* Posts by Wzrd1

1568 posts • joined 7 Dec 2012

'Scary' SILENCE as NASA probe podule bores in toward ice-world PLUTO

Wzrd1
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Re: Press F1 to continue

Bleh, just ask the PRC to hit F1 on their VPN to the probe.

They're in everything else.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Safe Modes Are Scary... This suggests a name-change is needed.

Fair enough.

How about:

Oh shit! mode?

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Wzrd1
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Re: Repair job

There are closer shops, but they're only listed in the Hitchiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

Don't Panic!

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US plans to apply export controls to 0-days put out for comment

Wzrd1
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Re: Let me be the first:

'As I understand it only US companies and citizens who would need a license to "export" or "import" the information.'

No, it's for export. One can import any information without suffering from an ITAR violation prosecution and fines. Exporting the wrong thing can get quit costly.

Such as one firm that develops state of the art night vision for the US DoD and those blessed by the US government to receive those devices as well, who made the brilliant decision to order sensitive components from the PRC. That resulted in $150 million in fines and concessions from the company (free services to the government).

Meanwhile, I can legally import Russia's favorite nuclear weapons designs, the most that would happen is a very, very threatening NDA (which I had already signed back in the 1980's) against revealing the contents of the new born secret documents and the NRC would confiscate the plans.*

Of course, I have no access to such plans, nor would I desire to somehow access those plans. That is just an outrageous example.

*By law, *all* things nuclear, be they fissionables above a certain curie unit or nuclear weapons belong, by law, to the NRC. Back when the core had to be inserted to arm a nuclear warhead, the core had to be signed out from the then AEC and signed back into AEC storage.

Yeah, US laws can get *quite* interesting. Add in federal, state, county and municipal, things can be rather tangled unless you review the US and state Constitutions.

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Giant FLYING SPACE ROCKS could KILL US ALL, warns Brian May

Wzrd1
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Re: So.

"...like the one that hit Sudan a couple of years back..."

I remember that. India and Pakistan had mobilized their nuclear forces when that detonated over the Med and chunks landed in Sudan.

Everyone's baro-sensors tripped at nuke levels, but no radiation for those with satellites looking for such things. Both sides had an "Oh, shit!" moment and put their stupid toys away and started talking. For the truth is, Sudan isn't all that far from the India-Pakistan border, as the meteor flies. Had that popped off in that region, the nukes would've flown before anyone realized it was a fireball of meteoric origin.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Welcome to the 19th century

Well, El Reg realizes that it has an audience in the US, which still soundly remains in the 19th century.

Hell, the health care system is purely 19th century in nature, with payment for treatment and no universal health care, unlike modern, civilized nations.

Most of my peers don't have a clue what a meter is, save for those peers I served in the military with. That said, I'm one of the few of those peers fluent in English, rather than American. ;)

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Wzrd1
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Re: So.

Gravity tractor, laser ablation, nuclear warhead near the asteroid and no contact causing ablation of the facing surface, ion thruster pushing it off course and a few other notions are being considered.

One need only move it a degree or so and it'd miss the Earth. Or speed it up slightly or slow it down slightly. If one wants to get fancy, one adjusts the course enough to slingshot around the planet and into an entirely different and distant orbit.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Welcome to the 19th century

"If the Siberian object, at 120 feet across, was equivalent to to 185 * Hiroshima (185 * 20 kilotonnes = 3700 kilitonnes), why was the Chelyabinsk object, at slightly over half the size (65 feet), only equivalent to 500 kilotonnes?"

Shape, density, composition, velocity, irregularities in the composition of the meteor, density of the atmosphere at the point of disruption of the mass, amount disrupted and size of the resulting debris all come to mind, along with a full dozen other factors that would include time of year (atmospheric density of the lower atmosphere based upon the temperature), amount of water in the are (density and cooling factors if it passed through stratospheric clouds), altitude of disruption also figures in.

