* Posts by Uffish

537 posts • joined 28 Aug 2012

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Microsoft inserts 'new kind of computer ... into our cloud' for speedier Azure services

Uffish
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"...it’s a new kind of computer that’s been inserted into our cloud. That layer can do networking, it can do AI, it can do other things".

Microsoft script writers seem to be Terminator fans.

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FBI overpaid $999,900 to crack San Bernardino iPhone 5c password

Uffish
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Re: Fragile evidence...

... hence the 'price' of $1M on the FBI crack. "No-one else could have cracked the phone m'lud, it cost the FBI $1M to get a solution ..." Now of course the defence lawyer will say "Anyone could have cracked the phone m'lud, the solution only costs about $100".

The FBI has about $999,900 worth of egg on its face.

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Edward Snowden's 40 days in a Russian airport – by the woman who helped him escape

Uffish
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Re: "The judge doesn't prove anything"

Literally, of course, you are right - but it is the judge's court and he would detail and explain all relevant points to the jury before they decided on a verdict.

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Making us pay tax will DESTROY EUROPE, roars Apple's Tim Cook

Uffish
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Divide and Conquer

You can bet that the 'lobbyists' will be out in force throughout Europe picking and scrabbling at any and all signs of unity.

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Missing Milky Way mass blown away by bingeing supermassive black hole

Uffish
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Re: "dark matter"

I know that you were just simplifying current ideas but you do realize that your statement also perfectly describes 'nothing at all'.

I shall try the idea of 'Dark Money' on my bank manager.

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Uffish
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Re: just a horizon.

I think of it as a bit more than just a horizon. It's the point where you shriek "Belgium" with your last breath in this universe.

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Stop lights, sunsets, junctions are tough work for Google's robo-cars

Uffish
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Re: Roundabouts...

What you have to understand is that the Arc de Triomphe roundabout has a different rule than most, but not all, roundabouts in France. It's the old rule, superseded for most but not all French roads - 'priorité à droit'. That and not loosing your no claims bonus.

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North Korea unveils its home-grown Netflix rival – Manbang

Uffish
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Re: Only 50 odd years behind the curve

Taken from a random French ski accessories website "Fart de base liquide pour le fartage..." and "VOLA Fart rouge 200 g. Pour les skieurs recherchant une optimisation du fart..."

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Paper mountain, hidden Brexit: How'd you say immigration control would work?

Uffish
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Re: "The problem..."

You might also wish to have your cake and eat it too.

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Uffish
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Re: Afghans.

"They won't be losing any rights." So you say, and in an ideal world that is what would happen.

It would be wise to remember that Britain is geographically an integral part of Europe and economically, culturally and politically always has been. All European nations have schemed against and fought with other European countries and all European countries think that they are 'special' and not like the others.

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Uffish
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If it all goes pear shaped...

... and Little England (and Little Wales) succeed in really pissing off all their neighbours I guess I will be turfed out of my peaceful retirement near Paris and have to come home (you can't stop me I have a British passport and no other nationality).

Then you will see how really annoying an immigrant to the UK can be and you will long for the peaceful, hard working Poles and Afghans.

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Uffish
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Re: two goals clear to win

In football ok, in tennis for example after a deuce score you need to win two points more than your opponent (in advantage scoring).

Horses for courses.

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Kaspersky launches its own OS on Russian routers

Uffish
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Re: Secure router, vulnerable SCADA & ICS behind ?

If I was a high-up in the Russian Telecoms Ministry I would have constant nightmares about other countries creeping and crawling round the Russian networks and would be very happy to have a solution to the problem. (Even if it were only a partial solution).

Computers in factories etc would be a problem for the Industry Ministry.

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Science Museum maths gallery to offer the perfect pint

Uffish
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The first transatlantic flight...

Four seaplanes and 53 ships were involved in the Curtis 'crossing" which took a total of 23 days and six stops (USA to UK). As Wikipedia succinctly puts it: "The accomplishment of the naval aviators of the NC-4 was somewhat eclipsed in the minds of the public by the first nonstop transatlantic flight, which took 15 hours, 57 minutes, and was made by the Royal Air Force pilots John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown, two weeks later." (Dominion of Newfoundland and Labrador to UK).

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'I found the intern curled up on the data centre floor moaning'

Uffish
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Re: God I hate lawyers!!

@ usbac

Don't we all, but now you have the 'summa cum laude' distinction of having lawyers that hate you !

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Hey, turn down that radio, it's alien season and we're hunting aliens

Uffish
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Re: Low, very high, frequencies

The radioastronomy boffins say that useful results from terrestrial observations have been obtained at frequencies from 2 MHz to 1 000 GHz and above.

