Feeds

* Posts by David Lester

51 posts • joined 3 Jul 2007

Page:

Ada Lovelace Day: Meet the 6 women who gave you the 'computer'

David Lester

And there I was, expecting a quick mention of the crytanalysts at Bletchley Park.

A rather nice photo of Joan Clarke is in the article:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2346828/Film-WW2-codebreaker-Alan-Turing-attacked-biographer-exaggerating-love-affair-woman-gay-says-Keira-Knightley-glamorous.html

0
0

NO SALE: IBM won't cash in its chips with GlobalFoundries after all

David Lester

300mm (= 1') fab

"DiMarco, a longtime IBM employee, was previously in charge of designing, building, and running IBM's 300mm fab in East Fishkill, NY."

Really? 300mm? One imperial foot?

Like wow!

Are you sure you're not having a Dr Evil moment?

(should it in fact be 30nm?)

1
8

Ex-Sun journalist charged with handling a stolen mobile phone

David Lester

Re: Is it wise leaving comments open on a live crown court prosecution?

Patrick writes:

"What bothers me is - does turning it on to see in the lock screen has contact info count as "using it without authorisation"?"

Well, to put the icing on the cake. After handing the phone in, and getting a receipt ("We don't want you to be done for receiving stolen goods, do we Sir"), the WPC turned it on, and because the PIN wasn't in use, she rapidly found "Mum" under the contacts list.

The ensuing conversation "She did what? On the bus?" did not bode well for a happy Mother-Daughter reunion that evening!

0
0
David Lester

Re: Is it wise leaving comments open on a live crown court prosecution?

Right, in that case -- as someone who found a mobile on a bus one morning and turned it into the police (rather than the bus driver) -- what is the protocol in this situation?

0
0
David Lester

Is it wise leaving comments open on a live crown court prosecution?

Your lawyers may have "views"!

0
0

Memory muddle muddies Intel's Exascale ambitions

David Lester

Re: I don't know why this is a problem..

"Exascale does not just mean "ARM based vector processor".... for specialized applications."

Talking with NVidea executives in the back of a taxi in Lausanne: "Exascale is just a marketing term; it means whatever we want it to mean!"

Still, to be serious for a moment, the major energy consumption is going to lie in the interconnect. Making it fully general purpose and scalable will be extremely expensive. As most supercomputers are made of stock Intel components, it might be useful to consider custom interconnect in order to drive energy costs down. The different supercomputer customers have wildly different requirements. Google, for example, the largest user of supercomputers on the planet has no (or very little) need of floating point.

What I expect to happen with next generation supercomputers is:

(*) Vectorization (drives down fetch-execute costs)

(*) DRAM stacked 3D (reduces memory access energy costs by factor of 5 at 28nm)

(*) As many cores as you can put in. (Steve's on record saying that energy efficiency dictates that these cores need to be as small and simple as possible; my only comment as the programmer is I'd like one heavy-duty core to handle IO)

1
0
David Lester

I don't know why this is a problem..

Furber and I announced an ARM-based vector processor for neuroscience applications with an equivalent power-performance ratio in Lisbon in June, and no need to invent new technologies, just 28nm, mobile DRAM, and 3D packaging.

... Of course, if you insist on something as power-hungry as x86, you'll need to be a bit more inventive, ...

1
1

Stephen Fry explains… Alan Turing's amazing computer

David Lester

Re: Am I missing something?

AC writes: "What he seems to have said doesn't look particularly wrong to me. Turing had written Computable Numbers in 1938..."

1936. See http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~robins/Turing_Paper_1936.pdf

"... but it was only after the war, at the NPL, that he focused on building the universal machine. Due to the lack of momentum at NPL he decided to go to Manchester where at least he would have access to a working computer."

True. But part of the problem at NPL was too many people trying to "help" design it. Turing included.

"For a mathematician he was very hands on, and did lots of building of electronics."

Hmmm...

"Finally, it is arguable that the Manchester device was the worlds first programmable digital logical computer, rather than a calculating machine which is what all previous devices were (and mostly analogue)."

Argue away...

0
6

Euro boffins plan supercomputer to SIMULATE HUMAN BRAIN

David Lester

SpiNNaker and HBP

Paul Turner has kindly pointed out similarities between SpiNNaker and the HBP proposal. This is no accident: Steve Furber and I have had considerable input into HBP, and we are major partners in this project.

