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* Posts by Snake

91 posts • joined 18 Oct 2012

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Tesla battery fire pushes beleaguered firm's share price even lower

Snake

I will have to agree with this sentiment.

What is with moronic midwest-America drivers running over towbars?? Is it the new Wack a Mole?!

Get off your DAMN CELL PHONE, pay attention to the road and the general idea is NOT to hit anything!

2
0

Microsoft delivers baker's dozen of patches on Tuesday

Snake

"Banker's dozen"

Does that mean that the patches take your data, charge you for the privilege of stealing it, pretend that they didn't do anything wrong and when caught run away with all the goodies anyway?

8
0

Ready to bin your USB cables yet? Wireless USB hops on WiGig bandwagon

Snake
Gimp

"Wireless USB with power"? A problem with an existing solution

...in the form of the preexisting device, the USB to Ethernet Bridge.

You add them to any Ethernet system, wired or wireless via your access point, and presto! you have your USB devices accessible via wireless. Plus something else: you can share your USB devices with multiple computers.

Been using them since 2006, first the Keyspan and now the Silex SX-DS-4000U2. Yes, powered USB for your devices plus sharing of devices to multiple hosts. Why wait another 3 years since their original promise of Wireless USB devices on your system when you can implement it now?

0
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No signal in Seascale? Countryside Alliance wants to hook you up

Snake
Thumb Up

LOL I wonder how many people remember/get that.

1
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Oh noes! New 'CRISIS DISASTER' at Fukushima! Oh wait, it's nothing. Again

Snake
Thumb Up

Re: "news"

Hear, hear

0
0

IT now 10 percent of world's electricity consumption, report finds

Snake
Childcatcher

Thoughtful yet ironic statement

"Unless people can get a clear idea of the overall impact of their digital world, then the cost to the planet will remain forever obscured.

It is ironic that you end an environmental awareness story with such a phrase, for in our capitalist societies we have almost never had an idea, or been charged for, the overall impact of our living.

For example, in the United States, let us take the lessons of Niagara Falls, New York's, Love Canal. Hooker Chemical manufactured, and sold, chemicals for decades from this plant and made a modest profit. After closure of the plant, a toxic waste site of the company's design was discovered on the site, one of the most contaminated locales in all of the United States. It has cost the taxpayers of the United States $400 million dollars for the cleanup of the site, money that neither Hooker Chemical, nor the customers of its products, ever paid in to. The new owners of Hooker, Occidental Petroleum, did have to pay, only $129 million...and it STILL cost the taxpayers millions in legal fees to forward the lawsuit that brought about that verdict, decades after Hooker itself was out of business.

Corporations sell pencils for, what $0.02 or so each? Does that take into account the toxic waste of caused by the production waste, the (full) environmental impact of the logging industry (which most of you are unawares; I, on the other hand, have been to both logging forests and wood processing plants O.O ), the processing and waste of creating the graphite sticks, and every other part of the production chain?

No, we don't, do we? We only pay the "up front" costs - the cost of the materials used to create the supply materials used in manufacturing, like gasoline for the trucks, etc. We simply don't factor long-term costs, like water treatments and cleanups into our products, mostly because we treat them as "Out of sight, Out of mind".

This HAS to change (as China is quickly realizing) or we'll all pay a huge price in the future.

3
1

Shareholders hoping to squeeze cash from Kodak are deluded, says court

Snake
FAIL

Re: @Robert Sneddon

IMHO I believe Kodak's major failing was the fact that they had no digital camera manufacturing abilities - Kodak always used third-party suppliers for their digital camera business. For the SLR's they built on Nikon bodies, for the compact point-and-shoots they used Chinon.

This was a MAJOR mistake. The early digital market was point and shoots, as dSLR's were simply too expensive to even resemble "mass market", but Chinon was in no real condition to compete once Nikon, Canon and Sony got into the market. For a while, Kodak was just about the only major name brand player in town, in regards to digital compacts, so people bought the Kodak products. Once Nikon and Canon started up their own product lines, however, Chinon, and therefore Kodak, were not equipped to compete - Chinon's tech stagnated and by the time Kodak fully integrated Chinon into itself, in 2004, it was too little, too late.

Kodak did itself no favors by having only a strategic agreement with Chinon in the early years rather than do everything in-house.

Then again, now that I think about it more, Kodak lost its compact camera design mojo by the 1970's and maybe this was inevitable, considering the wholesale industry paradigm shift that digital brought which killed photographic supplies sales and shifted the market to (almost) completely hardware based.

