* Posts by Kaltern

225 posts • joined 2 Jan 2013

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Samsung: You won't settle? Fine, we'll do this the Huawei

Kaltern

BTW That was a seriously bad article title....

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Web meltdown: BT feels heat from angry punters

Kaltern

Re: Power Outage

Putin will be taking notes...

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MPs tell BT: Lay more fibre or face split with Openreach

Kaltern

Re: BT - the caring company.

Yes, I do. It's almost enough to get satellite broadband.....

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Kaltern

Re: BT - the caring company.

FTTC is still fibre in some manner. FTTP is a rarity outside of main English cities.

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Kaltern

" it should be operated as a not-for-profit company in order to service the requirements of the various stakeholders (Government, Consumers and the Retail Services companies who sell the services to consumers)."

And this is the prime reason it will very likely never happen.

There is something to be said for nationalisation, but it is usually a bad word. Besides, people don't actually mind paying for their internet service. It's just that the initial cost outlay is scary for BT; it might eat into more important things, like making sure those with superfast broadband can get it a little bit faster on the same bit of wire that's serviced people since the war...

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Kaltern

BT - the caring company.

And somehow, they seem to think that the problem is more of servce - "...'while it agreed service levels have to improve, it was making progress in tackling the problem. "Thousands of engineers have been recruited and we are fixing repairs and installing new lines quicker than before.," it said.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-36832505

Typical attempt at translating the issue of investment into what they already 'provide'.

It's an utter embarrassment living in the UK. I'm one of the incredibly fortunate ones - 80mb fibre in Scotland. But I want to move from here to somewhere a little more rural. I can do that - provided I am happy with a 1.5mb line. And I'm not even moving that far from a main town, which has at least 21CN.

Until less emphasis is put on 'potential profit' and more on the 'service' bit, nothing will change. The EU '100mbps' minimum is something BT will be very happy to get out of once we leave...

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Drone bloke cuffed after gizmo stops firemen tackling forest inferno

Kaltern

Re: Save the Drone.

I like them. They make my toes itch.

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Kaltern
Trollface

Save the Drone.

I fly Boeing 747's for a living* and I can guarantee you that a drone would make absolutely no difference to my flight-path. I know this, because I've dodged at least 2 dozen over the last 50 years, and never once has one caused me to drop out of the sky.

Therefore, firefighting aircraft are exactly the same, and I think they should apologise to the drone operator for causing him unnecessary duress in difficult times.

* on Microsoft Flight Simulator. So I have more experience than most.

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Scientists want you to know how to have sex with a hyper-long dong

Kaltern

" the penis being continuously soft; continuously hard; hardening along its base; and softening along its base."

Sounds like a bad batch of Viagra.

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What Brexit means for you as a motorist

Kaltern

Oh look another article whereby a journalist tries to stir up possibles and maybe's as an article. What's next, the impact that Brexit has on drone ownership?

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Botnet-powered ballot stuffing suspected in 2nd referendum petition

Kaltern

http://heatst.com/uk/exclusive-brexit-2nd-referendum-petition-a-4-chan-prank-bbc-report-it-as-real/

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Holy kittens! YouTube screens go blank

Kaltern

What was almost as amusing was the site www.downforeveryoneorjustme.com was unavailable due to too many connections at the exact same time.

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Apple's 'lappable' iPad Pro concept is far from laughable

Kaltern

Re: file

"I use USB or LAN to synchronise my own files, NEVER the internet. The Internet is insecure and unreliable [citation needed]."

Sorry, but this is becoming less and less of a reason to hate anything cloud based. When you hear about these 'password leaks' from various accounts, they are invariably from services that are not exactly used for personal, sensitive data. (excluding dating sites. That's a whole kind of different type of sensitive data...).

AFAIK, the best known cloud storage sites are also the most secure. The only way your data is going to be compromised is down to your own negligence.

There is also a lot less chance of losing data, like you can 'misplace' that USB key. Or that laptop.

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Not two, not four, but 10 cores in Intel's new PC powerhouse

Kaltern

Pointless pointless.

