* Posts by Vimes

699 posts • joined 3 Dec 2012

Page:

Rackspace in Crawley: This is a local data centre for local people

Vimes
Silver badge

Funny you should mention Microsoft. You should ask Caspar Bowden. He's the former head of privacy there, and seems to be strongly of the opinion that US company = US law, regardless of location.

http://www.networkworld.com/article/2866286/microsoft-subnet/former-microsoft-chief-privacy-officer-on-the-cloud-conspiracy.html

http://www.computing.co.uk/ctg/analysis/2389869/why-i-hope-microsoft-loses-court-case-against-the-nsa-privacy-campaigner

0
0

Yay, we're all European (Irish) now on Twitter (except Americans)

Vimes
Silver badge

@Lee D

The EU employees who provide that facility are, by definition, breaking EU data protection law.

Even when taking Safe Harbour into account?

Besides which even Twitter's own new policy tells us that by using their service we're allowing our information to be exported to the US.

1
0
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: @LDS

From Twitters 'improved' privacy policy:

Irrespective of which country you reside in or supply information from, you authorize Twitter to use your information in the United States and any other country where Twitter operates.

[...]

We engage service providers to perform functions and provide services to us in the United States and abroad.

So basically what exactly is the improvement here, since they're telling us they'll still do what they think is best?

We may share your private personal information with such service providers subject to confidentiality obligations consistent with this Privacy Policy

'Consistent' - means nothing given what they previously said.

1
0
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: You're damned either way @LDS

If US starts to convict people for something outside their jurisdiction

You don't necessarily have to be convicted of anything to have your privacy invaded.

0
0
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: You're damned either way @solidsquid

...offence in the US or targeting the US...

What happens when somebody tweets something subsequently viewed in the US? Would this count as being published in the US since it has been made available there? What would then constitute 'targeting' I wonder if it's subsequently found to be libelous?

...controlled by various international treaties...

You mean like the MLATs ignored by the US in the Microsoft case? What makes you think they wouldn't be willing to ignore other international obligations when they get too 'cumbersome'?

2
0
Vimes
Silver badge

@LDS

Sorry, but that's just the opionion of an Australian lawyer - not the outcome of an EU court ruling.

That's sort of the point I was trying to make really - EU courts wouldn't be involved in the first place, even for EU companies (since they would still have to make data available to its US parent for the system as a whole to work).

The data centre might be in the EU, but it still has to play nice with those that aren't.

And as for backlashes: these demands are often accompanied by gagging orders. It's easy to get away with something as long as people don't know it's happening.

0
0
Vimes
Silver badge

...a more effective legal firewall between the two entities

Is that even possible? Legal firewalls are all well and good, but what's the point if technical limitations make the whole thing an exercise in futility?

Surely Twitter would either work as a single system with US users conversing with non-US users, in which case non-US data is available to US systems or it would operate as a separate service?

And if non-US data is available within the US where, in any real sense, is the protection?

2
0
Vimes
Silver badge

@solidquid

The US are already effectively doing so in Ireland by demanding access to Microsoft servers stored there?

EU privacy rights don't stop existing - or at least shouldn't do so - simply because of the nationality of the company in question and if get ignored there then the same will happen here too.

EU employees would likely be able to refuse to provide the data with impunity

...whilst destroying any prospects the employees would have within the company. It might not get them sacked but it would destroy any future they would have otherwise have had.

2
3
Vimes
Silver badge

This means that stricter European data protection laws will apply rather than US rules.

Except that's not the way the US sees it.

Connie Carnabuci, a partner of the law firm Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, said that under the Act which was passed in 2001, US authorities have the ability to pass orders for the disclosure of non-US data that is stored outside the country. “The basis for that disclosure is that you have to establish a sufficient connection with the US,” she said.

“One is that you have a US company with foreign subsidiaries outside the US, such as a service provider setting up in the Asia Pacific. The second might be that you have a non-US company that sets up a US subsidiary.”

http://www.computerworld.com.au/article/413379/australian-based_data_subject_patriot_act_lawyer/

That second point sounds like Twitter International to me.

If there's a conflict of demand between the US and a country like Ireland who do you think corporations will side with?

