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* Posts by YetAnotherLocksmith

85 posts • joined 11 Oct 2012

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Smart meters in UK homes will only save folks a lousy £26 a year

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: My Electricity supplier

Force it to a warrant action and it'll get resolved. Or at least threaten that to the call centre when you talk to them.

They will take action when they realise that you know what you are talking about.

Mind you, it depends on your supplier - some are incredibly bad and cut people off, while others try their best not to.

If it does go to warrant you'll get a Human Rights letter so you know when to go to court, & you should get at least two visits from a rep before that too. That costs the power company, so they tend to get things sorted before that if they can.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: not smart

Ah yes, but unlike the phone companies or your ISP, which are small companies like BT and Sky, the power companies are big, like e.on and British Gas.

Oh, wait.

If they read the power every 30 minutes, they won't have any idea what you were actually doing. No company is really going to waste money reading your electric meter continuously, & not across millions of households! They do still have to pay for the mobile bandwidth you know.

And if a 3 letter agency really wants a per millisecond power draw reading, they'll fit a monitor on your line to do it.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Why not a smart reading device?

People have spent years working out hacks to get free electric. If it was as simple as holding up a photo of your meter last month to 'prove' to the device your consumption this month, it'd be a disaster.

There are some really neat fiddles out there. Everything from vanishing coins in the old coin meters through electromagnetic pulses, to the latest hacked payment keys for the latest systems. All get discovered eventually.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: They're a bit OTT

Oh I hope I get your house coming up on warrant to change the meter then.

That's something that'll change with smart meters - no more arse customers getting cute about their meter fiddles. Of course, I won't be there, and nor will a rep, it'll just be some guy in a call centre toggling your power to persuade you to pay up.

That's actually one of the issues - without coming round and looking, how do 'we' know you haven't stuck a bit of wire over the terminals? Or you aren't a quadriplegic who can't get to the top up shop?

But it will save billions because the jobs on the ground will go and the rest can go to India or Scotland for a third of the money they'd have to pay in the UK. (Oo! Politics!)

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City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: what i would like to know

If they can't figure out what it was used for, it was 'religious use'.

Honestly, if there are no beds or soil holes (home or toilet) and no other clue, they put it down under that. Hence 17 in a small area.

Odds are high there is nowhere in the world with that many religious buildings so close, bar perhaps the Vatican City.

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iCloud fiasco: 100 FAMOUS WOMEN exposed NUDE online

YetAnotherLocksmith
Mushroom

Re: Yes.

[quote]

Although a bit OT here, the latest "scandal" is that many "no crime" rape reports are being re-opened because if the girl was that drunk then consent was impossible so it "must" be rape. I'm not sure how I feel about that.

[/quote]

And yet Rochdale still happened. One case had two detailed rape reports by a 15 year old, plus 2 sets of DNA tying the two perps to the "crime scene" and that wasn't taken to court as she "was 15 and a girl and so unreliable as a witness"!

The CPS and the police need to sort out what the rules actually are. Hint: The girl has to be both capable of consent and have given consent. (Yes, I know that's very complicated.)

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GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Just to clear up an inaccuracy or two

Gloriously broad law? In the UK? Surely not...

But don't worry, it will never be abused. Honest.

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YetAnotherLocksmith
WTF?

Re: Official Secrets Act

But, but, Google did it, your honour!

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US Copyright Office rules that monkeys CAN'T claim copyright over their selfies

YetAnotherLocksmith

And what about CCTV pictures? A static camera that simply streams a scene seems like it is less copyrightable than a monkey borrowing your nice camera.

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Why hackers won't be able to hijack your next flight - the facts

YetAnotherLocksmith
Flame

Re: Step back and thnk about this.

It is rather telling that there seems to be a mistake on the lithium batteries on those, a mistake that I wouldn't have made since I know more than nothing at all about lithium batteries, unlike whoever got it wrong enough that they keep catching fire.

Or perhaps some clever hacker has worked out that if he spins up all the drives at the same time it overheats the battery in the in-flight entertainment system?

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YetAnotherLocksmith
Mushroom

Re: "ARINC 629 is actually harder to hack that ARINC 629,"?

