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* Posts by wikkity

157 posts • joined 25 Feb 2013

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Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray

wikkity
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60 per cent of the population

Population of what? The UK, US, world? What does access mean, you can buy one?

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Ancient Earth asteroid strike that dwarfed dinosaur killer still felt today

wikkity
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reconstructed an asteroid

That's a pretty big jigsaw puzzle for one that big

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Microsoft: We've got HUNDREDS of patents on Android tech

wikkity
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MS Support

"Microsoft certainty isn't going to act in support of a rival to their own patented technology"

I think they would if mainstream manufacturers switched. As for "out of the box", most hardware still comes with a cd with extra stuff on, why not bundle a ext4 driver? Plus a lot of devices now support MTP, the underlying file system is then irrelevant from the point of view of the connected PC. Always surprised MTP has not bitten MS in the foot by affecting their FAT licensing.

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Google kills fake anti-virus app that hit No. 1 on Play charts

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Early release?

Maybe someone took Joel Spolsky a bit too literally when he said it's better to release a limited product and build up a user base, rather than waiting until everything is complete and perfect but most potential customers have since found something else.

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Samsung's thumb-achingly ENORMO Galaxy Note Pro 12.2

wikkity
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Re: re. use in portrait orientation

> Buying a windows tablet with one note built in would be half the price. (Never thought I'd be saying something like that, I need a shower.)

Did you know, lemons tend to be more expensive than oranges? So next next you want an lemon you know what to do to save some cash.

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Torvalds rails at Linux developer: 'I'm f*cking tired of your code'

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Re: I've RTFM for English

What language is the manual in? Hope it's not English.

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Beat it, freetards! Dyn to shut down no-cost dynamic DNS next month

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Re: So what are the alternatives that people recommend?

I recommend centrastage dot com. Gives a nice web interface to supporting windows boxes, can even set it up to email before the machine goes t*ts up, e.g. disk is getting full. Never needed to lookup my families ips or setup dyndns since I've started using this. Think it's only free for a few devices though.

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Microsoft frisked blogger's Hotmail inbox, IM chat to hunt Windows 8 leaker, court told

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Is this some beta version auto trolling software being tested? If so it needs some work.

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Bing accused of out-censoring the Great Firewall

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Re: Never confuse malice-

That was the comment that sprung to mind before I read the article, I assume (yeah I know) they check the results against Bing from elsewhere to see what was filtered.

Is it possible that the other native search engines get a way with a little more or maybe are not filtering things they should? I can't remember the last time I stuck up for MIcrosoft but maybe they are erring on the side of caution, the Chinese government are a bit picky after all.

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Google settles copyright suit with Viacom over YouTube vids

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> more likely google are just paying viacom the advertising revenue

Which is probably a lot more than the actual revenues they've lost because of people watching in on YouTube

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Apple rakes in 60% of profits in still-surging smartphone market

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Re: Don't care.

As well as an up and down voting button, can we have one to indicate that someone does not understand the comment, how on earth is Aldi related to this?

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Apple patent will see Siri remind you to keep taking your meds

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"A method for building an automated assistant, the method comprising: interfacing a service-oriented architecture comprising a plurality of services to an execution environment comprising an active ontology, wherein the active ontology models a domain and comprises a logical arrangement of a plurality of active processing elements, wherein each active processing element is configured to receive at least one fact relating to the modeled domain and to perform at least one action responsive to at least one received fact ..."

So they are trying to patent a rules engine then?

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Amazon wants me to WEAR NAPPIES?! But I'm a 40-something MAN

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Re: I find that nappies

Hmm, an American correcting English on an British web site? I had to look up the word stanch as I'd never come across it before, thought something was amiss when firefox put a red wiggly line underneath it, this is what google had to say:

stanch1

stɔːn(t)ʃ,stɑːn(t)ʃ/

verb

US

1.

variant spelling of staunch2.

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Twitter blew $36m on patents to avoid death by lethal injunction

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Re: @ Don Jefe (was: To mis-quote Frank Zappa)

> Frank would have looked at you and shaken his head in disgust.

Frank would, but his widow has a different take on things.

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Distro diaspora: Four flavours of Ubuntu unpacked

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Re: Minty

> Are you sure?

The poster is correct. Mint 14 requires PAE, the version of ubuntu it is based requires this, Ubuntu do have a nonpae version but Mint have not done so which is a shame. Mint 13 however does support processors without PAE and will be supported till 2017, I'd recommend just using 13 it will still have most of the stuff from 14, especially security updates., course it depends on what you want it for.

> MM yes. 32 bits is a long time ago tho.

