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* Posts by DaLo

263 posts • joined 30 Aug 2012

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The Register Monopoly Pubcrawl Mobile Map: VODAFONE WINS VOICE

DaLo
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"Naturally Three uses 3G 100 per cent of the time, having no 2G to fall back to. "

Three falls back to "Tmobile" on 2G, would this not be counted due to effectively roaming onto a different network?

In the real-world, however, this would offer users a signal in non-Three areas.

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New voting rules leave innocent Brits at risk of SPAM TSUNAMI

DaLo
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"It brings in a modicum of income for the council, which is not of itself a bad thing."

I would disagree - I would not expect that the details of people signing on to Job Seekers Allowance are sold to pay day loan companies if a box is/isn't ticked, or that people who submit planning applications who fail to tick a box are sold to a construction company etc. even if the money goes into the public purse.

Just because it raises a bit of extra money by selling your data that you have gathered for a completely different (and legally enforced) purpose and that money is part of the public funds does not make it okay, it is still a "bad thing".

The same as insurance companies selling your details to claims companies - even if it does reduce your insurance rates a little (although obviously the extra claims negate this) it is still a bad thing.

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DaLo
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Why should signing up on the electoral roll, a legal obligation that you have to do, be in any way linked to marketing and advertising from private companies in the first place?

There doesn't seem to be any good reason why they need to be intertwined like this.

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Farmville maker Zynga delays new games after losing 57 MILLION users

DaLo
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Re: Zynga has no USP...

It's hardly *that* simple or else everyone would've done it. Zynga did spot a market in Facebook games, made a compelling Sim format game (I guess, as I haven't played it but believe plenty have) and were some of the pioneers in generating significant in-app purchasing spend.

Racking in half a billion dollars a year from little more than repackaged games might not make their games have a particularly significant USP but their initial business model did that's what got the investor's attention.

It was never going to be easy to keep this up and I would agree with the bubble comment - this model was easy to replicate and also easy for players to get bored of, they had a definite primary-mover advantage.

I don't like this model of in-app purchasing and creating a player 'addiction' rather than compelling content, but for those that are happy with it would be very pleased to have been an early investor.

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Multiple user accounts coming to Android phones 'n' slabs

DaLo
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Re: It's the other way around...

Android already has support for multiple users, each with their own log in and each user can be restricted from installing or running anything (all data is separated also).

You can also manage each device from a remote management platform.

However this is for tablets, this post is about allowing it on phones also (although the article fails to make this clear).

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Americans to be guinea pigs in vast chip-and-PIN security experiment

DaLo
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Really?

"The results of the split approach will be studied by security experts to determine the pros and cons of each system; whether PINs are really more secure than a signature and whether chips are more tricky to clone than magnetic strips, for instance."

It takes security experts to decide whether chips are more tricky to clone than a magnetic Stripe? Do they know you can buy a mag stripe reader for hardly anything and read the stripe. Also signatures are not secure at all, hardly anyone checks them and even if they do it would take less than an hour to learn it to a level that it would pass a standard glance. The signature is also carried by the card so your secure authenticated element is given with the card!

Other than forensic examination signatures provide next to zero security.

Most of the skimming done in Europe is to steal the mag-stipe (which still only exists so the card can be used in the States and as a fall back if the chip fails) and the clone is then sent to the states to be used.

I'm not a security expert but I will happily accept the money for that analysis.

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DaLo
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Re: Restaurants?

If you let the waiter/waitress take your card away for swiping then you are asking to be cloned...

The idea is that they come to your table to swipe or check the card or you go to them. Don't let them take the card.

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HTTP-Yes! Google boosts SSL-encrypted sites in search results

DaLo
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Re: Slightly off-topic but

It isn't the fact it is self-signed that is the warning, it is the fact that it is from an untrusted authority. You can self-sign certificates using your certificate manager and trust the certificates on your domain and you won't get the warning.

The warning is stating that the certificate isn't from a trusted authority and therefore should not be trusted, hence the certificate trust model is broken and this is a situation that requires yuor attention - there is a significant security risk!

