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* Posts by YetAnotherLocksmith

33 posts • joined 11 Oct 2012

Google kills fake anti-virus app that hit No. 1 on Play charts

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: You need to understand,

Isn't that the point of the Samsung Knox store?

They carefully check that nothing dangerous/useful can be added to your phone, even by the App store, & so the idea of a protected area becomes useless when you literally cannot even make a text file note of a password.

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Where the HELL is my ROBOT BUTLER?

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: "Telepresence robots." Hmm.

"As a security professional, I can assure you that whilst I can tell you the locks and safe were good, I can make no such assurance for your Robo-Butler. Which is how it was able to pick up the 400kg safe and deliver it to the waiting robot car outside while you slept, disabling the alarms and using the front door with the codes and keys you gave it."

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: 'Everyone' get one?

That last bit sounds like the 8th circle of hell. A robot to watch all you do and keep you safe and out of trouble? Sounds a bit too much like a 'slap drone'* for my liking.

I don't want a robot car that monitors and reports all I do at all times, unless it had both as good a driving record as me and can actually take responsiblity in the event of an accident, such that I don't have to. Otherwise the only point is to have a backseat driver that will allow the fines & penalties to be posted directly.

I don't want a robot nanny. Perhaps one night a week for the kids, but again, if it burns the house down, unlike the real baby sitter, who would get the blame, and, more importantly, would it react in a sane manor compared to the carefully chosen and vetted person (who I can at least converse with and determine emotional state, intelligence and so on) unlike the alien thing that an AI would be (which I assume would be programmed fully with 'Trust signals', empathy and comforting words, while only being a network outage or network intrusion away from being either inert or passively deadly, or even actively hostile.

*If you don't know the reference, it means you have never read Iain M. Banks, and as such you are dead to me.

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MPs attack BT's 'monopolistic' grip on gov-subsidised £1.2bn rural broadband rollout

YetAnotherLocksmith

Hopefully we will be able to invade some 3rd world country and steal their wifi broadband airships.

Seriously, how come the 3rd world has a bigger brighter plan than the UK for getting high speed internet to the remote masses?

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YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Rural, talk about central london

But will that actually make any difference to your life? Going from 20Mbps to 80Mbps is like a pay rise from £165K a year to £200K - nice, but so what, really?

Going from sub-1Mbps to 3Mbps is like going from £7K a year up to £20K - suddenly you really can get more out of life.

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Google's Nest halts sales of its fire alarm – because waving your hand switches it off

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: I have a smoke alarm in my house

But this is a solved problem. There are designs that let you turn them off with the beam of a torch. Simple enough.

Best solution is to buy a fire alarm that looks for actual flames in your kitchen (unless you smoke in there, or have a gas cooker hob) or just do like I have, & leave the detector on a shelf in easy reach. That also reduces the sensitivity so something has to really smoke before it goes off - visible smoke appearing - so avoiding issues with slightly charred toast.

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They want me to install CCTV to see what YOU did in the TOILET

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: RE: Only temporarily.

Assuming everything is actually working properly, a regular cheap CCTV camera as fitted to most places isn't worth a damn beyond 20 metres and generally is only of use after the fact, so the employees and boys can see what happened and when, and perhaps laugh as the hated photocopier gets lugged away.

High end stuff, though? You can get multi mega pixel camera units that cleverly output multiple streams as if different cameras, with motion tracking built in so the virtual camera (s) follow everything moving in real time. And allow you to read the numberplate and even logos on shoes. And you can put them up a tall pole so well out of reach of the unprepared.

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Dropbox nukes bloke's file share in DMCA brouhaha – then admits it made a 'HASH OF IT'

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Hope they're using a good hash

Unless someone actually opens the cat picture or other text or whatever to check, then it makes no difference if the picture works or not - it is checked by a script, so if it matches it gets killed.

Yes, computationally tricky, but far from impossible. Just look at rainbow tables. It would be possible to do that for hash values so it becomes a relatively simple look up in a big database. Every time one doesn't appear, you add it. Eventually you have a huge Database with reasonable coverage.