It's time Intel et al started looking at new ways of doing the CPU thing - the gains from 10 cores are almost completely worthless today - if 8 cores isn't going to do the job, 10 really isn't going to help.

Gamers will get zero benefit from this CPU.

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The ‘Vaping Crackdown’ starts today. This is what you need to know

Kaltern

1) Smoking should be banned in public. I don't want to smell / inhale your second-hand smoke.

2) The risk of long-term damage to the lung lining by nicotine, tar, and carbon monoxide, as well as formaldehyde, ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, arsenic, and DDT is a gamble I wouldn't want to take. Carbon monoxide makes it harder for red blood cells to carry oxygen throughout the body. Tar is a mixture of substances that together form a sticky mass in the lungs.

I think on balance, my version is worse. And besides, you are, yet again, a knower of nothing, yet an expert on everything. You don't have a shred of evidence to back up your claims, so I would put you in both the first and second categories of my previous comment.

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Kaltern

The only people who criticise vaping are either

a) Clueless to what it really is

b) Jumping on another bandwagon

c) Losing profit from the practice

The less we understand, the more we think we know...

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Google asks the public to name the forthcoming Android N operating system

Kaltern

Nutella, obviously.

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Boffins achieve 'breakthrough' in random number generation

Kaltern

Never really understood why a external sensor for say, air temp or barometric pressure, accurate to say, 10 significant figures couldn't be used. That would be constantly changing, and would be pretty much impossible to recreate accurately - and would be totally autonomous.

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Dwarf planet intumesces before astronomers' gaze

Kaltern

Re: "I think we're coming to a point where we can give 2007 OR10 its rightful name."

Oreo, obviously.

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A UK-wide fibre broadband investment plan? Don't ask awkward questions

Kaltern

I'm not talking about the financial cost of laying that cable. It is true they sold off to each other, ending up with Virgin, but I'm not really talking about that.

I'm talking about the fact it can be done, and should be done today, by a company who could easily swallow the bill - and why not have the guverm'nt help out with a few million?

(The concept of the 'taxpayer' is a phrase which pisses me off no end because you personally do not actually pay any more from your wages than anyone else (so you don't notice the difference between paying for a much needed broadband infrastructure update, or paying for millions of pounds of wasted projects), and so bleating about how you shouldn't be paying for something for other people, is a ridiculous argument)

The fact of the matter is, the current antiquated network is eventually going to fall over. You can only patch something up so many times before it begins to be economically pointless to repair. The problem I see right now, is that BT, being a private company, won't repair anything until they're forced to do so, because there is literally no other choice open to the UK, other than to bend over and take the copper.

Until something is done to either force them to spend the money and sort this mess out, and separate telephony from data, then nothing will change. And the chances of that happening right now is zero - stuff 'works' and we're paying through the nose for it - so in Capitalist Britain, why should anything change?

Oh and I personally think the 'expected returns' will be much more significant than 25 years ago. Other countries can do it, we have absolutely no excuse.

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Kaltern

I know I might be missing the point here, and if I am, I apologise. But TV fibre was laid down back in the 90's, and that worked fine from what I understand.

It seems to be the main issue is BT just not wanting to separate telephony from internet services, which surely would be the obvious way forward.

After all, if Nynex and C&W laid down all that fibre for Virgin to use a decade later, then it means it can be done.

Of course, if the only thing that matters is profit, rather than improving the UK, then I guess we'll still be making phone calls using copper (or aluminium in some areas) cable, while the rest of the world are using quantum communication....

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Watch it again: SpaceX's boomerang rocket lands on robo-sea-barge

Kaltern
Trollface

I just wish they'd stop chanting USA USA USA like they're proud of their accomplishments or something. It's disgraceful.

Can you possibly imagine Oxford University graduates chanting UK UK UK? At least not so loudly as to not spill their glasses of Chardonnay?

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Ad-blocker blocking websites face legal peril at hands of privacy bods

Kaltern

*ponders*

The argument about us not paying for the content we read... we didn't buy anything, so why would we pay for it - in any way?

It's a companies choice to use the web - no-one is forcing them. If they believe that ads are the only way they're going to make money... then perhaps they should start charging a subscription fee.

