to bark if the temperature is over 25, his 50K$ leash isn't quite working yet and he has yet to beat a Chihuaha in a fair fight.

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Read the damning dossier on the security stupidity that let China ransack OPM's systems

JLV
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In hindsight and foresight

Given the specific nature of this data it should have been extremely well protected. I mean you hear how some F35 design data might have gone missing. Big deal, potentially, if there is a hot war with someone who got that data. This stuff is presumably highly defended.

However, OPM info is not just _potentially_damaging. Anyone who has it wanting to coerce or turn US govt employees can use it right away, no need for a war. Think back about the Cold War and all the spying going on in those days. This would have been the jackpot, for decades. In a fallback they can always turn it loose for identity theft - for profit or destabilization.

People up and down OPMs IT org should be _fired_ over this. Not _just_ top managers, also any techies/mgmt in a position to remediate/mitigate but incompetent enough to let it happen. The only real excuse if points where it can truly be shown to be a flagged budget/resource shortfall - then that axe should chew its way up the relevant management, from the levels where spending authority starts, going up.

Not scapegoating, no, but rooting out incompetence, yes. "Pour encourager les autres"

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It's OK to fine someone for repeating a historical fact, says Russian Supreme Court

JLV
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Re: Or the Russians haven't updated their website yet

I might get the point even better if Belgium and Holland were the size of Russia. Or if Russia didn't beat the crap out of France in 1812 using precisely its size and the opposite of a perimeter defense ; -)

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JLV
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Re: Or the Russians haven't updated their website yet

Stalin, like Hitler, had a fetish for edge-based defense. Their whole idea was to repel enemies on the perimeter and not give one inch of sacred Russian soil. It would therefore make sense to have everyone at the borders. Also it might make sense as well to station lots of troops in Ukraine - Soviet induced famine in the 30s probably meant a certain lack of political enthusiasm by the locals. Maybe - speculation here - even reliable NKVD near Moscow and potentially mutinous troops further away? - he seems to have been a grade 1 paranoid and the 37 purges were recent.

Stating, as a fact, rather than as a possible, but highly uncertain conjecture, that Russia was planning a 41 invasion, is wrong. 44 or 45? You might be right. 41, no. You can dredge up all the troop positioning info you want, but that remains speculation based on facts that could be interpreted differently. While Soviet historians in the 40s and 50s had plenty of motivation to tweak history and explain away why Uncle Joe could not possibly have been as spectacularly wrong as he was.

To return to the original article, several prominent members of the French Communist Party got expelled in 39-40 when they spoke against the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact when that became public. And in the interest of evenhandedness towards "nice" countries, wasn't there recently a case of lese majeste in Thailand where the convicted was also prosecuted for citing a recognized historical fact?

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JLV
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Re: Or the Russians haven't updated their website yet

>Stalin would have attacked him around the winter of 1941.

No. Read up on the early days of the Barbarossa campaign. The Russians were totally caught with their pants down. It took forever for them to react appropriately to the Nazi attack. Now, I have no doubt that Stalin hadn't suddenly become bosom buddies with Hitler. But his exact long term intents are secrets he took to the grave - maybe he would have screwed Adolf later, but he probably thought he would do it much later, on his terms. In 41 it was all about getting along with the Nazis and avoiding a casus belli.

To be fair, most of WW2 was won on the Eastern front, with Russian blood. But it was despite, not thanks to, Stalin. Even Stalingrad was a victory despite him - German-based spies, not believed to that date, had told the Kremlin of the coming offensive. And his generals somehow managed to convince dimwit that he could not afford another defense-in-place fiasco with Vyazma-level losses. Hence the tactic of giving ground till Stalingrad where Russian numbers finally counted.

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JLV
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Re: Orwell's alive & living in the Kremlin

You have to be pretty special to believe any ethics shortcomings and desinformation in Western governments is comparable to the crap Putin and his gang are pulling off in their own country. Including this particular anecdote, but also political assasinations, invasion of neighboring countries (remember Georgia?) who are scared shitless. And an incredible level of corruption - it took Canada $10B to host the winter Olympics, but $50B in Russia, for example.

