* Posts by mikeinnc

7 posts • joined 28 Aug 2012

No FTTH under alternative Oz NBN plan, says Oppn. leader

mikeinnc
Happy

Re: Nice writing Richard...

Actually, I think it is demeaning of the village idiot........

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The NBN questions Malcolm Turnbull won't answer

mikeinnc
FAIL

Why we will never get an answer.

The answers to these questions are insignificant. The whole plan is a huge deception; a giant scam to convince voters that the LNP will 'do something' about 'broadband'. As a communications policy, it is a complete dud. A non-starter. There are so many holes in the plan that blind freddy could drive a truck through it. The only conclusion is that if the LNP gain power, they will immediately find myriad excuses why the continuation of any sort of Government plan for a communications upgrade is not possible (and, no doubt, most of them will involve horror stories about the 'unbelievable levels of hidden debt left behind.....'). NBN Co will be sold at fire-sale prices to Telstra, who will do the bare minimum in those areas where there is the greatest profitability. The Australian consumer will be stuffed for a couple of generations - and Turnbull will walk off into the sunset, clutching his brown paper bag full of used banknotes, courtesy of Telstra, completely disillusioned with the Abbot antics but confident in the knowledge that his shares in France Telecom are doing very nicely, thank you.....

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Coalition's NBN plan: where's the cost of the copper?

mikeinnc
FAIL

The actual costs are insignificant. The whole plan is a huge deception; a giant scam to convince voters that the LNP will 'do something' about 'broadband'. As a communications policy, it is a complete dud. A non-starter. There are so many holes in the plan that blind freddy could drive a truck through it. The only conclusion is that Turnbull is - again - lying through his teeth. If the LNP gain power, they will immediately find myriad excuses why the continuation of any sort of Government plan for a communications upgrade is not possible (and, no doubt, most of them will involve horror stories about the 'unbelievable levels of hidden debt left behind.....'). NBN Co will be sold at fire-sale prices to Telstra, who will do the bare minimum in those areas where there is the greatest profitability. The Australian consumer will be stuffed for a couple of generations - and Turnbull will walk off into the sunset, clutching his brown paper bag full of used banknotes, courtesy of Telstra, completely disillusioned with the Abbot antics but confident in the knowledge that his shares in France Telecom are doing very nicely, thank you.....

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Australia's alternative NBN plan: some taxpayer-friendly questions

mikeinnc

Re: I have a question

Strychnine might be one suggestion. They are certainly brain dead.

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Opposition leader raises ‘your Internet will cost you more’ spook

mikeinnc

Re: Let's be clear about this

"...our kids are going to wonder why they have a fibre network which provides speed in abundance but is sold as a scarce resource."

So this is a reason not to build it? Might I suggest from your comments, you have a very warped, obscure and hopelessly confused attitude to technology. Oh, and by the way, can you please advise all the readers what these other "justifiable" technologies might be? I'm sure we'd all like to buy shares in them.....and, BTW, I've a nice bridge in Sydney you might be interested in.

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mikeinnc
Unhappy

Let's be clear about this

What seems to be so conveniently forgotten in all these arguments is that the NBN is NOT just about speed. Indeed, one of the biggest problems is that this has become the mantra by which it is judged. There is no doubt we are living with a telephone network that is at 2 minutes to midnight in terms of its useful life. And,

note my careful use of the word 'telephone' That's what the copper network was designed for, and by some marvellous and very clever technology, we have managed to overlay a data network on top of it. But, have no doubt - we are virtually at the end of technological development on copper as it exists in the telephone environment.

The NBN - itself an unfortunate choice of name, since it really is a National Communications Network - is designed to replace the dying copper network. It is a replacement program - replace the dying copper with fibre that will probably see three or four generations of use. To be effective and efficient, this needs to be done in a ubiquitous fashion. It will not be either effective nor efficient - and certainly will be far more costly - to do this in a piecemeal fashion. The value of the NBN comes from doing it once, and doing it with fibre. It is like taking the plunge to buy a new car when the old one is 20 years old. Sure, you can buy a new engine;

buy a new gearbox; buy new steering components because the old ones have worn out. You will keep it on the road, but at what price? And, when do you get to a point that it is more cost effective to buy a new one. Now that new one will almost certainly be 'faster' than the old - but was that really why you bought it? Probably not!

The lack of foresight; the petty politics and the sheer selfishness of the NBN detractors is staggering. This isn't about us - today's' generation. It is about tomorrow's, and the one after and the one after that. Our kids and grandkids will look back with despair if we don't do it - and Australia as a country will be so much the poorer as our Asian neighbours overtake us in the digital future.

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NBN zealotry in the ultra-high definition age

mikeinnc

FTTN Speed

In your article you suggest that ... "FTTN and wireless are both touted as capable of delivering around 100 Mbits/s to each end user as soon as or faster than it will be possible to install near-universal FTTP."

I think you grossly misunderstand the speeds that FTTN - and wireless - are capable of. FTTN is more likely to offer a top download speed of about 75Mbps - and that only if the copper tails from the cabinet are less than 500m long AND the VDSL is used. However, VDSL requires two pairs of wires - most all premises in Australia only have one, and do you seriously believe we should be laying new copper cables in 2012? So, given the NIMBY situation of where the fridge sized, air-conditioned cabinets will be placed as well as the dire shortage of acceptable copper pairs, top speeds of some 30Mbps are more likely. In fact, many subscribers would only see a 20% increase on current ADSL2+ speeds. The other issue that is NEVER discussed - because it just knocks FTTN into the outfield is upload speed. Currently, the HUGE limitation on cloud computing is the paltry upload speed - often well below 1Mbps on ADSL. On FTTN, this might rise to 5Mbps if you are VERY lucky. FTTP has no such physical limitation. The upload speed may be limited by the ISP for marketing or financial reasons, but there isn't any physical limitation. Most consumers would die for a 25Mbps upload! Wireless is another issue. Unless you were next to the transmitter, with a point to point link, you will be lucky to see 25Mbps! No, sorry - given the small incremental cost of installing FTTP now instead of FTTN now and FTTP within ten years, and given the ubiquitous and certain nature of the resulting network speeds, all the FTTN arguments fade into obscurity.

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