Might want an algorithm to generate the actual files though, else storage would rapidly become an issue!

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Facebook, you fools! Forget Oculus, you could have bought TRON-type headsets

YetAnotherLocksmith

Euros.

So £50 ish.

Still, if it uses good lenses and fits well, that's a lot less than a pair of frames for glasses will set you back, even before you add the lenses!

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Oxfam, you're full of FAIL. Leave economics to sensible bods

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Deiberately missing the point???

There are thousands of houses sitting empty, long term, across the country. Mostly held by land banks, they decay slowly and take the rest of the neighbourhood with it, leading to more empty houses, & so on, until the last few are bought out for a pittance, and the area gets levelled and turned into 'luxury' flats. Which stay that way for a few weeks.

The problem is, once the roof falls in, the land bank can stop paying council tax on the property, as it isn't habitable. So you can imagine the state of the neglect you find there. And the incentive to improve our maintain is a negative one - the faster they get everyone out, the better for their profit margin.

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Google slams Play Store password window shut after sueball hits

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Gift cards

Hardly a high tech method, & far better than a brick through the window, which makes noise and triggers alarms. Jamming the remote means the door isn't locked and the alarm isn't set, & you can likely rob several cars at once.

2 way comms on your car alarm is the answer. Aftermarket, of course. Else it would be what was expected.

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'BILLION-YEAR DISK' to help FUTURE LIFEFORMS study us

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: what to write

Might I suggest "Ozymandias"?

First, the sonnet by Shelley.

-----

I met a traveller from an antique land

Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone

Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,

Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,

And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,

Tell that its sculptor well those passions read

Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,

The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed:

And on the pedestal these words appear:

"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:

Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"

Nothing beside remains. Round the decay

Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare

The lone and level sands stretch far away.

------

And on the 'B' side? The companion work.

Smith's Ozymandias.

------

IN Egypt's sandy silence, all alone,

Stands a gigantic Leg, which far off throws

The only shadow that the Desert knows:—

"I am great OZYMANDIAS," saith the stone,

"The King of Kings; this mighty City shows

"The wonders of my hand."— The City's gone,—

Nought but the Leg remaining to disclose

The site of this forgotten Babylon.

We wonder,—and some Hunter may express

Wonder like ours, when thro' the wilderness

Where London stood, holding the Wolf in chace,

He meets some fragment huge, and stops to guess

What powerful but unrecorded race

Once dwelt in that annihilated place.

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We don't need no STEENKIN' exploit brokers: Let's FLATTEN all bug bounties

YetAnotherLocksmith

So there would be a race between the employed bug hunters and the rest of the world? Sounds like fun.

Further, I can see issues with bugs being hidden then "found" for $150k a time by friends of those working on the code.

"Anyone want to go halves?" would become a common refrain.

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Oi, bank manager. Only you've got my email address - where're these TROJANS coming from?

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Similar issues...

That, Sir, is truly a brilliant idea. Can't believe that isn't standard practise. I'm going to add "Forward to: CEO at email-sellers-domain.com" to the front of all my kill filters.

My wife (who is in IT, as I used to be) complains at my use of many different email addresses like this, but I find it very useful for the reasons given by others.

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Twitterers rally round #CensoredUK - to demand MORE PORN

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: "Well, isn't that special?”

Absolutely right.

Of course, with a service like Netflix you are streaming something like Sons of Anarchy, which has loads of often extreme violence and a fair bit of sex, plus drugs & (illegally used) guns.

So does that get banned? Even when they immolate a girl in a pit in front of her father in a very graphic and frankly horrific manner? Apparently not. That's fine. But showing more than a few seconds of consensual sex is as far as they can go in that direction...

It is very messed up.

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We've found it – the ULTIMATE man-cave accessory

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: The ultimate recliner

Careful. Everything will rust from the slight warmth and ready supply of water vapour from the burn fuel.

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If this doesn't terrify you... Google's computers OUTWIT their humans

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Something Missing

You are forgetting that I can easily have dozens of people verify whatever I want. Simply upload the job to Mechanical Turk, feed in what you think the answer is. Adjust your input. Repeat until you have a high enough confidence in your truth.