9
2

RSA supremo rips 'failed' security industry a new backdoor, warns of 'super-mega hack'

Vimes
Silver badge

Re: Audiences @Tom 7

The people who are your greatest threat are those that work on the inside and want easier access through these walls and across these moats.

...or are simply willing to lower the drawbridge for the invaders because they're told they have a problem with their portcullis that needs fixing...

2
0

Lapider les corneilles! French Patriot Act faces growing opposition

Vimes
Silver badge

Its wording is very broad and includes major industrial and scientific interests of France as being potentially related to terrorism

And of course the likes of the French DGSE would never abuse this would they? Would they?

...<glances in IBMs, Cornings and Texas Instruments direction>...

Oh, wait...

1
0
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: Warm Braw We refuse to legalise the right ...

Please do go back to mindlessly assuming your governments are all trop blanche and only The Big Satan is doing the naughty.

Who ever said that they thought that?

3
0
Vimes
Silver badge

There's no link to the petition?

Pity - I wouldn't have minded signing it too...

1
0

The content business wants Netflix out of Australia

Vimes
Silver badge

Re: Just give me a decent legal way to download. @Orlowski

On a related note region locks affect audio content too.

Just try being in the UK and buying audio books from Audibles US store if you need an example. For that matter is Spotify affected by this sort of thing?

1
0

JavaScript CPU cache snooper tells crooks EVERYTHING you do online

Vimes
Silver badge

which can be performed by JavaScript served from a malicious web ad network

Given problems in the past, potentially *any* ad network could be subverted for malicious purposes.

How many such networks does this site use, and will you ever be offering a paid option to remove ads entirely?

6
0

Who runs this world? Sony Pictures CEO jokes about getting UK culture minister fired

Vimes
Silver badge

And as for Dunstone, didn't he used to support the Labour party? I seem to recall Peter Mandelson attending Dunstone's wedding a number of years ago.

The telecoms & media industries seem to have their tentacles all over the place. Just look at Labour and BT (Patricia Hewitt was a non-executive director there for a while) whilst with the conservatives we have Ian Livingston (former MD at BT) being given a peerage and a position as unelected trade minister in government.

12
0
Vimes
Silver badge

It was the last Labour government that pushed through the Digital Economy Act shortly before they lost the last election, with Labour bigwigs meeting with media moguls.

The conservatives are far from the only ones with dodgy friends. When it comes to this sort of thing there is no choice. Don't think your vote will make the blindest bit of difference when it comes to who holds the power.

28
1

New Forum Wishlist - but read roadmap first

Vimes
Silver badge

Re: 10 minute window for editing posts

Example: You post: 'Apple is crap, but so is Samsung'. Other people post, 'yeah, I agree', then you edit your post to remove the Samsung reference....

I was thinking of additions rather than edits or outright deletions. Given the lack of any real structure to the threads (for some reason they thought removing the timestamp from posts was a good idea which has only made that even worse) and the large number of posts in some of them being able to append something might be useful.

0
0
Vimes
Silver badge

10 minute window for editing posts

There have been a few occasions where I've managed to start editing a post, go over the limit by a minute or two and then get the change rejected when I submit the change (which can be annoying if the change was big).

Is there a chance of extending this window for times when editing started within the 10 minutes? It wouldn't require a huge difference - perhaps allow a total of 15 minutes to edit a post if the editing started within the 10 minute window for example.

Although personally I would suggest extending the period either way. Sometimes I find myself wanting to add additional points to the post but finding myself unable to do so within that post. Perhaps allow additional text to be added outside the 10 minute window but label them as edits & display a timestamp for when the edit was made?

Also I'm not sure if this counts as a bug or enhancement but the 'my posts' link on the mobile version of your site seems to appear at the bottom of the page. This makes getting to it more time consuming than it needs to be on phones when there is a lot of scrolling to do to get past all my comments to get there. Could you please add these links at the top of the page too on the mobile version?

0
0

Lib Dem manifesto: Spook slapdown, ban on teen-repelling Mosquitos

Vimes
Silver badge

Re: Rock and hard place

Now if you do not like Lib Dems teaming up with Conservatives, but would be happy for them to taem up with Labour, why are you not voting Labour?

