* Posts by Ragequit

103 posts • joined 26 Aug 2012

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Starbucks denies mobile app hack, blames careless customers

Ragequit
Devil

Starbucks could have taken a different tone with that statement. Better to say they're looking into it and offer security best practices than flat out deny anything is happening on their end. Just because they didn't detect it doesn't mean there wasn't a vector they didn't consider...

@yoganmahew - Two bit dongle? Sir, I'm not sure if you should be waving that around in public.

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Japan showcases really, really fast … whoa, WTF was that?!

Ragequit

Re: It would be great...

Sadly you're probably right. That a small country with crowded cities like Japan could manage to do so while the US... /sigh. Two words come to mind. First word circle. Hah, but I don't want to be a jerk.

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Verizon FLICKS FINGER at Netflix with skinny à la carte-style TV package for fibre munchers

Ragequit

Business as usual then...

It's hard to say for sure without knowing the specifics of their FiOS service (don't know the slowest speed on offer) but it seems to me they are offering pretty much the same price point cable networks always have for "basic" cable. The devil is in the details (no mention of HD, number of devices, streaming to PC, etc). But it's certainly not what I'd call a la carte when they are doing channel packs more or less like they've always done. The only change is probably from a cablebox to an IP based streamer. I know, I know. That's the point of the article. Just never ceases to amaze me that these cable companies believe their own tripe.

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In Barcelona, no one can hear you scream ... HTC, Valve unleash Giger-inspired VR headgear

Ragequit
Devil

Hololens isn't VR...it's AR..

But rather than quibble over semantics I'm rather underwhelmed at all the hardware announcements. I agree that VR/AR both have great potential but am disheartened that nobody really seems to be talking about truly harnessing that potential. I roll my eyes at video watching (at least the 2D projected into 3D affair). Everyone's very quick to adapt current content into VR/AR, but very few are considering how to make something from the ground up tailored to it. At least in the near term. I would argue that these tailored experiences need to be available at launch for success. But I suppose that's a bit of a chicken and the egg thing. Content types don't want to invest in unproven (and low marketshare) kit and the kit needs content to drive marketshare.

That all said I'm really wondering if this so called partnership with Valve is much like the clumsy (non) launch of the Steamboxes. Piston? claimed they were Valve partners too. But in the end it seems valve likes to court hardware manufacturers with little care for real commitment. Unless Valve themselves announce this partnership I'm a little dubious.

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Now Samsung's spying smart TVs insert ADS in YOUR OWN movies

Ragequit

I'm guessing...

they are inserting the ads via the video codec itself. It would make sense that third party apps would be effected then. So basically the "error" is a design flaw in which they didn't consider that more than just their internal apps are dependent on the codec. Either that or they really were stupid enough to think people would accept it.

(Oh, I guess this article doesn't mention the 3rd party angle. I read that elsewhere.)

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Air gaps: Happy gas for infosec or a noble but inert idea?

Ragequit

A layered approach...

"It isn't all physical, however. Organisations should implement security controls on air gap machines as if it were connected to the internet, a move Sokorski and Dudu say could help knock-out some of the laboratory attacks."

The above was the first thing to come to mind when I started reading this article. I mean even without air gaps per say you can have any number of devices attached to your PCs or network. No one security technique is the end all be all. Even when it comes to physical security. Therefore you need a layered approach and some vigilance.

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Linux kernel set to get live patching in release 3.20

Ragequit

Just because it's in the main line kernel doesn't mean that it will be turned on by default in all distro's. More than likely it will be tunable via one or many kernel options during compile. So if there are security concerns in some use cases you can just turn it off.

At any rate it sounds good to me in theory. We'll have to see how it does in practice.

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Boffins turn nano-wires into their OWN thermometers

Ragequit
Joke

Good news everyone!

I've invented a way to create a processor that runs so hot it will melt through the earths mantle and kill us all!

(I know it's just the opposite. I remember when they claimed moore's law predicted processors that ran hotter than the inside of a nuclear reactor...)

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US plots to KILL hackers – with bureaucracy!

Ragequit
Facepalm

Right, so...

Sea-Stick will be about as useful against zero-days as a windows internet security package. Meanwhile they'll have legal grounds to slurp up all sorts of consumer data for the greater wood... err good.

