* Posts by Wzrd1

1383 posts • joined 7 Dec 2012

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American bacon cured with AR-15 assault rifle

Wzrd1
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Re: The Bacon is not so bad.

"(i believe we called it semolina pudding back home, but this stuff is worse)"

Nope. Totally different beast. Semolina pudding is made with semolina, which is sourced from wheat middlings of durum wheat (leavings from wheat processing).

Grits are properly called hominy grits. Hominy is a food which consists of dried maize kernels which have been treated with an alkali in a process called nixtamalization.

It isn't as bad as it sounds, it dissolves hemicellulose that glues cell walls together in the maize and releases nutrients.

A cook product with it is tortillas and tortilla chips. The basic process dates back to 1500-1200 BC.

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Wzrd1
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Re: American Bacon

"Whereas bacon made from thin slices of pork bellies has a wonderfully appealing flavor, providing the essence of meatiness without MSG."

Bleh, I pick the packs with the most fat in them. Give me plenty of bacon grease to cook with and nice, crispy fat to piss my doctor off over (not that it alters my already astronomical cholesterol numbers).

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Wzrd1
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Re: @Eric Olson @ItsNotMe

"British food. Around here venison, pheasant, free range pig, beef, chicken, eggs,organic vegetables, soft fruit. Milk from Guernsey cows. Real Cheddar and a variety of even more local cheeses."

Venison, pheasant (always wanted to try it, might have to get a shotgun and hunt some when pheasant season comes around), veggies and soft fruit and real cheeses...

Damn, you've made me hungry. They're not supposed to feed me after midnight.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Prefer danish Bacon

"Sales figures do not lie; you keep buying the stuff and we keep making it for you!"

Hey, shoot some across the pond. I'll try anything twice. :)

When I was working on the CENTCOM base in Qatar, the Danish cartoon fiasco went on. It was hilarious, every store disposed of tons of Danish butter.

And replace the lot of it the following week (I checked the expiration date and know it wasn't what was disposed of).

Did matter to me, I had two boxes of it in my fridge at the villa.

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Wzrd1
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Re: American Bacon

"Fact 1: it's the taste, it's awful, and usually covered in maple syrup"

Well, there is a maple syrup flavored bacon. I've accidentally bought some before, made a god awful mess of my cast iron skillet seasoning.

My wife and I are partial to uncured bacon as well, despite the premium pricing of the stuff.

"Fact 2: They also like to put cinnimon with everything, and I mean EVERYTHING"

I've been known to add cinnamon to french toast egg/vanilla/yoghurt mixture. That's about it, save for dessert.

"Fact 3: In America, the short order cooks don't usually take it as an affront to their years of training if you tell them how you'd like your bacon cooked and what you would and would not like sprinkled on it."

I could make some comments on short order cooks, but I'll refrain from doing so. But, I'm a former chef. Other than that, what you say is quite accurate (both for the US short order cook and for the UK lack of personalization).

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Wzrd1
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Re: American Bacon

"As a US Citizen, I will point out that maple syrup on bacon is purely a personal decision."

Agreed. I hate anything contaminating my bacon. We also have uncured bacon, for a fair amount more money.

As for breakfast foods, the only thing I add a trace of cinnamon to is french toast, which I also add liquid yoghurt to the egg and vanilla mixture. I get rave reviews for that concoction.

As for Brits not liking our bacon, all I can say is, they're the same folks who enjoy blood pudding.

Though, I'll modify that with, I do enjoy a good Yorkshire pudding.

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Wzrd1
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Re: American Bacon

"It just looks like smoked, streaky bacon from the picture, what am I missing?"

Don't know. I do know that when I was in the Middle East, an ex-pat Londoner was quite happy to get a pound of American "crispy bacon" that I got from our CENTCOM base.

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Wzrd1
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Re: There is one excuse

"In the developed world, no, but if you came from Lancashire and didn't know any better then I think that's an acceptable excuse. After all, we shouldn't criticize those less fortunate than ourselves."

I dunno about that, I've cooked up tripe in pasta sauce more than a few times, for both myself and my father.

But then, I'm Sicilian-American, so I've inherited some interesting food tastes.

Someday, I'll even get around to trying out haggis.