1
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Make or break: Microsoft sets date for CRUCIAL Win 8.1 launch

Snake

Olympic comparisons? Not really.

"Oddly, the design and engineering deficiencies of the Titanic didn't deter travellers of that age from embarking on the Olympic (Titanic's sister ship)"

Do you mean before or after the Olympic's refit to increase safety: the new double hull, the new davits, the raised watertight bulkheads?

Add in the fact that Imperator wasn't a slight on Olympic's luxury accommodations (read Imperator's refit nomenclature), including the fact that White Star's Olympic class had no steerage (while Imperator still did), and that left world-class supership travel to a competition between White Star and Cunard (as it always was, back then).

3
0

Xerox admits there's no fix yet for number-fudging copiers

Snake

Ouch -_-

Only in our modern world does a "copier"...not do (correct) copes.

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PEAK Apple: Cupertino's hopes died with Steve Jobs, says Larry Ellison

Snake

Re: It's all gone a bit Princess Di

No. I don't see it that way.

Jobs' impact is HIGHLY overrated due to his cult of personality. In REAL terms, in the terms of what he actually accomplished and his input into the devices sold, Jobs was a stylist. Jobs was at the level of Henry Dreyfuss, but since most people don't even know who that was or the level of impact Dreyfuss' designs had on modern society, they have no frame of reference to properly classify Jobs' skills. So they tag him as "inventor" rather than his proper designation as "designer and salesman" - he personally did not build not electrically design a single product, but he personally oversaw the physical and operational attributes of all the products his company came out with.

4
1

UK investigators finger emergency beacon for 787 Heathrow fire

Snake
Alert

Re: Plastic Vs Aluminium

PLEASE someone tell me this whole wiring story is not true. :-(

For all the self-professed techies around here, I guess it is apparent that most have no interest in aviation technology. Brittle wire? To learn what it can do Google "Kapton", and then "Kapton Swiss Air", and learn the horrors.

Yes, you can indeed make" brittle" PTFE coatings - the PTFE is combined with other ingredients in hopes to gain additional advantages. PTFE might be flexible in native state but it has other problems - it does not have the utmost in abrasion resistance and, even worse (from an aviation perspective) according to Wiki's tech article, it degrades over time with exposure to temperatures over 79 C / 117 F. If you think that those temperatures are never reached in an aircraft, I would advise you to study NTSB's TWA Flight 800 technical briefing at http://www.ntsb.gov/doclib/reports/2000/AAR0003.pdf and hit section 1.16.5.1 starting at page 124 / PDF page 142 :o

Anyway, the EXACT quotation from the source material story regarding the Teflon wiring is:

"To my amazement, I have been told by someone in the know, that the Teflon insulated wire being used on the Dreamliner is so fragile (emphasis mine), mechanics are prone to saying, "Don't look at it too hard or you'll break it." Teflon insulated wiring helped save weight for an airplane Boeing billed as 20% more fuel efficient."

This may be the EXACT the same failing of Kapton - in this case, the PTFE insulation may have been made so thin, in the name of weight savings, that it simply cannot stand up to the physical abrasion / heat-cool cycles that an airliner places on it. The suspected cause of Swissair 111 was Kapton abrasion and this lack of abrasion resistance was what led to Kapton being BANNED by the U.S. Navy and the FAA ended up issuing numerous AD's (Airworthiness Directives, the highest level of 'recall' notice) to cover it. Millions of dollars were spent after Swissair 111 in rewiring aircraft to get rid of Kapton in various systems due to lack of durability and if they have created the same situation in the new PTFE wiring, in the name of weight savings, we are in for serious trouble.

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2

Hey mobile firms: About that Android thing... Did Google add a lockout clause?

Snake

Re: So in other words

@Craigness:

Indeed. And there's the joke of it. To merge two news stories:

People are throwing out personal information by the bucket load and have no qualms with it...as long as (a) it is to a private entity and (b) if it gives them some level of convenience. And then get their knickers into a bunch when this same information gets into someone else's hands. Like their government.

[cue Apple theme] There's a Benjamin Franklin quote for that.

Ironically, WinMo didn't collect any information on you at all. Sometimes I feel I should have stayed with the WinMob crowd, at least you know who is doing what behind your back.

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Snake

Re: So in other words

"Consumers choose Android because they want Google services..."

No. I certainly did NOT choose Android because I want Google services; in fact, I do not use Google services on my phone at all. I have no data entered into any Google service in the phone (for example my phonebook is saved to the phone only, not to a Google account, and then I sync with my laptop via MyPhoneExplorer) and all Google sync services are deactivated (yes, that does include the location services).

