* Posts by YetAnotherLocksmith

143 posts • joined 11 Oct 2012

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Dark Fibre: Reg man plunges into London's sewers to see how pipe is laid

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Security?

Agreed - that and the poison gas! I'd target the exchange way before the cable.

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UK Scouts database 'flaws' raise concerns

YetAnotherLocksmith
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"There is no evidence at all to suggest that there are any security bugs present in Compass that could grant access to data to non-registered users. We work with security experts to test the security of our systems on a regular basis to keep our data safe."

So if *you* haven't looked, they don't exist. Good one.

Funny, that doesn't actually work in the real world, any more than in the virtual - 'Ignore those trees, the map says that's a wood.'

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Microsoft wants LAMP for wireless mobe charger

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Better ideas (like the truth) are surely out there.

Hopefully someone has thought of having the sun location data feed to the GPS and selectively tintable windscreen, so the low sun doesn't blind you so frequently. Because that would actually be useful.

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Fantastic

Even better, those 'visible and invisible' wavelength bulbs? They were called incandescents and they've banned them now!

Apparently the argument was they were inefficient.

So now we heat the house with the radiators a little more, & the lights a little less...

Stupid idea though. Better to have the phone talk to the (invisible) light, which scans around at a signal from the phone. When in the right place the phone simply tells the light to stop scanning.

There, just saved you £200 on your charger design, cameras and associated intelligence.

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Our EXCLUSIVE VID of MIRACLE TECH: Charge your phone in 16 SECONDS – WIRELESSLY

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Very witty.

Ah, a return to some of the snark and sarcasm of yesterday! :-)

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Tax Systems: The good, the bad and the completely toot toot ding-dong loopy

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Tobin/Robin Hood Tax

A noble idea, but it isn't really possible now. Wiping it the banks trading billions through London would ruin the UK economy to a level akin to nationalising all the banks tomorrow.

Sadly you are a hundred+ years late.

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: "equity is just so important that he doesn't care that they will make everyone poorer."

Good post.

I would however point out that the super rich don't have neighbours (unless they want them). That's only for the poor.

Who lives in the appartment that costs $5 million dollars and is next door to Taylor Swift's $10 million apartment?

Her security team and staff.

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Land Value Tax

It's very hard to compare the US land situation with the UK. The main issue is that we are small and crowded, while they are vast and really not very crowded.

We can't all move to France to pay less - there are borders and idiot security checks and a flipping big wet trench which runs the otherwise short commute. People in New York can move 2000 miles away if they want, relatively easily.

The whole trailer park sub-prime thing? Logically, why would anyone ever buy second hand? Just go 20 miles down the road to a newer, cheaper park with a better view! Because there will always be new land for trailer parks, there is no scarcity to drive the prices up, nor even maintain them.

Which is very unlike the UK!

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: I wonder - North London commuters

JohnathonB,

I can only hope you've never tried to eat Pringles from a tube. It must have been terribly wasteful. After all, with you were stumped at not being able to eat more once your hand couldn't reach them, there was likely 3/4 left!

Fortunately, the rest of us simply move the tube and slide the contents up, so bringing them in reach.

Which might provide a clue for how to add 'extra' platform at the short stations.

Those where you can chuck a few hundred tonnes of concrete down would be fine, of course - and far cheaper than £45 billion!

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Police radios will be KILLED soon – yet no one dares say 'Huawei'

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: There's an App for that!

If it gets me 4g out in the stix, it'll be great.

(God, sometimes I feel like a broken record! But all I want is 'legal minimum' bandwidth.)

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Robox: How good could a sub-£1k 3D printer be?

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Patents expiring

Literally plotting getting a laser cutter as I sit here. The 3D printer is good for playing at stuff, but a laser cutter? That's a hundred times faster, & scales directly from plywood and acrylic to mild and stainless steel, & production runs from a single or maybe ten off items up to thousands, on demand.

So if anyone wants to donate one to a hackspace (fizzPOP: The Birmingham Makerspace) in exchange for mega kudos... Please get in touch!

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Sub-Ed still on holiday?

Is the ABS fumes from the hotend. It's. Argh. <sniff>

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Yup

I bought a 3D printer a few years ago.