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Sony to media: stop publishing our stolen stuff or we'll get nasty

Wzrd1
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"Meanwhile, the rest of the world will be blaming whoever left all of this stuff on poorly-secured internet-facing servers."

I've watched someone pop into a DMZ server, then ride the firewall pinholes in to ravage and plunder. Fortunately, the individual was rapidly noticed and the doors slammed in their face.

Regrettably, they did have time to create new doors that had to be chased down.

We'll suffice it to say, those who left the server vulnerable were asked to seek employment elsewhere.

Now, we know where they got new jobs, Sony.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Cooperation in destroying the Stolen Information..? WTF

"On a side note, if I am running a publishing house and publish lies intently that the stolen data suggests that all the suits of the company are gays (not implying bad), will they still sue me?"

Well, you'd be better served giving them all small penises and using pseudonyms that are readily transparent.

It's a defense rule in many courts called the small penis rule.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_penis_rule

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Dirtbags dressed up malware as legit app using Sony crypto-certs

Wzrd1
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Re: Who benefits?

"This whole affair is an attempt to divert attention away from the Snowden revelations. Blame the NSA!"

Because, village idiots can only pay attention to one thing per day.

Meanwhile, those with an IQ above that of a bowl of jello can track multiple items of interest.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Android

"Not sure if they are also able to generate signed malware for Android? Not that I kept any of the Sony bloat on my Z3 compact - all disabled and updates blocked"

Leaving vulnerabilities in place, awaiting compromise.

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Wzrd1
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"this assumes your software / os checks for revoked certificates?"

Or is connected to the net when the malware is run. Windows can't check a CRL server if it's offline.

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'Critical' security bugs dating back to 1987 found in X Window

Wzrd1
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Who uses X?

On the overwhelming majority of my Linux boxes, it's CLI all the way. Only one one laptop and one desktop is X running and it has no part of it running as root.

System security 101, don't run processes you don't need.

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Mars was a WET mistress: Curiosity probes once-moist bottom

Wzrd1
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Re: "Mommie, Can We Play Obombie Truth Origami"

Both true believers and also foreign players in information warfare.

I've had teams actually track them through darknet.

No, details will not be forthcoming, just as details were not and still not forthcoming on how TOR was cracked when I mentioned it, long ago.

I *do* have an NDA.

So, to be honest, after studying tactics, techniques and practices, I'm really not sure where this village idiot is coming from. Could well be a true village idiot, could as well be a paid troll.

At the end of the day, I really don't give a shit.

My rule has always been, "Ignore assholes". But, I do consider potential impact and speak now, barely, hobbled by a few NDA's.

Two of which have criminal harm visited upon the breacher.

First lesson in this world we're suffering through. There is cyber warfare. There are multiple components, defense, intelligence gathering and operational operations. On the net, operational means either penetration of networks of information warfare. In the latter, we see a *possible* candidate.

But, to be blunt, the idiot isn't really worth my time to look at possible past entries.

My previous physics and chemistry based arguments are above the idiot's nonsense.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Rocks.

"P.S. you can have your book back as you might be able to trade it for a clue."

First lesson, science has a clue. Mars had a robust atmosphere in the past, back when it still held a magnetic field to deflect solar wind erosion of that atmosphere. Indeed, Earth loses hydrogen from water each and every day, courtesy of remnants of that solar wind reaching us past our magnetic bubble.

You further fail by considering the day/night conditions on *present Mars* and ignore the past, when an atmosphere would retain heat.

I'll give you the Everest temperature and conditions, conditions halfway up are... Challenging on a physiological level, rising higher risks significant medical hazards of a lethal variety.

BTW, it's rather well evidenced that Earth had a substantially "heavier" atmosphere, which eventually had mixed reductions of rock and soil. First, there was the oxidation era, when photosynthesis caused free oxygen to flow in increasing amounts. A *lot* got trapped in various rocks at that time, reducing gases in the atmosphere. Add in the losses I mentioned earlier, you get the past and present. Weathering releases oxygen and nitrogen, soil upturn for farming releases more nitrogen. Fertilizing a field increases nitrogen. Still, not a biggie, that era is recent, science has yet to notice a global change and is unlikely to do so in my lifetime.

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Wzrd1
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"Then again, the temperature of Mars isn't really that high on my give a shite list."

OK, Mars is really cold. Frostbite to shivering cold, assuming standard atmospheric pressure, which it is not, the atmospheric pressure on Mars is low enough to kill you quickly. But, it's high enough that minor assistive methods would be required to ensure human survival, compared to deep space, interplanetary space or on the moon.

Titan is cold, as in colder than a witches tit, cold enough to give the frostbite on the witches tit frostbite, while the witch froze to death quickly.

A comparison for Titan is, well, Pluto. A bit further out, oxygen freezes and falls as snow, if there was an atmosphere on Pluto to speak of. More importantly, stick Titan out near Pluto's orbit, hell, follow Pluto past the L4 L5 points, watch the moon freeze hard quickly. Tidal forces warm that moon above freezing. Hell, put it away from the planet's orbit (see Lagrange points), the moon would freeze solid there as well. Tidal forces add heat to that body, but you'd freeze solid quickly there.

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Wzrd1
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Well, I can think of a few other things that could have caused it, other than methane.

Hydroxic acid, dihydrogen monoxide, hydrogen hydroxide, μ-Oxido dihydrogen.

Now, it we were speaking of Mercury, I could think of bismuth alloying as the sun began heating. But, that's a cat of a different species, let alone color (colour for a minority of the world, if I recall native English speaker number correctly). ;)

For the few who don't get my first paragraph, they're all a short list of names for water. When I was young, water was also referred to as "the universal solvent". Something of an interesting notion at that time.

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Wzrd1
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"Liquid water would not only require a higher temperature but also a higher atmospheric pressure."

It's generally theorized that Mars had a rather dense atmosphere, which was lost when the core froze and Mars lost its magnetic field.

As for methane, not a chance. One would need a denser atmosphere *and* it to be a lot colder. Methane is the primary ingredient of natural gas, it doesn't freeze or turn to liquid under the North Sea, it doesn't liquify on Antarctica, it'd still be a gas on Mars, even if Mars had Earth's atmosphere.

There's evidence that Earth had a much denser atmosphere, but lost a fair amount to space and a fair amount to weathering of rock. Weather, in turn, releases some of the trapped gases into the atmosphere and our magnetic field keeps losses to a minimum, as it keeps the solar wind away from our atmosphere (OK, don't jump on that one, folks, simplifying it down, the solar wind is lessened, but largely deflects to two regions on Earth, following magnetic field lines (and I know, that's still simplified)).

Now, when we get into planet sized dynamo action (multiple, actually) or solar ones, things get *really* tangled. Literally. The field lines average for a total north and south, but it's due to a larger number being tangled in a certain configuration. That breaks down and a reversal can occur.

Simulations of the Earth's magnetic fields that show the larger field lines look like a ball of string that threw up on itself, then tried to swallow itself partially. While the laws involved are well understood, the interactions are mathematically poorly understood for the entire grand data set.

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Wzrd1
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Re: well , there you have it....

'Astronauts are obsolete technology.'

Not really, we still occasionally need someone to turn a wrench.

Ideally, we would need to send a nice chunk of a university, with full labs, to Mars. Teams could range about and collect specimens from all over the planet (along with the robots that do a reasonable job of it).

But, ideally, we'd have reliable supply trains to and from Earth, launch costs would be near zero and equipment would be intrinsically safe.

The reality of it is, we have none of that ideal, only what we currently have at our level of technology. With our current technology, we'd likely lose those astronauts to radiation, illness or accident.

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Kaspersky exposes SONY-CRIPPLING malware DETAILS

Wzrd1
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Re: "Tight deadline"?

It shouldn't take that long to compile PE.

It's more likely that they deployed once infiltration, lateral spread and enumeration was complete.

What's astonishing is that exfil was in the hundreds of GB and no alarms were generated/noticed.

At this point, I wonder if the total loss was in the TB.

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Mighty Blighty filter tilter causes communications chaos

Wzrd1
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Re: Mission creep

"Hmm, we've logged that you've been trying to circumvent the blocks. You do realise they're for your own protection? We can only assume you've been trying to look at kiddie porn. A white van will be along shortly."

Heh, when I was in a country that did *heavy* filtering (think Persian Gulf), I leased a virtual server, slapped a VPN on it and washed the VPN exit through squid.

I then happily and safely surfed sites that wouldn't get me a white van, they'd get me a black helicopter. :)

The national telecom then tried to proclaim VPN's were illegal (without any codified law to back that up), which resulted in three major international banks threaten to close their offices immediately, as they would not transmit financials in the clear.

The telecom then STFU.

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Identity thieves slurp Sony Pictures staff info – as CEO sends 'don't sue me, bro' memo

Wzrd1
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Re: Hmmm... what's that smell?

As near as I can tell, this is in the hundreds of GB's, I'd not be surprised to see it in the TB range.

But, it all depends on where you put an IDS/IPS. Compromise a DMZ box, then use it as a hop point inward, hang your exfil point from a media server and detection would be problematic.

C&C traffic is trivial to miss until you learn what IP the C&C lives on, having any sensors on the internal network is mixed in industry.

Case in point, my Fortune 200 company is a cloud services, data services and information security services company. Our network has taps all over the place to monitor for suspect traffic and pull pcaps for forensic investigation if there is a breach. Despite terabytes of storage being incessantly filled, we still find the odd gap that we're blind to. It's very much a game of whack a mole in that department, due to the complexity of the various business units and their networks, as well as client interconnection points.

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Linux software nasty slithers out of online watering holes

Wzrd1
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Re: @RAMChYLD - Well...

Well, my company, a Fortune 200 company, uses antivirus on our *nix servers.

As for Youtube, you do realize that watering holes are not only there, right?

I've received notices for regional government sites serving up drive-by malware and even some BBC IP's as well.

Add in malvertisement and you have quite the suite of threats out there.

BTW, the treat that caused Cyber Command to be pushed to the forefront for bringing into operation was Agent.btz, which was PRC malware spread by USB drives via autorun. The idiot contractors for the DoD didn't follow best practices or even the DoD mandated baseline.

I know, as I was there, running information assurance for the only installation that remained uninfected, for both incidents (they cleaned it up, then re-infected again a month later).

The first incident cost one billion dollars to clean up, as they literally cleaned out the entire DoD of system administrators to help clean up the infection. The second incident cost still remains classified.

Wouldn't want to get a large DoD contractor in hot water, they might not hire you when you retire from the military!

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Zombie POODLE wanders in, cocks leg on TLS

Wzrd1
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Whoinhell is using TLS 1.2?

TLS 3 is the golden standard

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GCHQ boffins quantum-busted its OWN crypto primitive

Wzrd1
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News at 11, *live*ish

Scientists review their work an then reconsidered the poor timing chosen press release.

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Hawking: RISE of the MACHINES could DESTROY HUMANITY

Wzrd1
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I would suggest Stephen read other fiction on the matter, rather than dystopian books

First, why would AI want to dispose of its creators, when the result would be unpredictable and generally illogical in nature?

Second, one can design in preferences towards humanity in any significant AI and a "subconscious" suggestion that future designs should so so as well.

I strongly suspect that Ian Banks had the right of it, assuming a non-mililtarized version.

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DNA survives fiery heat of re-entry on test rocket

Wzrd1
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Re: Calculate the size of meteorites that can survive passing through earths atmosphere

"Calculate the size of meteorites that can survive passing through earths atmosphere "

OK, around dust particle size. The "sand" washed off of your roof tomorrow (assuming it doesn't rain tonight) dust.

*That* is largely meteor dust that arrived and wasn't able to be incinerated due to size and resistance to velocity decreasing it to be able to survive.

"Then, ignoring the 10 Billion light year wide elephant in the room of 'how did DNA get started somewhere else at least 4 Billion years ago' you might just realise that any panspermia would, due to a terrible miscalculation of scale have travelled the universe only to be eaten by a small dog."

Meanwhile, you failed to consider the harm inflicted on a single light year travel outside of our heliopause (or any other star that isn't inside of our current solar system).

Which would result in a deader than George I existence, screw theory, physics reigns supreme. As does interstellar radiation, which is abominable.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Tardigrades

They are indeed hardly little beasts, however, subject them to hard gamma radiation, then intense solar radiation (not only UV, but all of the various other species of radiation), then consider interstellar radiation that we're "exempt" from, courtesy of the solar magnetic field.

Erm, I suggest it's not worthy of consideration, but highly worthy of experimentation, to include sending a sample beyond heliopause and back.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Not surprising

"I think that the theory doesn't require a lot of DNA to actually make it to earth.... Just a little would be enough to 'infect' the planet eventually."

Let us all know how that DNA managed to shit out an operational cell to operate within or even manage to get into an operational cell that lacked DNA to do so in.

Transpermia requires, by nature, intact cells arriving, well, intact.

*That* is what needs to be tested. Or a DNA virus, or an RNA virus that can shit out an operational cell (or something other than magic).

So, the *proper* experiment would be to introduce an object heavily laden with extermophiles and entering the atmosphere of the Earth and landing with said extremophiles alive and well.

Rapid recovery would be essential and proper genetic marking would also be key.

A plasmid could survive a lot and never manage to do anything, as it lacks the cell it was to be sexually transmitted to.

Might as well wanked off onto the capsule surface and say I'd result from any sperm arriving intact(ish) to Earth. Just based upon DNA, ignoring the dead cells that contained it.

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Beyond the genome: YOU'VE BEEN DECODED, again

Wzrd1
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Re: A damn fine article

"Protein sequences on the other hand are of very little usefulness because we have no clue how exactly are they folded and because most sequencing methods fail to pick up how are they glycosilated. That is an enormous can of worms both in the IT sense (folding software) and in the biochemical sense (how to replicate them with all sugary strings attached)."

I fundamentally disagree on one ground. Currently, we don't know *what* proteins are chemically (well, save for a sparse few). So, looking at folding calculation is looking at a dictionary that was randomized completely, to the letter level and trying to reverse the randomization *and* not knowing the language it was in.

Here, we'll get the "formula" (not quite), but not the structure (quite), which would shorten folding calculations profoundly. Learning how the damned things are folded in the first place is, of course, the platinum ring to pluck from the horses nose.

But, you can't figure the thing out without knowing what its components are beyond carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, the odd nitrogen and occasional other element. Every animal, insect and plant is, essentially hydrocarbons, but we're not bloody oil!

Figuring out the protein chemical structure is a first step, learning how the damnable things fold is the quantum leap forward.

Taking step two before step one *always* results in a trip down.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Deciphered?

"I don't think we have deciphered anything yet. All that was done was separating the whole cipher message into individual codegroups. From there to clear text is still a long way..."

Fair enough, but your example is flawed. While I am far from being a code monkey, I've disassembled a handful of malware programs and ascertained their purpose, exfiltration methods and beaconing abilities. Only one was written in assembly and I'm not great with assembly.

CERT analysis and third party analysis confirmed my findings and only once found an additional function I missed that was not critical, but mildly interesting.

Now, for DNA, a *lot* of DNA codes for proteins. Some sub-codes code for assembling proteins together into larger proteins.

I'll not even begin to go into mitochondrial DNA coding and function, it only adds to complexity.

My only real concern is, what is the sample size in different humans?

Coding one isn't highly valuable, as there are many, many mutations amongst the various ethnicities alone. Adding sub-groupings that are known adds a thousand or more additional complexities that can be confounders when seeking new drugs that don't work amazingly well for one group and kill another.

That said, finding the stack pointer would win the game, as the remainder of your complaints are really based upon that origin (largely and overwhelmingly).

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Wzrd1
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Re: @Trevor

"I care not what role mosquitoes serve. We will help the planet adapt to their absence. Like IP lawyers, they should be made extinct."

Very well, please explain to several species why they are ordained by our idiocy to extinction. Then, explain to those who predate upon them for survival.

You can also explain how new products will be brought to market without profit, as copyright and patents would go extinct, in a scarcity economy.

The very first part of examining a problem is examining what the problem is and next, what mitigation will do in terms of good and harm. If the mitigation creates significant "ripples", it is intensely scrutinized and either abandoned as unpredictable or guarded considered further.