I realize that we are now being fed a staedy stream of "bad Russia" news because it's flavor of the month. I really do. But that hardly means there isn't something fundamentally wrong with modern Russia. Starting with the Chechnya Wars, during which they were still seen as "good Russia" here, but were already conducting a counterinsurgency war with an incredible disregard for civilian life, against nominally their own citizens. Remember the botched hostage rescue in which the police gassed about 140 people dead?

I really hoped better from the Russian people post-Communism. That period's behavior was imposed and not really their fault. But I am starting to believe there is really some deep flaws of character when supposedly informed and intelligent people can be nostalgic for someone like Stalin, who was Hitler-level in his atrocities. And the folk running the Russian Orthodox Church should be ashamed to support the rising bigotry there.

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Watch SpaceX's rocket dramatically detonate, destroying a $200m Facebook satellite

JLV
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Re: cant see much

"Sorry, boss, I just copy/pasted this code I found on StackOverflow. How was I to know the guy didn't know what he was doing??? Besides... Fail Early, Fail Fast, FTW."

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Microsoft redfaced after Bing translation cockup enrages Saudis

JLV
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Re: Easy mistake to make?

Saudi may be investing but their per capita income is near Mexico. Long term, a country needs skilled people to be rich (Wealth of Nations), but Saudi hasn't really figured that out. Skilled or hard jobs are mostly expats. Couple that with a religious drive to have as many children as possible and a parasitic nobility. Then take a govt which coopts a particularily nasty strain of Islam, Wahhabism, and gives its clerics free reign as long as "King by the Grace of Allah" is religious dogma.

9/11? Mostly Saudis citizens. Mosques in France? Unwisely left to be financed by Saudi in the 80s and 90s. Pakistan & Taliban? Saudi money. Bin Laden. Whatever fuckups they are up to in Yemen?

If you tell me Norway is cleverly investing for post-oil, sure. Saudi? Hahahahaha. The cleverer of the princes are probably just lining their nest eggs. And it's not that much of a surprise that their subjects are cranky.

IMHO we'd have a generally less problematic Islam if some more competent, gentler, folk were living around the Muslim holy sites or if they had no oil $ to corrupt everyone else with.

p.s. to be fair there was a string of terrorism against the House of Saud 6-8 yrs ago that somewhat opened their eye that their crap wasn't just everyone else's problem.

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Robot babies fail in role as teenage sex deterrents

JLV
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Re: Bah!

So, basically abstinence, right?

That has a long track record in the US. Long, but hardly good, results-wise. Well, if by results you care about teen pregnancies rather than preaching your own beliefs onto others.

To each his own, but I also hardly see the positive in settling with the first person you bed. Tastes, ambitions, ethics and your own willingness to make a relationship work take a while to settle and your perfect match may not be the first person willing to bonk you. Which kinda presupposes a notion of, horror, potentially exploratory sexual relationships.

Best done safely, with sufficient sexual education and birth control to avoid unwanted pregnancies and STDs. For the rest I am a damn sight more concerned about real issues like rapes and spousal abuse than about "macarena at toddlers parties".

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Kindle Paperwhites turn Windows 10 PCs into paperweights: Plugging one in 'triggers a BSOD'

JLV
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Joke

Re: Drivers everywhere

Not everyone knows about those.

“Well, you can't drink your screwdrivers, can you?”

“What else would you suggest that we do with them?”

"Vodka and orange juice.”

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JLV
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a slow motion trainwreck

Not directly related, but did anyone notice that Win10 doesn't support the old .chm help file format? Really great when you have old software that still runs, but w.o. help files.

The best thing one can say about 10 is that it is not 8. But really MS is doing its best to frustrate as many of its loyal users as it can. I mean, the Linux folk are elsewhere. The Mac folk too. They are not coming back. They won't be pleased regardless so they don't matter much to MS.

But this constant stream of fairly high profile glitches and annoyances, along with telemetry, security holes, churn in system UI, bad system UI is not doing much to keep existing users around on Windows. No, they may not care about FOSS principles and on Linux. They may not be stylish and cost-unconscious and on Mac.

They may not be cutting edge IT and they may not even really know what an OS is.

But at some point, they may still just get fed up with Windows and leave. I don't see that happening any time soon with corporations. But individuals? What is the patience point when it is just not worth getting another PC with Windows? I suspect that's one of the reasons why tablets are replacing desktop/laptops for a lot of casual users - at least they are on Android/iOS, not Windows.