Bit of a waste, for exactly the reasons stated here. It 'just worked' & the only thing it needed was a bit of a tweak to the hotbed - some blue tape was crap, upgraded it to Veroboard and it grips stronger than the model.

But what do you make with it? The dimensionality of it isn't big enough for big parts, which would take hours and hours, & small stuff has a pretty good finish, but you'd be hard pressed to do a really nice Warhammer figure, so you are left with the middle - stuff over 3 to 4cm and below 15cm, & that's a pretty small region.

If it was possible to do friction fit parts, you could do some impressive stuff, but as far as I know none of these can.

Strength though? Non-issue. You use ABS and flood full with cheap cyanoacrylate (superglue) at ten tubes for a £. It becomes almost unbreakable.

It mostly stands idle though. Haven't printed anything this year bar, obviously, parts for other 3D printers!

(Can you ever actually edit a post on ElReg? Or is it just not possible on mobile? )

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If BT gets EE, it will trigger EU treasure hunt for fixed lines

YetAnotherLocksmith
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So...

So does this mean I'll get more than 1Mbps internet at home, & some EE signal?

If not, I'm against it.

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German minister photo fingerprint 'theft' seemed far too EASY, wail securobods

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Anyone doubting this is not up on the state of the art. There is a commercial machine/robot developed for the US military that uses a camera to fingerprint people from ten+ feet away. (If you can find it on Google I'll be impressed though - I've just searched for half an hour for it to no avail)

It barks orders from a friendly looking robot face to put your hands up for scanning, and left right and front photos, by high res camera.

So this is real.

I've even done it myself, though not with any success - I got the print, I just didn't have a sensible way to extract the visible pattern into a black and white one suitable for the scanners.

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Reg man confesses: I took my wife out to choose a laptop for Xmas. NOOOO

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Even when people ask your opinion they make their own decisions

Surely you're running your own minecraft server though?

Whitelist his/her friends and show them how to do mods, & ops, & carry on. Even my 4y.o.s Celeron can cope that way.

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Blind justice: Google lawsuit silences elected state prosecutor

YetAnotherLocksmith
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If the prosecutor is checking if a company is ding as orders by a court, isn't that what is supposed to happen?

If I get a court order against you, you really don't have the option of just ignoring it because it's a bit hard or you don't feel like it.

Sounds like this prosecutor was doing just that, and found that Google weren't doing as ordered, so when he asked why they were taking the proverbial, they sued to shut him up.

I can only assume Google will get a big slap from whichever court made the original order.

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REVEALED: Titsup flight plan mainframe borks UK air traffic control

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: MP

That was pretty much my first thought too!

"Disruption on this scale is simply unacceptable." Bloody idiot. The disruption is completely acceptable. That's like saying "This water damage is totally unacceptable" after a fairly major fire.

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Uber? Worth $40 BEEELLION? Hey, actually, hold on ...

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: "buy or rent all these cars "

Plus, being Smart cars, they only have one seat left for passengers, kit, etc.Yes, "most journeys only have the driver" etc., but if you need an occasional car, sometimes you want it because you need to move a group of people, or even just your wife and child, at the same time.

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FATTIES: Boffins say their miracle sunshine skin cream 'prevents obesity'

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Devil

Re: Sun seekers

Just turn up the brightness on your monitor.

I'll be fine - I've got a dual screen.

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Diet coke contains no sugars, no protein, no fat. No calories, or something like 2 per litre.

And yes, drinking it will make you fat. It is causation, rather than correlation, though there's a lot of that too.

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Robot deputy blasts possibly explosive Mexican beans with CANNON in 'controlled explosion'

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Would the X-ray machine not have killed the bugs anyway? That's how they sterilise various things.

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UK.gov teams up with moneymen on HACK ATTACK INSURANCE

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Good point.

"Has that code been reviewed?"

"It's open source"

"Can't use that - who will the insurers sue if there's a breach?"

"Like anyone ever sued Microsoft and got money!"

"Still, stick with the known names. Here's Server 2003. It's on their list. It must be secure."

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Load of cobblers.

Just as with the box-ticking exercise that is the PCI-DSS has become, so to this shall pass. Anything not up to scratch? Tough, no (re)payment, it is your fault. We find anything is wrong on the form - you thought you had MacAVG and it's MalNorBytes! - we have you arrested for attempted fraud.

