* Posts by DaLo

475 posts • joined 30 Aug 2012

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Getty Images flings competition sueball at Google Image Search

DaLo
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Re: Try Reading ALL The Words People

Not sure you understand the article completely.

"After the change Google still get everything they had before, plus a bit more on top as having the high res versions made their results richer. Getty on the other had get shafted as people can just steal their images rather than having to pay for them. "

If the hi-res image is available to Google, it is available to anyone to download anyway, they could just follow the thumbnail link to the image and download it.

Getty generally wouldn't show the hi-res image at all to the general public, especially not without a disruptive watermark so it wouldn't matter if Google had indexed it. The issue is with Getty images on a third party site in which there is no reason to believe would lead the member of the public looking at that image to decide to purchase it from Getty.

I fI was to take a stock image from Google for my use then I am just as likely to take it from MegaCorps website who is licensing Getty images. If I wish to work within copyrights then I would go to Getty (and others) to look through their licensed image library.

In reality it is more about the easy nature to search for images that you require using Google rather than having to go to a stock image supplier and a perception that there is okay to use images found on Google image search.

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DaLo
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Re: Watermark

Because Google aren't necessarily crawling the image library of Getty. Getty sell the rights to display a picture on websiteX. Google gets the image off websiteX to display in its image search.

Getty could as part of their licensing of the images require that each website ensures a noindex on the images so that Google won't retrieve them.

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'Droid Gmail on Exchange

DaLo
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Re: Must be missing something

And yet this story is about the Gmail client on Android, could be the missing bit?

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Sneaky Google KOs 'right to be forgotten' from search results

DaLo
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Re: Google on: rtbf "data processing business"

Read the comments you just don't understand the way Google searching works. It's no mystery, if you search for RTBF "data processing business" with verbatim on you still only get a few results (more than the initial two as some sites have added this story.

However the reason you are getting over 1000 results is due to Google deciding to expand the initialism and search for both RTBF and Right To Be Forgotten, which it wasn't before. So it is now allowing more ways to find the information. Bing et al are still ignoring quotes for phrases with limited results.

This really is a non-story with the current 'evidence' provided.

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UK authorities probe 'drone hitting plane at Heathrow'

DaLo
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Re: One guy

He's still got his laser pointer though!

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DaLo
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@Voland's right hand

"I have actually. I was blamed to be one of the registered DC persons a while back when I was still doing sysadmin for a living."

And yet you don't seem to understand the Data Protection Act? That is one of the fundamentals of being a DC (You're in good company because some ICO employees' don't understand the act either)

However, being a DC doesn't mean you can just use the well worn line "Can't, Data Protection innit?".

Just remember, there is no "privacy law" in the UK (there are certain other laws which involve some aspects of privacy). The Data Protection Act is for the protection of stored personally identifiable information by certain entities in certain circumstances, not a right of privacy.

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Music's value gap? Follow the money trail back to Google

DaLo
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Re: Great . .

"Maybe sweets have to be given away too. Or cars and houses."

Whatever the rights and wrongs, this argument is nonsensical and unbefitting. Physical goods have to be produced at a significant cost. Digital goods - assuming they were going to be produced anyway do not have a tangible cost to create new versions (copies) especially as the cost of copying is usually borne by the end user.

That is not to say there is no loss of revenue (although obviously isn't the kind of losses expressed by the various licensing companies and labels) or that it doesn't create certain economic and even social abnormalities around the purchasing of the goods. However to create an equivalence with physical goods does not a good argument make.

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How Remix's Android will eat the world

DaLo
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"What matters here is whether Windows 10's App Store is catching up, not just in mere quantity, but in quality apps from major names. And they are."

Citation needed.

Where are the stats that show that Windows 10 is catching up, i.e. more apps each period are being added to the Windows 10 store than the Google Play store or the Apple App Store?

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SANS man lists five security things you're not doing but should

DaLo
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Re: Drop attachments from unsigned emails?

True, but they could lock all attachments that could carry executable code (.doc, .js, .zip etc.). These can then only be unlocked by IT.

