* Posts by Solmyr ibn Wali Barad

432 posts • joined 26 Feb 2013

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C’mon Lenovo. Superfish hooked, but Pokki Start Menu still roaming free

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: You can always try YumCha

"The correct Ozism for "I can't remember the brand, you've never heard of them and they'll be long gone in six months anyway" is Kung Pow."

There's another - We Con. Reserved for a very nasty stuff. Dodgy powercords that are labeled as 10 A, but their wires can barely manage 1-2 A. Power supplies that have dozens of components optimised out. Heck, who needs all those capacitors and filters and thermal resistors there.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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"It may not be the case that all monopolies are illegal, but the majority are."

He was technically correct - having a monopoly is not illegal. Company may end up being a monopoly simply because others decide to leave the market.

But abusing a monopoly position is illegal. Usually it's a temptation too great to resist, so we don't get to see benign monopolies too often.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Why are you even diagnosing this lappy?

"I have installed an official windows iso from digitalriver and registered it with the serial number printed on that microsoft sticker couple of times already. Anybody with OEM licensed windows can do the same."

Not anybody. Only those who have a sticker. Windows 8 OEM versions mostly don't. And for greater amusement, Win8 SLIC code is not usable for vanilla 8.1 media, you have to install 8.0 first and then upgrade. Again, mostly. It's complicated like hell. Sometimes you'll have to sacrifice a goat to get W8 activated.

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Gemalto: NSA, GCHQ hacked us – but didn't snatch crucial SIM keys

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Well they would say that

And of course you would say that they would say...

Damn, that's getting complicated.

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Didn't the Left once want the WORKERS to get all the dosh?

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Stupid

But...but...Marx looked very wise, beard and all, how could he have written rubbish?

/it's an election time, have to play along/

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Captialism got rid of Racism!!

"At what point do they become evil exploiters? /.../ Is there an 'evil boss' induction ceremony they have to attend?"

It's the secret handshake. Which nobody hasn't seen (it's secret, natch), but is known to exist beyond any doubt whatsoever.

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Apple: Fine, we admit it – MacBook Pros suffer wonky GPU crapness

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Not the first time

Previous one was a soldering problem inside video chips, multi-layered sandwitches as they are. Nvidia took responsibility, after lots of wrangling, and paid reparations to computer companies. Web search on "Nvidia Bumpgate" should turn up a series of articles about that.

This time it's alleged to be between the video chip and motherboard. Not entirely same thing. That part of soldering is done on Foxconn lines. Whether it's done with a single heatblast for the entire board, or is there a separate step for GPU, can't really tell. Could be either way. Certainly looks like solder didn't turn out strong enough to withstand years of thermal stress (expansion and shrinkage cycles) around GPU. Which is painfully difficult to achieve.

In any case, Nvidia is probably out of the loop. Maybe Foxconn takes the hit this time. If it was an overlook in manufacturing. Or Apple will find that GPU cooling was a bit underspecced, which would be a design issue.

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Lenovo to customers: We only just found out about this Superfish vuln – remove it NOW

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: cert advisory re Komodia

Thanks for the link. Especially loved the mention of ring0 rootkits.

Now that is a worthy question, the most fundamental problem of modern IT - whose rootkit do you trust, in order to keep others out? Because not having a rootkit doesn't seem to be a valid option anymore. Most security products are using shady techniques, more like 50 shades, to give us a false and perverted sense of security.

Fuckyouverymuch, purveyors of "safe computing experience". I'm going to build myself a stone abacus. Root THAT, suckers. We'll see how well you can handle a chisel.

/rant off/

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: cert advisory re Komodia

Lavasoft? Holy crap.

Alas, seems to be true. Besides their usual ad-removal tools they have this Web Companion thingamabob, where Komodia served as an SSL analysis tool. Neat. And as a cherry on the pie, there's a fuss with Comodo certs too.

arstechnica.com/security/2015/02/security-software-found-using-superfish-style-code-as-attacks-get-simpler/

Lavasoft has said that they have removed Komodia. Not sure what'll happen with Comodo.

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So long, Lenovo, and no thanks for all the super-creepy Superfish

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: @Mephistro (tl;dr)

Thanks for sharing. Looks like you had a real scam pulled on you. Sorry for the doubts and geeky behaviour (hey, grab your keyboards, somebody seems to be wrong on the Internet! :-) )

This case wouldn't be any different between US/Europe. Refusal to fix DOA products is intolerable on either side of the pond. I assumed incorrectly that capacitors failed just outside the normal warranty, which is the most typical situation. And there it starts to depend on the context - is the problem widespread enough to justify a warranty extension, what's the cost/benefit ratio, is the component supplier willing to share costs, etc. Reputable names have done it occasionally. Albeit they don't advertise it outside the partner network. Public recalls are mostly for the safety-related issues like flaming batteries and dodgy power parts.