If it popped upon contact with the boundary of the stratosphere, the effects on the ground would be lesser than if it popped midway through the stratosphere, due to the inverse square law and atmospheric density. If it disrupted into 5cm units and less vs 5M rocks and assorted sized debris, etc.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Welcome to the 19th century

"If astrophysicists are using SI properly, why were Rosetta and Comet 67P quoted by ESA as being 303 million km from Earth last week, and not 303 Gm?"

Because, the people of the land that still uses inches, feet, yards and miles are metric challenged.

You know, 'Murica.

Yeah, I'm thrashing my own nation and its idios. Yes, I used the ancient Greek for a reason, I'm quite certain that the ancient Athenians had the right of it, in terms of democracy.

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Why SpaceX will sort out Sunday's snafu faster than NASA ever could

Wzrd1
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Re: NASA inefficiency: The hint is in the name

"The engine had progressed to the point where they had successful test stand firings, and were preparing to move to the next phase, building it into a new second stage for the Saturn V."

I remember that mess quite well. It seems that the US and the USSR had a treaty against things nuclear or nuclear looking going into orbit.

Hence, the Congressional cut, abiding by a space treaty that remains in effect today.

I also recall that that particular engine wasn't capable of anything *near* a Mars shot. At all. It'd have made the moon run much faster, but Mars was flat out out of the question.

That all said, we still do have nuclear rocket designs, which are far more efficient and designed to work in microgravity. However, environmental concerns also are important, for who wants uranium spewed on their beaches or their petunia garden?

So, what we *really* need is a rocket that is intrinsically safe, which sounds like black heresy today, but within our technological capabilities.

As for this one, compared to NASA, this is a small shop. Answers will be far more easily available, as one doesn't need to contact each and every subcontractor. The answer is likely simple enough, in terms of engineering. O2 overpressure and failure tends to a rare few methods to overpressure a sealed tank, fire, electrical short inside the tank or placed upon the tank. Heat is the key, as a cryogenic tank doesn't have a pressure increase without a fuckton of heat applied.

Thankfully, rocket science isn't *quite* as hard as it was when we confiscated war booty in the form of German scientists and V2 rockets.

Understood is length of wires, lest they separate under boost. Understood is pogo oscillation. Understood are thousands of things.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Saturns I, IB, & V

I'd nod to that, save for one thing. They were used only a bit over a dozen times.

Far too short a successful launch number to suggest high reliability.

That said, those rockets and payloads *did* turn a lunar launch into "something as exciting as driving to Pittsburgh".

But, a total of under 20 launches?

No.

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Wzrd1
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Re: NASA inefficiency: The hint is in the name

"Yes, apart from putting the only humans ever on the moon, getting probes to every planet and exploring the surface of Mars they've done fuck all."

Well, there *was* a snafu with metric and imperial measurements that resulted in an unintended ground incursion at high velocity on Mars once.

But, you can't fuck up if you never try to do anything.

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Wzrd1
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Re: NASA inefficiency: The hint is in the name

Idiot.

Yes, there were organizational issues that resulted in the loss of lives and spacecraft. But, the number of suppliers (who are sub-contractors) was and remains immense.

Look up the Apollo program, then look up who designed and built the Command and Service Modules, then look at who designed and built the LEM.

Then, look at who made the Saturn rockets.

Then, look at Apollo 13, whose accident was triggered by a change of contractor, which resulted in the incorrect voltage heater being installed in a cryogenic tank, which then overheated and blew the tank to hell and gone.

As the line in the movie said, "It's time to wake up ten thousand people", that was quite accurate.

Yes, there were safety cultural issues present and some peter principle present, the acronym wasn't an indicator. Some complacency was present and is always a danger, however, mission requirements resulted in other cultural issues, where launch may not be delayed without a major reason.

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Audit finds new flaw at US Office of Personnel Management

Wzrd1
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Re: Stop the Madness

Flying pig hell, should be a dunce cap.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Not competent.

Even money, that's *who* hacked OPM. What is known is it was PRC in origin.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Why do so many people *need* security clearance?