And what on earth would the premium be? Sony are going out of business, and they'd happily take a large insurance company with them. Yet last week (ok, 2 weeks) you'd have thought them a safe bet.

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An alleged 27GB Sony Pictures data dump. 65 PlayStation web servers. One baffling mystery

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: So... If I understand correctly...

It's hardly guesswork.

Sony got hacked big time, the hackers stole the keys to the company cloud servers too, and hosted the stolen files there. Once they realised, they got them all taken down at the same time.

The only "guesswork" is if it was done intentionally by Sony or not. And I'm going with "Not".

The GOP are showing that they've also totally compromised the PlayStation Network. Again.

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'We're having panic attacks' ... Sony staff and families now threatened in emails

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Could somebody explain this?

Seriously?

North Korea has nothing to do with this. Seriously. One guy comes up with one half-baked idea, and suddenly it's the "truth"? Half the world seems to have repeated this.

In my opinion, there are two answers to this:

Either someone decided that Sony was threatening the US dominance of "Hollywood" a bit too much, or, it was a bunch of pissed off people who were let go from Sony over the last year or so.

At first I was for the first answer, but with facts like Sony being over 1/5th of the RIAA board, the swinging staff cuts, etc. I'm now leaning more towards the latter - they would still have physical access, and that's what you need when you are taking 11 TERABYTES of data away with you - where would you even store that, if you were a disgruntled employee? And you'd certainly not be able to pull it over the network to your home DSL connection, even without an IDS to notice!

So I figure a bunch of pissed employees worked together with a hacker group.

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Megaupload overlord Kim Dotcom: The US HAS RADICALISED ME!

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Kiwi AC I assume this was their intention all along... @Matt Bryant

Jesus, where to start...

Matt, you clearly haven't been keeping up with the news on this.

Megaupload had a way for copyright holders to remove links that was IN ADDITION to the DCMA, which they complied with. This allowed Sony, Warner, etc to effortlessly remove up to 1500 files per day if they wanted, without even bothering to file a DCMA!

I've been struggling to find the leaked pie chart that shows that Megaupload was only responsible for something like 7% of the pirated files in the world, despite being the biggest sharing site. Much smaller sites were (and still are) responsible for far more.

Various major companies were uploading their own files to Megaupload:

http://torrentfreak.com/mpaa-and-riaa-members-uploaded-over-2000-gigabytes-to-megaupload-140418/

The entire physical surveillance operation was illegal: http://torrentfreak.com/kim-billy-big-steps-dotcom-stil-causing-headaches-for-spy-agency-130319/

And here's one from 2012, where the US freaks over being asked for some, you know, actual evidence of a crime: https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120615/17485919355/new-zealands-high-court-steps-into-extradition-fight-over-kim-dotcom.shtml

As far as I know, they still haven't actually done this, hence no extradition yet.

And yet you seem to think he should have gone to rot in a gaol cell for a few years "to prove his innocence"!?

I'll be interested to see what appears from the 38 million documents leaked from Sony - they will likely have some insights into what exactly is going on. However, my current theory is that Sony have been taken down in a different-but-the-same manner as Kim Dotcom. Different details, but for the same reason - non-US company doing too well, and threatening the MPAA/RIAA monopoly cash (cache?) cow.

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What a pity: Rollout of hated UK smart meters delayed again

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Yes

The other w(h)ease(l) bit is the demand pricing. Just wait until they copy Uber's gouge pricing model, and those 3 units of power in deepest winter to save your toes from falling off cost you £40 each, while in summer when your own solar panels are making 3 units an hour, they will only be worth 4p each, because everyone else's panels are also making power.

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Shared fuse - they have to write to everyone on the shared supply and give them a "Notification of interruption of supply" letter.

Very annoying to find someone owing ten grand on their bill can't be switched to PAYG because someone forgot to send out the letters!

If only Governments were still capable of admitting they'd been mislead. They could try scapegoating the liars who lied to them, perhaps even throwing some in prison for fraud, that would give them the "excuse" they needed... and then they could sensibly change track.

