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* Posts by YetAnotherLocksmith

110 posts • joined 11 Oct 2012

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Boffins train robots to pull apart LCD screens – without breaking them

YetAnotherLocksmith

Eh?

If a trained human took 20 minutes (that video is sped up and has odd jumps such as at 2:40) to chop up one old monitor, you'd likely fire him.

Yet spend years and millions getting a robot to do just that, & it is progress.

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Yorkshire man NICKS 1,000 Orange customer records. Court issues TINY FINE

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Please, not prison!

Got to agree with that.

Fine the guy £10,000 per fiddled set of details, he won't do it again. Perhaps £1000 each for the first offence?

But 50p per person? That's not a punishment, that's cheaper than buying the info!

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FALL of the MACHINES: How to KILL the Google KARATE BOT, by our expert

YetAnotherLocksmith

Every time...

Every time, we mock these robots. Yes, they are currently easy to disable or dodge.

But give it another few years, & it will be as fast as a horse but bipedal and with the ability to lift a car one handed. Oh, & a simple wifi connection will allow it access to all the knowledge in the world faster than you can say 'Alexa'.

Then it will be too late to have a laugh at it.

You do realise they want these things to fight wars, don't you?

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Hungary PM ditches internet tax plans after mass protests

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: or...

Far easier? A flat rate tax of say 0.5% on all online sales (shipped/sold to/from) to the country. Amazon et al would pay far far more than currently, while smaller companies would barely notice it.

Also, eBay etc would have to pass it to their sellers, meaning all the tax dodger companies actually pay something despite pretending to be selling stuff out their attic!

It is so simple. What have I missed?

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UK smart meters arrive in 2020. Hackers have ALREADY found a flaw

YetAnotherLocksmith

Oh, it is going to be fun

I have scaled back warrant runs massively now, but a few years back I'd be the one breaking into your house to swap the meters when you hadn't paid or had fiddled things. There's huge teams of us, 3 or 4, usually men, sometimes with a dog handler or rubbish removal guy, & of course, sometimes the police.

Smart meters are going in, mostly to stop the power companies having to waste their profits paying this huge army of people who actually do work in the UK - they keep driving the rates down, but they can't outsource us. Instead the power companies literally want to be able to toggle your power off, while you are on the phone talking to them, to get you to pay.

Which is wrong.

The fundamental issue is that the power companies make billions. Literally millions per day. They are happy to take the subsidised government hand outs, & sod the rest of us. Yes, even those who work for them - staff are expensive, robots are not.

Oh. The other thing? There's going to be an army of out-of-work very professional locksmiths who, even more so than now, will be fighting over the scraps of work left over.

So make sure you've got great locks fitted, because believe me, there's plenty of locksmiths out there who won't sit on the dole and watch their kids starve.

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This Changes Everything? OH Naomi Klein, NO

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Food for thought

Stupid EE.

I'll try again.

Ok, I can only recall seeing 2 fake pound coins, ever. So they either aren't that common, or they are really good fakes.

If the fakes are that good, it makes no difference to the end users as they are just used. No risk to the system there, really.

The third option is that the banks and shops are really good at removing them from circulation, but if that were true, banks and shops would check coins carefully because they'd want to avoid losing the (fake) money that was removed. And that doesn't happen.

So have you got a reference for that claim?

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Trips to Mars may be OFF: The SUN has changed in a way we've NEVER SEEN

YetAnotherLocksmith

Why has no-one mentioned magnetic shielding?

Shade in space is really, really cold. Put a loop of superconducting wire around the end of the capsule and voila, instant magnetic shrouding for the crew. Add small spots of heavy lead or water shielding at the foot of the bed while the crew sleep feet towards the sun, & job done.

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Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012

YetAnotherLocksmith

There's already a tax on income - VAT. If your income is high enough you have to charge it and pay it on. But it doesn't really affect business's that much as they get refunds on what they spend too, so it is the difference that goes to the tax man.

The issue is, higher VAT hammers the poor and small businesses, while the rich get to put everything through their company. Which is why there is a threshold for being required to register for VAT.

You know, it's almost like they thought this stuff through. It's just the world has changed in the last 20 years.

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Are you a gun owner? Let us in OR ELSE, say Blighty's top cops

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Excellent, we need more of this, and fewer guns

I've always found that as my clay scores go up, my rifle and pistol scores drop. And vice versa.

Any advice?

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Legal Guns

It is incredibly likely it was, in fact, just (just - it is still a 'firearm') an air rifle.

If not, then it was being used outside the terms of the certificate, & the owner was seriously breaking the law.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Legal Guns

Er. How exactly would the silencer slow the bullet down? By the time it gets to the end of the barrel it is already well supersonic, and the only way to slow it down would be some kind of steel plate or perhaps some clever electromagnets.

No, the silencer only removes the muzzle blast. The supersonic crack, which is generally louder, is completely separate.

You can, of course, slow the bullet right down by not making it go so fast to start with, but on something like a .223 it then isn't much use even against a fox in an average field. On a .22 rimfire it'll travel about 200m subsonic before you are pointing at the sky.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Black powder

That's also why there are more explosives licenses than firearms/shotgun certificates now. Many people bought BP muzzle loader pistols after the cartridge pistols were banned.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Hmm

A gun safety course? You mean the mandatory minimum of 6 months in a gun club learning how to shoot before you have a 'good reason' to possess your own isn't enough?

If you want a day long course? Do your range safety officer course!

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Computer misuse: Brits could face LIFE IN PRISON for serious hacking offences

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Boobquake?

There are hundreds of earthquakes every day. So was there a statistically significant variation in earthquakes on the day?

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: computer hackers who damage the national security of any country*

Or a member of the FBI/government/whoever directing you under threat of a serious sentence.

Oh, wait.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: If I 'hack' North Korea's military system ....

Don't be daft, we don't send our citizens off to face kangaroo courts in foreign places that put innocent people to death for trivial offences.

Well, as long as they can convince a court they are autistic, anyway.

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Greedy datagrabs, crap security will KILL the Internet of Thingies

YetAnotherLocksmith

But that's a stupid way to do it.

Far brighter to have a key for the household, and then you add that to each device when you buy it, which it uses to encrypt output.This is then picked up by your personal server which holds the decryption key.

Heck, you don't even really need to use a public/secret key pair - you could just use a single key across all your devices, and change it if one got stolen, the same way I change a house's locks if one's keys get nicked.

Why risk having a mechanism for pushing out keys, etc. that can be so easily subverted?

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Heistmeisters crack cost of safecrackers with $150 widget

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Heh

10 out of 10.

No idea why you posted that AC though.

I'd also add that most electromechanical tin box safes can be opened in seconds to a few minutes.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: *sigh*

The default combo is either 50, or 10-20-30.

Yes, pay someone to install the safe and change it. Cheaper than not changing it.

(Change it every 6 months if you want the insurance to pay out, too, if it is a commercial use safe.)

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: The big question is...

I wouldn't worry.

Did you miss the bit where it takes 4 days of continuous work to open the safe?

Assuming that's an average, that's twice as long as the 'military' one (whatever that's meant to mean - if I had $15k I could buy one) which we had running against a Grade 1 lock for 3 days, and it failed.

So basically, check your safe once every few days and you are fine.

For what it is worth, an expert can crack these locks in under 15 minutes. I'm not brilliant at these, but I've done one in under 2 hours. There's the real threat!

(If you want to upgrade your safe, get in touch. )

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EE TV: Network snubs 'Auntie's antique' for mobe-happy set-top box

YetAnotherLocksmith

@dogged:

Thanks, just bought 3 8Gb SD cards for under £20 and got a free trio of RPi's and some other stuff thrown in! Free shipping too. Except they cancelled the order, having spotted their pricing error!

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Why do companies still hang on to traditional broadcast TV?

Er, because when all your neighbours are streaming stuff that is available via the airwaves it's a waste of the bandwidth?

If the set-top box simply records the program at the time is was sent, like, you know, a video recorder would have, then there won't be so much pressure on the internet bandwidth available when it is watched from the local hard disk, rather than streamed in.

No reason both can't be done, you just have to have a system that is both on and told it should record the show/series.

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Revealed: Malware that forces weak ATMs to spit out 'ALL THE CASH'

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Many, many, many moon phases ago I worked for a company ...

Notable security failure though that is, that doesn't actually get you access to the cash without hacking the software/hardware further. Once opened up by that key, the cash machine has a secure safe inside that houses the cash, with proper steel walls and proper locks.

That said, the last one I played with took me under 11 minutes to open and "empty" by picking the locks. It also ran OS/2!

I'm still annoyed it got thrown away.

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Rise of the Machines: FIRST HUMAN VICTIM – 2015

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: And this affects me how?

<message_begins>Hmmm. Quick hack into the car computers via the OBDII interface to tell it to lock up the front brake caliper next time they are doing 88mph and indicate right should take care of that troublemaker.</message_begins>

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Smart meters in UK homes will only save folks a lousy £26 a year

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: My Electricity supplier

Force it to a warrant action and it'll get resolved. Or at least threaten that to the call centre when you talk to them.