As far as we are concerned, we gain immeasurably from access to interested Neuroscientists and the other skills we do not have. For example Seth Grant (Edinburgh/Cambridge/Sanger Institute) is one of the foremost scientists in the field of genetics and neuroscience. Stanislas Dehaene is a great Cognitive Scientist.

The difficulty with multi-disciplinary research projects is finding people willing to cooperate and willing to invest the time to understand the new languages used to describe other fields of science. For example, integrating the SpiNNaker chip into robotics is not something many mainstream roboticists wish to undertake, and with good reason. With most robots one would want to be sure about what it will do, for safety reasons if no others; this is not an option if the device's behaviour changes as it learns.

Steve and I have already invested time and effort talking to the "neurorobotic" part of the project: Alois Knoll and the rest of his team in Munich (there's a SpiNNaker board there already linked to one of their robots), Murray Shannahan at Imperial and others.

We also need the biological insights that will come from the neuroscience part of the project led by Henry Markram at EPFL Lausanne. Without this, we will struggle to make our work "biologically relevant".

Of course, there is also the Graphene research that won the other €1 billion prize; they're celebrating on the floor below me!

6
0

Learning about chip design from Silicon Roundabout

David Lester
IT Angle

So, about that Steve Furber Interview...

... I'm making damned sure he's up to his eye balls in EU funding proposals at the moment (it's my job); but if you like we'll see what we can do after Jan 6.

0
0

Future of computing crystal-balled by top chip boffins

David Lester

It's a shame Faggin isn't a bit younger...

... because I rather fancy a wager on the success of neuro-computing.

Say $50 on the Human Brain Project ( http://www.humanbrainproject.eu/ ) turning out something useful if it gets ten years funding.

The snag with teaching yourself neuroscience is that it's really an entirely new subject; you'd be better off getting real experts involved. So HBP involves people like Henry Markram (Neuroscience), Steve Furber (ARM designer), and Seth Grant (Human Genome project, neuro-genomics expert).

Dave Lester (APT Manchester / HBP project)

0
0

Boffins fear killer gamma death blasts from space

David Lester
Boffin

Timescales

I'm looking through an old book of mine ("Approaches to numerical Relativity" Ray d'Inverno, CUP 1992), and numeric simulations of colliding neutron stars appear to occur over very short periods: ie the final approach from 20km to merger takes about 2ms.

Does anyone have any more recent estimates? There's also an assumption that the pulsars are not shredded at 20km, which would have been a necessary simplification 20 years ago, but may be considered unrealistic nowadays. Anyone?

0
0

Faster-than-light back with surprising CERN discovery

David Lester
Coat

An observation from a Physics outsider ...

Does this tie in with the observation that neutrino bursts from distant supernova appear to arrive 20 minutes prior to the visual confirmation? Is this the right time difference to match the experiment? (Previously explained as "dust" interactions.)

As neutrinos notoriously don't interact much, could this be something to do with the virtual particle creation/destruction in transit.

0
1

Boffins step closer to steam-powered Babbage computer

David Lester
Boffin

An issue for steam-powered computers...

... is that of heat transmission.

One of the "computing engines" in the Science Museum's collection is Carter's Ringing Machine. This was devised circa 1900 by Mr Carter, who was a Birmingham Bell-ringer, and -- for afficionados it was capable of ringing Stedman Triples on hand bells via an electro-mechanical linkage. The problems was that with the original steam engine, heat was transmitted via the drive shaft into the system causing sufficient expansion for the tolerances to be exceeded and the machine to seize.

In more recent times, the machine has rung a "full extent" of Stedman Triples (that's all 7! = 5040 changes or about three hours), using an electric motor as power supply. It's worth a look if you can get the curator to give you a private demonstration.

2
0

ARM daddy simulates human brain with million-chip super

David Lester
Pint

Reply to Mike 137

The topic for discussion next Monday with Kevin Gurney (Computational Neuroscience, Sheffield) is: "The striatum: what do we know? Can SpiNNaker model it convincingly?"