'plain text' any hyperlinks can also help.

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Hey -- what is that oddball box on the left?

DaLo
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Re: Hey -- what is that oddball box on the left?

See here -> http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/04/05/welcome/

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Blighty starts pumping out 12-sided quids

DaLo
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Re: counterfeit pound coins

It is a pretty significant problem. A handful of pound coins is likely to have a fake or two in it and in some areas they are a lot more common than that.

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Elon Musk takes wraps off planet-saving Model 3 vapourmobile

DaLo
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Re: Interesting - Just hope the dates match up.

" I live in the South West of England and if I were to buy one I'd have to travel to London to get it serviced!!"

Or Bristol, bit closer.

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How one developer just broke Node, Babel and thousands of projects in 11 lines of JavaScript

DaLo
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Re: Bloody stupid!

It's done so that large libraries will not need to be downloaded by each visitor to your site as many will already have the library cached from another site.

Therefore, especially for mobile devices, having the various versions of jquery already cached on your device (from visiting a different site which uses the same resource from a central repository) means a much quicker download of your webpage. It can also reduce latency as the CDN is likely to be closer to your users for global queries, reduces bandwidth from your server and helps avoid any browser (or server) limits with parallel requests.

Sites that do this should use fall back of course to serve locally if the CDN is not available. However, as for privacy most sites are using Google analytics any way and for all their worth Google servers are pretty secure (at least from randomers).

There is tradeoffs of course an in an ideal world people would just use specific functions they require written in a pure scripting language (or even just a markup language) and not use libraries at all to minimise bloat etc. However this is the real world and browsers are optimised to run libraries fast and developers are expected to belt out solutions at a high rate of knots.

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Adobe will track you across all your devices with new co-op project

DaLo
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Interesting theory but can't see it being that successful.

Firstly, most people use Google Analytics and Google don't let you track across devices even though they could in a moment and even go so far to ban any tracking (if you do it yourself using logins) using personally identifiable information.

Secondly it will require at least one of the co-ops that the visitor visits to be using a login so they can register the visitor as belonging to each device - and if a business has logins then they can generally do this anyway using any other analytics package such as Google's (for their own customers). Therefore why would they want to join just to allow others access to this?

All serious web professionals would like a way of summarizing user journeys across multiple devices but giving Adobe the keys to the data is not one that most would be willing to do (I hope).

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Hands on with the BBC's Micro:Bit computer. You know, for kids

DaLo
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Re: @DropBear

Given the article shows things like boxes with "microbit.bearing;" being dragged and dropped to put together a so-called program

From the article:

"... the Micro:Bit ships ready for four development systems."

"Entry level is Microsoft Blocks, which if you haven’t seen Scratch, is drag’n’drop flowcharts where kids simply assemble programs and fill in blanks."

"Microsoft TouchDevelop has been in schools for a while as a simple way to get kids started in mobile app development for Android and WinPhone. The feedback from teachers has been pretty good and again it is helpful and simple."

"Code Kingdom’s JavaScript is the next step towards real programming with the drag’n’drop interface to help kids think about algos more than syntax, but it allows students to move stepwise between simple-but-limited blocks to straight hardcore text-based coding."

"MicroPython can communicate with the host for interpreted debugging and development, which means Y7’s can get started on what are rapidly becoming the most common languages for teaching CompSci in schools (JavaScript and Python).

"As it’s based on ARM’s mBed platform it can also do C++, so the more advanced kids or adults can do hard stuff like drivers for new hardware."

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What to call a £200m 15,000-tonne polar vessel – how about Boaty McBoatface?

DaLo
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Re: Two things

You can see the publications who have just repackaged other news articles and not done proper research as they have all called it Usain Bolt rather than Usain Boat and not questioned why Usain Bolt would be an amusing name for a ship.

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DaLo
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Re: This is why everyone thinks students are w*****s

Well seeing as that suggestion was from the Communications Manager of The Independent Association of Prep Schools, James Hand, then does that add or detract weight from your theory?