They will take action when they realise that you know what you are talking about.

Mind you, it depends on your supplier - some are incredibly bad and cut people off, while others try their best not to.

If it does go to warrant you'll get a Human Rights letter so you know when to go to court, & you should get at least two visits from a rep before that too. That costs the power company, so they tend to get things sorted before that if they can.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: not smart

Ah yes, but unlike the phone companies or your ISP, which are small companies like BT and Sky, the power companies are big, like e.on and British Gas.

Oh, wait.

If they read the power every 30 minutes, they won't have any idea what you were actually doing. No company is really going to waste money reading your electric meter continuously, & not across millions of households! They do still have to pay for the mobile bandwidth you know.

And if a 3 letter agency really wants a per millisecond power draw reading, they'll fit a monitor on your line to do it.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Why not a smart reading device?

People have spent years working out hacks to get free electric. If it was as simple as holding up a photo of your meter last month to 'prove' to the device your consumption this month, it'd be a disaster.

There are some really neat fiddles out there. Everything from vanishing coins in the old coin meters through electromagnetic pulses, to the latest hacked payment keys for the latest systems. All get discovered eventually.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: They're a bit OTT

Oh I hope I get your house coming up on warrant to change the meter then.

That's something that'll change with smart meters - no more arse customers getting cute about their meter fiddles. Of course, I won't be there, and nor will a rep, it'll just be some guy in a call centre toggling your power to persuade you to pay up.

That's actually one of the issues - without coming round and looking, how do 'we' know you haven't stuck a bit of wire over the terminals? Or you aren't a quadriplegic who can't get to the top up shop?

But it will save billions because the jobs on the ground will go and the rest can go to India or Scotland for a third of the money they'd have to pay in the UK. (Oo! Politics!)

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City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: what i would like to know

If they can't figure out what it was used for, it was 'religious use'.

Honestly, if there are no beds or soil holes (home or toilet) and no other clue, they put it down under that. Hence 17 in a small area.

Odds are high there is nowhere in the world with that many religious buildings so close, bar perhaps the Vatican City.

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iCloud fiasco: 100 FAMOUS WOMEN exposed NUDE online

YetAnotherLocksmith
Mushroom

Re: Yes.

[quote]

Although a bit OT here, the latest "scandal" is that many "no crime" rape reports are being re-opened because if the girl was that drunk then consent was impossible so it "must" be rape. I'm not sure how I feel about that.

[/quote]

And yet Rochdale still happened. One case had two detailed rape reports by a 15 year old, plus 2 sets of DNA tying the two perps to the "crime scene" and that wasn't taken to court as she "was 15 and a girl and so unreliable as a witness"!

The CPS and the police need to sort out what the rules actually are. Hint: The girl has to be both capable of consent and have given consent. (Yes, I know that's very complicated.)

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GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Just to clear up an inaccuracy or two

Gloriously broad law? In the UK? Surely not...

But don't worry, it will never be abused. Honest.

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YetAnotherLocksmith
WTF?

Re: Official Secrets Act

But, but, Google did it, your honour!

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US Copyright Office rules that monkeys CAN'T claim copyright over their selfies

YetAnotherLocksmith

And what about CCTV pictures? A static camera that simply streams a scene seems like it is less copyrightable than a monkey borrowing your nice camera.

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Why hackers won't be able to hijack your next flight - the facts

YetAnotherLocksmith
Flame

Re: Step back and thnk about this.

It is rather telling that there seems to be a mistake on the lithium batteries on those, a mistake that I wouldn't have made since I know more than nothing at all about lithium batteries, unlike whoever got it wrong enough that they keep catching fire.

Or perhaps some clever hacker has worked out that if he spins up all the drives at the same time it overheats the battery in the in-flight entertainment system?

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YetAnotherLocksmith
Mushroom

Re: "ARINC 629 is actually harder to hack that ARINC 629,"?

Yes, they'd need to be on-board, or running really fast to keep up. Otherwise the target plane will be out of WiFi range in about half a second.

Even with a high gain system and tracking dish, you'd only have it in range for a very short time unless you were using some serious kit - don't forget it would be line of sight and the plane is a few miles away at closest.

Yes, possible for a very well funded adversary, but the average hacker isn't going to hack the plane they are on and fly it into the ground for LULZ.

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Nice computers don’t need to go to the toilet, says Barclays

YetAnotherLocksmith

Ah, you mean like Alliance & Leicester had, before Santander took them over and replaced the nice state of the art machines that worked with the crap old machines that require an envelope that it fails to dispense?