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Arthur C Clarke award won by Adrian Tchaikovsky

JLV
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Coat

Re: Talking space spiders?

<pedant>

Actually, Vinge's spiders had to live underground, quite the opposite of space.

</pedant>

Yes, that's my coat, I know. Upvoted you anyway, that's one of my favorite SF books ever.

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MacPorts project leaving Apple’s OS Forge

JLV
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Re: Didn't know they were still around

Homebrew's got some good rep going for it, true.

But MacPorts seems to work just fine for me in practice (since 2009-2010).

No hassles, packages I want are available, no security snafus reported... This is strictly my perception as a user, did not try to upload package changes onto their service. Nor to change ports itself.

If it changes for the worse, yes, I know I can count on Homebrew - good feedback overall - but for now I am happy enough with them.

The move to GitHub? Probably a good thing overall. If done right, users won't notice the switch much.

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Password strength meters promote piss-poor paswords

JLV
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Re: Passwords need to be rethought

>because the crook did it first

Well the user couldn't log in that case. So...

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Microsoft has open-sourced PowerShell for Linux, Macs. Repeat, Microsoft has open-sourced PowerShell

JLV
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id and ego conflicts???

MS Jekyll - No more of this cancer stuff. Open source is good, openness rules. Let's go beyond Mono and open up .Net. You know, let's add bash to Windows. Let's be hip and cool. Let's support Linux on Azure. Let's use 8 and 10 to clean up a lot of underlying cruft in the old XP stack.

MS Hyde - Ribbon. Metro UI! We rulez and know best!

MS Jekyll - After Win 8, we need to be nicer. Let's upgrade our customers to Win 10 for free.

MS Hyde - Yummm! Telemetry. Yummm! All your data belongs to us. Forced Win 10 upgrades. We know best.

MS Jekyll - SQL Server on Linux!

MS Hyde - I know, let's send out an Anniversary Edition before QA is done on it. ME, AE, same difference. Let's pretend we use Telemetry to figure out our customer preferences. But then... aha, totally ignore whatever UI/behavior changes they request from us.

MS Jekyll - Powershell for everyone. Go talk to customers, meet your customers where they are. We’re confident that if we help our customers be successful we’re going to prosper.

MS Hyde -

... not there yet, but I am willing MS is more than able to bazooka its feet off several times in the near future.

Truly, I wonder how MS can be so bipolar these days??? How can it move on significant cultural changes, like accepting that it's got to play with others? And be even more bloody arrogant, and incompetent, than it ever was under Bill? Esp when "good MS" is mostly visible to geeks, but "bad MS" makes the front page news quite often these days.

There is the seed for a more mature, respectful company, but they insist on chucking it out.

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JLV
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Re: What is the shell?

You're right, it's easy to miss "and so on".

However, rather than immediately furiously typing away my outrage, I reread the sentence. This is the Reg, give the writer at least some benefit of the doubt that he knows basic IT notions.

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Penetration tech: BAE Systems' new ammo for Our Boys and Girls

JLV
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Good article, but one thing I would have liked more details about is how the round ended up being _heavier_ as a result of cutting out lead.

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JLV
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True, but on the opposite end of the spectrum, the Depleted Uranium rounds fired by the A-10s gun makes for really bad PR after the fact. Lots of current wars end up being waged in a counter-insurgency context and excessively messing up the place up for the locals is not a clear path to hearts and minds.

So, if it's all the same, why not clean it up? Though I totally get and appreciate your quip!

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Microsoft to overhaul Windows 10 UI – with a 3D Holographic Shell

JLV
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Happy

go, MS, go!

I totally trust them with this one.

An immersive equivalent of Charms and Metro modes:

- you never quite know how to trigger it when you're not in it

- once triggered, you can't figure out how to exit

Fun times in VR indeed

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More gums than Jaws: Greenland super-sharks live past 400 years old

JLV
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Re: Typical specimen is older than America

From sharks to Stasi clones and dry cleaning protocols*...

Commentards never cease to amaze.

* Bill was barred from reelection by the 22nd amendment rather than by his aim.

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Business users force Microsoft to back off Windows 10 PC kill plan

JLV
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Re: Microsoft start listening to people outside your bubble

Be careful what you wish for if Linux Office is anything like MS Office 2008 on a Mac. Shudder. Manages to have all the warts but different, worse and certainly unfamiliar, UI.