Some work on unclassified networks, but required a clearance for classified threat briefings. Some work on classified networks or sensitive networks and require a classification background investigation one level higher than their duties because of regulations that insist those with such access are of impeccable character.

Even a public trust position requires much of the same background investigation.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Lo-tech hi-sec

"Typewriters and carbon paper. Just remember to dispose of the carbon sheets and the ribbon cassette properly."

That leaves two forms, one immense in pages. The SF85 for general public trust and the SF86 for an actual clearance.

That is what e-Qip was filling out, the SF86. The papers, when printed are labeled SF86.

I know, I did one not all that long ago.

So, I'm quite enraged over this on two parts. One, I'm an information security professional and this is an exhibition of the most mind boggling incompetence imaginable. On the other side, I'm immensely pissed off, as my family's information is in there as well.

They're a bunch of incompetent, myopic, anencephalic arboreal misanthropes and the lot of them, from the junior IA staff to the IAM and DAA should be given the sack.

Preferably, with the sack filled with venomous snakes.

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Wzrd1
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"Haven't you noticed the awards ceremony every four years ?"

No, that's the real comedy act. This is just the warm-up act.

Although, the second warm-up act is one political party being forced to switch from a clown car to a clown bus.

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Get READY: Scientists set to make TIME STAND STILL tonight

Wzrd1
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Re: Having a single time is a nonsense

I'll stick with UTC. One standard works, rather than nine competing standards to generate confusion.

I get enough of that confusion at work, dealing with EDT, EST and UTC and remembering which device is using which.

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US is the world's botnet mothership, says Level 3

Wzrd1
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Re: Level 3? Seriously?

L3 is rather good, actually. We use threat intelligence from them, the government and pretty much the spectrum of organizations that contribute to threat intelligence.

We get intelligence on everything from hash values of known malware, TTP's of threat actors, emerging threat intelligence and traffic pattern values for our IPS.

As for C3 servers in the US and North America in general, one can get a virtual host for anything from $10 - 20 per month that is more than adequate for C3 operations and jump point for exfiltrated data. Other hotspots have similar availability and inexpensive solutions available.

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Version 0.1 super-stars built the universe – and they lived all the way over there, boffins point

Wzrd1
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Re: This is why i love science

Annoyingly, without citation.

Might as well call me god.

I can also provide zero citations and hence , am your Lord God.

Under those conditions, I'd be an atheist.

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Obama issues HTTPS-only order to US Federal sysadmins

Wzrd1
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Obama ordered what Bush ordered

I wonder if all those sysadmins will bother following orders this time?

Nah, there are far too many princesses out there.

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How much info did hackers steal on US spies? Try all of it

Wzrd1
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Let's put it this way

I have filled out the SF86 four times in my life, first when I worked with nuclear weapons, then with other highly sensitive operations and recently, for a job in the civilian world.

So, as near as I've been able to ascertain, the PRC knows everything about me - for the past 35 - 40 years.

Save, for some military duties.

Federal positions specific duties are outside of OPM's purview.

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Nobel bro-ffin: 'Girls in the lab fall in love with me ... then start crying'

Wzrd1
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Re: Why Apologise ?

"Are the writer of this article and the whiney brigade saying that what he said is not true ?"

Well, it preserves civilization, such as it is.

Because, to be blunt, he'd be offered a brief opportunity to retract, then his airway would be destroyed and his spine would be defunct at the C2 level.

First, I have more than one daughter. Second, we've shifted location to support a unit under attack, which had women firing quite effectively and maneuvering highly effectively.

Finally, never piss of a man who can kill you instantly.

I retired, I was unable to turn in my experience, training or operational capability.

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Wzrd1
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"Having done thyroid function tests on young still living at home female workmates in the 60's it could be embarrassing at the time."

Blather, sirrah, you forget the year/decade/century.

Today, we have iodine in salt, to address that of which you claim triumphant superiority.

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Wzrd1
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"No. We can respect them as equals right now. The Army can catch-up when it can."

I have only one argument, globally. *Which* Army? US, UK, Russian Federation, Salvation Army?

I really would prefer a preface of the nation being spoken of, to more accurately deliver my thermonuclear tipped venomous barb.

I've personally operated with many military national forces, so I know where and how to deliver the killing stroke. But only if the asshole admits to which nation he or she comes from.

Spelling isn't 100%.

Then, there's the entire mess of foreign nationals working for national forces, playing psyops games.

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Wzrd1
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Re: As if

"Not to mention the women who do get reasonable degrees drop out of the field as soon as they have a kid, leading to shortages of professionals in the industry (ex: doctors)."

Odd, my experience was a break from work, then return to work. Since I've retired from the military, I've worked under a handful of women managers.

Great managers, saw the odds and ends missed by others.

And strangely, our eldest daughter is a medical professional, who has delivered a grand and final total of three grandchildren for our admiration and joy. She remained working as a medical professional, within a very reasonable time period between deliveries.

So, I suspect one of two things are possible here.

You are a lying asshole.

You are working for the most effete corporation on the planet.

Would the headquarters be located in France?

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Wzrd1
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"We can 'treat them as equals' as soon as we have a mandated 50/50 quota for them in the army."

Well, your assholeship, I am a US Army retiree, however I will admit some admiration from various Commonwealth SAS gentlemen who quite enjoyed watching myself and my team work under my leadership, during a mutual aid mission.

Considering that scope of work experience and military experience and rank, may I direct you to fuck yourself with a 40mm bore brush?

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Wzrd1
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Re: As if

Congratulations! You have earned my down vote. An event quite epic, due to the rarity of the usage of a down vote.

I'm reminded of a personal introduction card I saw back in the tail end of the 1970's, early 1980's. One particular model I was quite fond of read, "Methinks thou art an asshole".

Although, that is in error, I do not think that, I know that as a certain fact equal with the law of gravity.

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TERROR in ORBIT: Dodgy rocket burp biffs International Space Station off track

Wzrd1
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"I do hope they sort out the cause and can correct it."

Do remember, a bug with seniority is a feature.

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We stand on the brink of global cyber war, warns encryption guru

Wzrd1
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"What I don't understand are 2 things:"

What I see is someone who has not detected, responded and mitigate an APT incursion.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Luckily defence is comparatively easy

"1970s was towards the end of the era of 16bit computers such as PDP11..."

Wow, that brings back memories. My high school had a donated PDP11/03.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Luckily defence is comparatively easy

"People these days DON'T WANT to learn."

Easy. Make the people *want* to learn.

'If you get infected due to stupidity, which is entirely the IS shop's call, you are terminated for cause and we'll sue you for damages incurred from the remediation'.

I know of one information security shop that has just that clause in their employment contract.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Just as well...(You never got the US filmstrip version)

"Your glowing parents will be over to pick you up as soon as the half life of Plutonium kicks in."

I don't know about the plutonium bit, but I'm of the generation that has radioactive bones, courtesy of strontium-90.

My area also still has plenty of the old CD shelters, aka school, church and older government buildings basements.

As I said long ago, when working with nuclear field missiles, "Go toward the light, my children!".

For, afterward shall be much suckage.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Before the Internet

"It OK guys we're safe, I've put the big blue 'e' into my recycle bin, if anyone tries to blow up the internet we can just restore it from there."

Oy!

The Almighty wanted me to tell you, he can get me out of this mess, but he's pretty sure you're fucked.

I have the internet backed up on my SAN in the basement, run on a Linux cluster, secured by *BSD and managed from a Solaris box.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Just as well...

"What happened to all those sirens on pylons and high buildings?"

They figured out that all of those precautions were rubbish.

If the nuclear attack didn't get you and the firestorm didn't get you, nuclear winter would get you.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Just as well...

"Or put another way, what's the minimum connection that would be required simply to keep up with all new content currently being uploaded worldwide?!"