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Power outage in Sheffield kills e-commerce at Insight UK

DaLo
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Re: A surge

Quite possibly a bad configuration on their servers and AC which meant that once power resumed they all automatically started up again rather than a phased start up.

All those motors, fans and spinning disks might have drawn too much current all at once causing the failsafes to kick in. This might have been interpreted as the power not stable/another outage and then not resumed until they figured it out later.

Just a guess...

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Data protection: Don't be an emotional knee jerk. When it comes to the law, RTFM

DaLo
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Re: ... this will validate EU/US data transfers once more...

The privacy shield has not been ratified and is still currently pending final approval.

Once it has it will then allow data transfers to the US as a trusted international nation similar to how Safe Harbour was previously accepted (i.e. as long as the US company follows the terms and abides by Privacy Shield then they can have data transferred to them rather than negotiating an individual contract).

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Open trucker comms lets Shodan snoops alter routes, tap CANs buses.

DaLo
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"He urges hackers to avoid probing active vehicles."

Yeah, that'll do it.

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Final Euro Parliament vote on passenger name records delayed

DaLo
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Re: But of course

Or what happens when your name is similar or the same as a known terrorist (or just mistakenly added) and you get stopped from taking your family on holiday and only find out at the airport? However you are not told why, given no right to appeal and may never be allowed to fly again.

http://edition.cnn.com/2015/12/07/politics/no-fly-mistakes-cat-stevens-ted-kennedy-john-lewis/

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Dell offers sweet, sweet, free honeypot tool to trap hungry hackers

DaLo
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Re: If this works as advertised, it will be incredibly useful.

Wouldn't encrypting the token stop it authenticating against AD? They'd have to run a decryption engine on your DC to pass through the token.

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Uncle Sam's boffins stumble upon battery storage holy grail

DaLo
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@Flashdunce: Tesla Hot Swap

"Or for car batteries, instead of charging there's the concept of hot-swapping - which might make the charge time moot for some drivers"

http://fortune.com/2015/06/10/teslas-battery-swap-is-dead/

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Toaster cooks network and burns 'expert' user's credibility to a crisp

DaLo
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Re: Sparky's Magic Fusebox

If you get overload on one of the circuits then the MCB will trip but it needs a very big overload to trigger it.

However each you will also usually have an RCD which will trip the whole CU if it detects an earthing fault or you decide to test if a wire is live with your tongue.

You could also have RCBOs, ELCBs, MCCBs etc in that equation as well.

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Like your iPhone, but not enough to touch it? This patent's for you

DaLo
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Re: WTF is this article talking about?

The paragraph from the reg does seem a bit strange...

"The firm pioneered touch for the masses with the iPhone, kicking to the curb earlier puny efforts from Microsoft with its tablets. However, touch on the iPhone is not multi-touch – that is, capable of taking input from more than one source, or person. Pinching and resizing a screen using just your fingertips doesn’t count as multi-touch."

Who says multi-touch has to be more than one scource. Multi-touch is defined by pretty much everyone as more than one point of contact, as DougS said. You can redefine to whatever you want such as saying "normal websites are not true websites, only theregister.co.uk is a true website", doesn't make it real until everyone else agrees with you.

Also, of course, the iPhone didn't pioneer touch for the masses. You could say that the iPhone pioneered a version of multi-touch that was used by 'the masses'*

*depending on your description of masses

However, in regards to DougS I would see that being able to distinguish between two different sources (people) is the claim. If two people point their fingers at a large ipad and move them apart the ipad will interpret that as "pinch to zoom", the same on android. Whereas detecting two different people would interpret it as two sources sliding their finger around independently. I'm guessing multiplayer gaming on a large surface is where it would help, although it could be simulated in software if each player controlled their own specific piece or were only able to play in a defined area of the board.

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Mall owner lays blame at Apple's door for dragging down sales

DaLo
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Jobs Halo

Re: Oh FFS !

I don't think you need to read an article or hack anything, F12 has always been available!

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DaLo
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Headmaster

Re: Mall landlords DO know tenant stores' sales

"...on insuring the reported sales are accurate"

Wow you can get insurance for anything nowadays.