Yes, they'd need to be on-board, or running really fast to keep up. Otherwise the target plane will be out of WiFi range in about half a second.

Even with a high gain system and tracking dish, you'd only have it in range for a very short time unless you were using some serious kit - don't forget it would be line of sight and the plane is a few miles away at closest.

Yes, possible for a very well funded adversary, but the average hacker isn't going to hack the plane they are on and fly it into the ground for LULZ.

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Nice computers don’t need to go to the toilet, says Barclays

YetAnotherLocksmith

Ah, you mean like Alliance & Leicester had, before Santander took them over and replaced the nice state of the art machines that worked with the crap old machines that require an envelope that it fails to dispense?

I used to go to those branches specifically for those scanning machines as it made life far easier. Especially since they Will Not take a business account cheque over the counter, even if the machine is knackered! Fuckwits wrote those procedures.

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Kickstarter hopefuls promise high-res aerial maps for the masses

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Value of the Imagery?

But are these guys actually doing that?

And how many people actually care if, when zoomed to the size of a field or less, if the picture is slightly distorted?

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NASA tests crazytech flying saucer thruster, could reach Mars in days

YetAnotherLocksmith

Last time I debunked this one the setup was the same.

A torsion balance is very rigidly constrained sick that it had only one degree of freedom. Add to that a microwave source with a rotating cooling fan, and you will get 'lift' as there is a centripetal force interaction. You can do this by picking up a bench grinder and twisting it around.

Remove that constriction of movement and exactly nothing happens.

You can't, in a closed system, turn a torque moment into actual thrust.

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Feel free to BONK on the TUBE, says Transport for London

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Cashless society ... please no !!

Handy if you want to break in someplace without risk. Check the database, see both adults are on the other side of the city from the card transactions, and carry on.

Just don't forget about the school holidays!

Using a debit card would also ruin the whole 'signing out' anti-fraud Oyster thing that stops card cloning being much use - it knows you are on one platform so it won't authorise the same card again onto the same platform. Are people going to have to re-bonk their debit card?

A debit card could do the same, in theory, but since you could go target a shop or something to skim the cards instead... not so useful. Since Oyster is only used on the bus, train or to open the door at London Hackspace, it is far harder to skim.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Amazingly it does seem that the concept of a wallet

Hahaha. Good one.

Wait, were you being serious? If so, consider this:

The pickpocket can be a foot away and read your card with no effort and without further action. The gear costs about £30. There won't be many physical pickpockets in the future, because why would you bother taking the actual card instead of just transferring the money?

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SMELL YOU LATER, LOSERS – Dumbo tells rats, dogs... humans

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Polar Bear

Get it on Pay-per-view and you could be rich!

Or instead of poor animals that might hurt each other, how about dumber animals:

Celebrity Sniff Off!

Get Daniella Westbrook to host.

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Revealed: SECRET DNA TEST SCANDAL at UN IP agency

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: GATTACA

Their DNA was taken nearly everywhere. Automatic finger pricking took samples to allow entry to buildings and police took mouth swabs just like the UK police, just with instant results.

The premise was that an individual's DNA was the prime driver for their abilities down to the lowest levels. And plenty of tweaks available too, such as the world's best pianist with 12 digits.

Good film.

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MPs to sue UK.gov over 'ridiculous' EMERGENCY data snooping law

YetAnotherLocksmith

Can I vote for both these guys?

Excellent.

And if they are both suddenly 'outed'? We will all know what is actually going on.

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US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account

YetAnotherLocksmith

Oh no. If you are rich and they really want you, they first have the court seize all your assets so you can't afford a good lawyer.

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That 'wiped' Android phone you bought is stuffed with NAKED SELFIES – possibly

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Phones

Blackberry takes ages because it actually scrubs the data.

The clue it isn't actually deleting properly is when you kill a gig of data in half a second. It's only changing the index!

But *we* all knew this already, obs.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: One punter was so casual...

But why would you turn it off? When you turn it back on it's exactly the same. It isn't like it wipes the thing!

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: "...promoted its free Android anti-theft tool as a solution."