Anyhow, there's a saying that it's the ability to handle big screw-ups that separates boys from men. Some say even this is not enough - a real man has to cause a serious blunder first, then clean it up, and learn his lessons on the way.

Let's see how present-day Lenovo handles things. At first, CTO managed to pour oil on fire, but over the weekend, they pulled an U-turn. That's slightly better than the usual "you're holding it wrong" crap we've been accustomed to.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: @Mephistro

OK, if you really managed to encounter Lenovo products in the nineties... But no, I still cannot say "fair enough" about it. There was no infamous brouhaha back then. Capacitor failures have happened since their invention, for any number of underlying reasons. And an equipment vendor that'll repair things outside the warranty period is a rare sight. Must be a truly known and endemic issue (like it was in 200x) to get free service.

15-20 years is a very long time. Technologies have changed, product lines have came and gone, companies have changed. For better or worse, as the case may be. By such absolutist standards we shouldn't buy anything from anybody, ever. Because I really can't name a worldwide brand where I haven't seen a blown capacitor. Must've replaced thousands of little buggers over time.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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@Mephistro

"I haven't purchased or advised to purchase any Lenovo kit since the infamous brouhaha with the bubbling capacitors in the nineties."

You what?! We're giving Lenovo a good bollocking for the things they do, but you managed to spoil the fun with just one sentence.

- Lenovo was entirely unheard of in the nineties.

- First capacitor plague started around 2000, low-esr.com had a good article about it in 2002. Basically, a good half of the Taiwanese cap production was rubbish because of badly copied chemical composition. Fascinating story, actually, if anyone can be arsed to look it up.

- Second wave was a Chinese production in late 2000's. This time it included a lot of "mislabeled" caps (like having a 16uF cap in a bigger 47uF barrel), and counterfeits of the reputable names like Sanyo. Besides the usual noname business.

- In both waves, affected caps ended up pretty much everywhere. In PSU's, monitors, motherboards, etc, all over the world.

Well, besides these two major plague-like events, there have been lesser screw-ups every now and then. These are not so remarkable. It's quite easy to kill an electrolyte capacitor, if you don't leave a sufficient safety margin for it.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Cue the ClassAction lawsuits in 3... 2... 1...

Disclaimer on a coffee cup: "Warning! Our coffee is so delicious that it may cause an addiction. Oh, and it's hot, too."

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: I won't be buying Lenovo or ASUS.....

There are always examples and counterexamples. Asus U35 happens to be well-engineered. Had to take one apart after a domestic accident, it was a pleasant surprise. Still works, too.

Basically, brand doesn't mean much, all mentioned companies have produced lemons every now and then.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: They shot themselves in the head

"It is unlikely the Server side of Lenovo will suffer from the Consumer laptops being infected with a security threat "

Not directly. But with clueless people at the helm, they'll bork something in servers sooner or later. Remote management cards are a prime example here. Their security sucks industry-wide. Thought that it could get even worse isn't exactly comforting. Then there's management software that all vendors are so keen to push, often claiming that only their own shitware is supported for management purposes.

Enterprise customers are able to identify threats, at least mostly, and put up a good fight. But small business just doesn't have means for it.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: "Superfish wasn't a major contributor to the manufacturer's bottom line"

That's not a problem. Now THIS is a problem.

Seriously, if a corporate CTO can claim with a straight face that there's no security problem...they do deserve all the ridicule they're getting, and a good punch in the wallet.

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Did NSA, GCHQ steal the secret key in YOUR phone SIM? It's LIKELY

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Colour me sceptical

"But if those temporary files are on a B1 or similar secure system"

There they are probably subject to same access restrictions as normal files. I was thinking about raw volume-level copies, like storage system snapshots. If (and that's a big if, as we can only use speculation and educated guesses on this matter) these copies will be mounted to a different server, which doesn't quite honour the restriction system? Or an extra duplicate gets made somewhere on the way? Point is, restrictions embedded into the data are not sufficient. Backup and test systems have to have a similar level of scrutiny than production ones. But rarely have.