It is, but putting linux onto old hardware is an excellent way of getting extra life out of a machine, Mint have dropped the ball here IMHO

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Get out your Allen keys: Facebook's cooked up flat-pack bit barns

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RE: ever attempted to assemble something

That's the word that sums up my dislike for Ikea (and it's ilk) 'assemble', the average quality of furniture nowadays is terrible and stems from everyones insatiable appetite for everything now. Whatever happened to the days where people saved and bought good quality stuff that will last a life time (often improving with age).

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Fukushima radioactivity a complete non-issue on West Coast: Also for Fukushima locals, in fact

wikkity
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Re: obvious link between people who don't believe in AGW, and religion.

No there isn't. One thing you could say may be true is that someone who believes in religion is more likely to accept things put to them by popular opinion as fact, so maybe there is a correlation between people who believe both are true.

I don't believe in either BTW

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Microsoft's JavaScript challenger nears 1.0, wins Visual Studio love

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@Boltar

> Javascript should not be used for large scale development.

I'd always prefer something else whenever possible. But say you have a number of core products that are customised for many clients that need to work offline on any device, say for geospatial data collection, then you've apps for processing/cleansing that data further up the chain and of course presentation of that data, you've got a lot of code though hopefully a lot of it shared . Then of course in all that source code you've got components that are used in completely different apps, e.g. data entry/validation components, even with backend checking you still need validation at the UI.

It doesn't take long before you've got a pretty large code base where your only alternative is using native apps or forcing the user online and always do stuff server side (which then reduces your client base).

I'm not saying this is how projects I work on are built, our javascript for large/medium projects tends to be generated from a variaety of tools/sources e.g. domain models, rules and buisness DSLs, those same generators create corresponding java, wsdl, c# etc...

> And if you have that much code client side then perhaps you should rethink your whole design.

Certainly an indicator that it should be revisited.

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Re: Can't see the point myself.

I like using both typed and untyped languages, each have their place. E.g. for the large (0.5M LOC) code base give me a typed language any day for a number of reasons, but if you have any doubts on this just compare refactoring possibilities for JS and Java, a typed language simply makes refactoring much easier.

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Re: Can't see the point myself.

Because like it or not Javascript development does not scale easily. Sure you can roll your own tools and pick and mix form open source tools but when you start approaching large code bases shared across projects it starts get hairy and refactoring is an absolute enormous pain.

And before anyone starts saying, you can do this with X and that with Y, sure you can but they are just bandaids. I like javascript and used it for many years, very familiar with jquery, mootools, various unit testing frameworks, package managers etc... But they don't come anywhere close to the tool chains that you get for say Java, TypeScript and Dart are a step in the right direction.

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Linux-friendly Munich: Ja, we'll take open source collab cloud

wikkity
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Re: Hmm. You never......

> Debian require more resources than Debian

Oops, should have been Debian require more resources than _Ubuntu_, need longer editing windows

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wikkity
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Re: Hmm. You never......

> Here you go if the press commentary was not evidence enough:

Was this document put there with the conset of the publisher? I'd be interested to know the details in this as my german is really not very good. For example, are they really say that you can run XP professional on a really crap 300Mz cpu with 128MB ram and Debian needs a much higher spec machine and a 5GB disk? Also, how does Debian require more resources than Debian. And this is just the bit I understand, maybe the rest of the document is nonsense?

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Re: publicly available evidence

Eh, how does an article based on a press release statinging that the report won't be published count as evidence? Evidence is something that can be examined, reviewed and concluded upon, a few tidbits of what someone who works in MS decides to put in a press release is not evidence.

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Re: Lucky

Even if it did cost more the most important point is that THEY are now in control of their IT roadmap and infrastructure. Remember the mess the NHS is in with XP?

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Pirate Bay becomes 'Research Bay' for three days

wikkity
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Re: Modern Cinema

Maybe the cineme app detects when a video is being recorded on the phone and notifies the cinema to catch people recording the movie. Though why anyone would want to watch a recording by someone sitting in the audience is beyond me.

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WhatsApp founder: Believe us, internet! 'Twas a DODGY network router WOT DONE IT

wikkity
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Re: I'm glad it was a router problem.

> Obviously It is clear that now we need to rewrite the whole internet infrastructure in a better language

But that won't stop people configuring it wrong

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Collective SSL FAIL a symptom of software's cultural malaise

wikkity
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Re: Goto

The code in question highlights the benefits of at least 4 essential coding standard rules:

Never initialise a return value if the language can detect an unassigned value (e.g. java) otherwise initialise to a value that can not be possibly be correct.

Have automated unit tests, both for success and failures.

ALWAYS add braces around blocks of code

Have automated unit tests, both for success and failures.

Plus a couple of minor ones:

only use goto _really_ improves readability (only rarely seen cases where it does)

don't use tabs for code indentation

In this case I've have thought a code development IDE would have made this glaringly obvious to the operator if they allow it to indent your code.

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wikkity
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Re: Shitty comments abound, too..

> Shitty comments abound, too... You should expect some down votes for making an unsubstantiated snidey comment about a wide-spread set of tools that a lot of people use by choice.

Maybe the op thought that what he said is did not need to be substantiated given the audience on this forum. For many application areas standards identify subsets of language features that can be used, e.g. MISRA for c/c++

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NHS England DIDN'T tell households about GP medical data grab plan

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Re: Every household?

Yep, we did not receive one either.

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Russian cybercrooks shun real currencies, develop private altcoins

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Re: But it keeps bouncing back.

And bouncing back down, and up and down ...

Good for speculation (potentially) No good for cash flow you are running a business regardless of legality.

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Samsung flings sueball at Dyson for 'intolerable' IP copycat claim

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Re: Not enough protection?

Downvoted for stating that patents do not cover ideas or solutions that have prior art or even cover other solutions to the same problem? Either people don't understand or work at Dyson?

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wikkity
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Not enough protection?

"The patent system offers us some protection but not enough: with an army of lawyers, hidden prior art is occasionally found and ways to design around existing patents identified."

Why should it offer any protection to something that is not prior art or if a company achieve the desired effect in a different way? You can't patent ideas, just the way of implementing them neber mind if it's not an original suggestion.

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New password system lets planet Earth do the hard work

wikkity
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Location Salted?

"geographical information such as longitude, latitude, altitude and the length of the boundary to form the password, which is salted"

I thought a scorched earth policy was outlawed under the Geneva convention?

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Google hefts MySQL service into cloud

wikkity
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Re: Well it is now the most commonly used database server....

That article on technet provide no source details for the information and seems to either plain incorrect or putting so much spin on figures to not be worthy of consideration, e.g. the very first:

"76% of all enterprise apps now run on the cloud-friendly Windows Server platform"

Clearly untrue. For starters I find it impossible to believe that 76% of all enterprise apps are hosted in a cloud never mind on their platform.

I'd suspect that these figures are based on strict MS centric criteria.

"Microsoft SQL Server is now the most widely used database in the world (46% market share), and has outgrew Oracle by nearly 2x."

This is most probably referring to deployments on windows servers

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wikkity
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Re: Well it is now the most commonly used database server....

I'm really not trolling here, I am genuinely interested. I had a bit of search into this before I posted and did a bit more afterwards but can't find anything recent or comprehensive. Gartner in 2012 are saying oracle is the clear winner, I found something with IDC that says for window servers SQL Server is way in front (which I could begin to believe).

Plus a lot of the reports seem to be orientated to licensed databases, i.e. missing most mysql and postrgressql database installations.

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wikkity
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Re: Well it is now the most commonly used database server....

Source for that? I'd personally be amazed if that is the case, I could possibly believe Access if you want to stretch things. For starters it only runs on windows unlike the other major players.

In (cough) years of experience with many companies (as an employee, client and provider) the only times I have encountered a SQL Service instance is when the system has been MS centric and they have been few and far between, i.e. MS dev tools, MS languages, MS platform. But maybe thats because I don't tend to get involved with MS development projects through both choice and suitability for the role. (I wouldn't be able to put a number of the amount of systems I've seen/worked on but you are talking several hundred.)

I've no problems about being proven wrong, just find it hard to believe.

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wikkity
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Re: re. MySQL cf. MariaDB

People want SQL Server? Bizarre!

Seriously though it's most likely a licensing issue, it would cost a lot more than than a few cents a day for an Oracle instance, especially one sitting in the internet. If you understand licensing of these as a dba you can add 10,000s at least to your salary.

Another reason, Google don't use those. They only seem to offer services around stuff they use for themeselves which I can understand, if you can earn a bit extra cash of what you do why not, but moving outside that then you are looking at extra costs you wouldn't normally have and not be able to focus as much on your main business.

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Whitehall and Microsoft negotiate NHS Windows XP hacker survival plan

wikkity
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Re: Risks of using proprietry software, less than no official support OS software!

> If open source offered SLA/support to mission critical services, then perhaps open source would be taken seriously

It does, presumably you don't think that people who say rely on linux for don't pay for support and hope stuff just works? If you and others are willing to pay for something someone will fill that gap. Open source is rarely a bunch of geeks in their bedroom, well maybe at the start of a project or yet another ego massaging attempt to implement another best ever UML editor. But the stuff used in enterprise and government the developers earn their living working on, it's not amateur stuff. There is a lot of money in developing and supporting OS.

> The cost of MS licensing is cheaper than losing critical services which could cost lives.

Open source in anything non critical or even inconvenient to lose is not free, and in likelyhood not cheaper on a like for like basis. It is the fact that the ONE supplier can change things. How many people on here would allow a single point of failure in something important?