"CTIIC will also hook up different arms of the government, pulling in intelligence from everyone and then act as a source of information for all."

Ah, so a prime target for any and all hackers then. 50 cents says there will be at least phishing attacks within the first 6 months of operation. If communication isn't done via email then it will be watering hole attacks against any related websites. Or some intern will send off a copy of a few million consumer database records.

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Fraudsters make bank as exec wires $17 MEELLION to China

Ragequit
Facepalm

It never ceases to amaze me...

Just how quick people are to trust and not question communication. If a stranger walks up to you and tries to convince you of something most often you have *some* level incredulity until they identify themselves in some way. But when it comes to phone calls, mail, and email people are largely defenseless. Even then one simple bit of information is usually enough to disarm those who are leery. Oh, they know my bosses name, what equipment we use in the office, or they used an official looking letterhead/graphic.

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$10,000 Ethernet cable promises BONKERS MP3 audio experience

Ragequit
Joke

!

What a value!! At first I thought for sure this was merely a 1-3m cable. But 12m?! That's less than a grand a meter!

An audiophile would want uncompressed audio and would probably rather spend the money on a really nice DAC.

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Forget robo-butlers – ROBO-MAIDS! New hotel staffed by slave-droids

Ragequit
Joke

Re: Why just butlers?

So long as the don't have ghosts we should be safe. Lets start with construction drones before we start putting so called cyberbrains in them shall we? I don't like the idea of bots that can bend girders deciding they'd rather bend humans.

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UK boffins DOUBLE distance of fiber data: London to New York WITHOUT a repeater

Ragequit
Joke

Cool

Cool. Now if they could only do the reverse. That is reduce the effective range but increase the bandwidth/channels. Then maybe cable companies would offer higher speeds... oh wait.. no they'd probably just put twice as many households on a single fiber run. Nvm.

Seriously though I understand how having to use repeaters for anything can be a pain for a number of reasons. I imagine especially so for underwater cables.

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Valve set for OpenGL BIG REVEAL at upcoming conference

Ragequit

I'm hopeful

Pretty much any graphics hardware that has drivers for linux already has support for OpenGL. A lot of the newer desktop environments use 3D support. Even if the proprietary drivers lag behind in supporting this NextGL there's hope that the community drivers will. If valve is successful in creating even a small gaming community with the SteamOS I don't see why ATI/Nvidia wouldn't support it if it means more hardware sales.

Ultimately this sounds like an effort to make opengl compete with the DirectX optimizations and mantle. We don't need something vendor specific like mantle. Having an opensource alternative that any vendor can use is better, imo.

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Who's come to fix your broadband? It may be a Fed in disguise. Without a search warrant

Ragequit

Re: Very slippery slope...

Touche. I might have jumped the gun a bit. It's easy to be overly sensitive with the feds so quick to abuse their powers for everything. And as you say they could have intercepted the service call.

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Ragequit
Devil

Re: Still Better than Comcast

1) Contractor resets the modem. No luck.

2) Contractor resets your off the shelf firewall. Nope. -Or-

2) Contractor looks around in confusion completely unaware that you can in fact roll your own firewall. Aka he's staring at the PC you've setup as a firewall and he's treating it like alien technology. No Dice.

3) Contractor phones in and asks them to reprovision the line while ineffectually messing with diagnostic software on his laptop that reports that there is nothing wrong with the line. He's stumped and tells you he'll have to escalate your ticket up to his manager and lets himself out.

I think this is 90% of major ISP's these days. It once took me three service calls to a cable provider over two weeks before they finally sent out an actual employee who ran a completely new line from the street to the house. It fixed my latency and dropped packets... for a while.

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Ragequit

Very slippery slope...

Still the ring leader's mistake was letting the fake technician in to the house. It's a worrisome trend but anyone with a bit of common sense is going to be suspicious of any utility or service proactively dispatching a repairman to a home. I mean it's an uphill battle to even get someone out in the same week. Though most of the time you're simply told that there's a service outage in your area.

I wonder if the guy had refused them access if they would have stood down? Or would they have forced their way in? I wonder if the intended precedence is for hotels only and not private residences? Well they probably had no intended distinction.