You could argue if the humans doing Mechanical Turk are truly intelligent, in the way they are when just acting as individual human beings. But you can also use those same arguements on any company or employed person - do they have self determination?

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Want to go to billionaire Sun kingpin's beach? Hope you're a strong swimmer

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Miserable Git

The problem with a boycott is that they just don't work anymore. Not against the rich.

Even if you organised a really good one, he could have a courier or the postal service bring in food, even if you somehow got the national supermarkets offering home delivery to stop feeding him. Beyond that, he could simply hire a goon to do it.

Being mega rich insulates from the requirement of needing people. Indeed, that's half the point. But even kids have all they need these days, the Internet ensures that no-one lacks for 'human' contact and you can have all the pizza delivered to your basement you want...

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Samsung Galaxy Note 3: Once, twice, three times - a Very Large Phone™

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Three Note 3 Fails

What an odd claim! Detach stylus, write note. Or at least that's how mine is how set up. I don't even need to unlock it.

Also, it warns you if you've left the pen undocked then the phone starts moving, making it far harder to leave on the table.

It even copes 95% with my nearly illegible cursive scrawl!

Best phone ever.

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How I hacked SIM cards with a single text - and the networks DON'T CARE

YetAnotherLocksmith
Black Helicopters

Bit like last week's Apple snafu?

From the description, it sounds like the same sort of flaw as the Unicode handler last week on Apple, where any SMS or even webpage knocked it over.

Take an array and point to it via a one-step-away function call which fails to check it is in-bounds.

Wonder if it's the same backdoor writer who did both?

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Upgraded 3D printed rifle shoots 14 times before breaking

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: inevitable

The other guy is right - like the metal bullet case is an issue for anyone you know?

You need only be paranoid about plastic guns if you have a huge security theatre you want to increase. Because shit like that makes people want to shoot you.*

*Correlation is not causation.

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YetAnotherLocksmith
FAIL

Re: whats the point?

No, the root cause, if you care to look hard enough, isn't the gun(s) it is the people who want to kill. And they will use everything and anything to do that. Guns are just one of the better tools, right up there with medical degrees and whatever Fred West used...

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YetAnotherLocksmith
WTF?

Re: We stand to have access restricted to 3D by spooked bureaucrats.

Er, what?

No-one's safe at the moment. Plus, the implication of it all being plastic is that it can't be found by metal detectors. I don't have a couple of guards and an arch at my front door, so whatever it was made of, I'd not be 'safe'. No, you are talking about the mega rich and powerful.

Perhaps they'll be safer if they start being a bit more human and a bit less mega-wealthy.

Besides which, you don't need a 3D printed gun or anything else so useless. For the price of that printer you could assemble a remote controlled drone, and simply fly it into your target's head. No explosives, no prints, no ballistics, no warning, no need to be anywhere closeby, and you can get reasonable doubt by claiming it was all a terrible accident...

Or just run them over with a car, because they kill a lot more people than guns or anything else!

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Lasers capture 3D images from a kilometre away

YetAnotherLocksmith
Flame

What university are you saying? Edin-who? HERIOT WATT!

Er, when I was being taught by Gerald Buller, I wasn't at Edinburgh University, I was at Heriot-Watt University, and so was he!

(And he still is, according to http://www.eps.hw.ac.uk/institutes/photonics-quantum-sciences/gerald-buller.htm )

This system has been in development for decades. When I graduated in, er, 1998 they had a sub-millimetre accuracy demonstrator that was mind blowing as it took detailed pictures across the room, accurate in 3 dimensions.

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Attention, CIOs: Stop outsourcing or YOU will never retire

YetAnotherLocksmith
FAIL

That's true of nearly everywhere though, not just in IT.

When I was in aerospace, the graduate track got me a £500 increase every 6 months. Once off that track, it was, well, 0.5% if you were lucky. The obvious result was that people who could build a plane or program a radar or do actual real stuff that was essential to the company were rapidly finding they were paid less than the inexperienced graduates, who were also rapidly out-stripping the slightly experienced graduates - who were surely worth more since they now had experience?