The only reason you think it is less of a security risk than having no certificate is because you know that you put that self-sign cert there in the first place. The browser doesn't know that you know it but will allow you to ignore it in the future. However if you access mybank.com and a very simple DNS redirect has taken you to a different server which uses a self-sign certificate but no warning is given then that is a major issue - the browser didn't even inform you that this site is using a certificate from an authority that you don't trust.

Eventually, if you look at the way this is going, you may find that any site which doesn't use SSL will also give you a warning when you access it...

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DaLo
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Re: Awful for millions

Of course you can have two domains on the same server both running SSL each with their own certificate, it's done regularly and if you were an ISP then you would expect to know this.

In reality though anyone using shared web server hosting (not including VMs in that obviously) is unlikely to have a serious enough web business that the difference in the search rankings that this would provide would be of concern.

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DaLo
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"Proofpoint’s researchers have observed that most websites were slow to enforce the use of HTTPS because the encryption it uses to secure the connection slows down the web experience..."

Are they saying their researchers regard using HTTPS as significantly or just that the webmasters' perception is that it will slow their site down so they don't so it.

Overall, I would expect that https is unlikely to have any noticeable different to any modern webserver, unless Proofpoint know different (and this is now showing as a sub headline for this story "Er, what about latency, bro?")

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BAD VIBES: High-speed video camera records your voice from trash

DaLo
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"Next step: CCTV cams that can eavesdrop on you"

Not much of a step seeing as CCTV cameras often have built in microphones?

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Today's Facebook fury: Coppertone-like baby pic ban baffles US mom

DaLo
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Re: Asymmetric laws and asymmetric justice

Not everything you read on the internet is true ...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17610820

..now it this post a paradox?

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'iPhone 6' survives FRENZIED STABBING. Truly, it is the JESUS Phone

DaLo
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Re: It is an exclusive for a while at least

I said they weren't in the same volume as the iPhone, however they aren't touted as 'extra durable' just luxury.

The idea that it is Apple that has made this an exclusive and set up the supply chains just isn't true. There are phone manufacturers who have been doing this since the 90s and were the pioneers in getting worldwide supply chains set up to use large sapphire crystal displays.

To Quote: "This meant the Hampshire-based British firm had to go out and find its own Sapphire source and create its own supply chain, one that was capable of creating crystals large enough to meet its requirements.

"We found one or two suppliers in the late 90s who we then started working with to get the bits we wanted."

Back to the present day and Vertu now has Sapphire suppliers around the world who are capable of making single sheets of glass large enough to cover the 4.7-inch full HD screen of the firm's latest flagship device - the Signature Touch."

http://www.techradar.com/news/phone-and-communications/mobile-phones/sapphire-screens-for-mobiles-were-branded-impossible-15-years-ago-1251887

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DaLo
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Re: Flexibility

None of it is 'true' sapphire it is all synthetic and is deemed to be both tough and hard.

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DaLo
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Re: It is an exclusive for a while at least

Other phones already use Sapphire Glass fro their display, however they don't have the same number of sales as an iPhone.

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DaLo
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Re: bull...

Sand is the culprit, quite often. A bit of sand which gets on your finger or in your pocket and it scratches glass quite easily.

That is the test of the hardness of the display.

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Google de-listing of BBC article 'broke UK and Euro public interest laws' - So WHY do it?

DaLo
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Google de-listing of BBC article 'broke UK and Euro public interest laws'

Where are these "UK and Euro public interest laws" that Google have broken?

I don't seem to find any reference to them on the EU Legislation archive? These laws must prevent Google from removing any links (or not linking to) any articles that would be deemed in the public interest (I presume by the fact they have broken them).

Does this mean that a robots.txt file is also illegal under "UK and Euro public interest laws"? That may be used also to stop search engines indexing information that may be in the public interest?

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London officials won't take Uber to court – because cabbies are suing the drivers anyway

DaLo
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Re: Sir

"An odometer doesn't increase when you are stationary in traffic though does it?"

No but the clock does..

"Is an odometer and a clock in the car also a meter?"

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DaLo
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Re: Sir

Is an odometer and a clock in the car also a meter? Do these need to be banned?

Heck, they are actually connected to the car and the calculation is done locally - using the driver's head or a calculator!