I bought Android because I didn't see much of a CHOICE - there were only two significant players in the market when I purchased, Apple and Google, and I had to pick the lesser of two evils. And that is the choice I believe a lot of people are making. It is not "I want Google", it is "Do I go with Apple or [other]?" For most people, "[other]" is most likely Google because they are the only other mobile OS with significant support.

This is a small but significant difference: one type of choice is 'positive' and based upon actively choosing a product while the other choice is 'negative', deciding you DON'T want a certain product but being forced to purchase the other due to the market reality of only have 2 major players to choose from. The same choice is there if you decide to buy a gaming console - XBox or PlayStation. You can make a 'positive' choice and say "I want ________" or be forced into your purchase only because you said (to yourself) "I DON'T want 'X" so I guess [my only choice is] 'Y'"

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Big browser builders scramble to fix cross-platform zero-day flaw

Snake

Re: I explain the graphs as MS making a much more secure browser this month

I don't understand why you are using all three addons when NoScript does what FlashBlock does (a Flash embed won't load until you give permission in NoScript). Most ads are JS enabled and therefore NoScript blocks those, as well.

So why use all three?

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Thanks, NSA: Amazon sales of Orwell's 1984 rise 9,500%

Snake
Mushroom

Re: People are so F'en dumb, AC 05:08

I'll agree with AC 05:08 - people ARE F'en dumb.

"People who say they are ok with this level of surveillance have simply not touched the boundaries of their prison yet."

You have been at an even HIGHER level of surveillance for YEARS, probably closer to DECADES. You've been tracked, IP recorded, email archived, phone calls referenced, credit card recorded, cookied, purchase history mass mailing targeted, banner ad spammed, Twitter feed documented, Facebook listed, Google Scroogled and customer feedback traced by just about every single private for-profit (and, let's add, non-for-profit) business entity in practical existence.

Yet THAT does not bother most people. And THAT is what AC 05:08 is saying.

You idiots give out your personal information to just about any private entity that asks for it - hell, there are SANDWICH SHOPS that ask for your home phone number just to 'register' a bonus points card where I work (all true) - and people don't give it a second thought.

But when the GOVERNMENT gets just a SECTION of that data...ooh, terror!!

But what, exactly, are the businesses that have the information in the first place DOING with all that info? Making money off of it [you], that's what.

And what do they DO with that money?

THAT'S where you people should be paying attention...because you've happily been told not to look at the man behind the curtain. While he throws money at politicos to get his way with one hand...and stabs you in the back with the other.

Robots, one and all.

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2

Opera rewrite comes to Android

Snake
Unhappy

Tried it this morning

and regretfully uninstalled it less than 10 minutes later.

Looks nice, shiny new features...code bloat city (versus previous version). Did not run well on my phone so I went backwards and it looks like I may have to stay there for a while.

0
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Google 'DOES DO EVIL', thunders British politician

Snake
Mushroom

Re: An open letter

We all know EXACTLY what Google is doing:

'Thank you for purchasing our ad program, Mr. Smith! Sign here...just disregard that the invoice says "Google Ireland' even though we're both here'

Smoke and mirrors, indeed. Many companies pull these shenanigans and yes, in this case it is only to say "We don't sell here!" when in actuality the accurate statement is "We just don't invoice, here'".

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Firefox 21 ships with performance-profiling Health Report

Snake

Re: WTF

Isn't this a violation of EU privacy laws? To submit data (even anonymized) without express permission of the user?

0
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Oi, Google! Stop LIBELLING us Germans, fix your autocomplete

Snake

Re: Is this a defence?

"We believe that Google should not be held liable for terms that appear in Autocomplete even though we created it, we manage it, we market it, we enable it, we embed it and we feature it on all of our web pages. Just because we are linked inexorably to a creation of our own design does not mean that we should actually be liable for it."

There, Google. Fixed it for you now.

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Snake
Stop

Re: "Germans are ..."

Yes, we have two problems:

- You being a self-righteous egotist

- Making universal declaration on a group different than yourself because you simply must know better than they do

From playing the 'screaming minority lazy Socialists!' card to declaring what the average German citizen 'do[es] not care about', you've managed to hit all the "Fool" buttons with a single hand swipe. Good work!

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El Reg drills into Office 365: What's under the hood?

Snake

Re: The Popping sound..

But of course.

"better and more like TIFKAM (the interface formerly known as Metro), or Modern User as it is now called, than ever before. "

Only in this review has TIFKAM ever been listed as a positive attribute!