But the point about Robots is well-taken. We have already made contact with both UK and EU robotics potential partners. What Tim has not focused on (there's rather a lot of work behind the press release) is that the system runs in real-time. And it's low power --- each chip consumes 1A at 1V (for 1W power consumption) and for the neural simulation it has the computing power of a typical high-end desk top. The full system runs at less then 50kW (depending on work-load).

Still, the question we all have is: just what do you have to do to get an article filed under RiseOfTheMachines? Buy all the London-based staff beers?

0
0

Psychology graduates remain poor for life, study shows

David Lester
IT Angle

Lewis: there's an IT flip side...

Whilst the popularity of Psychology probably lies more in it's promise to aid understanding of other humans, rather than subsequent employability; there's a mystery as to why -- here at Manchester -- our Computer Science courses are so un-popular, at least for UK students.

Last year the department led the Engineering and Science Faculty tables on employability. Has this led to a major improvement in applications? Of course not! As Admissions Tutor I will be one of the few in the University going into clearing again this summer, and this despite having the target reduced by 10% a few weeks ago.

Perhaps the Reg readership would like to get to the bottom of the subject's unpopularity. Is it that compulsory IT GCSE leaves people with the mistaken impression that Computer Science is IT? Do most people not realise that the subject is either discrete maths or electrical engineering, and consequently fail to get the requisite maths A-level? Answers on a postcard, please ...

Still it's the same story over in Chemical Engineering, and they're the most well-rewarded newly-minted graduates.

0
0

Journos 'risk charges' for covering Parliamentary debates

David Lester

Who do you invite to a Dinner Party with Andrew Marr?

Another question is the old Private Eye trick, whereby we conclude an article about the fragrant Imogen, with -- apropos nothing at all -- a quick: "Lester Haines is 57".

I noticed rather a lot of that in the last issue, including apparently interesting speculation on who best to invite to a dinner party with Andrew Marr.

I think it'd be best if their Lordships got their thinking straight on these relatively simple matters before taking on the complexity of the interwebs.

0
0

Intel: Windows on ARM won't run 'legacy apps'

David Lester

... And I thought our spin-out (Transitive, now IBM) had solved the binary translation problem?

Binary Translation, anyone?

(Seriously, if this is the best Intel can muster, then the writing really is on the wall isn't it?)

1
0

Plague of US preachers falsely claim to be Navy SEALs

David Lester

The combat-to-clergy transition

The most famous example in the UK would be the late Robert Runcie MC: a tank platoon commander in 1944/5; latterly ABofC.

1
0

Microsoft to Apple: 'Oh, yeah? Well, your font is too small'

David Lester
Headmaster

For the First Time ever ... I support Microsoft!

Not content with "genericness", we also have "fact-intensive assessment" inflicted upon us.

All I can suppose is that it makes a pleasant change to the usual lawyerly[*] amble through the sunlit uplands of "fact free" legal discourse.

[*] What do you mean: of course any noun can be f**kingly adverbed. It's part of my first amendment rights.

0
0

Ten... fantasy swords you wish you owned

David Lester
Boffin

Hrunting Hellfire!!! ...

... you've only forgotten the most famous sword in Anglo-Saxon folklore (we'll ignore the Romano-British Excalibur, shall we?)

0
0

WikiLeaks.org resurrected in US of A

David Lester

Diplomacy

As someone who's been acting as ambassador to my boss on contract negotiations with the EU, the whole feel of these diplomatic cables gives me deja vu.

The boss (for whatever reason) cannot attend the mid-level meeting. He can read the minutes. But what he really needs is a feel for how the meeting went. That's what these thumbnail portraits (of foreign worthies) and gossip (the stuff that's not minuted) really represents.

And with few exceptions, what we see is that US diplomacy in private is virtually identical to what it says in public. And that's a jolly good thing.

0
0

French woman chased up tree by wild pigs, rescued by copter

David Lester

Add Pheasant ...

Typical porcine behaviour; boar are viscious buggers when they're defending their young.

Still to add to you list: pheasants...

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1257522/?page=1

This is from a memorable Xmas special BMJ issue (1987); they used to reserve their strangest articles for the holiday period.

0
0

Jobsian fondle-slab in SEXY FILTHGRAM CRACKDOWN

David Lester
Boffin

I have a Dream!

Steve Evans writes: "Jeeez The US patent office will allow a patent on anything won't they!"