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DaLo
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Re: Sir

Not quite true, the Uber app will quote but their fare structure is still based on distance and time and the final price is only after the journey has ended (you could ask for a diversion if you wanted to).

Still doesn't make it a meter as these are a specific type with regulations surreounding them that are installed in the car and calculate locally.

The Uber meter has no car connection and calculates the fare remotely, it just collects distance and time information.

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Your Android phone is a SNITCH: Wi-Fi bug makes you easy to track

DaLo
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Re: Install Pri-fi

"What's the relevance of this MAC address discussion?"

I was replying on the above post who was talking about tracking via MAC addresses, this is another feature of Pri-Fi - to randomise the MAC address (as well as suppress AP broadcast).

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DaLo
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"Oh look the CEO's phone is showing that he has recently been to company B and he was out all day yesterday, I wonder if those merger rumours are true after all?"

"Oh look Julie's phone is showing the Palma Resort, isn't that where Kevin went last week on holiday? I thought Kevin was married?"

"Hey boss, we went to that nightclub last night and Luis Suárez was there and his AP was showing Real Madrid, maybe he's in talks about transferring? Should we print it?"

...etc

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DaLo
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Re: Install Pri-fi

You can't track someone at a website using their MAC address, how would you know their MAC address?

The only way it would even be possible would be to get the user to download a plugin or software during their browsing session and read it that way, but to what purpose?

If you want a unique ID you would normally just create one and put it in a cookie or get them to login to your site (which then also works cross device).

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'Disruptive innovation' is nonsense? Not ALWAYS, actually

DaLo
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Something can be disruptive even if it doesn't eventually succeed. A really good company would notice the disruptive threat and react quickly and effectively, using their experience and knowledge which then may make the newcomer redundant. It's when an established company doesn't notice or dismisses the threat, of which there are many examples, that the newcomer can really take off.

So, if Ford produce a driverless car that works as well as Google's but is based more around single ownership/family ownership and a regular car design (retrofitting to their existing chassis for instance) then that may well be a lot more appealing than an expensive bubble car from Google that has shared public ownership (and there is never one around in the rain or on a Friday night). Google's car might then fail but it will still have been disruptive and caused a seismic shift in industry thinking and speed of development.

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Speed of light slower than we thought? Probably not

DaLo
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Re: Silly question...

Light is affected by gravity - that's why there are 'black holes'.

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New MH370 search zone picked using just seven satellite 'handshakes'

DaLo
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Re: Ughh... bad news

Seeing as there is a reasonable chance of a crashing international plane hitting water why not develop a simple locator that is held in a sealed recessed area of the outer body which has a switch activated when significant water pressure is detected (non-electrical)?

The flap pops open and a floating tracker beacon pops out and stays on the surface.

This would not be able to be deactivated by crew (and due to a pressure opener wouldn't be at risk of causing an electrical fire). The high pressure, only experienced underwater, would ensure non-accidental release and with an armoured housing wouldn't get destroyed on impact.

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I/O NOOOOO!!! We sat through Google's bum numbing 3-hour keynote so you didn't have to

DaLo
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Re: Remote wipe?

I think, but I might be wrong, is that the feature actually disables the phone even surviving a factory reset/bootstrap. It is there to stop the potential resale rather than just erase your data.

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Microsoft's Online Exchange fixed after going titsup for NINE HOURS

DaLo
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Don't think it was ever free. Outlook express was free, but that was not the same thing at all.

Outlook was, however, included with the Exchange serve licence, as long as you had the relevant Exchange server Cals you could also use Outlook. This is no longer the case and you need to buy Outlook separately (or as part of Office of course).

However, there is not much point in using exchange without outlook and vice versa so not so much of a bait and switch. The main point is that it limits people using Open office for Word, Excel replacements while having Outlook for Email (as there really isn't much from the Open Source community that can match it) as the price difference isn't that big after you negotiate a nice discount.

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F1 racing ace Michael Schumacher's medical records were pinched

DaLo
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Re: Is this really so unique?

I am willing to bet that medical records are not routinely passed to accident lawyers in the UK.

However, I am pretty sure they are passed by insurance companies, tow trucks, coachworks, garages etc.