I left after 6 years, by which time 90%+ of the grads who joined with me were already gone. Yet that company still says it can't get enough "quality" engineering graduates...

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Ten pi-fect projects for your new Raspberry Pi

YetAnotherLocksmith
Mushroom

Re: Solar monitor

Surely the easy way to do that is to simply run a wire from the panel inverter output to the input terminals of your water tank's immersion heater, then add a relay so that when it switches the solar in the mains disconnects? And vice versa.

A zero-crossing electronic relay will last far longer under a 3kW load, and be nicer to your electronics on the other end.

Obviously you'll need to run some temperature feedback too, so you don't run the risk of too high a tank temperature if the UK sun ever stays out for more than 35 minutes if the heater itself doesn't manage that. Otherwise, see icon.

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CCTV hack takes casino for $33 MILLION in poker losses

YetAnotherLocksmith
Angel

Because a feed to Google would be more secure?

So your theory is that the card footage would be more secure if it was fed live to the Big G servers so they could scan for, track, then obscure the cards? I can see a flaw or two here.

Further, since most cheating is by the person holding the cards, leaving the "trusted" security officer unable to see that the 4 cards in someone's hand just changed from a low pair to a high pair, or indeed into both, would be a big step backwards.

Would you like to play "Find the Queen" while we wait? You can trust me. Just look at my icon, it has a halo.

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Police use 24/7 power grid recordings to spot doctored audio

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: So take a high-pass 200Hz filter and ...

@This Side Up

Hardly! Many bits of recording equipment have this built in because it is easy and cheap, and gets rid of annoying mains hum without issue. Anything with a mains filter automatically takes that step. Also, anything digital voice recorder-wise is probably only recording between 62Hz and 2kHz to save bandwidth and improve sound quality.

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YetAnotherLocksmith
FAIL

Re: @2nd AC :-) re "same frequency"

While you are right in the main, you are wrong for this, I fear.

The electronics that do the frequency matching of the (say) PV panels to the mains will be fairly accurate, but it is very unlikely they will be so accurate that the micro-variations in frequency the plod are claiming they can measure accurately (and 100% ID a recording from) won't turn out to be substantially different.

I just can't see some Chinese engineer sitting there and saying "Yes, but we need it to be a perfect true sine wave running off this crystal oscillator" when honestly, a crude approximation of a sine wave will do - just look at nearly all the cheap inverters used in cars and vans.

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Hands on with BB10: Strokey dokey

YetAnotherLocksmith
Thumb Up

Hurrah! I practically run my business, Twitter accounts, etc. from my Blackberry. Although knocking them seems to be the in thing, the machines are solid, the keyboard excellent, and the slide-y one I use is robust & reliable.

Plus now I won't have to buy an iPhone, assuming this gets a bit of traction.

I hope they've built in some backward compatability for Apps though. Google/Android got that incredibly right, and developing for Android 2.2 still makes sense as everything newer still runs it, unlike many others where the slightest update means the OS refuses to even try to run it.

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Microsoft really is watching us from above

YetAnotherLocksmith
Trollface

But seriously...

...surely no-one will ever need more than 16 bit VGA?

How much are these beasts? And can I mount it on a real falcon?

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Experts split over regulation for bounty-hunting bug sniffers

YetAnotherLocksmith
Meh

Politicians, eh?

So getting the pork barrel politicians in will help? I suspect it will just make the rates go up dramatically, and drive the market to become more developed.

Whether that is good or bad, who can tell?

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Bloke jailed for being unable to use BlackBerry Messenger freed

YetAnotherLocksmith
Holmes

Re: Big society

How can you blame the last 2 years of tory for 15 years of labour?

The Conservatives have recently passed some useful changes to reduce how often CRBs are demanded for things like giving lifts, but (probably because they are stupid) didn't really advertise it, probably for fear of being shouted down as 'soft on crime'. Hmmm, perhaps not so stupid...

My dad just got out of jury duty. You can too. When you get the paperwork, phone them up and say 'Brilliant! I've been reading up on jury nullification and my other responsibilities as a juror.'

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