I would like to patent a device that can automatically generate a patent that the US patent office will reject. Provided that such a device/software/buisness method is granted a patent -- and I'm unaware of prior art, nor do I think such a device is obvious to practicioners of the art -- then I think I can then diagonalize (after Georg Cantor) the US patent office, and we will never hear from them again.

2
0

Google ops czar condemns multi-core extremists

David Lester
Boffin

I'm writing a Wimpy multi-core OS, as we speak ...

... well more an RT executive, truth be told.

Whilst Amdahl's Law cannot be revoked, our intended application (neuroscience) has P=1 (ie everything is parallellizable). And hence, (modulo interconnect performance) a million chips runs a million times faster. By Amdahl's Law. Cool eh?

An 18 core ARM chip running at 233MHz? Pretty wimpy. (But can be powered from the USB port)

A million of them, with sufficient interconnect? Now that's what I call interesting ...

http://www.newelectronics.co.uk/article/26279/Modelling-the-brain.aspx

0
0

Reg hack celebrates happy event

David Lester
IT Angle

Buridan's Ass

For those in need of the IT angle, I commend Leslie Lamport's excellent article on Buridan's Ass:

http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/lamport/pubs/buridan.pdf

0
0

Computer grads can't even get jobs offering personal services

David Lester

What this actually means...

These are government statistics. This means that we will be using all HESA course codes in subject area 25.

(Decrypt: G4xx Computer Science, G5xx IT, G6x Software (and other) Engineering, G7xx AI, G8xx I just don't care).

So the message might more simply have been stated as: if you have a degree in IT, you'll struggle to get a job. The CS students will be a minority amongst the sample included within these statistics. Certainly here in Manchester, our graduates have turned out to be more employable than any others in the science faculty for the last year.

1
0

MIT boffins exhibit self-forming 'programmable matter'

David Lester
Thumb Up

Very interesting, but ...

I was impressed enough with Daniela's work when I saw it in Italy last month that I'd intended to tip off El Reg about it.

One drawback on the practical front is the power consumption. Those smart wires draw five amps. She also has other vids of self-sculpting matter and smart matter. Again the current drawn by the 1624 minimotors she's using would worry me.

Still I'm no robotocist; instead it's a matter of some pride that she's using our low-power ARMs!

1
0

A Deadlock Holiday

David Lester
Boffin

Oh No it's Not! (parody)

Panto season started early this year Mr Carnegie?

Having spent twenty-five years with threading and multi-processor programming, I'd say that this is probably the finest introduction to the subject that you'll ever come across.

0
0

Hands off our boffins!

David Lester

@how many boffins do you expect to leave the UK in search of better prospects?

Dear AC (14.50GMT),

I thought I might get a reply of that nature. ;-)

We are in complete agreement: what matters is the resources available to "UK based boffinry". And by that I mean PhD grants and money for post docs. If it's taken away, then there's not much point in my under-boffins or any xeno-boffins replacing me is there? They'd also be better off elsewhere. Don't forget that in today's world, my under-boffins are not UK nationals. As for getting UK nationals as PhD students....

And by taking away the PhD grants, the primary mechanism for finding your overseas boffins (for subsequent use in UK industry) is also removed. But you knew that, didn't you?

0
0
David Lester

Speaking as one of the afore-mentioned boffins

The question you have to ask DBIS is this: how many boffins do you expect to leave the UK in search of better prospects?

We put up with the low pay, and the petty bureaucracy, in return for sufficient funding to do something interesting and then tell others about it. We build up networks of friends around the globe. And, if conditions become uncomfortable, we are highly mobile.

So, for computing: Seattle, the Bay Area, or Sophia Antipolis vs Manchester? Right now, what holds me back are worries about health insurance and the doubtful nature of my rusty French. If either country has the foresight to make me an offer, I'm interested.

All it would take to wreck UK Science and Engineering is for politicians in another part of the world to make us an offer we can't refuse. An interesting ploy for the USA, at the right time, would be to make a blanket offer to consider all UK scientists in disciplines of interest, short-circuiting current immigration red-tape. For France the immigration status is even easier to sort out, and the climate in Nice is attractive. So to the French minister I say: "Give me a modest salary, and the research funding I need, and I'll move tomorrow."

And besides, buying up another countries scientists is probably the cheapest way to undermine it's viability.