Very effective to spend money to promote a free bit of software. Must be a great ROI. /sarcasm

Raising awareness of crap locks on customer doors is something I do. People think they are secure, they aren't. Am I scaremongering? No, I'm telling the truth. Just like these guys I can demonstrate the flaws and fix it. Unlike them, I'll charge for it. In fact, they must have some other service to keep them in money, otherwise they'll need a second job. Are they cross promoting? Probably. But it is a free solution to an obvious issue some may not have thought about.

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Victim of Tor-hidden revenge smut site sues Tor Project developers

YetAnotherLocksmith

Well said.

It appears 3 commentards are set to sue - next time they type format c:, confirm it a few times then lose everything, they'll be calling their lawyers for their data back!

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'BIGGEST BIRD EVER': 21-foot ripsaw-beaked flying HORROR

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: According to the abstract

One factor people seem to forget is the oxygen percentage of the atmosphere was higher. Another is that the sun was brighter. So you had both more power available from the one-source-to-rule-them-all, & more chemical energy/power available more easily.

Hence bigger creatures that are not energetically viable today.

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Alabama quadchopper hits THREE THOUSAND FEET next to AIRPORT

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: @corestore

Arnaut, we do have one. The Bill of Rights.

However, the government(s) has basically ignored it and overwritten it for so long that it is pretty much worthless.

The 'merkins have at least got that bit right - if you don't defend your rights they rapidly become nothing but forgotten words on paper.

Oh, and the US Constitution was modelled on our Bill of Rights. It's just the citizens there kept it alive.

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F1? No, it's Formula E as electric racing cars hit the track

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Thank you Formula E

No idea which cretin downvoted you.

Absolutely correct analysis. The only thing that would make it wrong would be charge-as-you-drive. Which might work on a track but it will be hellish in a car you are actually driving, rather than one that trundles along on auto pilot.

I think of I were forced to drive at 50mph and not even have the ability to change lanes I'd fall asleep - it is bad enough going through the average camera zones!

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YetAnotherLocksmith

I too am confused - plus Virgin Mobile can clearly be seen as a car sponsor on the video!

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Brit celebs' homes VANISH from Google's Street View

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: The next step...

"Pencil sharpener", I smiled.

Damn, that's me on another list...

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London officials won't take Uber to court – because cabbies are suing the drivers anyway

YetAnotherLocksmith
Pirate

Insurance?

I thought running as a "paid more than the cost of the fuel" service was classed as "for hire or reward" & as such specifically excluded from regular insurance policies. Private 'car sharing for reward' is surely not insured then, unless the driver has a commercial cover policy?

Or are they running like a taxi (mini cab) firm but arguing the fares are pure booked through the app?

(Sorry, I live in the middle of nowhere; I've taken one taxi in the last two years. As such I'm not up on the details)

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BOFH: You can take our lives, but you'll never take OUR MACROS

YetAnotherLocksmith

Before I fled, I worked as a 'DBA' for a Big Aerospace company and was forced to use Access for everything - the spods in IT were outsourced morons who wouldn't allow anyone to actually do anything with IT beyond what was on the desktop. So we had Access and we made it jump through all sorts of hoops. When my boss and I quit there were hundreds of them! All with hundreds of users, and because it was so rubbish at multi user, it was split up and so only a dozen users were in any instance, which another Access db later pulled in and merged, and so on.

The 'backups' were insane. They were done by another series of Access databases, so when some muppet deleted all their weeks reporting "by accident' we could still get it.

There was a Access db front end menu that looked up which version of which database that user was to be presented with when they clicked 'the' button - which was actually changed depending on where, when and who did the clicking...

This was all backed up on a 'secret' HDD that was swapped in and it of the bosses laptop, as he couldn't get permission to store so much data anywhere. (It was also on the network, but since it was a database, IT couldn't cope with backing it up! They'd back up the initial file, but anything that changed they didn't notice. And this was a major IT company! )

So anyway, when my boss quit, I wasn't long behind him. And I became a locksmith. (Still a very technical job, but far fewer computers!)

I still sometimes wonder how the muppets got on. They were the kind of users baffled by the scroll bar moving the page down...

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USB charger is prime suspect in death of Australian woman

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: More official advice completely divorced from reality

That's a crap argument.

So you are saying the manufacturer who needs to recoup his investment on R&D for his new idea and then the huge sums charged for testing so he can legally add those stickers and other declarations of conformity should try and match the prices of the assholes who rip off their design so badly it kills people?

Do you not see how that doesn't work? & even if they did sell the fancy chargers at cost, just to keep you happy, the assholes would still be cheaper due to them not paying for half the parts that ensure safety. That's just a race to the bottom.

The message is, be a smart consumer. Buy from someone who isn't likely to be selling dangerous kit.

I've bought Chinese kit that was wired to kill. First thing I do now is take it apart and check any mains circuitry.

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App maker defends selling S.F. parking spots as a FREE SPEECH issue

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: the meatspace alternative?

And how would he feel if you then suggested he pay you a quid, or you'd go and have another cup of coffee? Because that's pretty much what is going to happen with this App.

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Who needs a ride-on mower when a ROBOT will cut your grass

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Value?

If you pay enough, they'll move trees and ponds too. Or you can hire a digger and do it yourself. And it'd still be cheaper than this lawn mower!

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Satellite 'net hype ignores realpolitik

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Politcs

@AC:

If they have even crap Internet, they will get better solutions to other problems far faster than *any other single improvement would.*

No clean water? Google how to filter water through sand. No bricks? Instructables can show you how to make them from mud or sand and cow poo. Need to check the fair price for what you are growing? Bing could tell you. Heard there's a nasty epidemic killing lots of people? That's be via the Internet, hopefully, rather than some Typhoid Mary who's already been exposed.

So yes, Internet for all, for near free. Sign me up too. I'll even pay for a second channel so I can get more bandwidth and a back up to my BT line.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

@bluenose: Too right! We are about to get set up with it, crap latency, insane setup cost, high cost and all, because we simply can't get a 1mb connection, despite being in the middle of England!

We literally have line of sight to several hills, which should allow a connection, but the people who do these things have, after a year, failed to get their end sorted out.

I'm currently considering taking the ADSL box up the lane and hanging my own fibre, to gain us that bit more bandwidth!

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IoT cup claims 'instant' identification of what's in it

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: 2 girls 1 cup

That'd confuse the count - sharing the cup.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Actually, this may have a use.

You do realise that most food intolerance is minor, right?

Peanuts are the most major (in the USA, & somewhat in the UK) but that has now been cured by actually eating peanuts. (As a therapy, don't just knock a few back)

As for the idea? I'll believe this 'super sensor' when I see it. Odds are high this is a made-up thing. If it takes 20,000 biological receptors to do the job, one silicon sensor probably won't cut the mustard.

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Israel develops wireless-malware-injection-by-smartmobe tool

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Not sure about infection

Damn, you beat me to it!

There's a lot of ill informed "this isn't possible" comment on this thread, considering there is a home brew FM transmitter for an actual computer already, which you can do with a few lines of code and a few inches of wire - and the wire is optional!

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So, what exactly defines a 'boffin'? Speak your brains...

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: I really, really, hate that word

I work with 'meter fixers' & 'engineers' all the time on gas and electric. You can tell the difference quite easily. The fitter will swap a meter pretty quickly, but refuse to do anything that isn't entirely simple. An engineer will, perhaps, sometimes, warn you it will take a while, but it will get done, & done right.

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NSA: Inside the FIVE-EYED VAMPIRE SQUID of the INTERNET

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Outrage

Do you not realise that your liberty is completely gone if someone else had every scrap of data about you, your family and the political elite tucked away for use on a whim?

I see you as a 'threat' so have a close look at your file. Assign a few people to have a dig. How many laws can you be arrested for breaking in a week of close surveillance? But that costs money. Easier to just query the file, and have plod take you away.

Even if squeaky clean your kid might not be. What father wouldn't consider a polite request for a set of the encryption keys for a decode if lent on with threats to their son or daughters liberty?