If you are sure that it was someone in the hospital (in the UK) then I recommend you contact the ICO and Health Care Trust immediately to pursue it and catch the culprit.

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iFind: Critics slam Kickstarter campaign for miraculous battery-free phone finder

DaLo
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The article is already slightly Anti-kickstarter and rightly so. The way they can absolve all responsibility from this obvious fraud that they are helping to generate half a million dollars (minus the healthy Kickstarter commission of course) is just plain wrong.

They still have time to pull the plug but leaving scams like this going just damages the long term viability of both Kickstarter and other crowdfunding sites.

I reported this project about two weeks ago https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1690998653/magnetic-hoverboard-i-think-yes as it clearly breaches their terms (they have no plans for a finished product, it's just a scam to use as a marketing opportunity for their other products)

If Kickstarter just becomes known as being a fraud site for criminals then it doesn't help anyone, especially Kickstarter themselves so they should get off their ass and create some proper safeguards and policies that provide at least some basic protection from obvious scams.

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David Cameron wants mobe network roaming INSIDE the UK

DaLo
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Doesn't seem so daft?

Operators already mast share (often with a head leaser of one of the operators who then sub leases to the other operators), they also have MVNOs and they allow roaming from other networks on their own network from foreign customers.

There would be a cross network charge which with an equal network and an equal number of subscribers would be cost neutral. However if one operator spends more on building their infrastructure they reap more in cross network charges. Similarly the operator who has the biggest customer base with the smallest infrastructure has to pay out the most.

As a working analogy - ATM/Cashpoint machines. These are installed by a certain entity and then they get a fee for each transaction made by a customer of another institution. Seems to work pretty well, you don't need 15 cashpoints in every village and as a customer you can use any for free (apart from private - chargeable - ones of course). The original installer has the cost of installation and ongoing running costs but they make their money back on their own customers not needing to speak to a human and third party charges.

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no commenting?

DaLo
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no commenting?

Just wondering why comments were turned off on the Oracle article. The one where they confirmed they were biting Micros?

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Restaurant chain uses CARBON PAPER to fight credit card hack

DaLo
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Non-embossed cards (in the UK at least) are designed specifically not to be used in manual imprinters as they specifically need an online, real-time authorisation. The will often have "electronic authorisation only" or similar.

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Car titans WON'T STEAL our tech, says Musk: DAMNIT, I'll GIVE IT to 'em

DaLo
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Re: Publicity Stunt

"So after proving hes running a company thats an answer to a question that no-ones asking"

So no one is asking "what are we going to do for fuel as oil reserves start to become depleted?" or "how would a dramatic enforced shortage of oil by OPEC affect the economy?" or "if man-made global warming is true how can we reduce our reliance on it especially if taxes are punitive on oil burning vehicles?" or "isn't is ridiculous how expensive it is to run a car in Europe now-a-days?" etc

There are plenty of questions being asked about the future of petrol and diesel vehicles, if you think there isn't then you must have been asleep for the last 20 years.

Electric has the advantage that once cars are "generally" battery powered the raw source of that electricity can be decided by the politicians, the environmentalists, the economists etc. Whether that is more nuclear, wind, tidal, solar, coal, gas, fusion etc All the cars get an automatic upgrade to using that new source at the same time.

Could it be that the actual issue is that the petroleum industry has a little bit too much sway and too much invested to see it disappear? Or that car manufacturers have too much invested in combustion engines and aren't always the quickest to adapt to change especially on such a large risk for them (many European vehicles manufacturers can't even afford the expense of a new regular chassis and wheelbase so they often share a similar platform and have a lot of mergers)?

The main issues with electric cars has been the range, the batteries and the "chicken and egg" lack of chargers en route. If a car has a 200 mile range and there was a decent network of rapid chargers then most people could work to that. Day-to-day commutes would be within range and longer trips could be broken up with lunch or a break at an appropriate location.

Elon Musk at least has the guts to try to address this and has the balls to do it without whinging that the government should stump up all the cash or the industry will fold. He's put his money where his mouth is and decided to give it a shot, it might eventually fall short but the thinking is sound.

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DaLo
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Re: This is nice but

Oh come on, do you really think any company would be that Naive?