(And if you want an example of how to do science in a recession look at the Alvey Project in the early 1980s. The UK CS scene was transformed by this, and ARM is only the most significant of the many productive companies resulting from that decision.)

What has David Willetts got to say?

0
0

Tory MP to sue over sex smear email

David Lester

Conspiracy to commit libel

Mr Anonymous Coward writes:

" - there is no offence of plotting to commit libel."

I wonder, however, whether there might be a charge of "conspiracy to commit libel"? Or is "consipricy" restricted purely to criminal charges?

Time to call Schillings and Carter-Ruck...

0
0

Good Housekeeping readers play hunt the G-spot

David Lester
Joke

Homophone Gambit Declined

Sarah,

Surely you meant to ask Mr Gumby whether he wished to become "...our sex toy co-respondent" before pointing out that such a task might not involve any journalistic talent.

0
0

PC repair shop caught trying bank fraud

David Lester
Happy

You just can't get the PFYs these days...

Paging Simon Travaglia...

0
0

DRAM patent holder sues Big Blue

David Lester
Boffin

on-chip DRAM patent?

Remind me: wasn't I using Intel chips in the 1970s with these features?

How long does a patent last in the good ole US of A?

0
0

Did speaker's statement show he doesn't know what day IT is?

David Lester
Thumb Down

No PC? No evidence!

Pace the informative correspondence attatched to your last item on plod/computer interactions, it should be abundantly clear by now that the Met have no intention of taking this to trial. Because if they did intend to go to trial, they now have no audited evidence trail for Mr Greene's PC or hard drive image.

We can therefore safely infer that the only remaining purpose of the SO15 operation is to serve as an intimidatory warning to others.

I'm still puzzled by the red herring of warrants? These are signed by a judge or magistrate on behalf of Her Majesty. And She is the one person who through centuries of hard-fought tradition is prohibited, along with all Her agents, from entering the House of Commons, except by the express invitation of the House.

Logically, any search of Parliament can only take place with the express permission of the Speaker and/or Sergeant-at-arms. Which, luckily for the Met, is exactly what happened.

0
0

Counter-terror police arrest Tory frontbencher

David Lester
Coat

Fabulous News!

First they came for the Icelandic Banks; but I wasn't an Icelandic Bank.

Then they came for opposition MPs; but I wasn't an opposition MP.

Who's next?

Perhaps it's time for all of us all to get our coats?

0
0

IBM gets into server transit business

David Lester
Coat

A former Labour Minister does Nominet's job for them...

Alisdair was a lecturer here, not a research student.

And as I recall it, the initial development of the idea was undertaken by final year undergraduates.

0
0

Mandelson's dept mulls UK internet power grab

David Lester
Boffin

A former Labour Minister does Nominet's job for them...

A quick google through www.berr.gov.uk/pressroom (now cached only) shows that a certain Right Honourable Stephen Timms had this to say about nominet:

"I am really pleased that Nominet has taken the lead, showing that this really is not a government-led, top-down initiative, but one grown from the Internet community. It is an initiative that engages with all parts of the social and economic fabric that benefits from, and contributes to, the development of the information society.

The Forum is not a club for governments, not a decision or treaty making forum. It serves to improve our understanding, to help us make better decisions, to find better ways of addressing problems.

The Internet Governance Forum has identified key topics to help orient its discussion: access, diversity, openness and security. As well as concern from some countries about the management of critical Internet resources. These issues are all important for the future of the Internet, and they cannot be addressed in isolation from each other.

Next June the OECD is organising a ministerial conference on the future of the Internet economy. That will see a similar focus: how to increase global connectivity? How to respond to the changes in use of the Internet? How to allow individual choice for access to content?

These things are looked at differently around the world. There are different expectations and concerns. The more we can do to understand the challenges and the opportunities, the better prepared we will be to take advantage of the knowledge economy, of the societal benefits from the innovation and growth of this powerful channel of communications and human interaction.

And that’s where Nominet’s Best Practice Challenge comes in. The UK has a good story to tell. We can use our position as a major knowledge economy to help show others examples of good practice, to help others address concerns. Sharing good practice like this will also help us to identify things that we could do better.

And so to the best practice challenge awards.

First, I’d like to commend Nominet for their initiative: this is really important in helping underline UK leadership.