Because people don't want anything to do with either the conservatives or labour? Or perhaps they feel that labour have moved too far to the right and that the only option for them is to vote lib dem?

0
0
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: coalition is what people want

The coalition was truly representative with around 60% of votes

Except that a large chunk of lib dem voters would never want to go near the tories. And nobody asked them before entering the coalition either, so how can anybody claim that level of support with a straight face - especially when quite a few people would have changed their minds had they been given the chance to do so?

1
3
Vimes
Silver badge

Just look at how Labour and Tories conveniently forgot promises and manifesto pledges when in powe ALONE!

Except that in most cases that's because a promise was carelessly made that could no longer be kept. These are promises being deliberately sacrificed in a way that was entirely avoidable and only done as a matter of choice. There is a big difference between the two IMO.

The simple fact is the Lib Dems have managed to scale back what would have been even more insanely drastic Tory attack upon the poor and non-elite of society.

...but only by supporting other dracanion programs themselves. Bedroom tax, tuition fee increases, secret trials and DRIPA to name a few.

The only reason this government has survived so long is thanks to the lib dems. Forgive me if I don't think that's a good thing.

0
3
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: Rock and hard place

There is NO RULE which says you must side with Labour if you are not Conservative.

There is no rule either that says it's absolutely vital for any party to enter a coalition. Surely to assume it had to be one or the other, rather than let the Tories stay in a minority government is a false assumption? Avoiding election re-runs is no absolute need that some people think it is.

The lib dems deliberately sacrificed their own policies to satisfy their desire for power. They *chose* to enter the coalition. Nobody forced them, and there are voters out there that won't forget what has been done.

For a party that claims to promote fairer electoral systems, how on earth can they justify propping up a party that a large chunk of their voters would never want to go near? For all the intents and purposes they stole those votes, and I for one will never vote for them again.

4
5
Vimes
Silver badge

It is at least honest.

True, but if they fail to come up with a reason to say 'vote for me' that doesn't rely on unflattering views of other candidates then I wonder what good would come from them winning any election.

3
0
Vimes
Silver badge

Is it just me, or is there something unappealing when it comes to being told by politicians that they're the least worst alternative rather than give good reasons to vote for them?

18
0
Vimes
Silver badge

'Clegg: It's Salmond, Farage or me'

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/election-2015-32311736

So it's a choice between some weak willed politician with all the moral backbone of an amoeba or one of two narcissistic nutters? I'm not sure which is worse.

4
3
Vimes
Silver badge

'Protections' - complete and utter bollocks.

This is the party that voted *FOR* DRIPA amongst other things (and in the case of Julian Huppert voted against any review of DRIPA before 2016).

Don't believe a word they say.

'We need more civil liberties!'

...only because they helped to destroy them in the first place...

15
2

Conservative manifesto: 5G, 'near universal' broadband and free mobes for PC Dixon

Vimes
Silver badge

Re: Some political minds might be concentrated if...

The only way to change that system is to get the voters to not reward lying

Isn't that a bit like putting the responsibility of a scam on the victims rather than the scammers trying to con them?

complaining about the MPs wont change anything

Tell that to the MPs forced to quit after the expenses scandal. It sure changed things for them.

Perhaps if they know the same sort of thing would happen to them if they dared to tell such bare faced lies then they wouldn't do it in the first place?

0
1
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: The Tories are no strangers...

If you vote us in to power

Shouldn't that be more simply stated as 'if you vote for us'? Even MPs outside of government have influence (witness for example the SNP helping the government get through legislation only affecting England).

I personally don't subscribe to the view that because they didn't win the election that they get to drop all the standards that got them their share of the vote to start with.

Even if the likes of the lib Dems couldn't force tuition fees to stay at the same level they didn't have to vote for them to be raised either (beyond their obsession with wanting power).

If nobody won then perhaps the best option would have been to have another election?

For that matter why don't we have a similar system to countries like France where there is more than one round? If we had this last time then lib dem voters could have had a chance to decide which side they wanted to support rather than only have the option of having Nick Clegg make that decision for them.

1
1
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: Some political minds might be concentrated if...

Oddly enough you don't get a magical ability to predict the future when you enter politics.

I never claimed that they did.