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Singapore wants nation-wide internet of things, hold the internet

Ragequit
Joke

My money is on..

Someone getting lazy and putting unprotected wifi on the private network to ease administration... However well planned the air gap is I have a feeling the network will find a way ;)

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Microsoft takes lid off .Net Common Language Runtime sauce

Ragequit

I'm thinking...

Either there is a play here to get business to their own cloud offering and/or they are planning on porting their backend server software to linux/bsd. If they did the later then developers could build against MS licensed software/tools and no matter where the code ran they could would get some license revenue. Making the runtime/api stack opensource makes it possible for the binaries to be available in a distro's repositories? That way any cloud service provider wouldn't have much in the way of extra work to provide the MS stack that their server software would presumably run on? I'm just guessing though.

I still don't think they'll be all that successful at it, but at least it kinda makes sense in that context.

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Adobe and software pals haul Forever 21 to court over piracy allegations

Ragequit
Joke

Forever 21 - "It was a youthful indiscretion."

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Why Windows 10 on Raspberry Pi 2? Upton: 'I drank the Kool-Aid'

Ragequit
Joke

Security...

Well in this case maybe he's right. After windows 10 is loaded there won't be enough ram left to load the latest malware platform...

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Tango UP – Google graduates 3D tablet from the labs

Ragequit
FAIL

Re: OH LOOK, A COOL DEVICE!

Oh, great, fondleslab voyeurism while fondling your own bits? I'd not take that iFad into the facilities with you unless you want google indexing *that* as well.

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Ragequit
Joke

Re: If I had to make a guess as to it's use..

Yes, but does it include the 3D model of that waitress you've had your eye on? Or the interior of her workplace from your favorite table?

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Ragequit

If I had to make a guess as to it's use..

One would be to dynamically construct game 3D environments for use in both AR and VR. In the later case it could help VR users keep their spatial awareness without breaking the immersion of a virtual world. For the former it's a rather necessary step in superimposing graphics onto the real world.

There are some technical hurdles I'm not sure if they've sorted out. One being pathfinding for AI in VR. When a 3D landscape can be created in advance, pathing can be tested as well. I imagine procedurally generated worlds face some AI problems as well but the real world is harder since it doesn't follow an easily definable set of rules. Though some of the tech from self driving vehicles could be applied here. Which google obviously has experience with.

Though I suppose Tango could also be used to crowed source the generation of 3D models of.. well the entire earth given enough time. A 1:1 scale replica of the entire earth updated in near realtime? Kinda scary as much as it is neat.

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Intel brings Broadwell to businesses with 5th-gen Core chips with vPro

Ragequit

Re: Wake me up..

Oh, don't get me wrong I do think the pace at which we arrived at something so small is quite an achievement. I don't know if it just comes with age or if I've gotten a bit cynical about cat video upgrades. Probably both. It's just a shame that we're slow to come up with ideas on how to use it all.

Which is ironic because I sit here and look forward to graphene, silicene, and a bunch of other tech that blurs the lines of traditional hardware. But what will I be doing with such tech if it ever comes out? Playing games, managing data, and watching cat videos.... faster.

...or maybe I'll be losing touch with reality using AR gear that has processing power that rivals today's super computers and runs off a battery that lasts 150 years between zero point energy recharges.

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Ragequit
Pint

Wake me up..

Wake me up when the 14nm low power SoC chips roll off the line. Or I suppose when mainstream Intel Mb's and processors have enough PCI-e lanes to have more than a couple slots. Cheap LPDDR4 would be an added bonus but that's not intel.

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You must have at least 8 inches for Windows 10 to go all the way

Ragequit
Joke

Microsoft is having a mid life crises so it's no wonder they're obsessed with size. I'm sure they'll be bagging on about having the largest fondleslabs in the industry any day now. They'll have some luxury or sports car manufacturer design it for them. Sadly it will only come in canary yellow and pink.

Seriously though I doubt MS has any intention of making the UI type user selectable. It's these arbitrary classifications of kit that let them charge a premium for certain use cases. I mean heaven forbid uses an inexpensive 7" fondleslab to run desktop apps when they can charge you considerably more for 1" more? lol. I'm honestly not sure if that's the case but I wouldn't find it surprising. Wouldn't be the first time.