2
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BadNews, fandroids: MILLIONS of Google Play downloads riddled with malware

Snake
Stop

Re: Come on El Reg

Your limited viewpoint is only due to you believing that, personally, you have the power to decide the definition of "useful activity".

That is not your definition to decide. That definition is for each individual user to decide, and since Apple has a LARGE number of things that they will not allow to happen on an iPhone, for example

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/burnette/apples-new-iphone-restrictions-and-the-5-stages-of-grief/1904

your reply is a complete and utter FAIL.

0
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Snake
Flame

Re: Come on El Reg

"Then what's it for? Just for carrying around, to show that you can't afford an iPhone?"

But why would I WANT an iPhone? To only show that I simply MUST follow a trend, to show that in order to be 'accepted' I will be judged by a DEVICE that I use? To use a locked-up, walled-off, nanny-stated interface to the real world, where Big Brother Corporation has the nerve to tell me what I can and cannot do with my own device? To have to go to the effort of "jailbreaking" my own, personal device - when jailbreaking is even available, as every time Big Brother Corporation does a firmware update they strengthen their hold on your personal thoughts by intentionally nullifying the jailbreak options you have applied - just to get around BBC's thoughthold on me?

If I want to watch porn on my device that is MY choice, not theirs. If they have a problem with an adult making adult choices for themselves, sell and market the device only to children and have the parents sign a permission form that gives Apple ("BBC") the right to censor the device content for "the good of the child". IN THE MEANTIME, I simply refuse to revoke my own freedom of will to a company simply to own their petty little device so as to feel like I belong with the REST of the blind sheep who have all *already* forfeited a portion of their adult choice simply to own said petty little device.

The free market is a form of willful, voluntary voting. Apparently, a large number of people throughout the world have voted for the idea that "Yes, we are willing to give up certain self-evident adult decision processes for the advantage of paying you to own your product". And then, a lot of these same people bitch and moan when they even *think* that the government may be considering the exact same thing.

What does this tell you? Sheep stupidity for profit = 'OK by me! Sign me up, the bauble is worth more than the absolute ability to exercise the choice of free will!" Remove bauble from benefit vs cost ration = "No! Never! I will never give up my rights and free will!"

Loki from The Avengers (Avengers Assemble!) had it right - humans ARE sheep looking to be blindly led.

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Report: Apple returned 8M shoddy iPhones to Foxconn

Snake
Thumb Up

Re: Don't Beggar Thy Supplier

BINGO!! I wondered if at least ONE person here would realize this.

Foxconn is a contract supplier. If the contract no longer meets a benefit vs cost ratio, any sane contractor will reexamine the cost of doing business with the customer and say "No, thank you!" to the next contract. Foxconn may not do this in its entirety but, considering the well documented difficulties with manufacture of the iPhone5's design and final finish requirements, don't be surprised if Foxconn decided to have much more say in the next iPhone design: "We can not manufacture that design to your satisfaction, so we won't. Redo the design so that we can actually built it".

As a manufacturer, I / we have certainly said "No, thank you!" to repeatedly difficult clients. After a while the benefit vs cost is simply not worth it; we have indeed used the line 'We can not manufacture this design to your satisfaction, so we won't' several times in the past.

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Vinyl sales reach 15 year high, Blighty becomes No. 3 music buyer

Snake
Headmaster

Re: Face it, vinyl sucks

"I think CDs are better than vinyl in every way, and not just by a small amount, but by a huge margin. Eg the noise floor on a CD is so low it almost can't be measured."

And one of these days - and I've been pointing this issue out since the first days of CD - people will realize that noise floor means SQUAT as relative to music.

Proof? Unquestionable proof?! Easy. Which would you rather listen to: Miles Davis playing in the middle of Oxford Street / Times Square, or your 8-year old sister playing in the back study?

Case closed.

There is MUCH more to music quality that simply dynamic range and noise floor, folks.

0
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Microsoft Xbox gaffe reveals cloudy arrogance

Snake

Re: Always on gaming, are these guys allowing for ANY BREAK IN THE CONNECTION?

Since when does common sense have to do with this?

This topic has already been decided and settled - the companies have already won. They decided upon a corporate policy, required always-on, and implemented it. The public had the chance to vote yea or nay to this policy with their feet and wallets - they could have not purchased the products.

But, as history proved, they DID buy the products. Sim City had sales and continues to do so even after the always-on system was pointed out.

So common sense lost. The sales of the product has shown the companies that enough people are willing to purchase the product regardless of the type of DRM in use, meaning that their policy is justified. So this type of DRM use will only INCREASE because not enough people walked away from the company's products to teach them a lesson.