A crude example closer to home. If I can get a volume dump from a Windows machine, I can happily mount this volume via Linux ntfs-3g driver, and presto - Windows ACL's that are set on files are ignored, all files, including ntuser.dat files, are readable. And nothing gets logged into the Windows audit log. Therefore a good chunk of normal security measures are already bypassed.

Oh, well. Whatever security measures you can think of - they are not absolute. There are plenty of cracks for a BOFH to slip through. And if they're not wide enough, a stolen bulldozer will help.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Colour me sceptical

"You can back up the files and do sysadmin stuff without needing to be able to read the data"

Well, yes, but there is a part that's frequently overlooked. Temporary copies that are routinely created and destroyed. Quite a lot can happen to these copies during their short lifetime, without anyone really noticing.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Colour me sceptical

Database dumps can be a real treasure trove. And usual tricks like access restrictions and audit trails may not be effective against an admin, whose daily job is to juggle short-lived database copies around.

It is a good thing to be sceptical, asking questions and seeking answers. If the intentions are honourable and the questions are fair. Are they?

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Does anyone still think this is only about terrorism? ...Its just too big a dragnet...

"most intelligence services are doing it and those that aren't well they want to"

Heh. That would make a nice comedy sketch. "Because we currently lack technical means to record phonecalls, we kindly ask you to record all your phonecalls, and mail the tapes to the aforementioned address. CD and MP3 formats are also accepted. Thank you for your cooperation, citizen."

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Superfish: Lenovo ditches adware, but that doesn't fix SSL megavuln – researcher

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: or to serve as an expert in legal proceedings.

Probably so. Jury trial is supposed to be a 'common sense' test, so selection process should filter out anyone who's not so common. And remove people with a clear bias or prejudice. How's that working in practice, I wouldn't know, haven't seen it close up. Probably less than perfectly, as jury foreman in Apple vs Samsung so aptly demonstrated. He got away with playing an "expert" during a jury session.

Yes, some experts can be outright scary. Highly educated (which is kind of a requirement), highly decorated, and able to talk utter bollocks with a confidence.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: If we self-ban any vendors who do this shit...

Oh, that's just bloody great. In the meantime, Lenovo's corporate CTO has come out with a claim that security risks are only hypothetical. It's time for torches and pitchforks then.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: If we self-ban any vendors who do this shit...

"We'll run out of vendors to buy from."

Agreed. Knee-jerk reactions are often unjust, and rarely adequate.

Main thing to understand would be that corporations and their brands are not monolithic entities. There are several divisions, essentially different companies, whose goals are often in conflict. For example, Sony Music (aka former Columbia) is a very different beast than Sony Electronics or Sony Mobile. Punishing other divisions for that bloody rootkit is an overreach.

On the other hand, misbehaving division is not good for the company, nor anybody else. So there is a reason to make noise about it, in a hope that the corporate overlords can be persuaded to take actions. Hasn't happened with Sony conglomerate though. They're still stubbornly subsidizing their failing entertainment arms. Maybe they do deserve the ridicule afterall.

Speaking of Lenovo - they're not a single brand either. Consumer division seems to live on a different planet. Probably have green skin and tentacles too. Business side seems to have its own share of morons - somebody thought it's a good idea to introduce "affordable Thinkpads" like S, L and Edge series. Which are nothing like Thinkpads if you'll have a look under covers. Cheap noname stuff with a Thinkpad logo. Classic example of brand dilution. And even IT guys often fall for this scam.

Fortunately, T, X and W lines are still worthy.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Well....

"Still have no new laptop. Am I a failure?"

Maybe. But you are certainly not alone - my trusty T40 says hello. It has survived quite a lot of newer doodads, so it remains to be seen who has the last laugh on this.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Superfish comes with Lenovo consumer products only

True that. Business laptops are a different kettle of fish (pardon the pun). It's the consumer that gets shafted at every turn. But therein lies the danger - if such a behaviour remains unchallenged, then it's just a matter of time when some bright spark will try similar tricks in the business segment.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: @Halverflake

"2- you have 0 judge or lawyer on earth who can understand this SSL stuff"

Heck, even a good half of the IT crowd doesn't. Myself included. Maybe there's enough understanding to cope with the daily tasks, but not enough to make truly important policy decisions, or to serve as an expert in legal proceedings.

Which may be a serious problem in the legal matters. If someone's machine is hijacked for a criminal activity, then a false impression of security may become a deciding factor in a verdict. Encrypted drive? Check. Password-protected? Check. SSL? Check. That's a proof beyond reasonable doubt, m'lud. Nobody but the defendant could have gained access to this machine. Throw in an "expert" or two, and it's pretty much a done deal.