They do however have the choice of deciding what to promise, with most of them opting to promise the moon when they know it's not possible.

Making these promises legally binding would at least ensure that no party could illegitimately gain votes by making promises that can never be kept without facing consequences.

And once again: it's the political parties themselves insisting on using terms like 'fully costed'. If that truly is the case then what harm could there be in putting that to the test? And if not why shouldn't their lives be made difficult when they make claims that don't stand up to scrutiny?

7
4
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: Some political minds might be concentrated if...

Plus the crystal ball required to predict movements of the economy over the next 5 years - given that this is currently impossible...

Then why make the promises in the first place?

And the parties themselves are the ones that keep on claiming that their policies are fully costed. Personally I wouldn't mind putting that to the test.

17
2
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: Some political minds might be concentrated if...

Even better - make any manifesto pledges legally binding. It might make certain people think twice before making promises they can't keep.

10
0
Vimes
Silver badge

The Tories would give the security services the power they need.

Other parties are wary of giving offence, and upsetting those concerned about civil liberties.

But, he says, he has met the relatives of terrorist victims. He has had to make the judgment calls. And the Conservative party will not risk the nation’s security, he says.

Guardian article

Ummm... Despite knowing about the 7/7 bombers, Lee Rigby killers and Jihadi John, and all *WITHOUT* these additional powers he intends to give them? As did the French government with the Charlie Hebdo attack? Nobody within the government seems to have paid any sort of price for these continued failures, and are presumably still in their job. Come to think of it:

https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/04/10/cressida-dick-uk-foreign-office-secret/

It must be nice to be involved in the death of an innocent man (De Menezes), get to keep your job and even get to keep it secret. Most people would be fired and possibly even in prison. Do it in the name of the government and you apparently get a promotion.

Isn't *that* sort of behaviour the bigger risk to the nation's security?

35
2

Lib Dems wheel out Digital Rights Bill pledge as election sweetener

Vimes
Silver badge

Here we go again...

The Tories would give the security services the power they need.

Other parties are wary of giving offence, and upsetting those concerned about civil liberties.

But, he says, he has met the relatives of terrorist victims. He has had to make the judgment calls. And the Conservative party will not risk the nation’s security, he says.

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/live/2015/apr/14/election-2015-live-conservative-manifesto-david-cameron-right-to-buy#block-552ceb41e4b04b4dc25b7793

0
0
Vimes
Silver badge

You get the impression sometimes that MPs just don't seem to understand technology, and that when it comes to Twitter in particular they forget that other people can read what they write...

https://twitter.com/KarlTurnerMP/status/587763576129122304

'Good luck with Grayling' - hardly an inspiring message or a reason to vote Labour is it?

0
0
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: Logic

The Lib Dems are a party who've been campaigning for PR and coalition governments being a better idea for their entire existence. Not to go into coalition when there was a viable option to do so would basically be like saying "our party is a pointless waste of time".

Except that people didn't vote lib Dems for them to be in government no matter what, they voted for lib dem policies. There is something dishonest about how they behaved, especially when they are aware a large chunk of people would never have voted for them had they realised that this outcome was a very real possibility. They got into government based on the votes of people that they would never have got had the voters realised what could happen as a result of voting lib dem.

As for 'viable' that's a matter of opinion, especially if being in coalition completely destroys any faith that people might have otherwise had in any future promises and pledges.

I've already said elsewhere how I think conflicts should have been handled, and personally speaking I think a system without any party whips where the MPs really do represent the interests of their constituency rather than those of their party would be one of the best things that could happen to this country, even if PR is completely forgotten.

If any leader can't carry his or her own MPs without that sort of thing then how in any real sense are they a leader?

2
3
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: And don't bother trying https:// ...

No, my mistake.

I got him confused with somebody else. Need to be more careful next time.

It's still bad though that the government - regardless of party - is willing to go to these sorts of lengths to make their own lives easier.

0
0
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: And don't bother trying https:// ...

As for the tories:

http://europeanmemorandum.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/files/2014/04/17067-13_Min_Cor_7_April_2014_Hughes-Cash.pdf

(see first three paragraphs on the 2nd page)

We really are screwed.

1
0
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: Logic

it would have been worth bringing the coalition down

No, just not worth entering the coalition in the first place...