And this is the problem: there are enough people in the world to blindly swallow just about any stupid, bad idea that true failures are hard to come by. The lack of failure breeds arrogance (can we say "banking industry", as a modern well studied example) and the system runs on autopilot into dark oblivion. Happened more times than I care to admit.

2
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Apple pulls banned content from Chinese App Store

Snake

Re: "Playing nice or rolling over."

Yes, there is.

Rolling over is something you just do.

Abiding by the laws of the land where you operate is the fundamental principles of a working society. If Apple doesn't wish to play by CCP's rules, then Apple should take their ball and go home. As a Westerner, you/we may not want to hear that - we believe ourselves to be entitled to just about any action we deem *personally* acceptable - but laws are laws no matter where they are. And, since Apple is nothing more than a foreign visitor to a host's land, playing by the rules is even more important.

Or should they be the typical "loud American" and be allowed to walk into any country they wish to, and do whatever they wish?

0
0

Gates and Allen reshoot historic 1981 Microsoft photo

Snake
Facepalm

I have a soft spot for one-piece designs such the Heathkit; I preferred the Commodore 4032 more over the Commodore PET 2001 shown @ front-right due to the larger screen, full keyboard and external cassette drive over the latter.

I remember wonderful integrated chassis stuffed with Z-80 cards on S-100 bus with a generous 16K of static RAM. Wonderful!

I also miss 'luggables' They were fun.

But no TRS-80 Model 1 with expansion module in the updated photo! How could you?!

2
0

Speaking in Tech: Forget BYOD, now there's Bring Your Own CODE

Snake

Indeed!

At 9:36, quote:

"When ever you abstract a part of your process away an organization, that's a good thing"

Really? When "you abstract a part of your process away from an organization", you also abstract RESPONSIBILITY away as well. That's reality.

"You make some assumption on the technology staff you're going to use"

Isn't THAT an understatement!

Sure, your abstraction salesmanship belief has always been good on paper, has been for years. Hand the responsibility of dealing with problems off to someone else, you only deal with what you wish to deal with on your end - using the system that someone else manages for you. But the reality has ALWAYS been different. Why don't you ask the aviation industry, for example, who abstracted their maintenance chores out to contractors beginning the 1980's...and ask them how their reliability experience went. The airlines thought they were washing their hands of the 'headaches' of maintenance only to realize that constant oversight of the third-party operations was the only way to guarantee work quality; I recommend you start your search with "ValuJet Flight 592" and work from there.

Or are you so blind to Apple's current Chinese labor issues that you believe this problem to not exist??

"Abstraction" only builds a layer of new management issues between you and the solution, it is *not* the solution. It *can" lower your personnel count, and therefore costs, but you'd better be prepared to deal with consequences. The fact is that you are now handing the massive responsibility of these chores off to a third party, a third party that must consider profit as much or more than 100% up-time (as it must, in order to remain in business). Since they ARE in business profit is required and, if your costs are lower, then their pay is lower and they must still work in a profit from that lower pay scale. So, in the end, something MUST give a bit - it is called "entropy".

You've just added a layer of entropy into your system and you had better have planned for that.

0
0

Steve Jobs to supervise iPhone 6 FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE

Snake

Re: Ahhh...@Snake...

Only if I don't have to pay him licensing agreement fees for the rounded corners on my old composition note pads, after I "apologize" with a bat, that is.

1
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Snake
Thumb Up

Re: Wow so he knew about all the chip roadmaps.....

Agreed. What "Dead genius"? Steve Jobs never designed or build anything himself - he was a salesman and stylistic designer, not an engineer. And considering that his stylistic input were all, fundamentally, built on the design principles of others (Henry Dreyfuss' principles, for one, plus of course Xerox) even his stylistic endeavors can be reasonably called into question as being truly 'individualistic'.

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I am NOT a PC repair man. I will NOT get your iPad working

Snake

Two hours for 65 miles?

It was two hours for about 72 miles. And I guess you've never heard of TRAFFIC - you're all a wonderful bunch of pompous, self-important windbags on this "forum". Patting yourselves on the back on how SPECIAL you are, on oh! so many different story threads.

0
6
Snake

Do you know what it is like to end a day's work, travel a 110 MINUTE 108km commute to arrive...at a person's door who is desperately asking you for help, only to stay to 1 O'CLOCK in the morning fixing the problems to then drive 40 minutes back home, in order to wake up at 6 A.M. for the next day's workday?

I SERIOUSLY doubt it.