Ads should be opt IN - if you want to support this website, tick this box [_]

If not, have a great day.

Calling visitors freeloaders is not really the way forward.

Besides, do ads REALLY make that much money? I mean, let's look at El Reg for a moment. I'm imagining they sell advertising space, possibly with a click target. That's income right there, and I imagine it's not a small amount of cash, plenty to run the site and pay the bills.

watchmebathe.org* is covered with Google ads, those really irritating full-screen video ads, and various '25 reasons to not shave with sulfuric acid' clickbaits. I seriously can't imagine that making anywhere close to what El Reg makes for selling ad space.

I sometimes wonder if I really understand the world of internet advertising at all in fact.

* Not a real website. Probably. I never checked.

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'Impossible' EmDrive flying saucer thruster may herald new theory of inertia

Kaltern

Wow.. it's nice to see so much openmindedness.

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Chrome lives in dog years: It's seven years old but just turned 50

Kaltern

Sceptic

Wow take a look at the comments from back then - the amount of skepticism that was shows was bordering on paranoia.

Either people were REALLY overreacting... or Google failed to earn any trust back then.

And nothing's changed.

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NASA gives blacked-out Kepler space 'scope the kiss of life

Kaltern

I fully expect a space-based 3D-printing station with little dronebots buzzing about fixing things in the near future...

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SpaceX's Musk: We'll reuse today's Falcon 9 rocket within 2 months

Kaltern

Re: The plans are going to sound crazy

It's probably better than 'Rockety McRocketface.'

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Brits rattle tin for 'revolutionary' hydrogen-powered car

Kaltern

Re: Give it up, I'm not buying fuel any more

What a very odd argument.

Fossil fuel needs to go. Like, go. It's as old as the industrial age, and we're way past that. Oil companies don't like alternative power. It's a direct challenge to their obscene profits.

Hydrogen fuel is 100% the future of power. It's been proven to work. Drones are now using hydrogen fuel cells to get around for longer. They produce no pollutants as emissions.

It doesn't matter how difficult it is to produce or store, oil isn't exactly always easy to get at, but oil companies have no problem grinding up more bits of the crust to get to it. Solar power / mains power is still created by fossil fuel at it's source, apart from nuclear, which has problems of it's own.

Why people think that faster is better I'll never understand. The combustion engine is really past it's day and needs to go the same way as the waterwheel and steam engine.

Petrol heads are as arrogant and stubborn about their V8's as the NRA are about... well you know.

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Oculus Rift review-gasm round-up: The QT on VR

Kaltern

Tax.

It's not £500. It's £700.

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Go No! Google cyber-brain bests top-ranked human in ancient game

Kaltern

I suspect a lot of readers are missing the point here. It isn't just that a computer program beat a meatbag at Go, but that it was given something like:

'This is Go. You need to own more territory than the other player. You do this by placing stones on a 19x19 grid.

Off you go.'

And it did. And it played against itself, making mistakes, but eventually understanding the most efficient ways of winning. Pretty much like how we all learn.

And then it beat someone who was rather very good at it.

I would be most interested to see how the base program actually works - does it have anything other than the basic rules, or have the developers chucked in some other code that might possibly take away some of the 'thinking' from the program?

Oh and somoene said Poker? That's been going on for decades. Remember, poker is about learning how your opponents react to given situations. It wouldn't be much of a problem for a computer to use sensors such as IR cameras and moisture detection to determine how an opponent is 'feeling'. Or to play a few loose hands, to judge how others react.

It's obvious computers are beginning to show signs of being able to learn information, and act upon it. We should start to embrace this, not fight it - contrary to popular belief, Skynet isn't really going to happen - it's probably safer in a computer's 'hands' than it is in world leaders, in today's political climate.

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Boffins give amputee the finger – a bionic touch-sensitive fingertip

Kaltern

Gotta hand it to them, they know how to take the rough with the smooth.

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Microsoft wants to lock everyone into its store via universal Windows apps, says game kingpin

Kaltern

I've said it before, until such time that: a) Linux becomes as easy to use for the average PC user as Windows, and b) DirectX is 100% available within a Linux environment, the vast majority of Windows users will remain so.