Second, I welcome the community’s response in coming forward with first class examples of what can be achieved. That must have made Alun Michael’s job as chair of the selection difficult.

And third to commend the selection team for choosing between the really good to identify the excellent.

Competition has been strong. There is a wealth of good examples which we can show the world with pride. Which show the UK off as a forward thinking, Internet economy that cares for its citizens, too.

Perhaps Bob and Lesley could tell us about the shortlist?"

0
0

Knights Templar to Vatican: Give us back our assets

David Lester
Coat

Nothing exists ...

I'm rather taken with the epistemology involved in the statement "... <True> Nothing<ness> exists".

0
0

Attack of the Italian space pod parachute babes

David Lester
Alert

I foresee a Lego re-imagining ...

Lewis writes: "Regarding the matter of which Shooting Star might eventually become the world's first space parachutist - truly, the first really haut couture sky diver - Giovangrossi played his cards close to his chest.

"Tests with humans are a long way off", he said. ®"

Surely the perfect moment to suggest that El Reg contributes to the advancement of science, no?

Weren't you even mildly tempted to suggest that there might be suitably qualified El Reg staffers prepared to go where no one has gone before in pursuit of the best in Italian high fashion?

0
0

Ubuntu trumpets aromatic pistou of borage

David Lester
Coat

Restaurant Reviews

Dear Ashley,

I've found two restaurant reviews for this place (I had thought that a mate of mine who reviews for the Michelin Guide had reviewed it early last year when he visited Napa, but apparently not).

http://www.chow.com/stories/11149/

Quote: "In February, Ubuntu was lauded by New York Times food critic Frank Bruni as one of the 10 best new restaurants in the country alongside meat-centric places like New Orleans’s Cochon."

Alternatively,

http://madeater.blogspot.com/2008/03/not-review-of-ubuntu.html

(So, Pizza is on the menu, and wine, and salt (lots of salt), Mr Tanuki)

From what I can see of the wine list, there's lots of Napa wine (duh!), but perhaps a little surprisingly none of the wines I'd personally select from Napa are there. Perhaps that's to be expected, as most Californian wine never makes it onto the shelves of wine stores here in the UK. On the other hand, the French wines with which I'm much more familiar don't inspire much confidence in the sommelier. Delas Freres Cote-du-Rhone? An eminently missable Sauternes?

My best guess? Ashley probably won't like this restaurant anymore than I would.

0
0

Airshow Blighty hits town - 100 years of UK powered flight

David Lester
Happy

I foresee a Lego re-imagining ...

... of the Lady parachutists and the Escape Capsule this Friday!

(And am disappointed that Lewis is not currently beavering away on this very topic, as we speak.)

0
0

French Colonial Marines to get Aliens medic-datalink

David Lester
Boffin

That's not MM and JFK ...

Lewis,

As you are obviously an educated man, I offer for your consideration today's new French word: "Atomize" (pronounced atom-ee-zay). Approximate translation: "Nuked". From the verb "atomizer".

I feel you of all people would appreciate having such a word in their lexicon.

0
0

Monroe BJ film - world exclusive still

David Lester
Happy

That's not MM and JFK ...

... That's the headless man (Alec Douglas-Home?) and the Duchess of Argyll!

0
0

Robot builders hunt for a killer application

David Lester
Paris Hilton

Killer App already found

Old news; Lester Haines has already covered this.

The "Killer App" for robotics is --- of course:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/04/22/android_begats_armageddon_machine/

(I have selected the terrifying image of one of the Lizard Army's cyber drones.)

0
0

Hypersonic hydrogen airliner to bitchslap Concorde

David Lester

Fireball XL5

Mark,

It's not Captain Scarlet, that's Fireball XL5 (another great Gerry Anderson adventure in SuperMarionation)!

0
0
David Lester

Where's the RoTM angle icon?

That's Fireflash, sorry image at http://thunderbirds.sfdaydreams.com/toys/kfelevcars2.jpg

0
0

Erratic fleshies sabotage, wreck innocent flying robot

David Lester
Heart

Where's the RoTM angle icon?

Well?

We've got an "IT?" icon and a "Bubble-headed Heiress?" icon.

So why no "RoTM angle?" icon

I guess I'm just going to improvise something ironic...

0
0

Page: