* Posts by ma1010

308 posts • joined 30 Nov 2012

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After AT&T's crushing blow, FTC tells Senate it wants its balls back

ma1010
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FAIL

So, business as usual?

This is exactly what the communications oligipoly wants, a complete lack of government oversight. And they have the monetary muscle to buy any court or Congress. Expect nothing to change. Government by, for and of the corporations these days. Welcome to the future.

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No wonder we're being hit by Internet of Things botnets. Ever tried patching a Thing?

ma1010
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Holmes

does the widespread use of an IoT botnet mean that the whole concept of IoT security is fatally flawed? Do we need to trash it all and start over?

Yes.

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Brit boffins get $800k for Los Angeles Twitter pre-crime tech

ma1010
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Big Brother

I thought our security people were alredy doing that.

Perhaps this sort of thing could work with deep data mining techniques, but I'm expecting more in the way of this.

If that's all it amounts to, then don't expect much.

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Behold the fruit of your techie utopia: A $43 San Francisco fog-infused martini

ma1010
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Holmes

This is a standard business model

Sell something to fools for much more than it's worth and get rich. Apple has been doing it for years.

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Azure is on fire, your DNS is terrified

ma1010
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FAIL

The cloud strikes again

Someday perhaps I'll understand why people and businesses want to put their own data on computers that belong to some corporation in some distant location which depend on the Internet to work at all.

If something breaks on your in-house IT and you're the IT guy, you can do something about fixing it. If something breaks in the cloud, all you can do is whine about it. And wait for someone else somewhere to fix it, eventually. The cloud demotes your IT department to the "using classes," as the BOFH would put it. At the BOFH's company, those "cloud solution" sales people wound up in the subbasement with the PFY, a hole punch and a soldering iron. Good place for them.

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Hacker and chums jailed over gold bullion hack, track 'n' grab scam

ma1010
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Facepalm

Re: Ca fait mal

Thieves often do this sort of thing. They spend a great time and a lot of effort trying to steal something when, if they spent that time and effort on something legitimate, they'd make more money and not get arrested.

I remember a case of someone spending about two hours to break into a vending machine. He got about $5.00 for his trouble. And went to jail. If he'd spent that two hours time working at a McJob, he would have made more than twice as much money legally. Not too bright.

Protip: If you haven't any morals and want to make money at computer crime, look for a successful business model and copy it. Ransomware seems to work well.

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It actually will be Obama who decides whether to end US government oversight of the internet

ma1010
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Childcatcher

ICANN probably can't

The problem that I see is that ICANN has no transparency or accountability at all. They seem very secretive, and often do things that make one question their competency. All this makes me want to not trust them with full control of the root domain, even if it does put me on the same side of the question as idiots spouting nonsense about Iran taking over the Internet.

Also, as another poster pointed out, the fact that outfits like Apple, Google and Farcebook are in favor of the takeover should give one pause. Perhaps they have pre-bribed ICANN to do their bidding? I smell something fishy here.

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Jeff Bezos' thrusting cylinder makes Elon Musk's look minuscule

ma1010
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Re: ....but third US astronaut to make a flight. (Not counting the apes.)

Why aren't we counting the apes?

Because "New Ham" sounds like some synthetic food product.

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Tesla to stop killing drivers: Software update beamed to leccy cars

ma1010
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Re: Mansfield bars

Thanks to all those who replied to my post. So higher visibility (perhaps) and hitting the car lower where it's better able to handle a hit can improve surviveability in a collision. I kind of suspect in this particular case at 70+ MPH the guy was pretty much toast either way, but I can see how bars like that could help in a lower speed collision.

Of course it likely won't happen here because...corporations...Congress, etc. You know. And there are a fair number of action movies that use shots where a car goes under a trailer like that (the stunt men are paying attention and do duck, at least), so maybe add Hollywood to the list of reasons why no Mansfield bars on this side of the Pond.

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ma1010
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Paris Hilton

Mansfield bars

Of course, if the US passed a law requiring "Mansfield bars" (underride guard hanging from rear of trailer) on the sides of trucks as well as the back, the death could most likely have been avoided altogether.

Okay, maybe I'm missing something here. But I keep seeing comments like this from Right-Pondians, and I'm perplexed. The fellow died because, due to his inattention to the road, his car went under a trailer at 70+ MPH. So, are we being told that if the trailer had had some sort of steel guard to stop the car from going under the trailer, the driver would have been unaffected by hitting such a steel guard at 70+ MPH? Perhaps instead of getting decapitated, he'd have been crushed by the impact. With either scenario, I'd think you're not going to be pining for the fjords anymore.

If there is something about these Mansfield bars I'm missing that would make my statement incorrect, please enlighten me. Paris because I'm confused.

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HP Ink buys Samsung's printer business for a BILLION dollars

ma1010
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Thumb Up

Once upon a time..

HP made printers that were just TANKS. The HP III Laser? Where I used to work we had one that did hundreds of thousands of copies and just kept going. We even did double-sided printing (in a single sided printer) by just taking the paper that came out, turning it over and putting it back in the paper tray. (Yes, we had special software that printed the pages in reverse order on the back side.) It worked perfectly and gave very little trouble if you'd just keep it clean.

Where I work now, we have a bunch of ancient 9040n printers that just keep chugging along doing hundreds of pages a day. They break down once in a while, but occasional, simple repairs heave kept them going year after year.

Back in the day, HP sure knew how to build great printers.

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Meet DDoSaaS: Distributed Denial of Service-as-a-Service

ma1010
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Pirate

Good mornin', Squire!

Be a real shame if anything bad was to happen 'ere! But for just a few quid a month...

Really, something should be done about these types of companies. It's one thing if once in a while some criminal uses your service, and you take steps to stop them once you know about it (think most mail services which don't allow spammers).

But here we seem to have a company that regularly allows criminals to use their network and then sells services to mitigate the attacks they allow?? Maybe I'm missing something here, but it sounds like racketeering to me. Perhaps Cloudflare's management should be getting some porridge time.

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Israeli Pentagon DDoSers explain their work, get busted by FBI

ma1010
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Alert

It's a tried and true business model

Hi! Someone who wishes to remain anonymous hired me to stress test your head. With this cosh.

I hope these clowns get some serious jail time. Perhaps they'll get a bit of "stress testing" from their fellow inmates. All for their own good, of course.

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'Jet blast' noise KOs ING bank's spinning rust servers

ma1010
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Trollface

So the BOFH missed a bet?

130 db can knock you out and disorient you

No doubt Simon will be ordering a 130 db siren to add to the machine room for when the (black market) Halon system goes off. Why take chances that "unauthorized personnel" might find their way out in time to survive?

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Printers now the least-secure things on the internet

ma1010
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Great product idea?

I don't need my printer, fridge, TV, oven, washer, dryer or any bloody thing except my computer and phone getting on the Internet. And then only to do what I want them to do. Something that could help people fight back against all this might find a large market. Perhaps someone could design a not-sohopeless router that blocks Internet access by default and allows only the computer, phone and specific, designated appliances to get out?

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Inside our three-month effort to attend Apple's iPhone 7 launch party

ma1010
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Big Brother

If one compared companies to countries

Apple would be, IMHO, the Soviet Union. The Party is all-knowing and wise. Anyone who criticizes The Party goes to the Gulag (of non-communication from Apple).

Everything is a state secret until we release it. The Party owns everything (in the name of the People, of course). The Party is 100% in control of everything in a top-down dictatorship. The Party does nothing wrong -- if the People's Phones do not work correctly, this is not Party's fault - people must be holding them wrong.

Sounds a lot like Soviet Russia to me. Somehow, Apple have done well, either because of their approach or despite it. Somehow, Soviet Russia survived for quite a while, too. But then it fell apart. Is Apple starting to show a few cracks?

Folks like me just have an innate dislike and distrust of tyrants like Apple and won't have anything to do with them or their products. I'd pick MS over Apple any day, although I'm far from fond of Satya's new regime. And Linux is the best of all. Yes, you've got Linus' potty mouth and temper to deal with, but it does have entertainment value. And overall, the Linux devs have done a magnificent job and done it in an atmosphere of freedom and collaboration so very foreign to Apple's entire existence.

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US tech college ITT is not pining for the fjords. It is no more. It has gone and met its maker

ma1010
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Headmaster

Don't hate all private colleges

Years (quite a few) ago, I went to a private college, Heald Business College. At that time they'd been around about 80 years or more, and were fully accredited with (I think) about 6-8 campuses in California. You got a very good, practical education there. It was exactly what I was looking for as I was coming out of a really bad period with a failed marriage and physical injuries that made it impossible for me to pursue my former occupation. I needed to get myself sorted out and prepared to work in a totally different field and do it quickly.

They got me started in IT and accounting and found me my first job (where I worked for 15 years and did quite well). They were an excellent school, and well worth every penny I spent there.

Unfortunately, a few years ago, they were sold to some other corporation that used their name but *destroyed* the school. After a few years of that debacle, the new owners went bankrupt, and Heald is no more. They were killed by the leading reason for the death of great businesses: management greed and incompetence.

I don't know a lot about ITT, but perhaps they were good once, too.

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FCC goes over the top again to battle America's cable-box rip-off

ma1010
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FAIL

It's a great idea, but forget it

There is no way to defeat the communications/cable/internet oligopoly. They have too much money and will buy Congress every time. The only thing that would fix this is for everyone to dump their cable, satellite TV and Internet and do without until the bastards went bankrupt. Then Congress might give us a reasonable set of laws if they weren't being bribed. Of course, that's pure fantasy and will never happen.

So continue to expect high priced crap service with no end in sight. Don't like your provider? Take your business to the <joke>"competition" </joke>.

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GE runs off $1.4bn, hands it to two 3D printing firms

ma1010
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Childcatcher

Like many new technologies...

...it takes time to develop. If it was 1944 and you had somehow wandered into Bletchley Park (without being shot!) and seen those primitive "computing machines," would you have visualized the PC revolution in the 1980's and all the effect it's had on the world? What about the first automobiles? Those were silly toys for rich men to play with. They certainly were not any sort of reliable transportation! And the price -- FORGET the average person ever being able to own one. And then progress happened, and the world changed.

It's early innings for additive technology. It may never be of much use except for one-off production, prototyping and such, or it may be THE NEXT BIG THING. Apparently someone at GE thinks it's worth investing a lot of money in. Will it work out? We'll just have to wait and see.

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Paint your wagon (with electric circuits) but leave my crotch alone

ma1010
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Paris Hilton

Re: Dont' put phones in your pants pocket

Yeah, especially if the case is one of those clever gun-shaped ones! Live out that Bond fantasy! Impress all your friends AND the police. Let everyone know what a sad wanker you are.

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ma1010
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Thanks for putting THAT picture into my head. Now I can imagine someone strapping on such an accessory, removing their number from the "Do Not Call List" while simultaneously signing up for every phone spam list they can find.

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Want a Windows 10 update? Don't go to Microsoft ... please

ma1010
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Holmes

Re: DOS attack??

Of course users would notice if you put Linux on their computer! No BSODs, no ads, no data slurping, no forced updates, no automatic torrents nuking their bandwidth (important if you have a narrow pipe).

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BBC vans are coming for you

ma1010
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Coat

I got caught by a detector van

It was the cat detector van. From the Ministry of Alvinge or something like that. He made me buy a license for my cat.

Mine's the one with the cat license in the pocket.

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US appeals court slaps down FTC, AT&T walks free, cats and dog living together, mass hysteria

ma1010
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FAIL

Okay, will you get this straight, America?

Officially, as a matter of federal law, the oligopolies can charge you whatever they like, however they like. They may or may not do what they promise to do in exchange for the money you gave them. It doesn't matter, either way. You just need to pay them whatever they tell you to pay, whenever they tell you. And if you don't like it? You can just shut the fuck up!

Welcome to America, land of the fee. Government of the corporations, by the corporations and for the corporations shall not perish from the Earth!

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Got to dash out for some rubber johnnies? Amazon has a button for that

ma1010
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WTF?

Yet another IOT "solution"...

...looking for a problem.

And I'm with Martin 47; visiting someone foolish enough to have these buttons scattered around? Oh, what does this little button do? <push> "Noooo!"

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FBI: Look out – hackers are breaking into US election board systems

ma1010
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Re: Laundry to the rescue!

The Black Chamber was the US organization in charge of defense against supernatural entities.

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Ireland looks like it's outpacing Britain in the superfast broadband rollout stakes

ma1010
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FAIL

Livin' in the USA

Well, over here, we're so much better off screwed.

I live in a large city in California, not the sticks. Some folks in urban areas here might be able to get high speed, but it's going to cost you a packet. Actually, there are people who live in a small town about 25 miles from here who have fiber to the premises, while where I live (did I mention it's in a fairly large city?), I can have high-cost, ZERO customer service-oriented Crapcast cable. Or I can have slow DSL from a small provider, which is what I have. It's slow, but it works, and on the rare (2 times in 6 years) occasions when there was a problem, it got fixed right away. Comcast? I've heard too many horror stories to want to open that Pandora's box. Fiber? Well, AT&T says they will provide it, but they lie. There is no fiber available where I live, nor do they have any plans to make it available. I did mention this is in the middle of a city, right?

The real operating plan of our Data Oligopoly is to keep milking the consumers for the absolute maximum profits while providing the minimum (or less) service and zero customer support. Don't like it? Try one of the other members of the Oligopoly! They're totally different - well, at least they have a different name. Same business model.

I say erin go braugh!

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Robot babies fail in role as teenage sex deterrents

ma1010
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Gimp

This has been thought of before

You might want to check out Cyril Kornbluth's famous story, The Marching Morons. This is exactly the point of the story. It has a pretty scary "solution" to the problem, too.

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BSODs at scale: We laugh at your puny five storeys, here's our SIX storey #fail

ma1010
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Go

Re: and over at the entertainment industry . . .

You might want to consider using Linux and LibreOffice Impress instead of Windows and PowerPoint. I've done quite a number of presentations using Impress and have yet to be interrupted by the OS or some idiot program deciding to interrupt what I was doing. In addition, I can use my Android phone to control the computer remotely via Wi-Fi or Bluetooth using the Impress Remote app.

It just works, and quite well. I'm using a fairly old laptop that bogs down a bit with Win 7, but runs just perfectly with Ubuntu.

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Both HPs allegedly axed people just for being old, California court told

ma1010
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Holmes

Trying to make themselves younger?

Really? First of all, it's their (now) geezers who made them great, so the idea of "becoming younger" doesn't really make a lot of sense. Secondly, it's not really about age per se; it's all about MONEY.

Generally, older employees get paid more than younger ones. So, if you're one of the typical stupid, greedy, wildly overpaid and short-sighted asshats who seem to be in charge of most big big corporations these days (and get paid millions for plowing it under thanks to golden parachutes), you fire all your older, more experienced workers -- the guys who made the company great in the first place -- and hire a bunch of "yow'uns" you can pay more cheaply. Or, better yet, you can outsource everything to some third world country! Cut costs, push up that share price (for now), and, in the long term, cut your throat.

Either way, you rid your company of the people who made it great in the first place. So what happens next? You enter what's called a slow death spiral. And join many other once excellent companies who are fading away today after following the same strategy. I'm sure all El Reg readers can come up with a list of members of this fraternity.

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An ethical Google won't break the internet, leaked EU report finds

ma1010
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Paris Hilton

Oxymoron

"Ethical Google." Hmmm. Can't make heads or tail of that. Sounds like the "fat, thin, short, tall fellow." Those words just don't seem to go together, somehow.

Paris for obvious reasons.

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Kindle Paperwhites turn Windows 10 PCs into paperweights: Plugging one in 'triggers a BSOD'

ma1010
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Linux

I have a Kindle paperwhite and have NOT had any computer problems

I transfer all my books to my Kindle paperwhite by plugging it into the computer. Haven't had a BSOD or any other computer problems like that for over a year.

Of course, I'm running Linux Mint. No data slurping. No ads. It just works.

I'm hoping that Yet Another MS Cockup encourages more Windows users (and I used to be one) to try out Linux Mint. It installs dual boot so you can take baby steps if you need to. "Computer Users of the World, Unite! You have nothing to lose but your BSODs, ads, spyware and crippleware!"

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Stop lights, sunsets, junctions are tough work for Google's robo-cars

ma1010
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Thumb Up

Thank you for the truth

This is a great article. I'm so tired of reading tons of bollocks about "We're going to be mass producing self-driving cars by 2022" and so forth. This article highlights some of the real world problems that go into creating autonomous vehicles, and the fact that while we've learned a lot, we still have a long way to go before we really have self-driving cars.

While Google may be "projecting" having self-driving cars by 2020, I think it's clear that it will take more than 4 more years to get the bugs out of the project to where the cars actually work.

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I got the power – over your IoT power-point

ma1010
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Joke

Re: The problem

the bigger risk is that a "newspaper" will pickup on this story and demand the IT industry provide a fix for the gormless bastards being gormless ...

A fix for idiots being idiots? Wow, that would really be something to see!

Perhaps someone could take their cue from a Monty Python episode and sell brains people could strap on top of their heads before buying anything IOT related? (And maybe even before voting, dating and other various activities.)

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Former RN flagship HMS Illustrious to be sold for scrap – report

ma1010
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Facepalm

Re: Ada

I well remember Ada. Did my master's project in it (NOT voluntarily). The program wasn't all that complex, but we all used a horrible Windows-based compiler from a company named Meridian. You could write perfectly good code, compile it, and get it to run perfectly at home. Then you take it to Uni and watch it fail when you run it on the machine there. Same version of same OS. Enough to (literally) bring tears to your eyes at times. "But it worked at home!" Even our instructor, who was an Ada expert (including using "tasking," which at that time meant you were super-programmer) couldn't see why our code did that.

At work I was using Borland compilers. So much nicer! They just worked.

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Oracle Java copyright war latest: Why Google's luck is about to run out

ma1010
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Childcatcher

Here we go again

I work in the legal field. And I know we're much more civilized (mostly, anyhow) than folks were in the Middle Ages.

Still, when I see these lawsuits that rumble around for years, back and forth, like this one or the SCO/Unix crap, I sort of wonder if the Medieval folks didn't have some better ideas than we do. For example, trial by combat. Each side picks a champion, and they fight it out. For those more squeamish (or civilized), keep in mind that we don't need a fight to the death. The champions could be boxers. Or even go completely non-violent and play Scrabble or something to settle the issue. Winner take all.

Such a system probably wouldn't be a lot less "just" than what courts mete out in these kinids of lawsuits, and it sure would be a lot cheaper and quicker than these zombie-like just-won't-ever-die lawsuits.

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Oracle campaigns for third Android Java infringement trial

ma1010
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WTF?

Corporate evolution in action?

Oracle got big by being out front with a technology that worked well and fulfilled customers' needs at the time. Nowadays, they appear to be mainly resting on their laurels and starting to fade away as technology changes leave them behind.

It seems that when some companies start to loose their innovative edge and trend downwards, there is a tendency to resort to lawsuits. I guess the motto is: "If you can't compete, sue." Another poster mentioned SCO, and Blackberry (RIM) also comes to mind, too, as they seem to be starting down this path.

Perhaps this is a form of corporate evolution? Innovation and good customer service, then market dominance, then arrogance and failure to keep up with others, then patent troll and eventual (we all hope) extinction?

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Microsoft has open-sourced PowerShell for Linux, Macs. Repeat, Microsoft has open-sourced PowerShell

ma1010
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Black Helicopters

Geeks bearing gifts?