The new API's are as much use as frozen cheese without a steady supply of top games publishers using them on a daily basis. Steam is the best hope for this change over, but only if they make it worthwhile to the developers and publishers.

I hate what Windows has turned into as much as most, but being an avid gamer who refuses to buy a console due to the depreciation of technology before every release, I will have to remain on it.

WINE is useful, but it takes far too much work for the average person to get something running, that it is only of use for the curious.

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MAME goes fully FOSS

Kaltern

Re: Really good news

Ironic, as they probably find they sell a lot of these games, in comparison to the garbage being released today.

Fallout 4 or Mr Do!

I know what I'd rather be playing. Take THAT, 'X'!

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Institute of Directors: Make broadband speeds 1000x faster than today's puny 2020 target

Kaltern

I say forget about all this cabling nonsense. I want to get my internet by DroneFi - or possibly BalloonFi, and just worry about keeping them up there.

After all, didn't those clever folks in Japan come up with a really good wireless speed?

Then OpenReach would be OutofReach.

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BT, Sky, EE, TalkTalk and Virgin to appeal website blocking ruling

Kaltern

Joe public hasn't. And that's really what this is all about - stopping Joe (or Jean, must be gender indifferent musn't we) public from getting free stuff that they would have paid for had it not been available for free - don't forget, every copy is a lost sale. (I'm sure Picasso would be having some words by now if he were alive)...

Us clever people know what VPN's are, but you mention it to Doris on the highstreet who likes to listen to Welsh Folk music on Spotify, that her 15yr old darling grandson set up for her, she'd look at you with a blank stare, much as if it were an answer on Pointless.

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NASA boffin wants FRIKKIN LASERS to propel lightsails

Kaltern
Trollface

They'd turn the lasers off...

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Curiosity Rover eyes Mars' creeping dunes

Kaltern

Re: Bah!

I'm glad we have people like you, making sure we look after other people's money and well being, keeping us firmly grounded.

I imagine you do a lot of thinking about the children too?

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Aroused Lycra-clad cyclist prompts Manchester cop dragnet

Kaltern

Re: Concerned woman.

I wonder if I got a downvote from the Concerned woman in question?

Or just someone who automatically dislikes my posts?

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Kaltern

Concerned woman.

Get a fucking life.

That is all.

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Boffins unwrap bargain-basement processor that talks light and current

Kaltern

I wonder if these reduce heat waste dramatically, and if so, will that mean they can eventually be made to go very fast compared to today's silicon?

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Physics uses warp theory to look beyond relativity

Kaltern

Re: thicko amused by ftl boffins

I assume your ability to read must cloud your openmindedness.

I said powered flight. As in humans powering their own flight. I think you'll find Pterodactyls and it's ilk were flying before birds. Not very well, but they got the job done.

Flight for humans required knowledge of physics. And engineering. And determination. And a belief that it could be done.

It's no wonder we're stuck where we are right now with people like you and your 'It's impossible because we know it to be so' attitude.

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Kaltern

Powered flight was impossible 163 years ago.

Space flight was impossible 58 years ago.

The Higgs Boson wasn't proven 3 years ago.

We can't travel FTL, or use any form of spacetime compression drive.

Yet.

How about we stop saying it isn't possible, and make it so it is? It worked for the last few thousand years.

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After Death Star II blew: Dissecting the tech of Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens

Kaltern

I think you have to look at this movie from a viewer's point of view.

Most people will have seen at least the first 3 movies, a lot will have watched all 6. While this movie is set 100 years from TPM, it isn't set THAT much further on from ROTJ, and as such, it's only logical that there will be remnants of the Imperial army hanging around, wanting a go at the whole 'I wanna run the galaxy' thing.

Plus, there will be oodles of Imperial ships and tech still working perfectly. Given that these ships will be fine since ROTJ, there's no reason to assume they'll all rot and die just cos the emperor snuffed it.

I would also imagine that, even the 20 or so years after ROTJ, it's still going to take time for economics and trade to become like they were pre-war, and so new droid and weapon designs will probably take a back seat.