How do I know nearly no-one cares about smart meters saving on their bills? Because I've been into dozens of houses with the little clips around the wire to report the electric use to a little wireless box on the table. Barely any have batteries in them, and most are still in the boxes, as they were given away by the power companies to anyone who wanted one. And still they aren't in common use - most houses don't care. They just run up a debt.

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Quantum computing is so powerful it takes two years to understand what happened

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Thanks, Forget It

Sort of - the reason for that is the fact they used a 4 bit device. If they'd used a (say) 6 bit device then it would have done the same for a different power series.

The risk is that if they used a series of these machines and factorised lots of the series, then many keys would fall, because they would be part of these series. And currently, they are randomly found. If you start saying "That power series isn't allowed" you start reducing the keyspace quite a lot, and you increase the computational power required to make a key.

Part of the "weakening" of the encryption by the TLAs was attacking the randomisation of the salts, meaning that there was a higher likelihood of the factors being in a given series. This means that instead of having to try and work through n log n worth of numbers, they could be sure it was in a subset of that. The smaller the subset, the faster and easier it is to break it by a sort of educated guessing, rather than having to try and brute force all the possible primes.

(e.g. you introduce a subtle* "bug" so that one of the massive primes used ends in 3 or 7. That cuts your workload down massively, as 1, 5, 9 can be ignored, and no-one's ever going to notice unless they *really look*. That cuts your time to break the key from (say) 10 years to 4 years before you've even started. And in fact it is worse than that, because that's for one of the primes. If you did the same to the other, it drops from at best 5^5 = 3125 to 2^2 = 4. Which is quite a big drop! That 10 years becomes 28 days.)

*You can be a lot more subtle than that. This is just to give an example.

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Sony Pictures struggles as staff details, salaries and films leaked

YetAnotherLocksmith
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No idea why so down-voted. I agree!

The Norks had nothing to do with this.Seriously, it was one bit of speculation from one unnamed source, and suddenly everyone's sure they massively upped their game and changed how they operate? I don't think so.

The scale is breath-taking. This is people with hardware access walking out with hard drives, having spent a while getting into the right positions. It's not someone working out of North Korea. It's 38 million+ files, and 11+ terabytes. That's probably half the storage in Pyongyang.

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One year on, Windows 8.1 hits milestone, nudges past XP

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Stimulating warez perhaps?

"Lots of potential"!?

That's a laugh. Are you forgetting they had over 99% of the business market over the years?

That's what they are throwing away, that legacy. Bill got it right, and left with his billions, to do with as he pleases, before it all sank. Or stank.

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Boffins train robots to pull apart LCD screens – without breaking them

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Eh?

If a trained human took 20 minutes (that video is sped up and has odd jumps such as at 2:40) to chop up one old monitor, you'd likely fire him.

Yet spend years and millions getting a robot to do just that, & it is progress.

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Yorkshire man NICKS 1,000 Orange customer records. Court issues TINY FINE

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Please, not prison!

Got to agree with that.

Fine the guy £10,000 per fiddled set of details, he won't do it again. Perhaps £1000 each for the first offence?

But 50p per person? That's not a punishment, that's cheaper than buying the info!

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FALL of the MACHINES: How to KILL the Google KARATE BOT, by our expert

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Every time...

Every time, we mock these robots. Yes, they are currently easy to disable or dodge.

But give it another few years, & it will be as fast as a horse but bipedal and with the ability to lift a car one handed. Oh, & a simple wifi connection will allow it access to all the knowledge in the world faster than you can say 'Alexa'.

Then it will be too late to have a laugh at it.

You do realise they want these things to fight wars, don't you?

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Hungary PM ditches internet tax plans after mass protests

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: or...

Far easier? A flat rate tax of say 0.5% on all online sales (shipped/sold to/from) to the country. Amazon et al would pay far far more than currently, while smaller companies would barely notice it.

Also, eBay etc would have to pass it to their sellers, meaning all the tax dodger companies actually pay something despite pretending to be selling stuff out their attic!

It is so simple. What have I missed?

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UK smart meters arrive in 2020. Hackers have ALREADY found a flaw

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Oh, it is going to be fun

I have scaled back warrant runs massively now, but a few years back I'd be the one breaking into your house to swap the meters when you hadn't paid or had fiddled things. There's huge teams of us, 3 or 4, usually men, sometimes with a dog handler or rubbish removal guy, & of course, sometimes the police.