Having to fork out an extra $200 for each pc to the only people who can provide support is a huge extra cost.

> This is not the issue, a migration plan should have been kicked off when MS announced XP is dead! If migration had occurred, your point would be moot.

Yes it should but they didn't get it done in time, thats the situation. If they had have made it they are only delaying the problem, you think switch to windows 9 next time is going to be any easier, how many technologies will MS have decided to ditch by then how much broken software will they have to fix then? Unless lessons are learnt they will be in the same boat.

How much has been spent in migration costs across the entire government, the UK, the world? True, upgrading is always going to be an expense, but having to migrate from something you are happy with and works to something you don't want to move to, and at great cost is simply a side affect of being dependant on a company who's business model needs you to buy the new version (I'm not saying MS are evil for not supporting this indefinitely, they are a business that sells products).

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wikkity
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Re: Risks of using proprietry software

> ignoring eol dates until 5 minutes

The date was not ignored, they have failed to migrate in time, I have seen evidence first hand of genuine attempts to get ready, not just the NHS but other depts and LEAs. If their infrastructure was based on open solutions you can be certain that they would be able to get someone to provide support the software and the OS for as long as they want without having to pay a crazy amount.

It's not just a case of hoping around a bunch of machines installing a new OS. They have an infrastructure where many things that are tightly coupled and critical applications are preventing movement and that can take significant time to fix/replace/test. I don't know most of the details, but the people I have spoken to cite issues with software not working correctly on windows 7/8, mainly due to sloppy/rushed development, say for example those requiring IE 6 or 7 or propriety software that needs fixing or replacing.

If they used open standards moving to a new platform or replacing bits would be much simpler.

They should never have got into this situation in the first place and as I said I hope that this will help raise the importance of open solutions (open source or standards), and maybe mean choosing propriety product from a large multinational will not continue to be considered a low risk option. Not saying that it is a magic bullet but gives you _options_, and when things go bad you need options and things going bad needs to be considered up front and constantly reviewed.

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wikkity
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> testing the 160 applications we needed to deliver services

How many failed? How many are preventing this migration from being rolled out? I have no idea and can't see any information about that.

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wikkity
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Risks of using proprietry software

I hope this serves as learning exercise to people about the risks of using proprietary software and I hope that it is remembered . You are then dependent on a single company, personally I can not understand why anyone, let alone a government organisation can ever allow themselves to be potentially affected by the whims of a single company, regardless of who that company is.

This mess must surely send some loud signals that maybe open source and (real) standards are something that really needs to be considered when buying in new systems. I personally am seeing a lot of desire for large organisations to migrate to more open solutions but budget constraints are preventing this, not just this country but government depts/enterpise customers in other countries.

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FBI offers $10,000 bounty for arrest of laser-wielding idiots

wikkity
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"aircraft must avoid the vicinity for 20 minutes"

Hmm, maybe they should search people who turn up late for a delayed flight, see if they have a laser pointer in their pockets.

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John McAfee declares war on Android

wikkity
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If you use something like cyanogen then yes (google/bing/etc for privacy guard), if you use stock anroind then no, but I'd be very surprised if it doesn't come soon.

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wikkity
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Re: Android is one big spying platform

> The weather app sends your GPS coordinates to a web server periodically

I assume you are talking about sending the coords unencrypted, otherwise how would you expect it to function? If you are worried about your coords being unencrypted find another one that doesn't. If you are just concerned about it sending the coords to a webserver I'd suggest you wet your finger and stick it out the window.

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wikkity
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Re: Really

Yeah, really. I suppose you could install openjdk on there if you root the device if you really wanted to run java.

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wikkity
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@DAM

You are clearly looking for downvotes, why else would someone write a clear and simple to understand fact.

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Someone's snatched my yummy Brit COTTAGE PIE – Viv Reding

wikkity
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Re: Cheese? In a cottage pie?

No, has to have grated cheese on top, fantastic as it melts in the mash as you eat it.

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HTC looks to cheaper phones as revenues wane

wikkity
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MTP

I personally prefer MTP, it encapsulates the file system to the device rather than the host (usually the PC) allowing the device to safely use the filesystem at the same time and theoretically allow the device to use a filesystem other than FAT (and associated MS licensing), don't know of any phones that do though.

It would be nice to have the choice though.

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Netflix speed index shows further decline in Verizon quality

wikkity
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Re: @Christian Berger Overly aggressive throttling?

> fringe group

Netflix customers are a fringe group? Last I heard it was around 1/3 of internet traffic, thats more than porn!

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JavaScript is everywhere. So are we all OK with that?

wikkity
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RE: Does anyone remember DHTML ?

Eh, what do you use nowadays then?

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