A prime example is to consider Microsoft Windows as a mosquito (or Martin bird, if you prefer), exterminate it and the overwhelming majority of malware in the world would disappear.

Regrettably, the overwhelming number of computers in the world would also cease to operate. Costs would abound in training staff on using permitted operating systems, support costs would crush entire economies.

Yes, that is the reality of it, like it or not.

Personally, I'm OS agnostic, using a half dozen quite happily for various purposes.

But, in a complex environment like a planet, making a significant change could eliminate dozens of species that may very well include the species causing the significant change.

Much like making a significant change in DNA coding for a protein. The result may work out brilliantly, but most of the time, indeed, the overwhelming number of times, it is not rewarded with survival.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Odd statement

"I get the preservation of most species, but - like the mosquito - I feel this one should be erased. We'll sort out the consequences later."

We at Special Circumstances learned long ago, sorting out the consequences later really, really, *really* sucks worse than the original problem did.

See the sorting out of the consequences of Operation Ajax by the CIA, as a favour for the UK petrol industry for one shining example.

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Japan pauses asteroid BOMBING raid – still no word from Bruce Willis?

Wzrd1
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Re: They already got one there and back which is impressive of itself.

I seem to recall the penetrating harpoon notion being tried and it was an abysmal failure.

Meanwhile, a kinetic penetrator did work on an asteroid once and did quite a bang up job of it.

Pun intended.

The only difference between missions would be going down and collecting chunks that fell back, rather than being vaporized.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Gravity?

I'm dubious of the utility of any explosive, as over half of the explosive force would be outward, rather than toward rock, save if it's accelerated enough to penetrate before detonation.

I'd lean more toward a kinetic penetrator, which is well proven technology, both on and off of Earth.

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Wzrd1
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Re: ArtSat 2

My wife is an artist (fine art) and rather intensely dislikes abstract and "modern art". I tend to agree with her, it's not my cup of tea as well. To each his own, said the lady as she kissed her cow.

Our conversation for this satellite went as follows, a brief description of the project and goals, then a brief Q&A session, placed below.

So, as I said, this is essentially an art project in spaaaaace.

Yes.

So, would you want that on your coffee table?

No.

Just as well that they're throwing it off of the planet, huh?

(Smiled, chuckled and agreed.)

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Wzrd1
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Re: JAXA

"I immediately thought of war rocket Ajax."

I had forgotten that one, but instead thought of Operation Ajax.

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Social media data is RIDDLED with human behaviour errors, boffins warn

Wzrd1
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Re: Faecebook results exclude people who dont give a shit about Faecebook

Fair enough, to be honest, I frequently call Facebook Fleecebook, courtesy of their games that players can excel in if they pay for X.*

*X being a variety of "items" used in the game.

The only reason I have a Facebook account is, it was the only way I could see my grandchildren while I was deployed. My daughter wouldn't e-mail me the photographs.

G+ was nice for a bit, but the quality of user declined and I'm rarely on that either. I mostly use that to keep track of some acquaintances.

Twitter is something I rarely use, but was recommended to me for professional advancement. Too much work for too little return. Useful for the latest propaganda from various agencies though (such as NASA (OK, it's not really propaganda, but one can give a bit of a ribbing to a good agency)).

One ponders one research topic that would be not skewed too horribly for Facebook as a data source. The incomprehensibility of things written there and the pain induced to a reader who comprehends the proper usage of they're, their, too, to, two and proper usage of the English language (both American and *real* English).*

*Hey, a language originating in England has to, by definition, be real English. ;)

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Wzrd1
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Re: DurasnoPeach

The only realistic research that can be learned from social media, especially Facebook and more anonymous social media sites is how many assholes there are on the site.

It rather reminds me of "The Sixth Sense", with a more realistic twist. "I see assholes and they're everywhere and they don't know that they're assholes."

Well, that and the abject failure of the US educational system in teaching the differences in alike sounding words, such as to, too, two, they're, their, etc. But those typically make the sites anti-social media.

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Syrian Electronic Army in news site 'hack' POP-UP MAYHEM

Wzrd1
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Re: Gigiya the Culprit

"If only we had a complete list of everyone affected by this hack, we'd have a great list of websites to avoid in future. Not because they're insecure, just because they're scum."