If that previous part sounds as a hyperbole - not necessarily so. Germany has a precedent on this. If any cybercrimes are performed from a "secure" WEP-protected WiFi network, then the owner is liable. Not to mention that possession of any "hack-tools" is an offence by itself, and a solid proof of guilt.

Honest mistakes undoubtedly happen. But there shall be no mercy for vendors that are knowingly exposing their customers.

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Lenovo shipped lappies with man-in-the-middle ad/mal/bloatware

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: my E540 is clean

You never had it. Unless you managed to download it somewhere.

"Users report Superfish is installed on the Lenovo Y50, Z40, Z50, G50 and Yoga 2 Pro laptops"

libertysflame.com/cgi-bin/readart.cgi?ArtNum=37137

https://forums.lenovo.com/t5/IdeaPad-Y-U-V-Z-and-P-series/Lenovo-Pre-instaling-adware-spam-Superfish-powerd-by/td-p/1726839

Which is consistent with the claim that only consumer-oriented machines were preloaded with it.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Very effective program

That's a shame. Because X1 is not affected by this brouhaha.

If anyone's using a brandname, or any other marketing label, as the only guidance for making decisions, they'll be mightily disappointed sooner or later. Brands are far too messy these days. Lots of crap is peddled under reputable brands, which in order tarnishes good products. There seems to be an infinite supply of greedy fools, who'll try to make a quick buck by misappropriating a solid brand, despite all the historical failures.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Microsoft hardware

"When you buy a "windows" laptop you get a licence key on the bottom, usually under the battery. This is so you can download a vanilla copy of the OS from MS and install it, getting rid of the crapware that came with the laptop."

No you don't. Not anymore. Windows 8 Large OEM versions do not have a license sticker. Only a SLIC key buried into the motherboard.

And good luck calling Microsoft on that. OEM license keys are not compatible with vanilla. You'll get a choice of buying a new retail copy of Windows 8, or going back to OEM, who will happily sell you a "recovery media" for a tenner or so. With all the "bonus software" included for free.

Exception: if the computer has a W8 Pro license, then it may be possible to get a W7 Pro "downgrade" key from MS. W8 Standard has never had any right to use other versions.

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M0n0wall comes tumbling down as dev throws in the trowel

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Possible. But may not be necessary. Depends on whether these newer alternatives are good for everyone and every known usage case. Original developer seems to think so, but if anyone disagrees, they can grab a source and get hacking.

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Think you’re hard? Check out the frozen Panasonic CF-54 Toughbook

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Ok, so..

Probably won't happen. ECC SO-DIMMs and ECC-capable mobile chips are as rare as hen's teeth. And the excuse is - guess what - no market demand. Bugger.

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UK air traffic mega cockup: BOTH server channels failed - report

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Failure to report reason for shut-down

"there must be some kind of third system that adjudicates when there is a failure"

Yes, but who'll be watching the watcher? And if you get around it by making three systems equal, then one day you'll be looking for a minority report. With Tom Cruise and ginormous touchscreens involved. Har har.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: I wonder if

Why boo? He may have his life carved up in a way that he doesn't fancy moving anywhere.

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Russian revolution: YotaPhone 2 double-screen JANUS MOBE

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: I have one

Ah, but we're talking about a perceivably non-cool part. Phone calls? Pah. That's so last century.

If many phone designers tend to neglect it, then we cannot really blame poor reviewers for following the trend.

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Brit Linux distro CrunchBang calls it quits

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Aww...

Same here, T40 is still going strong. With few tweaks here and there.

Can't stand newer keyboards with small Ctrl and Alt keys.

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'If someone in Australia says lick my toad, it's not a euphemism'

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Marmite?

End product of fermentation, and end of fermentation. Well, mostly. Only a select few of the fermenting bacteria can live amidst acids.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: surströmming

Yep, it's quite plausible that some people will actually like surströmming and those other niceties. While my claim about the Danes preferring pickled fish was a generalization, thus nowhere near perfect, it's mostly true. Swedes are often bullying them (and anybody else) with surströmming.

Anyhow, let's agree that Marmite isn't the most controversial treat out there.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Marmite?

"Having experienced what the Danes can do to innocent herrings, I'm suprised they objected to recycled beer products."

Danes are fond of pickled stuff, which isn't quite the same thing. Vinegar kills most of the fermenting processes. But Swedish surströmming fits the description nicely. Fermented herring from hell.