I don't know, but I have six (!) OC-48 feeds coming into my building at work.

And we're *not* the NSA or any other government entity.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Just as well...

I always thought that slices of bread *were* Styrofoam.

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DARPA unTerminators gather for Robotics Challenge finals in Hell*

Wzrd1
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The robots will destroy us all!

Shortly after proton decay is completed in this universe.

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Ruskies behind German govt cyber attack — report

Wzrd1
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Re: And yet the EU continues...

"Now how do you propose the West can impact on "the criminal government staff" without starting a war?"

Not without it going thermonuclear within less than a week.

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Why did Snowden swipe 900k+ US DoD files? (Or so Uncle Sam claims)

Wzrd1
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Re: Time

That is one thing about espionage many people do not get. Sensitive information typically is time sensitive.

Frankly, many of the documents Snowden stole and have not been released yet are no longer timely, leaving much to be in the "who cares" category as time moves on.

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Wzrd1
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Re: "Secret" == "Not very import, interesting, or secret at all"

Far too often, secret is abused and things that should be unclassified are marked secret. Confidential is largely ignored.

The stupidest thing I ever saw was a group of DoD contractors, who were marking U/FOUO information as S/FOUO. Whiskey, Tango, Foxtrot, over?! FOUO is for unclassified information that should still remain free of FOI requests.

Of course, there's a full alphabet soup after the primary security level is determined, NOFORN being the least and I'll not bother getting into bigot lists.

But, I also started out in things nuclear, holding an N clearance and a standard clearance.

Top Secret is determined by whether the information being released would result in critical damage to the government.

Secret is determined whether the information being released would result in significant damage to the government.

Confidential is determined whether the information being released would result in minor damage to the government.

The damage could be to reputation, standing or things like everyone knowing precisely what is inside of the physics package on a modern thermonuclear warhead.

Unclassified is a valid security designated, if sensitive, such as personnel PII, it's designed Unclassified/FOUO (For Official Use Only) and is typically exempt from FOI requests (or the sensitive details removed from the document).

An N clearance is for things nuclear, in nuclear weapons fields, where direct access to the device is part of one's duties.

A Q clearance allows one just to be around a nuclear weapon, but not to directly access, handle or touch a device.

A Yankee White clearance allows one to be physically around the POTUS, such as workers in the White House and other locations the POTUS frequents.

I'm sure I missed a couple of oddball clearances, but it is late here.

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Electrons ride huge plasma tubes above Earth

Wzrd1
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Re: excellent!

A bit of greater separation between arrays would increase definition and precision of measurements.

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So, EE. Who IS this app on your HTC M9s sneakily texting, hmm?

Wzrd1
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Re: Where it ends

In the US, those are called Homeowners Associations.

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Wzrd1
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Re: If you think ..........

You do know that googleapis is part of Google, in the US, right?

Google, who sells Google appliances to three letter US agencies.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Crapware

You'd have to check with GCHQ to find out, but probably.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Stock Rom

Or, there's a carrier push when the version/checksum is "wrong".

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Mac bug makes rootkit injection as easy as falling asleep

Wzrd1
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Re: Without...

Ah, you mean like the old Chernobyl virus? Windows 95 days, trashed the flashed BIOS.

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Hardcore creationist finds 60-million-year-old fossils in backyard ... 'No, it hasn’t changed my mind about the Bible'

Wzrd1
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Re: Loaves and fishes

Yeah, we are. We're talking about North America, where all superstitions are welcome.

But, the Earth is *indeed* 4.5 billion years old. I was part of the Great Earth Dirt Delivery Project.

So, yes indeed, I am older than dirt.

I'm not older than rocks though.

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Wzrd1
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Re: From a proud Bible thumper

Well, one can arrive from the Big Bang to essentially today in six days, relativeisticly. But, the hardest gamma radiation since the Big Bang would make it a miserable trip, with all of those atoms phtoto-disassociating and all.

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