2
1
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: And don't bother trying https:// ...

Labour did too when Tom Watson ran his 'Say no to the Sun' campaign a little while back, and as for Labour's main site:

http://www.tcpiputils.com/browse/domain/labour.org.uk

And as a bonus they seem to use Microsofts services for email. The MX record for their domain points to this:

http://www.tcpiputils.com/browse/ip-address/213.199.154.87

We're all screwed no matter who we vote for...

2
0
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: [the Lib Dems have] never broken an election promise before.

Just the nature of coalition government

Easy solution: free votes and the whips stay away when there are conflicts like that. That way the respective parties are given the opportunity to stick to their promises.

If the prime minister can't get a bill through parliament on that sort of basis then he doesn't deserve to, and should have thought twice about introducing it in the first place.

5
0

Labour manifesto: Tech Bacc, not-spot zapping and hi-speed interwebs

Vimes
Silver badge

Thank god the Tories understood that we need teach children about what's going on under the hood.

I can only speak for myself, and admittedly this is a long time ago now, but I left school in 1995, and IT was a joke during my four years in that school. All we were taught was how to use software - not even what it did or the underlying concepts when it came to databases for example - and mostly using cheap software that we wouldn't even encounter in real life. From what I hear things haven't really managed to progress from there very much if comments I've heard in relation to the current state of play is anything to go by.

This was during the last conservative government and in a very heavily conservative-leaning area (the last election saw the MP get more than 50% of the entire vote).

4
2
Vimes
Silver badge

And civil liberties? They don't deserve a mention?

This whole thing reads like something run through the Dilbert mission statement generator. A lot of meaningless fluff.

'Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing' - who knew Shakespeare had to deal with politicians?

There's no mention of strengthening online freedoms, which would probably have a bigger impact in investment in this country than anything to do with not-spots. But then this is the party that gave us the 'Mastering the Internet' program and whose civil servant - Charles Farr - is still advising the government to this day.

18
0

NSA: 'Back doors are a bad idea, give us a FRONT door key'

Vimes
Silver badge

Re: I get it, but

People working in GCHQ are after terrorists and real bad guys

That's not always the case.

http://www.gloucestershireecho.co.uk/Staff-member-GCHQ-sacked-inappropriate-searches/story-26187243-detail/story.html

6
0
Vimes
Silver badge

@moiety

For bonus points if you ever get the chance, ask them:

If non-US companies can be forced to make life easy for the US how does this not open the door (front, back or any other sort you'd care to name) to the same thing happening in either Russia or China when it comes to companies there dealing with data originating from the US?

5
0
Vimes
Silver badge

The last time this seemed to have any serious traction was with the clipper chip saga.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipper_chip

7
0

Woeful groans over Game of Thrones' spill on piracy sites

Vimes
Silver badge

Re: Game of Torrents!

IMHO, all TV should be broadcast in all locations on the same day

Putting aside any copyright considerations, how would you suggest achieving this when dealing with countless broadcasters worldwide, with each effectively being a completely different customer and each with different priorities as to what they want to show?

As for a 'local' on demand service, which one? And how many of those are there spread across the globe?

For that matter eliminating time differences entirely is probably impossible given the time differences between countries. Taking GoT as an example the first episode was I believe broadcast Sunday night in the US, but even if it was broadcast in the UK at the same time it would have been the early hours of Monday morning.

0
0
Vimes
Silver badge

Re: Game of Torrents!

Social aspect? But what happens when your friends are just as likely to be downloading it too?

6
0

'We want better publicly funded education...'

Vimes
Silver badge

'We want better publicly funded education...'

'...just don't expect us to pay any more tax to help actually fund it'?

http://www.geekwire.com/2015/geekwire-radio-microsoft-general-counsel-brad-smith-on-government-snooping-tech-talent-and-the-companys-new-era/

It's an audio recording with Brad Smith, head legal counsel at Microsoft. Try listening in from about 28:25 onwards.

'You pay taxes on the revenue that you generate in that state'? Seriously?

Does this mean that we can expect Microsoft playing tricks with their taxes in the UK?

*cough* Luxembourg* cough* Ireland* cough*

0
0

Page:

Forums