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A docket, tweet and selfie can reveal your identity, boffins find

Ragequit
Joke

"2) These days if you're not on FB, Twitter, etc. then sadly that means you are probably on some "and here's a list of all the 'weirdos' who chose not to register for some reason"

See!? Now photographs do more than just steal your soul!

Seriously though anyone with enough time and resources could identify anyone. It's just social media makes it so anyone with little time nor money can identify someone. Though group photos (the kind that friends/family are likely to post on social media) are less of a concern as it does not help to establish a one to one correlation. Candid photos taken by a stalker could certainly establish a correlation in a dataset. Fortunately it would require 4 or more photos. Unfortunately your stalker probably posted 100's. Fortunately (or unfortunately) they'll probably make their presence know sooner or later and then you'll know your privacy has been compromised in more ways than one.

This topic is food for thought but at the end of the day it just means people will be even more paranoid about gps tracking on their own devices.

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Ragequit

I had to skim thru the original paper to get the gist of it. All data was anonymous except for the photo's. Basically you can be stalked by using gps/time data on photos and correlating that into any other dataset that has time and location. The more photos you have the better. Anyway I don't think this is really a new concept. It's just someone bothered to the math behind it. Though depending on the precision of the data I don't think you can necessarily be 100% accurate. What if you were on vacation and shopping with a friend? If you didn't buy anything but took pictures of the places your friend did you would get a false positive. All you can prove is that the pictures were taken at the same general time/place as the credit card purchases?

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Hey, America. Canada's watchdog just slapped net neutrality rules on wireless internet

Ragequit
Joke

I'm tired of this heat anyways. Time to move up north methinks.

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Windows 10 heralds the MINECRAFT-isation of Microsoft

Ragequit

Re: A Stretch...

I'll admit having a bias against expensive development tools. I often found that features that automated any aspect of my job actually created more work at the end of the day. That said I've not looked at embarcadero's products. Though I had a chuckle when I read that they bought Interbase from borland. For better or worse I had some experience dealing with a custom application written on top of Interbase a long time ago.

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Ragequit

A Stretch...

I'm sorry but I think kids mining pixelated blocks in minecraft to data mining is a bit of a stretch. Other than both having the word "mining" in common. I appreciate that what the author was probably pointing out how these tools would be interfaced but I'm still not convinced (putting aside that the original minecraft didn't have motion controls). While I believe AR like the hololens and presumably magic leap will have some very cool, very real applications. I'm not convinced that it will be seen as a fit for all business use cases for the foreseeable future.

For one some of the very complaints about Google Glass apply to hololens. Even moreso as it can truly obstruct your vision from what testers have claimed. Even if you're not using it outside I don't think this is tech you'll be using in cubicle farms unless you find watching your coworkers stumble over furniture and themselves funny.

But the biggest bottleneck as always is adoption and I don't mean simply units sold. Who is going to build the databases and SQL queries that these data mining tools expose visually? Who's going to take the extra time to identify and group every element of a 3D design so that someone in management can take it apart like a jigsaw puzzle? The point is data in any form isn't going to magically format itself to adapt to our new 3D visualization hardware. It's an investment that will pay off in some areas and not in others. Despite the cool factor.

*edit* On a second read I realized that I failed to detect the sarcasm the first time.

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FCC will vote to cut off 41 million broadband users this Thursday*

Ragequit

Re: people don't need

I remember running a BBS on a 2400 Baud Modem and watching someone logging in with a 300 Baud modem with the username "Speedy"... It's sad when you could sometimes type faster than the modem could transfer the terminal session. We've come a very long way speed wise.

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

Let's be clear, everyone: DON'T BLOCK Wi-Fi, DUH – FCC official ruling

Ragequit
Joke

Gov't - "Only *we* can block or hijack Wifi!"

This has some potential unintended consequences. If everyone has their own hotspots in a hotel wouldn't you have some serious issues with overlapping channels? Plus it increases the risk of the technically challenged using rogue wifi networks that infect their machines with malware.

Don't get me wrong I don't think what the hotels were doing is right but I think there might be some other issues to consider. Not that the FCC or hotels are the solution.

