* Posts by Solmyr ibn Wali Barad

677 posts • joined 26 Feb 2013

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Sick and tired of modern Windows? Upgrade to Windows 3.1 today – in your web browser

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Oh, there's an article about that. Who'd have thought it.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_3.2

"Windows 3.11 was released on November 8, 1993. It did not add any feature improvements over Windows 3.1; it only corrected problems."

"Windows for Workgroups 3.1 (originally codenamed Winball and later Sparta), released in October 1992,[14] is an extended version of Windows 3.1 that features native networking support. It comes with SMB file sharing support via NetBIOS-based NBF and/or IPX network transport protocols"

"Windows for Workgroups 3.11 (originally codenamed Snowball) was released on August 11, 1993,[15] and shipped in November 1993."

"A Winsock package was required to support TCP/IP networking in Windows 3.x. Usually third-party packages were used, but in August 1994, Microsoft released an add-on package (codenamed Wolverine) that provided TCP/IP support in Windows for Workgroups 3.11."

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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TCP/IP was on a separate floppy. Add-on for Windows 3.11 for Workgroups. Non-workgroup edition of Win 3.11 did exist, and I have floppies somewhere, but it was quite rare.

3.2 was released only in China.

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Carly Fiorina makes like HP and splits – ex-CEO quits White House race

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: loony tunes

Mynd you, møøse bites kan be pretti nasti...

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: loony tunes

Would you fancy to set up an US Rhino party then?

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhinoceros_Party_of_Canada_(1963–93)

Around my neck of woods, we have only mad squirrels and badgers. Not much of a party.

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Don't you see these simple facts? Destroy Facebook and restore human Liberty

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: plus ca change

"In the beginning, the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry, and has been considered a bad move ever since."

/towel.jpg/

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Are Indians too stupid to be trusted with free Internet?

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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"99.9999999% of the human race is too stupid to exist"

How nice. That leaves how many? About 7 persons for the entire world?

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Silent Nork satellite tumbling in orbit

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: " Soviet SS-1 "Scud" powerplants"

"But the user experience really sucked."

That's what 'enhanced experience' usually means, yes. Sucks more with every version.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: " Soviet SS-1 "Scud" powerplants"

"Which itself was based on a version of the V1 engine"

Shame you should say that! V2 is a complete rewrite - modern technologies, enhanced user experience, advanced communication capabilities, better socialization features, compliant with every modern buzzword out there. You name it & we've got it.

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Trane thermostat is a hot spot for viruses on home networks

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: true @stizzleswick

"Er... is there a reason you're removing kb2952664 twice"

Probably. When doing manual removal, I noticed that KB2952664 didn't disappear on the first attempt. Can't tell whether it always behaves like that. This KB was re-issued at some point, so it may have been an update on top of the similarly named update.

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Cisco recalls switches that could short power to the case. And hurt you

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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If these can be zapped remotely, then it's surely BOFH.

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Who wants a quad-core 4.2GHz, 64GB, 5TB SSD RAID 10 … laptop?

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: RAID 10 ? Why not RAID 5 then?

In RAID10 (excepting 0+1 variants), disk rebuild means copying data from one partner disk. Obviously requiring this partner disk to be in perfect health.

For a 4-disk array, risks of a rebuild failure are 3 to 1 (as RAID5 requires 3 good disks to copy from, RAID10 requires 1). For 8-disk array the ratio increases to 7:1, and so forth.

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Reminder: iPhones commit suicide if you repair them on the cheap

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: As an Apple product owner? Totally unacceptable

"screen repairs are one major reason to buy Apple - costs are very competitive and rarely go over $120. Contrast with Android or other phones which typically start @ $200"

It has to be something big or special to cost over $200. I just had one replaced for €70 - and it was a bloody sandwich with 4 layers glued together. Other phone had LCD panel as a separable part, only €30. Labour included.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Apple. Purveyors of stuff I never knew...

There's nothing more common than a need to feel special.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: @ chris 17

"P.S. Putting sugar into the tank of either a gasoline or diesel car would equally screw the engine."

If it makes it past the fuel filter. Even then, not so certain.

www.snopes.com/autos/grace/sugar.asp

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Hardly a surprise

"After I replaced the battery in my old iPhone 4 I decided to by an iPhone 6s"

Would be worthwhile to know if you can replace 6s battery just as easily, and does it survive next firmware update. Until then it's a comparison of apples and...different apples.