I used to go to those branches specifically for those scanning machines as it made life far easier. Especially since they Will Not take a business account cheque over the counter, even if the machine is knackered! Fuckwits wrote those procedures.

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Kickstarter hopefuls promise high-res aerial maps for the masses

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Value of the Imagery?

But are these guys actually doing that?

And how many people actually care if, when zoomed to the size of a field or less, if the picture is slightly distorted?

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NASA tests crazytech flying saucer thruster, could reach Mars in days

YetAnotherLocksmith

Last time I debunked this one the setup was the same.

A torsion balance is very rigidly constrained sick that it had only one degree of freedom. Add to that a microwave source with a rotating cooling fan, and you will get 'lift' as there is a centripetal force interaction. You can do this by picking up a bench grinder and twisting it around.

Remove that constriction of movement and exactly nothing happens.

You can't, in a closed system, turn a torque moment into actual thrust.

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Feel free to BONK on the TUBE, says Transport for London

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Cashless society ... please no !!

Handy if you want to break in someplace without risk. Check the database, see both adults are on the other side of the city from the card transactions, and carry on.

Just don't forget about the school holidays!

Using a debit card would also ruin the whole 'signing out' anti-fraud Oyster thing that stops card cloning being much use - it knows you are on one platform so it won't authorise the same card again onto the same platform. Are people going to have to re-bonk their debit card?

A debit card could do the same, in theory, but since you could go target a shop or something to skim the cards instead... not so useful. Since Oyster is only used on the bus, train or to open the door at London Hackspace, it is far harder to skim.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Amazingly it does seem that the concept of a wallet

Hahaha. Good one.

Wait, were you being serious? If so, consider this:

The pickpocket can be a foot away and read your card with no effort and without further action. The gear costs about £30. There won't be many physical pickpockets in the future, because why would you bother taking the actual card instead of just transferring the money?

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SMELL YOU LATER, LOSERS – Dumbo tells rats, dogs... humans

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Polar Bear

Get it on Pay-per-view and you could be rich!

Or instead of poor animals that might hurt each other, how about dumber animals:

Celebrity Sniff Off!

Get Daniella Westbrook to host.

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Revealed: SECRET DNA TEST SCANDAL at UN IP agency

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: GATTACA

Their DNA was taken nearly everywhere. Automatic finger pricking took samples to allow entry to buildings and police took mouth swabs just like the UK police, just with instant results.

The premise was that an individual's DNA was the prime driver for their abilities down to the lowest levels. And plenty of tweaks available too, such as the world's best pianist with 12 digits.

Good film.

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MPs to sue UK.gov over 'ridiculous' EMERGENCY data snooping law

YetAnotherLocksmith

Can I vote for both these guys?

Excellent.

And if they are both suddenly 'outed'? We will all know what is actually going on.

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US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account

YetAnotherLocksmith

Oh no. If you are rich and they really want you, they first have the court seize all your assets so you can't afford a good lawyer.

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That 'wiped' Android phone you bought is stuffed with NAKED SELFIES – possibly

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Phones

Blackberry takes ages because it actually scrubs the data.

The clue it isn't actually deleting properly is when you kill a gig of data in half a second. It's only changing the index!

But *we* all knew this already, obs.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: One punter was so casual...

But why would you turn it off? When you turn it back on it's exactly the same. It isn't like it wipes the thing!

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: "...promoted its free Android anti-theft tool as a solution."

Very effective to spend money to promote a free bit of software. Must be a great ROI. /sarcasm

Raising awareness of crap locks on customer doors is something I do. People think they are secure, they aren't. Am I scaremongering? No, I'm telling the truth. Just like these guys I can demonstrate the flaws and fix it. Unlike them, I'll charge for it. In fact, they must have some other service to keep them in money, otherwise they'll need a second job. Are they cross promoting? Probably. But it is a free solution to an obvious issue some may not have thought about.

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Victim of Tor-hidden revenge smut site sues Tor Project developers

YetAnotherLocksmith

Well said.

It appears 3 commentards are set to sue - next time they type format c:, confirm it a few times then lose everything, they'll be calling their lawyers for their data back!

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'BIGGEST BIRD EVER': 21-foot ripsaw-beaked flying HORROR

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: According to the abstract

One factor people seem to forget is the oxygen percentage of the atmosphere was higher. Another is that the sun was brighter. So you had both more power available from the one-source-to-rule-them-all, & more chemical energy/power available more easily.

Hence bigger creatures that are not energetically viable today.

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