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BOO! Grave remote-code exec flaw in GNU C Library TERRIFIES Linux

Ragequit
Facepalm

oO for the record that was not sarcasm. Read ars article on this and even ignoring the hype they are a little misleading with the facts. i.e. while it is true that lots of software was found to use this call and might be vulnerable they do not mention that the researchers *have* tested them and have not found a working exploit.

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Ragequit

Lol I read about this on another site that certainly gave this a completely different spin. Good to see that El Reg has their facts straight.

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INTERNET of STUFF: Google to replace old Dropcams for $0.00

Ragequit
Joke

I don't particularly like Google or MS but El Reg seems to be on Google's back these days. /Shrug When MS repeatedly tries to be Google most of the press seems to focus on if it can succeed. Nobody seems to question if we really want another Google built entirely on closed source software. To be fair there's plenty of google's stack that is obscured from us. Still people love free stuff and until they stop loving free stuff there will be companies like Google.

I'm also surprised that there isn't more trepidation at the idea of Google Fiber... Guess people really love their free stuff really fast too.

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Some Androids can be HOSED by WiFi Direct vuln

Ragequit

It would be quite annoying...

If this attack could be chained continuously making the device reboot over and over. However simply disabling wifi when your not using it would effectively mitigate this. I'm not sure how often wifi direct would query for devices but I imagine that is somewhat implementation specific due to the concerns of battery life. Of course that doesn't help if you're actually using wifi.

Though I suppose the reason Google declines to fix it is because their own devices can just be updated to 5.0. And once again getting others to update the stack is hard due to the nature of the android beast.

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IBM details PowerPC microserver aimed at square kilometre array

Ragequit

In the past...

I've been in the habit of using my PC hand-me-down hardware for my pet projects at home. But recently reconsidered trying out an Intel atom based SoC server board. Unfortunately as Intel seems wont to do these days they are bit miserly with PCI-e lanes. If only something like this IBM kit were available reasonably cheap. Not for a supercomputer mind you. 24 threads is totally not overkill for testing out software.

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NSA gunning for Google, wants cop-spotting dropped from Waze app

Ragequit

Garbage in Garbage out.

In hindsight they could effectively make the service unusable by having all the significant others and family members enter and rank up fake police locations. Crowd sourced does not mean it's verifiable. Hell they could even setup honey pots if organized crime used it to hunt down officers. Set a couple traps and most criminals in the know wouldn't dare to trust the data.

No, someone is making this far to personal or political. Rather than think outside the box a little and turn this into a tool to trap would be cop killers they just want the problem to go away.

Unless of course there really isn't a problem to begin with.

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Wannabe ZFS rival Exablox decloaks MYSTERY NAS box

Ragequit

Re: Could El Reg explain how this is a ZFS rival?

I presume it was because everything thing this product offers storage wise can be done better with Zfs at the block level for free. Replicating block level incremental snapshots to other servers (nodes), for example. Joking aside, I have no idea what, if any, advantages a object data security methodology brings to the table.

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Ragequit
Devil

Re: Eh?

Yeah, it sounds almost as bad as managing your network security in the cloud (*coughciscocough*). Seems to be just a cheap hack that avoids rolling out proper remote administration infrastructure and lowers the hardware requirements for their boxes. Just spin the UI to the cloud and remove any meddlesome hardware that assists in local administration.

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Ubuntu 13.04: No privacy controls as promised, but hey - photo search!

Ragequit
Meh

Wake me up...

When kernel 3.9 is released. I have no want or need for features found or not found in Ubuntu 13.04. What I'm interested in is upstream changes to KVM/VFIO that might make things easier for vga passthrough.

Btw am I the only one that doesn't trust some search aggregator with my login credentials? One would assume they would be encrypted but how much care is really taken (they can't store hashes since it's logging in on your behalf)? /shrug. Maybe it's fine and they've taken the proper steps. Still, it's a matter of security over convenience. To some the latter is more important.

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Apple files patent for iPhone with wraparound display

Ragequit

Re: Is it just me?

"There are actually quite a few neat things you could do with this. But trashing everything without bothering to consider things for even a moment -does- have the advantage of helping one convince one's self of one's superiority..."