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Roll up, roll up to the Malware Museum! Run classic DOS viruses in your web browser

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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"Banking my reputation on Logitech being a Good Brand"

Fortunately it was. Doubtful we could have the same level of confidence today.

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Who would code a self-destruct feature into their own web browser? Oh, hello, Apple

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: dark magic

I have a nagging suspicion that web browsers are spawns of dark magic. In that case, it would be folly to throw any further amounts at them, it only makes them stronger.

Well-aimed lightning bolts have somewhat better chances. If your Mac is reduced to a smoldering ruin, then evil ghosts will have to leave. Probably.

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Pebble punts out new firmware to watch you as you sleep

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Remember, kids! Right foot is the one without the watch, m'kay?

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German Chancellor fires hydrogen plasma with the push of a button

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: tokamaks

"If they built it big enough it would (probably) work. That would cost a lot of money and governments have pointless wars that they prefer to finance."

Ah, they're just following the genie from this old story:

A Princeton plasma physicist is at the beach when he discovers an ancient looking oil lantern sticking out of the sand. He rubs the sand off with a towel and a genie pops out. The genie offers to grant him one wish. The physicist retrieves a map of the world from his car an circles the Middle East and tells the genie, 'I wish you to bring peace in this region'.

After 10 long minutes of deliberation, the genie replies, 'Gee, there are lots of problems there with Lebanon, Iraq, Israel, and all those other places. This is awfully embarrassing. I've never had to do this before, but I'm just going to have to ask you for another wish. This one is just too much for me'.

Taken aback, the physicist thinks a bit and asks, 'I wish that the Princeton tokamak would achieve scientific fusion energy break-even.

After another deliberation the genie asks, 'Could I see that map again?'

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The monitor didn't work but the problem was between the user's ears

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Old IT joke

"Which is presumably why, decades later, power supplies tend to be universal now. Eventuallly the feedback got through to the factories?"

It wasn't just a matter of decision. It took years of serious engineering to get universal input supplies good enough for mass market. Starting from notebook AC adapters where it mattered most. During development there were major obstacles like cost, complexity, reliability, conversion efficiency. Plus a zillion of lesser hurdles.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: "Do not try this yourself."

"Impossible, unless it was an outrageously stupid voltage switch design."

In 90's, about half of the switches could be moved with a fingernail. Rest of them were either recessed, hidden, or needed a considerable force.

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Ginni Rometty to pocket $4.5m bonus for IBM leadership

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: as far as analogies go

Yes, mature corporations tend to have some similarities, which is rather worrying.

There's one more: by tradition, leaders of the communist party occupied several governing positions - either heading the executive branch, or legislative branch. Conflation of duties tends to be a bad omen. It didn't matter very much in the USSR, because all influential positions were tightly controlled by the party, down to the street level, so the system was screwed anyway.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Soviet era is right

"You have problem with Corporate Communist Capitalism, comrade?"

Title 'comrade' was actually reserved for those loyal to the party line. Dissenters were addressed as 'citizen', with a hint of disgust in the voice. Quite Orwellian, come to think of it.

/bigbrother.jpg/

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: It's even more fun working there

Megacorps seem more like stagnation-era Soviet Union. There are at least 3 key similarities:

- Internally they operate by the principle of planned economy. Plans are sacred. Markets may sometimes be acknowledged in words, but in practice they'll try to avoid influences from that scary unpredictable wilderness at any cost.

- Unified propaganda service that uses a lot of doublespeak and newspeak. Gaps are occasionally filled with pure noise.

- They have an enormous caste of administrative personnel and a rather mild cult of the leadership. Apparatchiks pay some lip service to the upper echelon, trying to parrot as much phrases from the official propaganda as they can. But in everyday life they just play by the byzantine rules of bureaucracy, mostly unwritten and obscure, rarely changed as the leaders come and go.

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US police contracts and private forum posts dumped online

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Interesting

"These constitutional and legal protections apply to all, including criminals and criminal organizations"

Yes, that's how I understood your initial comment too. Very commendable principle.

And much loathed in the executive branch.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Interesting

I tend to agree with your unexpressed concern - yes, it's not fair to 'punish' big and diverse group of people for words and actions of their head honchos. Too much collateral damage. Not to mention that collective responsibility is never just, it's a leftover from tribal societies.

If some specific individuals leading the crusade against constitutional rights would see their dirty laundry out in the open...that'd be much more fitting.

OTOH, those big honchos don't seem to have any qualms about invading the life of millions to catch few perpetrators. Where's the fairness in that.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Interesting

You probably misread these comments. Among IT folks, prevailing interest is to have privacy for everyone. With a (somewhat naïve) hope that everyone would like to play by the same book and would respect the privacy of others.