So, I'VE BEEN THERE. And I've put my money where my mouth is with that above post. I've put in more after-work hours on outside IT help than you people will ever do in your lifetime. I can't even COUNT how many times I've gone to a person's house after my standard workday just to work past midnight on their issues - I don't think my brain can rationalize a figure that large.

And, yes, for some people I did it without charge. Later, when the visits got regular, I did indeed charge...based upon their ability to pay. A number of people were middle class everyday workers and for all those hours I'd ask for (far) less than $100. For the businesswoman, I charged more.

After doing the above for, oh, err, say 12 years (?) I had some serious life issues and stepped away, unable to dedicate that much time - to just about anything, really. Yes, I *do* feel that I have my life back! But I did help people who were in need...and lost a good elderly man that I was helping and got to know well to cancer. I watched him fade away as I continued my IT support visits to him, and then several years later watched my own father die in the exact same fashion. It was too much to bear.

But I helped the people who needed help, and I felt rather honored that they would trust me enough to bring me into their homes and businesses to work on the equipment where they place so much of their lives into. Luckily my days of hand-recovering data from crashed hard drives and piecing damaged OS's back together is long behind me :)

0
8
Snake
Flame

Wow. Talk about short temper! Someone asks you for assistance and [he's] automatically a PITA fucker?

You seem to believe that all old people must automatically delve into the latest and greatest automation systems in order to be a functional part of society, that full comprehension of current technology is a must-have for every living soul.

No empathy whatsoever.

Have you ever considered that old people have other activities in their lives, that the technology forced upon them by modern society is not their main interests, and that actually asking for help is unreasonable? No one is saying that YOU must give the help, but your tirade of a column seems to make is so that their even *asking* for help is an abomination to modern living.

"Most of my neighbours are retired but that’s no excuse. Being eligible to book a world cruise with Saga ought not to make them technologically helpless"

YES, IT IS.

Just because YOU center your life around understanding modern technology does not mean that EVERYONE must do the same. Their lives are based upon other interests - do YOU make it a point to completely and utterly service EVERY SINGLE DEVICE in your life, including every single service on your vehicle(s) personally as well as replacing the defective IC chips in that blown-out stereo system? No, I doubt you do. You have other interests, other activities, that you would rather be doing than training yourself in keeping up mundane servicing of mechanisms in your life.

For these old people, it is the same. They have other personal interests that do NOT center around the fact that they simply "must" be on Facebook otherwise their peer neighbors won't think highly of them and then not invite them to the next district cookout. But you, so high and mighty, look dow on them: How DARE they not know how to work and maintain every technological toy near them! How gastly!!!

Refuse the requests for service - that is your right. But don't act as if the entire world must be so on top of what YOU perceive as interesting that they must have the same proficiency in the area as you do. Look at the request as flattering - they perceive you as knowledgeable and helpful - but that does not mean that you must bow to their wishes - refusing to help, because of your *own* time-taking life patterns, is valid.

3
37

Spotting a Big Data faker as you set up Big Data for someone

Snake
Thumb Up

Re: On a completely unrelated note...

Took me a second to reference that one. Classic!

1
0
Snake

Re: whats big?

And on that, I'll agree with AC 14:28 - Emperor's New Clothes.

Big Data, (adj):

1) A cute, supposedly cut-and-dry New Word for old problems with, supposedly, new solutions.

2) An appellation, applied by technologists in order to appear as expertise in an amorphous field where growth has been continual yet specific job descriptions applying to said field has been lagging.

3) A premise for a web article, which fails to specify exact skill sets required to tackle the issue but instead mention nonspecific and generalized industry catch phrases to appeal to one's sense of self worth.

3
0

Living in the middle of a big city? Your broadband may still be crap

Snake

But this is issue is what cloud providers, and their most vocal adherents, consistently miss. With questionable connectivity speeds even within the same geographic area, dodgy reliability and questionable ISP and provider security, how is the public - and business, especially - supposed to get all excited about cloud services?

5
0

Oz shop slaps browsers with $5 just looking fee

Snake

Re: Anyone thinking about shopping there

"Will now probably just wait for the closing down sale."

Most certainly. Several stores in NYC have tried this tactic...they did not last long, either.

This type of policy leaves a bitter taste in customer's mouths - either real, current customers or even prospective customers. Its says "You are only good to us for your money" to passers by, and shoppers learn to say "Stuff off" back to the store.

2
0

Apple in Chinese court over patent rights for Siri

Snake
Mushroom

Ouch

If the Chinese court decides against Apple, that's going to leave a mark.