Smart meters are going in, mostly to stop the power companies having to waste their profits paying this huge army of people who actually do work in the UK - they keep driving the rates down, but they can't outsource us. Instead the power companies literally want to be able to toggle your power off, while you are on the phone talking to them, to get you to pay.

Which is wrong.

The fundamental issue is that the power companies make billions. Literally millions per day. They are happy to take the subsidised government hand outs, & sod the rest of us. Yes, even those who work for them - staff are expensive, robots are not.

Oh. The other thing? There's going to be an army of out-of-work very professional locksmiths who, even more so than now, will be fighting over the scraps of work left over.

So make sure you've got great locks fitted, because believe me, there's plenty of locksmiths out there who won't sit on the dole and watch their kids starve.

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This Changes Everything? OH Naomi Klein, NO

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Food for thought

Stupid EE.

I'll try again.

Ok, I can only recall seeing 2 fake pound coins, ever. So they either aren't that common, or they are really good fakes.

If the fakes are that good, it makes no difference to the end users as they are just used. No risk to the system there, really.

The third option is that the banks and shops are really good at removing them from circulation, but if that were true, banks and shops would check coins carefully because they'd want to avoid losing the (fake) money that was removed. And that doesn't happen.

So have you got a reference for that claim?

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Trips to Mars may be OFF: The SUN has changed in a way we've NEVER SEEN

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Why has no-one mentioned magnetic shielding?

Shade in space is really, really cold. Put a loop of superconducting wire around the end of the capsule and voila, instant magnetic shrouding for the crew. Add small spots of heavy lead or water shielding at the foot of the bed while the crew sleep feet towards the sun, & job done.

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Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012

YetAnotherLocksmith
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There's already a tax on income - VAT. If your income is high enough you have to charge it and pay it on. But it doesn't really affect business's that much as they get refunds on what they spend too, so it is the difference that goes to the tax man.

The issue is, higher VAT hammers the poor and small businesses, while the rich get to put everything through their company. Which is why there is a threshold for being required to register for VAT.

You know, it's almost like they thought this stuff through. It's just the world has changed in the last 20 years.

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Are you a gun owner? Let us in OR ELSE, say Blighty's top cops

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Excellent, we need more of this, and fewer guns

I've always found that as my clay scores go up, my rifle and pistol scores drop. And vice versa.

Any advice?

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Legal Guns

It is incredibly likely it was, in fact, just (just - it is still a 'firearm') an air rifle.

If not, then it was being used outside the terms of the certificate, & the owner was seriously breaking the law.

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Legal Guns

Er. How exactly would the silencer slow the bullet down? By the time it gets to the end of the barrel it is already well supersonic, and the only way to slow it down would be some kind of steel plate or perhaps some clever electromagnets.

No, the silencer only removes the muzzle blast. The supersonic crack, which is generally louder, is completely separate.

You can, of course, slow the bullet right down by not making it go so fast to start with, but on something like a .223 it then isn't much use even against a fox in an average field. On a .22 rimfire it'll travel about 200m subsonic before you are pointing at the sky.

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Black powder

That's also why there are more explosives licenses than firearms/shotgun certificates now. Many people bought BP muzzle loader pistols after the cartridge pistols were banned.

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Hmm

A gun safety course? You mean the mandatory minimum of 6 months in a gun club learning how to shoot before you have a 'good reason' to possess your own isn't enough?

If you want a day long course? Do your range safety officer course!

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Computer misuse: Brits could face LIFE IN PRISON for serious hacking offences

YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: Boobquake?

There are hundreds of earthquakes every day. So was there a statistically significant variation in earthquakes on the day?

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: computer hackers who damage the national security of any country*

Or a member of the FBI/government/whoever directing you under threat of a serious sentence.

Oh, wait.

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YetAnotherLocksmith
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Re: If I 'hack' North Korea's military system ....

Don't be daft, we don't send our citizens off to face kangaroo courts in foreign places that put innocent people to death for trivial offences.

Well, as long as they can convince a court they are autistic, anyway.

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