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What's it like to work for a genius and Olympic archer who's mates with Richard Branson?

DaLo
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Especially in finance and accounts, use Excel for everything (I've even seen it suggested that it could be used for a location map, with all the cells reduced right down each of the hundreds of houses in an individual cell!)

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It killed Safe Harbor. Will Europe's highest court now kill off hyperlinks?

DaLo
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Re: Random someone....

Not sure you could be, unless you knew the intention was to rob your friend in which case there could be an aiding and abetting charge. Otherwise the person who would be held liable in law would be the robber, as they should be.

However that does raise an interesting law analogy. If the links are held in the same regard as aiding and abetting - i.e. if you knew, beyond reasonable doubt, they were pointing to 'illegal' material then you are aiding and abetting the 'criminal'. However if you would not reasonably know that or you had legitimate journalistic reasons (in the public interest) then you wouldn't.

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When customers try to be programmers: 'I want this CHANGED TO A ZERO ASAP'

DaLo
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Facepalm

Re: customized codebases

"Then the salesman persuaded Z that it would be a drop-in replacement for their existing system..."

No way, can't believe it. An honest, knowledgeable salesman promising the earth to get a sale and then letting the tech team/customer sort it out afterwards. Scandalous, never happened in the history of the earth.

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The monitor didn't work but the problem was between the user's ears

DaLo
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Facepalm

Re: Old IT joke

Yes, I've heard this joke many, many times...

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ICO says TalkTalk customers need to get themselves a lawyer

DaLo
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@Terry Re: Hold on a moment

"If I get pickpocketed in M&S I wouldn't expect them to reimburse me unless they could be somehow shown to have been less than diligent."

A better analogy... If you have to leave your wallet with M&S staff to shop at their store and then they put it in an unlocked and unguarded cupboard and someone steals it, would you expect them to reimburse you?

I know I would.

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Brit censors endure 10-hour Paint Drying movie epic

DaLo
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Coat

Is this the one starring Mark Wallberg?

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Retailers urged to create 'CCTV-like' symbol to inform customers of mobile tracking

DaLo
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"Can Apps override it? Does the OS override so as to check for updates etc?"

You think a standard app or the OS would override it and down the plane* just so it can check if there is any updates available?

"... is it tracking offline via GPS and/or other means (though very rare and too hard to do outside of the spooks/University experiments)."

Not hard at all, absolutely simple. I could put an app together to do that in about 15 minutes.

*yes, yes I know but those arguments aren't part of this post.

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Airbus, Boeing aero parts maker loses $54m in cyber-stick-up

DaLo
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Re: No surpirse...

You can't vet an employee for something they haven't done yet.

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Sainsbury's Bank web pages stuck on crappy 20th century crypto

DaLo
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EH? That report shows www.tescobank.com gets an 'A' rating. That is their banking domain.

Without the www they get an F but that just redirects you to the more secure www.tescobank.com.

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Unsolicited email?

DaLo
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Re: Unsolicited email?

Hmm, it could possibly be an e-mail I sent regarding corrections or in relation to the Register that I sent which went directly to his PC rather than bulk copying the El Reg DB.

I can't find one but I delete a lot of old mail.

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DaLo
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Unsolicited email?

So Lewis Page has left The Register?

I find out through an unsolicited group e-mail message from him. Not a massive deal but should individual authors (whether they were management/owner or not) have access to the e-mail database of El Reg users?

This seems like a DPA breach to me...

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Eight-billion-dollar Irish tax bill looms over Apple

DaLo
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Re: The cash

"Will the impact be seen by the citizens of Ireland?"

Yes, probably as all the tech companies close down and move to out-of-the-EU tax havens and all the staff lose their jobs.

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SlemBunk slamdunk: Mobile banking Trojans found worldwide

DaLo
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Re: Explain to me again...

This same attack could work equally well on a PC, in fact it would be easier on a PC.

The only difference is that 2FA could not be intercepted, however this wouldn't stop it happening. The banking app could stop this quite easily with different information for each customer presented on the login screen.