That's clearly not the case for the law enforcement and secret services. High-ranking officials are rather constantly banging on the notion that privacy serves no other purpose than providing a cover for nefarious people. Which is akin to throwing the baby out with the bathwater, if you ask me.

Anyhow, if that "nothing to hide, nothing to fear" mantra is repeated endlessly, it is only natural that people will want to put it to the test. Should it become apparent that these mockers of privacy are using double standards, you'll witness a good deal of schadenfreude. As you just did.

Schadenfreude is a rather nasty emotion, of course, but quite frequently it's a normal response to seeing an even nastier mindset going down in flames.

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Israeli drones and jet signals slurped by UK and US SIGINT teams

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: "Anarchist training manual"

AFAIK Mary isn't related to Chuck Berry, nor Nick Berry of EastEnders (and Heartbeat) fame. And no, despite lots of people claiming that EastEnders should be classified as illegal, harm to the society was never proven.

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BOFH: In-depth IT training needs a single-malt distillery

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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I believe it's still legal to sell 60/40 solder for specialty uses like repairing older kit. Bought few rolls last year. Although the price seems to be a bit steeper.

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Facebook tells Belgian government its use of English invalidates privacy case

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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An act of invasion then? Albeit on a minuscule scale. But still, the last bunch who invaded Belgium were somewhat frowned upon.

/coat.jpg/

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Windows Mobile users suffer backup super-slurp as Redmond forgets Wi-Fi switch

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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"spreading a lot of FUD about Microsoft recently"

It's prevalently FU attitude, not FUD.

As for Orlowski, try to read his articles from 2012 or so. He was enormously kind towards MS back then.

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We've all suffered hangovers, but Qualcomm's right now is something epic

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Qualkomm = agony is coming?

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Mincing Nokia's factories made Microsoft a sausage factory

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Why do they always use %

May I offer my humble services then. With one touch, the upvote count increased by 100%. Aren't we living in wonderful times.

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Oracle blurts Google's Android secrets in court: You made $22bn using Java, punk

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Wait a minute

"Damn... there is no coffee icon."

There is, kind of, if you fancy that coffee being served on a keyboard.

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Eighteen year old server trumped by functional 486 fleet!

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Power

"I've always understood that the gel-filled batteries in UPSs are deep-discharge-tolerant"

As a general rule - no. Deep discharge cells are too expensive and unnecessary for the UPS use. Most UPS designs consider cell voltage below 12 volts as "empty" and will cut power off. Also, generic VRLA cell will rapidly deteriorate when its voltage drops below 10 volts. For that reason, typical UPS refuses to charge deeply discharged cells. There are exceptions, like solar energy storage solutions using a modified UPS and deep discharge cells. But charging circuit has to be well aware of the battery type.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/VRLA_battery

AGM & Gel VRLA batteries:

Have shorter recharge time than flooded lead-acid.[15]

Cannot tolerate overcharging: overcharging leads to premature failure.[15]

Have shorter useful life, compared to properly maintained wet-cell battery.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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"that era was time of the 8.4GB limit"

Imposed by a BIOS INT13 interface limit, not by disks, and it had to be amended with BIOS INT13 extensions.

SCSI-2 protocol has a 2TB hard limit. Nothing before that.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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"72Gb hard disks in 1997? Not that I recall."

Indeed. 9.1 GB SCSI disks had just hit the streets. Noisy beasts with 1.6" thickness. Price-wise they were quite, but not entirely unlike a brick of gold.

For a reference point, I have a working Netfinity 5500 in my shed, built in early 1998. Hasn't been running all the time, so it doesn't qualify for the pissing contest.

2x Pentium II 400 MHz in Slot-1 cartridge format.

4 slots for PC-100 ECC SDRAM, taking either 128 MB or 256 MB sticks. Was quite heartwarming to know that you could sell your car for a whopping 1 GB of memory.

40 MB/s RAID controller on the motherboard.

6 hot-swap SCSI disk slots with 3.5" width and 1" height (those 9.1 GB Seagates with 1.6" height took away two slots). 70GB DLT tape drive.

In 1998, a fully loaded 5500 had a street price of 25000 pounds or thereabouts. Woot.

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Waving Microsoft's Windows 10 stick won't help Intel's Gen 6 core

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: People are excited???

Being just excited does not suffice.

To qualify as a W10 evangelist, one has to be super excited.