Firstly if a company was going to spend that much money developing a car using Tesla's patents they would approach Tesla and ask for it in writing that they can use them, probably in the form of a Patent License agreement with no cost. No manufacturer is just going to start using someone's patent based solely on a second-hand news report that it was okay.

Secondly, if a company publicly states (directly) that they will allow others to use their patents then tried to sue for using them then, even in the US there would be little hope of a sympathetic judge.

Lastly, Elon's name would be mud if he then renegades on this and I'm pretty sure reputation is very important for him. Not completely impossible but unlikely to be his strategy (look at Oracle for instance)

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Stephen Fry MADNESS: 'New domain names GENERATE NEW IP NUMBERS'

DaLo
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Sites rarely have a certificate for all their various domains. They'll just redirect to their default or create a specific secure.xxxxx.co.uk domain to use for secure interactions.

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Google's URL-hiding 'origin chip' is 'backburnered'

DaLo
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Re: Clarification needed.

You're right the subdomain is only hidden for some sites now I hadn't used it for a while so I turned the setting back on to check. This is a change that they have made as it didn't do this originally. I'm not sure what the list consists of but the 'www' and "m" subdomain will still be hidden when you visit a site (slightly confusing if you happen to follow an m.site.com link as the display will not look correct but the URL will state site.com the same as if you had clickled www.site.com/).

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DaLo
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Re: Clarification needed.

The example The Register used doesn't make sense, of course - not only for the reason you stated (they'd actually have to upload a page onto someone else's site and by that point your website and visitors would be fubared anyway and also the fact that they obviously wouldn't use an address of www.google.com/this_page_is_malware_planted_by_a_phisher they would use www.google.com/this_page_is_perfectly_safe (www.google.com/gofind for instance).

The issue was more with subdomains as these were getting hidden so a service like blogger, geocities etc could have a link to sandras_blog.blogger.com but redirect them to geoffs_blog.blogger.com with Geoff being a naughty boy. The address bar would just show blogger.com.

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DaLo
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Re: Good Idea, Poor Implementation?

Chrome does do this already and has for a long time

forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2014/06/11/googles_urlhiding_origin_chip_is_backburnered/

It isn't very obvious though due to the differences being quite subtle. However there was a lot more to the discussion than this which ran for pages and pages.

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Look inside ELON MUSK'S CAR! Tesla S wundervehicle has voom

DaLo
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Re: Site locations

I would doubt it would be a shopping centre as everyone going to a shopping centre normally goes there for a long period of time, however an individual store to encourage a captive, well-off audience for 30~60 minutes would be more likely to see the marketing opportunity.

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Piketty thinks the 1% should cough up 80%. Discuss

DaLo
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NHS

You caption a picture of an Air Ambulance with a comment about NHS funding. However the Air Ambulance is funded privately by charity donations with only the paramedics seconded from the NHS.

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New iOS 8 SDK: Come in, apps. Get cozy, sip wine, swap numbers

DaLo
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Android Intents?

Surely this is just what Android Intents do (although a bit more limiting) and has allowed since the beginning.

All Android Apps can publish certain intents and this allows any mapping application to service any location request or allow an app to use another app to process its data.

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DUDE, WHERE'S MY CAR? New leccy BMWs have flimsy password security – researcher

DaLo
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Re: Selling the Car

"Can you disable individual phones from the dashboard/display?"

That would make this system a lot more secure, if an individual mobile had to be verified and activate from the car with the ignition turned on. You wouldn't be able to load the app onto any other phone then and use it as the mobile would not be verified.

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DaLo
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Re: My name

"Being able to use "any" username, and "any" password, effectively gives you two factor authentication"

Not quite it is two step verification but it is single factor (it is equivalent to a single password that is the combined length of the username+password but sometimes worse if the system individually lets you know if the username is wrong regardless of password).

Two factor could be available if the mobile phone, for instance, had to be verified and unique so that only a verified mobile phone could be used along with a (username/)password

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Former Azzurri project manager who stole £1.3m ordered to pay back £146k

DaLo
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Re: "or face 6 years' porridge"

Criminals often get a choice - plea bargaining is common. Even choosing to admit guilt early can knock a large amount off a sentence.

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