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Boffins switch on pinchfist incandescent bulb

DaLo
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Re: 'ere we go

But you could just use a low watt electric heater in the winter for the same effect but better efficiency. You then choose exactly when to have heat and when to have light and not have to compromise for the times you want one but not the other.

The light bulb is more likely to be radiating heat to parts of the ceiling than a ground level heater which will have a more convective airflow.

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DaLo
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Re: TCO?

Stronger LEDs (not 6w!) might have the "equivalent" in a narrow field underneath the bulb (they are very directional unless diffused), but the total amount of light given off will not be equivalent.

They are good at replacing GU10s or under cupboard lighting, less so for a single bulb in a lamp to light up a room.

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DaLo
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Re: TCO?

Efficiency is lumens per watt. Therefore a more efficient bulb either requires less power for the same light output or you get more light for the same output.

A bulb that is three times more efficient therefore needs a 1/3 of the power for the same light output. You now only need a 20w bulb to replace your existing 60w bulb.

The key is also "the same amount if light" - a regular 6w LED bulb will not produce the same amount of dispersed light as a 60w incandescent bulb at the moment.

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Open Web Application Security Project issues new secure coding bible

DaLo
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Re: Eureka

It is also rather easier to fix issues in code afterwards than fix a critical flaw with a bridge or a high-rise.

It's also easier to spot flaws in code as it doesn't have three layers of reinforced concrete poured over it.

(Not that I'm condoning post build security reviews, I believe all programmers should program securely at all times, the same way they're expected to write good, or efficient code)

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T-Mobile US boss John Legere calls bulls*** on video throttling claims

DaLo
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Re: It's not throttling

T-mobile throttle the bandwidth themselves. That is why you get buffering on the Hi Res video from YouTube when you start to play them and makes the experience a mess.

You connect at full bandwidth to YouTube and start getting a 1080p res video for instance. T-Mobile then decides to optimise this video and it does this using YouTube's bandwidth sensing system by throttling the link down to the level which forces Youtube to downgrade your video to 480p.

However during this process there is a time where Youtube is sending at 1080p and T-Mobile has throttled the bandwidth right down. Youtube keeps buffering as it thinks it is a blip (you started on a high bandwidth connection) and keeps trying before deciding that your pipe can't support it and so reduces the quality. It's a bad user experience.

This happens for everyone despite Youtube not being a partner and you possibly having unmetered bandwidth if you have' binge on' turned on.

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DaLo
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Re: Pink?

That is exactly what they do, see my post above.

"You connect at full bandwidth to YouTube and start getting a 1080p res video for instance. T-Mobile then decides to optimise this video and it does this using YouTube's bandwidth sensing system by throttling the link down to the level which forces Youtube to downgrade your video to 480p."

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Mozilla warns Firefox fans its SHA-1 ban could bork their security

DaLo
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Re: Isn't The Reg one Firefox iteration late?

https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1236975

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Brian Krebs criticises PayPal’s security as authentication flaws exposed

DaLo
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Re: The problem with entirely online companies....

Why could they not do one of the following:

Ask for the 2FA code

Call him back on his registered phone number

Ask for the last x Pay Pal transaction

Ask for his last login time/date

Mark his account as supervisor changes only with extra verification required

etc etc

Basically things that aren't public record.

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Google brews a fresh pot of Oracle's OpenJDK Java for future Android

DaLo
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Re: non-harmonious Harmony

It came down to copyright (and still is ongoing regarding copyright). Google were within their rights to use a derivative of an open source Java, Sun praised them for it. Oracle tried to sue for patent infringement and lost, they then turned to API copyright infringement and lost (with a pretty knowledgeable judge who happened to do a bit of programming so knew more than most judges). However on appeal it was sent back for review where it stands today - is using a public API a breach of copyright even if the software itself is open source?

Nearly everyone with any clue would say - in practical terms, of course not. However in the strictest definition of copyright, with no special exception written in for APIs then it comes down to the defence of fair use.

It's just a sham IBM didn't sue Oracle for SQL copyright infringement shortly after they used this defence.

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