Okay, I can see advantages for some people here in the area of cross-platform use. And I know many of us have to deal with Windows at work, so this could be a valuable tool.

At the same time, I (and many others) have abandoned Windows due to the whole Win X debacle. I'm not much excited about MS extending their tentacles into the Linux world. I just don't trust them. Do you trust Satya? Does it really sound like a good idea to put anything from MS on your Linux machine?

Am I overly paranoid? Well, three years ago, when I was a happy, little Win 7 user, I never would have imagined that MS would go so completely over to the Dark Side and shaft their users as they have done with that deadly weapon known as Win X. How many others saw that one coming? I don't know what new nefarious schemes Satya & Company are working on, but, given that MS has clearly demonstrated complete arrogance and a total lack of concern for their users, I wouldn't be surprised by much of anything they did. I say beware!.

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If this headline was a security warning, 90% of you would ignore it

ma1010
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Holmes

Leave me alone!

This fact can also be used "backwards," taking advantage of this by actively seeking times when people won't be paying close attention. Amazon once had a pop-up that would display just as you were trying to finalize buying something. It exhorted everyone to "try Prime" and spend $100/year on it. There was a YES and a NO checkbox. The default was YES, and it was small and located as far from the "OK" (only) button as possible. I knew people who got taken in by this because they were NOT wanting to be interrupted and just clicked "OK" to get rid of the damn pop-up -- and unknowingly subscribed to Amazon Prime. Then they got their bank accounts debited $100 by surprise, with the usual problems ensuing.

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Brit cops cuff Sage employee at Heathrow airport

ma1010
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Flame

Call centers

Obligatory Dilbert.

If there is an afterlife in which people receive justice for their deeds, I'm certain that Hitler, Stalin and others of that ilk are working in a call center somewhere.

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Verizon fingered in Android bloatware-for-cash cram scandal

ma1010
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Thumb Up

Re: As long as it is removable

Agreed - as long as it IS removable. Before I got smart enough to buy an "unlocked" phone, I had a phone that was full of bloatware that I couldn't remove without rooting the phone (and, thus, the warranty).

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Lab-grown black hole proves Stephen Hawking's radiation claims – physicist

ma1010
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Thumb Up

Yes

More like this, please.

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Business users force Microsoft to back off Windows 10 PC kill plan

ma1010
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Megaphone

Right on!

You are so very, very right. MS could fix this easily. And make people actually WANT their OS. And even be willing to pay good $, either in the form of a "purchase" as in the past or an annual fee. At least I would likely be willing.

However, that's not what they've done, so I've abandoned Windows for Linux. As many, many others have.

MS, are you listening at all? There's still time to fix this. I think. But you'd better hurry, or it WILL be too late.

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Russia is planning to use airships as part of a $240bn transport project

ma1010
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Coat

Re: No reason it couldn't work

Have an upvote - and many "virtual" ones. You are spot on. Materials science, monitoring, command and control systems, and a host of other technologies have improved a hell of a lot since the 1930s. The idea of landing an airship like a helicopter is perfect for low-tech landing sites.

I'm surprised Canada isn't looking into this more as they have a similar problem to Russia. The north of Canada has a lot of isolated villages that are virtually inaccessible except by air most of the year, and many of them have only small or no air strips. All their heavy supplies have to be delivered during the short time the "ice roads" are driveable - sort of - by trucks. If these airships with VTOL turn out to be practical, this could make year-round supply of remote villages possible and help bring supply costs down. It might even be feasible to add a limited passenger service, too.

Mine's the one with the airship ticket in the pocket.

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Hitler ‘ransomware’ offers to sell you back access to your files – but just deletes them

ma1010
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Headmaster

Also...

The lock screen features a misspelling “Ransonware”, further evidence that the malicious code was either hastily or sloppily put together.

And the fact that they say "Your files was encrypted" could be further evidence of hasty/sloppy assembly, or the fact that the malware writers just don't speak no good English.