All I suggested is that they should use the appropriate ITU band designation (VHF) instead of writing the first thing that came into their heads.

After all it is the ITU that coordinates the world-wide protection from terrestrial interference for the radioastronomy frequencies.

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Uffish
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Re: I for one

And I for one would like to ask them, or one of their boffin friends, why they call it the Low Frequency Array when it operates in the VHF band (Very High Frequency).

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Google tells Android's Linux kernel to toughen up and fight off those horrible hacker bullies

Uffish
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Re: Because [technical reasons].

I can understand that quick and easy update solutions were not included when the phones were designed, but can the manufacturer's understand that one way or another we pay good money for their products and would probably prefer something that doesn't go rancid after a couple of years.

Throw-away is just so last year dontcha know.

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Russia reports RAT scurrying through govt systems, chewing data

Uffish
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Re: No the US

You got an upvote for that?

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A glass of soda-and-lime is the straight dope for graphene

Uffish
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Re: Bah!

It's the cumulative effect of all the irrational numbers they have to deal with

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Maxthon web browser blabs about your PC all the way back to Beijing

Uffish
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Re: US First Amendment

Why are you wittering on about the first amendment to some scrap of eighteenth century parchment when the article was about a browser phoning home (in this case to China)?

It's not about politics, it's about privacy.

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Uffish
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Dark Side of the Moon

It's a prism - as in PRISM.

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Uffish
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US First Amendment

So you are saying that my browser can say what it likes about me as long as it was born in the USA?

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Africa's MeerKAT looks at the sky, surprises boffins with 1,300 galaxies

Uffish
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Comparethemeerkat.com

For J.R.Hartley's downvoters - I can only suppose that you haven't had the pleasure of watching all the adverts for the insurance etc comparison website Comparethemarket.com.

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New Mars rover is GO for 2020 says NASA

Uffish
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Re: Surely that's a Mars shattering kaboom...

Only if there isn't an Earth shattering kaboom first.

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Extortion trojan watches until crims find you doing something dodgy

Uffish
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Crims send email to your family...

Which is of course believed, especially when you have a copy of their original blackmailing emails.

May I volunteer for the team developing honeypots for this trojan, should be fun.

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Google on piracy: We really, really care

Uffish
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Mantra

To quote the NYTimes:-

To quote the U.S. Supreme Court opinion in the recent Hobby Lobby case: "Modern corporate law does not require for-profit corporations to pursue profit at the expense of everything else, and many do not."

So Google, "Why ya doin' it"?

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Tesla whacks guardrail in Montana, driver blames autopilot

Uffish
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From the Tesla press release...

"Model S is designed to keep getting better over time. The latest software update, 7.0 allows Model S to use its unique combination of cameras, radar, ultrasonic sensors and data to automatically steer down the highway, change lanes, and adjust speed in response to traffic. Once you’ve arrived at your destination, Model S scans for a parking space and parallel parks on your command."

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New ISS crew will spend their time bombarding computers with radiation

Uffish
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Roughly the size

Just looked up the dimensions of the ISS and had a big surprise - it's three dimensional, as opposed to rugby, world (except US) football, and US football pitches.

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Prominent Brit law firm instructed to block Brexit Article 50 trigger

Uffish
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Re: "... and worry about the legalities later..."

That would be fun, I can see the adverts "Have you been forcibly repatriated? Phone Gribble and Gribble for a free application form and join the thousands benefiting from the European Court of Human Rights ruling...".

But I expect that I will stay in France as a British citizen, shame really, I could do with some free money.

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fMRI bugs could upend years of research

Uffish
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Re: You can kick instruments

Point taken but consider a multi-million pound telescope, if it ends up taking a photo of the wrong galaxy it is probably the fault of the software in the pointing mechanism but it is still the telescope that is malfunctioning and I bet the telescope operators take a few calibration photos now and again just for a reality check.

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Uffish
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Re: Where's the problem?

I agree - but what is a 'proper' baseline scan (or set of scans)? Totally MRI ignorant nerds would like to know.

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Uffish
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Re: Good science

No, it's bad science. The measuring instruments were all (?) badly calibrated. With all due respect to the people involved in the experiments, they didn't check their equipment properly.

That's a problem nowadays, you get a big shiny beige box with knobs on it and you think it must be outputting the truth. Well it ain't necessarily so and the shiny beige box will always need some sort of calibration validation traceable back to something real, not just something repeatable.

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Last panel in place, China ready to boot up giant telescope

Uffish
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Re: radar

I'm now searching for an envelope for some careful calculations for maximum target distance before the whole antenna has rotated too far by the time the echo gets back.

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IT consultant gets 4 years' porridge for tax fraud

Uffish
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Re: Minimum of ten years

Long jail sentences are mostly a complete waste of taxpayers' money. Prosecute the lawmakers instead, you know it makes sense.