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Data retention: It seems BORING ... until your TV SPIES ON YOU

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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It has happened before, it will happen again.

TV sets that are watching people? What a novel concept.

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At the third beep, the Atomic Clock will be 60 ... imprecisely

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: The third beep arrives 15s late

Not entirely unheard of. That's like a principle from Muphry: "Measure with a micrometer. Mark with chalk. Cut with an axe."

Of course, if 15s delay happens to be precise, then it can be properly accounted for. But where's the fun in that.

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Basic minimum income is a BRILLIANT idea. Small problem: it doesn't work as planned

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Overly simplistic?

"Except that assumes the billionaires would pay their 13%, which they wouldn't"

This Russian experiment with a flat rate of 13% had one rather unexpected result. Lots of mobsters suddenly started to pay income taxes.

Usual claim was that hiding the money required a real effort - and it was so much simpler to declare an arbitrary sum, pay it off, and forget about the matter. Of course, such an arrangement could not work for very long. As soon as the tax board could grow real teeth, they started to dig into the sources of the declared income.

It's somewhat plausible that billionaires (despite being, like, y'know, #greedybastards or something) would have similar sweet spot in regard to taxes.

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Ex-squeeze me? Baking soda? Boffins claim it safely sucks CO2 out of the air

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Paris Hilton

Re: Umm, so not baking soda then?

"A proper chemist wears a lab coat with many and varied stains"

There is a debate, howewer, whether a true master should be able to identify all those stains. Some claim that only an apprentice will keep track of the stains, and to the master it matters not. Others claim that you cannot be a master unless you truly know all the substances around you.

/btw, icon represents a dilemma, not stains!/

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Smartphones don’t dumb you down, they DUMB you UP

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: It's not just directions

And then there was a BMW driver, who crashed his car on a slippery road, and blamed it on a technical malfunction. You see, m'lud, ESP didn't pull the car straight.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Why dont you just ask...

Ivan Sussanin, proud inventor of the modern guidance systems.

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'YOUTUBE is EVIL': Somebody had a tape running, Google...

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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@Naughtyhorse

If my previous post left an impression that I'm a fan of record companies - that's not the case. Far from it.

My argument in a nutshell - Google/Apple/Spotify/etc are just digital distributors of the finished product. Nothing else. They have no hand in production. Whereas record companies used to operate more like a venture capital - making investments in a number of upstarts, in exchange for a hefty share. Plus production facilities, marketing, distribution.

Which means that these two models are radically different and cannot be compared directly.

Downsides of the old model are well-known. No need to argue about that. Maybe it's gotten even worse - I wouldn't be surprised if the Big Five have outsourced all meaningful work to the smaller companies and just funnel money to and fro. Doesn't really matter. They're toast anyway. Big question (and a big concern) is about the future market.

FWIW: David Lowery did that 'worse than old boss' argument in a length. Highly recommended reading.

thetrichordist.com/2012/04/15/meet-the-new-boss-worse-than-the-old-boss-full-post/

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Quantum of Suspicion: Despite another $29m, D-Wave doubts remain

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Joke

Re: "only faster for certain classes of algorithms"

"If it's able to solve a particular problem"

And therein lies the paradox. Successful quantum solution means that you would lose the ability to determine whether it's solved or not.

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Post-modem Ericsson wobbles thanks to flat sales and falling profits

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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@Michael Wojcik

Thanks a lot. By the casual glance it looked quite decent, hence the doubts - maybe others could notice something I couldn't. But NSA and Wallenbergs...it'd take a bottle of really hard moonshine to be able to see that.

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'Linus Torvalds is UNFIT for the WORKPLACE!' And you've given the world what, exactly?

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Pint

Re: He is right though, too many cooks does make for shite

Heh, sounds like you've had lots of fun. I'm positively jealous. Have one more!

Good thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from. Like those sector sizes - 512, 520, 522, 524, 528, 1024, 2048, 4096 and maybe more. Lots of possibilities to get bitten by faulty assumptions.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Pint

Re: How bad is Torvalds?

Thing is, 32-bit LBA can handle disk sizes up to 137 GB, assuming 512-byte sectors. Newer disks are usually larger, and some use 4096-byte sectors. So any old DOS will stumble. Except for the newer versions of FreeDOS.

Cheers!

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'LOOK into my EYES: You are feeling very worried about the climate ... SO worried'

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Coat

And all this data-cooking makes it clearly anthropogenic...

/fetches an asbestos coat/

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