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Good news: Teen hacker gets 1-million-air-miles bug bounty reward. Bad news: It's United Airlines

ma1010
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Facepalm

Poor bugger

My condolences. I remember when United was a great airline, and I told my travel agent to be sure to book me on their flights. But that was 30 years ago, and things have sure changed, from all the horror stories I've heard.

To find about others' horror stories with United, or to report yours, check out this site.

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Facebook to forcefeed you web ads, whether you like it or not: Ad blocker? Get the Zuck out!

ma1010
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Holmes

Simple solution...

...is to bin Facebook in the first place. Don't use it. Never did. Never will.

Of course, if you really like the "Facebook experience," that may be worth it to you, so your mileage may vary. My wife would be lost without it, and many others fall into that category. But I can't imagine wanting to use it or anything that basically sells my personal data to make money (bad enough), then wants to make yet MORE money by shoving ads at me that I can't block. Of course, this is an accepted business model - see Google et al.

And now we have Microsoft going this one better: 1) They slurp your data, 2) They sling ads *AND* 3) They want you to *PAY* them for the "privilege" of using their operating system. You could even add a fourth item "while it's still in development and, at best, a beta version."

P.T. Barnum was right, I guess.

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Google Chrome will beat Flash to death with a shovel: Why... won't... you... just... die!

ma1010
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Mushroom

Haven't most of us already done this?

I expect most El Reg readers have been blocking Flash one way or another for years. Certainly anyone not wanting their computer p0wned has. Got tired of those "Oh Gawd! Another Zero Day! Patch Right Away" headlines, and I'm sure I'm not alone.

I agree with Tomato42 that if Flash were a planet in some other solar system, we'd want multiple high-factional-c strikes (.999 c comes to mind) on it. And, just to be on the safe side, make the system's star go nova, too.

Good on Chrome for helping to finish off this monster.

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AT&T dinged for $7.75m after letting scammers gouge customers (again)

ma1010
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Flame

Why am I not surprised?

Here we have AT&T at it's finest as an accessory to larceny out stealing EVEN MORE from their customers. Aren't their inflated rates enough in the way of theft? Not for them!

These buggers used to charge me almost $10 a month for long distance service which didn't actually INCLUDE any calls - it was just a fee for allowing me to make long distance calls. I didn't make any, but I still had to pay this bogus fee. (Note: this was NOT the government-mandated long distance access fee, but something extra AT&T came up with.)

I dumped them years ago and went with a small, local telco that gives me everything AT&T did and more - for less money. With the added bonus that they're honest and have NEVER tried to cram my bill with bogus charges.

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Microsoft: You liked Windows 10 so much, you'll get 2 more in 2017

ma1010
Silver badge
FAIL

Just can't fathom what Microsoft is trying to do

Does anyone really *like* what MS is doing these days? We have beta-like functionality, the frequently ugly, clunky interface, the data slurping, the ad slinging, the "you have no choices about updating" and the "we'll make whatever changes to your OS and options whenever *WE* feel like it" "features" that have been baked into Win X.

I'm not an old-time MS hater. I was an MS evangelist for many years. I just can't fathom MS's current strategy, unless they secretly WANT everyone to abandon their operating system. They turned me from a Windows booster (for Win 7, at least - I figured 8 was just another "Vista" and hopefully would be fixed with Win 9) a bit over a year ago into someone who can't stand MS at all. I stand in amazement at their strategy - it strikes me as insane. They seem to be doing everything in their power to alienate their users short of having the start-up screen for Windows say "Fuck YOU, Windows Luser! Switch to Mac or Linux, you Moron!" I'm just wondering what new anti-customer strategy they will adopt next.

I think the only hope for MS to survive for very long is if the board fires Satya and gets a CEO with a different approach. I think many people would be willing to pay an annual fee (which seems to be a lot of what is behind what MS is doing) if it was reasonable AND they gave people back control of updates and no data slurping or ads. Take us back to the strategy of Windows 7 and add an annual fee if you must, but for God's sake, give us back control of our PCs. Or watch more and more of your customer base go to Linux or Mac.

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