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JLV
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Trollface

Re: 'Fraid not

> stop Microsoft from wasting billions on failed acquisitions like Nokia and Acquantive

LinkedIn? I hear chairs are getting nervous again and local dry cleaners are gearing up their armpit sweat cleaning machinery.

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Intel's latest diversity report shows numbers at a standstill

JLV
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It's a complex issue for sure. At the company level, I don't buy the "won't understand our customers" much. And, while we shouldn't tolerate negative hiring discrimination, there is little joy in having incompetent coworkers of any color. And, yes, there are cultural problems within some minorities.

But, at a larger scale, once your country has sizeable minorities, it is in everyone's long term interest that large segments of the population are capable to fully participate in economic opportunities. If that doesn't happen everyone else gets stuck with societal unrest, possibly criminal activity and welfare bills.

So _some_ nudging from the pure meritocracy path can be warranted. Even from the perspective of a white taxpayer.

Call me an optimist, but I believe success breeds success. Once some members of an ethnic group succeed, their status can motivate others to follow. The reverse effect is, IMHO, responsible for a lot of underperformance - if all your buds are on the dole easy to blame the dominant group and retreat on yourself.

In many cases, there a mix of some negative discrimination by the majority coupled with a culture of non-participation by the minority. Complex to break this kind of fail, but doesn't mean we shouldn't try.

I'll add that I also consider it the decent thing to do. But there are cold hearted reasons to do it anyway.

Last, and cynically, in our age of Internet outrage, a company may find it in its best interest to at least appear motivated to diversity. So why not try to do a good job if you're stuck doing it anyway? As long as you don't just hire underqualified folk.

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Linux 4.8 rc1 lands, with Surface 3 support promised!

JLV
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Re: Keep on hacking

JJ being a twat, again.

Compared to what, dufus? Letting alone that a recent compare point's Anniversary Edition is making the news for instability. The article is all about relative weights of what's being changed. Ie x% drivers. Not how much % of the code base is being changed in absolute terms.

Are you really that dense? That you can't comprehend a short article in your native language? I mean it's one thing to be partisan. Or a troll. But a dim partisan troll?

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Your 'intimate personal massager' – cough – is spying on you

JLV
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Re: Bah!

The thing has a remote control function. So you can send the missus a vibe during the day instead of a text. So it makes sense that there is a mothership server to intermediate through, but less so that they store and even less that they are not secure.

That said people struggle to use secure passwords on banking sites or routers, can't expect too much resetting of factory defaults on a sex toy.

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JLV
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Re: Bah!

Why the hate?

This is just another hack of an IoT device. One of a class of device that also happens to have some potential for embarassment/blackmail to its users. Funny to the Reg crowd, cuz we are often, hmmm, bit weird. But it's still a depressingly common thread of IoT to have bad security. No more, no less.

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JLV
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Coat

Google Anal-ytics anyone?

>the makers of the We collect exactly when the device is used, which of the ten vibration modes they are using, and even the temperature of the device

That is all, getting me coat.

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Canadian govt to cloud providers: Want our business? Stay local, eh

JLV
Silver badge

Re: carry through

Duh. Of course US companies have high, unreasonably so, tax rates. In practice though, the actual tax payout is highly variable w all the loopholes. US govt should figure out how much/little it wants to tax corporations and set a sane simple tax system with as few loopholes as possible around a simple base rate. Then... drumroll... make them pay it.

Of course, with a huge industry of tax accountants, lobbyists and strident lefties defending the rarely-applied-nominal rate, the likelihood of that happening is the same as Kim Jong-Un dropping 20kg and not being bat shit crazy.

Still doesn't make your post any more intelligent though.

Reality is more complex, with higher Canadian taxes partially offset by not having to pony up as much health coverage.

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California to put all your power-hungry PCs on a low carb(on) diet

JLV
Silver badge
Facepalm

>It depends

Odd that you are pundit-ing on energy generation, yet you don't know about the concept of baseload. As it impacts solar energy generation roughly 12 hrs a day, even in sunny California :)

Far as the article goes, cautious support, assuming a coherent directive has been put together. Energy saving often hits a short term vs long term conflict. Getting $18

back on a laptops energy consumption seems optimistic though.

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