The irony that is you're lecturing me with the same smug sense of superiority that I supposedly have. Well they do say the internet is tone deaf so perhaps I misjudge.

You bring up some good points. Certainly some apps need not dominate the screen when working on other things. Though this would seem to be a minor convenience over regular task switching and limited to a select few applications. Perhaps it would be better to not move all apps and only move the ones you specify (a whitelist).

This design might have a few 'neat' features, but samsung's clam-shell/book design seems more practical to me. If you're going after more screen real estate that is. It certainly doesn't tax the processor with facial recognition or drain the battery with the camera. Though I must say the idea of rolled up display in the other design sample sounds ill advised to me. Just seems like it'd wear out faster.

And for the record I'm not trying to make this an Apple vs. Samsung thing. It's just that someone linked a video to the demo of their OLED flexible screens. So that was the example at hand.

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Ragequit
Stop

Is it just me?

Some of these ideas don't seem well thought out. Like the facial tracking. Why have what is effectively a front and back screen when the device is going to move the current app to the side you're looking at? So they're going to power all the screen but only give you effective use of one? I mean what's the other side for? For your friends to look at in envy?

Not to mention the potential problems they'll have with the antennas and the battery. Not that IPhone has a user replaceable battery right? But presumably we can swap caps around. I'm guessing that's the first thing to break if, heaven forbid, you drop the thing. Which would be a bad thing if the antenna really is located there.

Sure, they'll probably work out the kinks if/when they bring this to market, but I'm still puzzled how I'm supposed to use both sides if everything is repositioned to the side I'm currently working on.

Wait.. wouldn't this have a tendency to slide on anything that's not level? It's going to have less surface area touching your desk.

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Chinese game addict MURDERS girlfriend after she leaves him

Ragequit
Facepalm

Re: Doesn't he know...

Right. The issue is his antisocial behavior and his alleged ineptitude with women. Not the fact that he killed someone.

Being both a gamer and a divorcee I can assure you it's quite possible to be more interested in a hobby than the old lady. Especially if it's your only escape from the nagging. Just because he's not walking to the pub every time he needs to get away doesn't make him a loser.

Being an addict and a murderer is another story (assuming this story wasn't just propaganda against gaming and cohabitation). The devil is in the details. He couldn't have been that distracted if he caught wind of his ladies new lover.

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I've got a super free multi-petabyte storage box for you: /dev/null

Ragequit

Long term storage...

While I generally agree with the idea that humans (and especially businesses run by humans) tend to be major pack rats when it comes to data.. This really isn't such a new problem if you consider the warehouses of file cabinets that were common not that long ago (and in some cases still are).

As our ability to store information digitally increases so does our desire to save everything. Nobody dares try to create an algorithm for sorting out what data is truly valuable for fear of making a mistake. Irregardless, we really could use a storage technology that is reliable and whose means of access are adaptive to changing technology.

How about bioengineering a storage medium that uses already established data redundancy and integrity techniques to recover lost data or reject mutated storage. :P You'd just have to engineer new interfaces for the storage over time. Or maybe you could induce a forced mutation to 'upgrade' the entire system? The cost would be in feeding the thing I imagine. And it could scale to any size as needed. lol. Kidding. Kinda.

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Swedish linguists nix new word after row with Google

Ragequit
Meh

huh

Mixed feelings. I don't really know trademark law so I don't know how legit google's stance is. I figured that trademarks, like patent law, merely had a provision to protect prior language (or art in the case of patents). That way someone couldn't trademark a common everyday word. The reverse happening is a little bizzare at first glance. If a product is too successful it endangers it's own trademark because it becomes a common term? Of course this is US law. I'm sure it differs somewhat worldwide.

I suppose it somewhat encourages companies to pick unique names and I suppose some would see this as just deserts for any company who's services become such a monopoly that it's name becomes the name of the tech.

Of course it's every search engines wet dream to have the brand recognition google has. So I'm sure microsoft would take exception to 'obingbar' as well as Yahoo to 'oyahoo!bar'.

As much as I'm for free speech I question why the Swedish linguists really have to add what amounts to slang to their dictionaries. But then I suppose that's what a linguists do to try to stay hip in an age when everybody relies on spell check a tad too much.

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