0
0

Apple share-price-off-a-cliff: Told you that would happen

Snake

Re: Don't blame Apple for the price drop

I personally think that some of this past year's events proves some Apple naysayer's point: that a good deal of Apple's "success" was simply the Cult of Jobs.

Now that Jobs is gone, big money is frightened that the cult consumers will no longer throw unending piles of money at the firm in an unrequited battle to constantly have the latest gadget. The analysts are scared that people will lose faith in Apple having a unified theme across their marketing systems; the public will back away from the rabid endowment of near-godlike properties towards anything Apple and therefore actually examine possible alternatives at their next purchase phase.

And competition for the mind of a consumer is bad for business.

And, quite simply, Apple is helping the doubt right along. Between the failure of Maps, the market shrug of 'excitement' due to a perceived lack of substantial model evolution of the iPhone 4 in light of Samsung's all-out Android attack, the lack of great iPhone lust in China, the eventual and rapidly increasing decline of the iPod market, the sales cannibalism of the iPad Mini (rather than opening a brand new market), etc etc etc - the analysts might have a good point. Apple has stumbled lately, and Big Money listens. Big Money get scared very quickly and runs for the caves at the first signs of trouble (note the well placed cro-magnon reference there

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Snake

Re: Don't blame Apple for the price drop

Ah, yes, the quants. The same fools people who proposed the end of recessions and the great unknown due to their 'stupendous' analytical formulas.

As you know, those same formulas stated that real estate would always be such a great investment, and keep our economy booming, because no one would ever walk away from their mortgages....

and that's what you get for listening to "Experts" who play fortune tellers part time.

2
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Software glitch WIPES OUT listings of 10,000 eBay sellers

Snake

"Due to a software issue...

the knowledge of how much we suck has now been broadcast across the entire world.

All Your Sales Are Belong to Us. And, even if by some miracle they don't, we'll still suck you dry through our PayPal Transactional Fee Vacuum Magic©

You may now return to your regularly scheduled droneage."

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MasterCard stings PayPal with payment fee hike

Snake
Big Brother

Proof

Proof of what I have been saying: Conspiracy theorists, anti-government nutjobs libertarians and the media have all been telling you to worry about the government, for they are collecting information on you.

All the while you ignorantly, and blissfully, ignore CORPORATIONS, the real concentration of money and power in today's world.

Here is a company that is willing to penalize other companies, and therefore YOU via passed-on higher fees, because they can't grab more information on you than they already have.

But we're supposed to fear the government. Yeah.

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Oi, Microsoft, where's my effin' toolbar gone?

Snake
Unhappy

Re: What is this article supposed to be?

If you were that concerned about ligatures, then you should not be concerned that a "word processor" is not applying them correctly.

Ligatures are due to the page layout typesetting and LaTex is page layout, so comparing apples to oranges is quite unfair. Word makes no claim to being a "page layout" application; you should, therefore, be properly using InDesign or Quark if accurate page layouts are what you seek. A generic "word processor" application, like Microsoft "Word", where the word processor functionality is mentioned but extreme layout accuracy is not, is unfairly asking too much of the wrong tool for the wrong job.

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Give Google a COLD HARD SLAP - web rivals' plea to Euro watchdog

Snake

Re: Google.. Just say FU to the EU and Buyone

Because if it's American it can do no wrong?

It is too bad that the forum only allows 1 downvote tick per voting...

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First sale doctrine survives US Supreme Court

Snake

Re: Overturning a Supreme Court ruling

Boy do I hate agreeing with that sentiment...but I have to, because it is rather true.

What does this tell you? When you pray to money as King, and grant the greatest associations that trade in this asset (corporations) the equivalent power of an individual in a constitutional society...your individual rights are, inevitably, doomed. An individual cannot have the strength to fight a large political construct and their money - a direct inversion of what the Constitution was designed to protect against.

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Lenovo: Windows 8 is so good, everyone wants Windows 7

Snake

Re: Trying to find Windows 7 laptops for consumers is hard work

Quite right! Which is why I decided to jump into a Win7 laptop several weeks ago before my only option was Win8.

While at the store I tried Win8. It isn't as bad as some of the media, and users, make it out to be. What it is, in a word, is "unintuitive". It does indeed do everything you want and need, but in many ways it simply does so in a method that is either not apparent or does not make (reasonable) sense. Hot corners that aren't marked? Popping in and out of TIFKAM as the default navigation metaphor? And bright, primary colors without shading? Really? That's the "future", 1970's Revisited?