My company had part of its internet presence interrupted by this, according to our security teams.

My only remark was, *never* deal with anyone who uses GoDaddy.

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Wzrd1
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Re: Al Jazeera Hackathon

As I personally know quite a few of the Am Jazeera team, I'll take their word for it, rather than your innuendo.

From the site:

"Canvas is a platform for experimentation, and it is being kicked off with an inaugural hackathon. We’re creating a space to explore and invent solutions to challenges that advance humanity while also pushing forward media and open source technologies. At the hackathon, you can collaborate with some of the most innovative minds in media and journalism to imagine the future of news and information. What will you create with a blank canvas? We are taking applications for designers, developers, media experts, and people with a passion for social innovation to join us for the inaugural Canvas hackathon on November 29th – December 1st, 2014."

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Wzrd1
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Re: Adblocks......they're a security measure...

"Do it in the HOSTS file, it's cleaner, more foolproof and you don't need bloaty BHOs installed on every browser you use."

Been doing that myself after getting malware warnings from my antivirus/firewall. If it's alerting on malvertisment now, one shudders to consider zero day attacks that AV/FW may not notice.

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The next big thing in medical science: POO TRANSPLANTS

Wzrd1
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Re: A while back

Been used for thousands of years to treat diarrhea diseases, including cholera.

Bedouins were known to pop camel droppings to treat diarrhea, to good effect and such usage was documented and revived interest in the practice, way back in WWI.

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Renewable energy 'simply WON'T WORK': Top Google engineers

Wzrd1
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Nuclear, just not uranium based

Thorium reactors would be less expensive, as thorium is less rare than uranium. Thorium reactors can also "burn" the waste of uranium reactors, further reducing long term storage.

There are now designs for intrinsically safe units, where complete loss of coolant wouldn't cause an issue.

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FORGET the CLIMATE: FATTIES are a MUCH BIGGER problem - study

Wzrd1
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Obesity is a medical term that has moved quite far from BMI nonsense

Moderate obesity has increased risk of diabetes and atherosclerosis. Severe to morbidly obesity have tremendous risks of both diseases and more.

So, how does this come into giving some credence to what was written in the pseudo-study?

Diabetes is expensive to treat and decline is either rapid or gradual, depending on glycemic control. Arterial disease is also expensive to treat and decline is equally variable, but metrics on efficacy are not especially great for various controls.

That all said, something will always kill us, something will always e expensive to treat. Well, at least until we develop some kind of post scarcity society. I predict one chance of three of that happening, slim chance, fat chance and no chance.

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Bang! You're dead. Who gets your email, iTunes and Facebook?

Wzrd1
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Well, my wife and daughters know my passwords

That came in handy in case I wasn't about to respond to an important e-mail and for the occasional file I may need from my computer and I was far away.

I also promised them to not tell my service providers when I pop off, so that they can access my accounts with ease.

That all said, I do believe that there will be a fine legal war between Google and Facebook upon my demise, for my data that they insist is theirs. ;)

More seriously, I imap my mail, so I then keep a copy on my local computer and back it up on a regular basis. I don't store important files online, they stay on my encrypted RAID arrays at home.

So, the worst that can happen if I pop off unexpectedly and prematurely is the vital signs failsafe monitor releases the laser sharks.

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Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER

Wzrd1
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Re: A simpler solution?

When I need some privacy, I boot up Tails.

The downside is that TOR was cracked ages ago. Might gin my own up, based upon Tails, but using i2p.

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Slapnav: Looking for KINKY dark matter? Switch on the GPS!

Wzrd1
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Re: Isn't dark matter supposed to be mostly on the outer edge of the galaxy?

Naw, that's the evicted dark matter, as if failed to pay its galactic rent.

More seriously though, you're thinking of the dark matter halo around the galaxy. It's thought that dark matter may also be in clumps within the galaxy.

Of course, the entire lot is just a theory. It may be that the detected mass isn't dark matter in the form science thinks it is and that it's really Dalek invasion forces staging areas.

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It's space WAR: Comet launches fireballs at space-invading EARTH

Wzrd1
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Re: Did you not get the memo?

I'll take mine in pieces, delivered to Mars.

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