As for the Force sensitive people, I understand a huge majority were destroyed after Anakin did his youngling slaughtering thing. The emperor ensured that all lightsabre crystals were heavily controlled, and I would imagine all force sensitives were killed off.

I don't know anything about the movie (deliberately of course) so I don't know if Luke set up a Skywalker School of Jedi (only 50 credits per session), as he is supposed to be the last surviving Jedi. If he did, then new sabres must be developed, so that must mean good news for the crystal economy ;P

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How to build a real lightsabre

Kaltern

To build a lightsabre IMO takes a few basic things: Energy, Stability, Control.

In SW lore, the original lightsabre was connected to a power-belt worn by the wielder, as the amount of power required was too much for anything small enough to put in a hilt. Some of the more advanced sabre techniques were therefore not applicable - no spinning the blade about your person... getting tangled would be a surefire way to lose!

So given that we're not even close to making some Fusion based Duracells, it would be prudent to focus on the actual blade itself and forget the hilt for the time being.

The blade must be contained within some form of magnetic field, strong enough to repel other fields (so we get that lovely CLASH! (probably minus any sound effects), and of course enough to contain the plasma which creates the blade - lasers are useless here, you'd never generate one powerful and wide enough to cut through anything fast enough.

The plasma is generated as part of a circuit. In the lore, it's all done with focusing crystals, which Is possible now, given the right form of crystal and grinding tools. But my understanding of energy/plasma generation is non-existent, so I can only speculate how you would produce plasma and somehow focus it into a upwards beam. I do understand the concept of the confinement field, and that the plasma must be made to come back down to the hilt again, to complete the power circuit - the plasma itself is used to power the energy/plasma conversion, thus ensuring power is continuous. A small amount of energy is used while the plasma is visible, lost with light and heat, and when striking an opponent, but the majority would find itself back within the circuit.

My idea for a fake sabre in the real world would just be either a powerful laser diffused into a wide beam, or a REALLY powerful bulb, again, focused to travel upwards as much as possible, with a telescopic central core, like automated car aerials, with the mirror on the top - this should be sufficient to produce a nice looking beam.

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Subscribe to your free El Reg newsletter and save 95% on Wired (UK) mag

Kaltern

Re: Wired?

The Internet.

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No, the EU is not going to make hyperlinks illegal

Kaltern

Diddums

'This would affect commercial sites that rely on bringing together data from various sources and re-packaging them for a different audiences. '

What a fucking shame. Does that mean that :

a) We'll not be inundated with companies such as Taboola and Outbrain shoving their pay-2-click shite on websites?

b) Web content editor will actually have to y'know, edit their own content?

Unless I'm missing something, I don't see this as a huge problem - anything that slows down the income-generating crap on Web 2.0 is fine in my book.

Oh and I notice back in June that 'Daily Mail Invests $3 Million in Native Partner Taboola' - I DO hope this fucks them over too.

(I'm REALLY grumpy this morning...)

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TalkTalk offers customer £30.20 'final settlement' after crims nick £3,500

Kaltern

Oddly enough, just a few days ago, I had a dodgy transaction for Orange Home (whom I've never been a customer of) for something like 90 quid, using a debit card that was destroyed many years ago - but definitely the same card I used for TT. Even my bank fraud team were like 'yes, bit of a coincidence isn't it...'

Not sure how the perp used it tho, seeing as it wasn't even on the bank's system any more...

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TalkTalk downplays extent of breach damage, gives extra details

Kaltern

Just found an unauthorised transaction for Orange Home on my account (£93), on a debit card that was destroyed a long time ago. Oddly enough , this card was used when I had a TalkTalk Business account.

Coincidence?

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Yamaha unleashes motorcycling robot

Kaltern

New Amazon delivery system just announced.

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No, seriously, NASA will fly a probe through Saturn's moon plumes

Kaltern

I wonder what this will mean if they discover loads of life, bacterial or otherwise.

Of course, mainstream media won't care unless these organisms have tits, but wouldn't this be the most defining moment in human history since we discovered social media?*

* that really is a joke. Although it's a sad fact that it was a 'defining' moment...

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