Microsoft develops new 'Super' language

theregister.co.uk/2005/08/04/microsoft_nicely/

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Trump's new thought bubble: Make Apple manufacture in the USA

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: If the American people want to put their trust in The Donald

"We Always like to compare build quality of your average Ford to a Benz S-Class"

Especially by people who haven't seen S-class build quality up close. Or are using pre-1995 models for comparison. Times have changed a bit, to put it mildly.

As for the country of origin - that's an arbitrary distinction, bordering on meaningless. For instance, European Ford models are largely designed in Europe and assembled in Europe. Some components are manufactured in-house, others by suppliers all over the world. Should we define such a car as an US product? Yes, no, maybe, kind of, who-the-hell-knows. All modern cars are complex international efforts these days.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Increasingly convinced that Scott Adams is right

"Trump appeals to the section of society who believes in the quick fix, the gut feeling"

A good moment to remember H. L. Mencken:

"Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong."

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The designer of the IBM ThinkPad has died

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Butterfly keyboard

John Karidis designed the keyboard. Richard Sapper was also involved.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_ThinkPad_Butterfly_keyboard

richardsapperdesign.com/products/1990-2000/thinkpad-701

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Yahoo! Mail! Had! Nasty! XSS! Bug!

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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offtopic!

Have to admit it was rather worrying to read several Yahoo! related articles without requisite exlamation marks. Seems that normal service is being restored.

Articles in concern:

m.theregister.co.uk/2016/01/14/yahoo_dumps_135tb_of_users_news_interaction_data_for_machine_eating/

m.theregister.co.uk/2016/01/13/ok_to_spy_on_employees_at_work_european_court/

m.theregister.co.uk/2015/12/14/hedge_fund_manager_can_turn_yahoo_around/

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It's Wikipedia mythbuster time: 8 of the best on your 15th birthday

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: It's about as reliable as a newspaper

In 90's, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung was quite solid. Before several attempts at modernization.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankfurter_Allgemeine_Zeitung

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Nah

Well, compared to the Great Soviet Encyclopedia...not bad.

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Trustworthy x86 laptops? There is a way, says system-level security ace

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Performance vs security?

"So are we now at the point of "fast, cheap, secure - chose any two"?"

At the point of painful understanding, perhaps, but the underlying principle hasn't changed much. System design has always been a fine art of compromises.

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Microsoft in 2016: Is there any point asking SatNad what's coming?

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: "Possibly more noble intentions, but awful execution"

Like a popular wisecrack in Russia: wanted the best, but achieved the usual.

(хотели как лучше, но получилось как всегда...)

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There's an epidemic of idiots who can't find power switches

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: IT Support Robots

Only if we can have robot users to go with it. And a deathmatch set up between the two clans.

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Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: How not to turn it off and on again

Ah, the voltage selector. Problem ticket from days of yore:

"Sorry, folks, I seem to have blown the power supply. I was lying in the bed, half awake. There was a computer nearby. Somehow I reached for that tempting red slider switch, and started to flip it. Oh boy. Was that a quick wake-up! Don't you just love a smell of freshly baked MOSFET in the morning."

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City of London cops in Christmas karaoke crackdown shocker

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Paris Hilton

"voiceless backing tracks from the likes of Beyonce, Gaga, Kanye and Kylie"

So which is a bigger offence here - to offer these tracks with or without vocals?

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After Death Star II blew: Dissecting the tech of Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens

Solmyr ibn Wali Barad
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Re: Slow today

"how enormous trans-national organisations could take decades to design a fighter aircraft, and Saab create the Viggen on a shoestring."

Hmmm, it isn't that plain simple. Couple of loosely scattered points:

- Viggen didn't fall from the skies like Dannebrog. Saab had decades of previous experience for designing planes. Preceeding J-35 Draken was already a successful fighter, good enough for exports into neighbouring countries. Bizarre looks for an extra bonus.

- Viggen had a rather unique airframe, but engines and lots of other innards were bought in.

- In 60's and 70's development cycles weren't that long. Around 5 years for simpler projects, ten for complex ones. Several fighter designs came out every year. But somewhere along the way, for a multitude of reasons, the pace started to slow down. Now it's decades as you say.

- Smaller companies often have their advantages. Less inertia, less bureaucracy & politics, smaller communication overheads. All these tend to grow exponentially with size. If the stars align, people are enlightened, and common project management pitfalls can be avoided, then wonderful things may happen. Isolated team within a bigger company may also work well. Like Lockheed Skunkworks.

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