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'Leave EU means...' WHAT?! Britons ask Google after results declared

Uffish
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English

Unware is like vapourware, only more blatant - think Project Plan and Budget Estimates for Post Brexit Negotiations.

Communty is a county sized area containing lots of teepees and yurts.

Do keep up.

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Mandarins plotted to water down EU data protection regs

Uffish
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Re: Big government is watching you

May I be the first to welcome our new British overlords!

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Three non-obvious reasons to Vote Leave on the 23rd

Uffish
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Re: So where is the post to balance this out?

"don't put it past the French especially to put all sorts of hurdles in the way of people"

or remove them perhaps, especially around Calais.

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Uffish
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Re: "cheaper pound means more affordable exports"

Sir, so why hasn't the Bank of England already been ordered to cheapen the pound?

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Astroboffins discover rapid 'electric winds' blowing on Venus

Uffish
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Re: Planetary electric field?

First, it's current that produces magnetic fields not voltage. I suppose you could nevertheless get a reasonable current flowing, somehow.

Second, varying magnetic fields induce voltages/currents in conductors including any ionized parts of the atmosphere and, I suppose, the core of Mars which used to produce a magnetic field before it stopped. You may or may not want to include some form of current stabilisation.

Third. That's it really, nothing to it, good luck with the build ! (Less sarcastically, I believe such a project to be permanently ruled out on cost / benefit grounds).

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Major Tim Peake comes home to a gastronaut's Sunday roast

Uffish
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Re: Can someone fill me in...

https://principia.org.uk/the-mission/experiments-in-space/

That's a list of some of what he was doing and I would imagine that the full documentation of his work program would have a mass considerably higher than that of Tim Peake. Also, I imagine that he followed the work plan, or if not, the fully approved and vetted, modified work plan. So he did what his bosses wanted.

I only saw a couple of 360° flips and a clip from a live question and answer session where he 'disappeared' - it went down well with the school kids.

All in all, "mission accomplished" I think.

The UK has finally decided to play a bigger part in the space business, I'm very impressed that we have, for once, got back to some joined-up government thinking.

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Meet the 1,000 core chip that can be powered by an AA battery

Uffish
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Re: missing and broken links

Try typing in "Glasgow university 1000 core fpga" into Startpage. It was the first result when I tried it.

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You lucky creatures! Mammals only JUUUST survived asteroid that killed dinosaurs

Uffish
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Re: Nope, nope, nope.

Your ten-year-old has a fine grip on reality and is to be congratulated.

I'd suggest that you move to the UK to escape the intelligent designers (or whoever they are) but you would only provoke a mindless storm over immigrants coming here to steal our welfare so, happy reading.

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Non-US encryption is 'theoretical,' claims CIA chief in backdoor debate

Uffish
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Re: Prohibition in the United States

I quote from the United States Prohibition article in the ultimate online cribsheet "Within a week after Prohibition went into effect, small portable stills were on sale throughout the country".[

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Patent trolls, innovation and Brexit: What the FT won't tell you

Uffish
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Re: Is 4 days enough....

To play the devil's advocate, it seems the examiners do an automated search for prior art and send the top ten results to the applicant’s attorney. Three or four iterations of this procedure will have most of the work done by the applicant's attorney at the applicant's expense.

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Microsoft's paid $60 per LinkedIn user – and it's a bargain, because we're mugs

Uffish
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Re: Probably it is just another very unethical tax optimization

On the other hand, I just looked up the Wikipedia article on GEC UK (not to be confused with GE). It starts off: "The General Electric Company, or GEC, was a major UK-based industrial conglomerate...) and gets progressively sadder as you read on.

GEC was a company with more money than sense. Seems to me that MS is similar.

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One entire US spook base: Yours for $1m+

Uffish
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Re: Security

But if you look closely you'll find that the all rural sites are guarded by special MOD killer sheep.

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Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image. Repeat. Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image

Uffish
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Re: Oh grow up.

"They are at it again" said my wife passing over her laptop. The umpteenth +1 pop-up said "Would you like to do something we know you don't want to do - now, or this evening".

And you talk about 'growing up'?

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Samsung: Don't install Windows 10. REALLY

Uffish
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Re: vendors writing drivers...

Why write drivers for older equipment when all it does with any certainty is bolster the profits of Microsoft.

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LISA Pathfinder free fall test beats expectations

Uffish
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Re: "Nothing is holding the blocks in place..."

Don't the 2kg blocks attract each other ? I seem to remember a school science experiment with lead canon balls and a miniature dumbbell hung from a thread, it certainly gave the appearance of showing gravitational attraction.

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