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SanDisk cops to malfunctioning Micro SDs in Galaxy S3s

Snake

Re: RMA policy

"Don't forget that in the UK its the retailer you need to contact first, at least during the first year... not the Manufacturer.... and IIRC in the event of a faulty item, they are responsible for Postage for the return.."

Ah, then you UKers are fortunate. Here in the United States the manufacturers leave you out to dry in regards to defective merchandise beyond the retailer return period - you must deal direct with the manufacturer, who usually make you run around chasing your own tail. Device have a serial number? "We still require your purchase receipt". Then what is the use of applying a (traceable) serial number, you IDIOTS?!

I am in manufacturing and personally created the SKU numbering system in use. Give me just about any combination of the following - your customer name, the style of the item, the size, the approximate date purchased or the exact SKU serial number - and I have all the information I need to locate all the balance of the information I need including how much you paid for it and on what invoice number, going back 12 years now.

Once, years ago, I was in a different business - photography - and ran a camera store. Ordered 6 Nikon cameras for one customer (the local newspaper) and pre-tested them prior to delivery. One was dead. Called Nikon...who promptly told me to send it back FOR SERVICE. Excuse me? It is a BRAND NEW item. Replacement is expected and warranted, especially considering that all 6 must be delivered to the same client. 'No, we will only service it. Send it back for repair'.

You BET I steered customers away from Nikon after *that* reply...

0
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Google Drive goes titsup for MILLIONS of users

Snake
Big Brother

Re: At least with Google...

That's the point. As demand for the Google product increases, more problems will happen. It is a statistically certainty.

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Snake

Re: Death to the cloud

"The cloud really is the safest place for your data..."

Dream on with that belief. The only thing the "cloud' is, is that you are handing over hardware responsibilities for someone else to handle.

Almost forgot: plus network connectivity.

Almost forgot: plus security.

Almost forgot: plus system software upkeep.

Almost forgot: plus basic access rights, like making sure that your account is active and actually grants you access to your own data.

Almost forgot: discounting copyright and DRM search / lockdown procedures, the failure to guarantee that your own data will *remain* your own unless some big company decides to use auto-scanning on your data and delete what they see fit.

Almost forgot: cloud ownership and service continuity. Because if a company decides to shut down a service due to internal decisions, or even sell their service to a new owner, you have no guarantee of continued service.

Almost forgot - AND PROBABLY THE MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL - MTBF. This is EXACTLY what you are seeing today. When 10,000,000 users access a certain construct, the construct's MTBF is statistically altered. If a switch is rated at 180,000 MTBF, that calculation get modified by the number of switches and ends up λ= 1/Ɵ = r/T, using for example analysis such as:

http://www.vicorpower.com/documents/quality/Rel_MTBF.pdf

This factor must then be calculated across ALL devices in the data stream - your network card, your router, your wires, your modem, the data link to your ISP, the ISP switches, the ISP servers, the ISP link, all the segments to the cloud service, the cloud service data link, the cloud servers, the cloud switches, etc. etc. etc. PLUS you must add in the statistical analysis of the MTBF of the multiple hard drives that make up the cluster that your data is physically on; the hard drives must maintain the same MTBF calculation modifications and, therefore, the more drives in the cluster the more likely that one drive will fail within said cluster.

In other words, statistically a cloud MUST have more failures than an individual PC due to the fact that there are more component links to fail. Add in the human factors - software bugs, errors in administration of hardware, software *and* account configuration / rights / access, etc. - and cloud will ALWAYS have a greater statistical probability of failure. For example: ISP reliability. Wow, where I am currently located that is defined as "pipe dream", and I'm in the 8th largest city in the world (by population)! I have had to deal with 1 WEEK outages (infrastructure building wiring failure) at the job and 2 day outages at home. Was just yesterday dealing with an ISP blackout at my inlaw's home 35 blocks away, using a different ISP than I have personally. Last week? Last week *I* had that 2 day system outage; a combination modem and ISP configuration failure, as upon replacement of the modem with 3 different modems they still could not stay consistently connected until a phone call (made by me after the tech left) to the ISP forced a full reconfiguration of the newly replaced (3rd) modem! :(

FWIW, I have *never* lost one scrap of data or lost personal access to said data on any of the systems I use. Never. As the data is local and the system is mine, I can control data redundancy and maintenance and, as there are fewer failure points, the statistics are also on my side. Offline backups, offsite backups - and, amongst other things, no network probabilities between me and my data - assure that my data always there when and where I need it.

Depend upon the ISP, the internet AND the cloud service for my data needs? No, thank you.

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