Failing even that, just call up the local political elite and use some of the data on them to have a nice law passed. Consider this gem: they could revoke your right to travel out the country by adding you to the football list, worth nothing more than a word and a name. Hand in your passport or else, and attend the police station during matches. Even if you didn't give a damn about football. .. Add your name to the 'No fly' list. Revoke your firearms or shotgun certificates, even your driving license, then make sure a copper is there at the right time, and sure, it might be a 'clerical error' eventually, but you'll enjoy the ride through the police station, courts and custody chain, even knowing it is a set-up. Just tweaking the results of your CRB or credit record could ruin your job or your life.

So yes, mass surveillance is a bad thing. Especially when those doing it are hidden from any oversight whatsoever.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Lets not forget who is to blame

What rubbish.

Much of this collection stuff existed before 9/11/2000 let alone the more memorable one a few years later!

They just used the event to expand their scope futher, using the foolish argument that because they missed the needle passing through the huge haystack of data they collected, what they needed was to build bigger haystacks!

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REVEALED: GCHQ's BEYOND TOP SECRET Middle Eastern INTERNET SPY BASE

YetAnotherLocksmith

This is Bollocks Telecom all over.

As someone else said, they'll spend hundreds of millions putting fibre in 3rd world countries by hook or by crook, but won't help the UK out by sorting out decent connectivity for the UK? Not even when paid millions by a government scheme that specifically requests that!

Hang on - or was the UK countryside broadband thing actually just a way to hide the money in the accounts? After all, it is quite possible no-one specified *which* countryside internet they had to speed up!

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Cops crimp global perve-cam attacks

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: False logic

Have an Upvote.

I literally clicked the comments button to say exactly the same thing. Sure they might be lower hanging fruit, but taking them now prevents a lot of misery. Plus if flagged now they are less likely to get better able to hide themselves now, than after a few years of practise.

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El Reg Quid-A-Day Nosh Posse crawls towards finish line

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Interesting...

Yes, that psycho Sheriff should be a role model for the poor. If you can't handle the crap food he dishes out, don't do the crime, etc.

Fact is he has been taken to court for using food that is marked for animal feed. And 24 cents per meal, times 3 a day isn't far from the lower limit of the possible. Indeed it isn't that far from £1 a day.

It has been shown that giving inmates a vaguely complete meal reduces poor behaviour. Even just adding vitamins reduces bad behaviour.

So having people subsisting on £1 a day isn't really going to help society, and screwing the inmates for 15p a day on food really isn't helping anyone. Food is a negligible cost compared to everything else. Make it a proper part of the solution and everyone benefits.

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Time-rich Brit boffin demos DIY crazytech WOLVERINE talons

YetAnotherLocksmith
Mushroom

Does anyone know what make of TIG welder that is? Looks ace. Lovely job he did.

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Shame these are already illegal under UK law. (Just like everything else! )

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The amazing .uk domain: Less .co and loads more whalesong

YetAnotherLocksmith

It's a joke. Surely.

The .uk domain names can only be bought by the squatter already holding it for the next five years anyway, & have first refusal. So surely in 4.99 years there will be a few people buying their .uk to protect it, before protection lapses, then a few people who wanted the .co.uk will buy the .uk?

Of course, in 5 years time, who can day what the state of the nation (literally) will be?

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Google CAN be told to delete sensitive data from its search results, rules top EU court

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Barmy (@Psyx)

Er. Except they *have* done the time.

Or are you really saying all crimes should be punishable by life shaming?

But of course, you've *never* been done for something suspect by a dodgy copper, driven too fast, & you practise archery on your common land every week, right?

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Minecraft players can now download Denmark – all of it – in 1:1 scale

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: As a 29 year old who doesn't quite 'get' MC...

Absolutely agree.

Even if the Danish taxpayer paid a hundred thousand to a developer for this, that's a small company (hopefully) who will stay in business for another year to grow their economy. Meanwhile they get some great PR out to the world, & the goodwill generated makes the world a generally better place.

Being able to remodel the skyline of London would be cool. Could knock down that gherkin now they've gone bust, & see if it is an improvement or not. For nearly free!

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