* Posts by Ragequit

61 posts • joined 26 Aug 2012

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Wannabe ZFS rival Exablox decloaks MYSTERY NAS box

Ragequit

Re: Could El Reg explain how this is a ZFS rival?

I presume it was because everything thing this product offers storage wise can be done better with Zfs at the block level for free. Replicating block level incremental snapshots to other servers (nodes), for example. Joking aside, I have no idea what, if any, advantages a object data security methodology brings to the table.

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Ragequit
Devil

Re: Eh?

Yeah, it sounds almost as bad as managing your network security in the cloud (*coughciscocough*). Seems to be just a cheap hack that avoids rolling out proper remote administration infrastructure and lowers the hardware requirements for their boxes. Just spin the UI to the cloud and remove any meddlesome hardware that assists in local administration.

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Ubuntu 13.04: No privacy controls as promised, but hey - photo search!

Ragequit
Meh

Wake me up...

When kernel 3.9 is released. I have no want or need for features found or not found in Ubuntu 13.04. What I'm interested in is upstream changes to KVM/VFIO that might make things easier for vga passthrough.

Btw am I the only one that doesn't trust some search aggregator with my login credentials? One would assume they would be encrypted but how much care is really taken (they can't store hashes since it's logging in on your behalf)? /shrug. Maybe it's fine and they've taken the proper steps. Still, it's a matter of security over convenience. To some the latter is more important.

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Apple files patent for iPhone with wraparound display

Ragequit

Re: Is it just me?

"There are actually quite a few neat things you could do with this. But trashing everything without bothering to consider things for even a moment -does- have the advantage of helping one convince one's self of one's superiority..."

The irony that is you're lecturing me with the same smug sense of superiority that I supposedly have. Well they do say the internet is tone deaf so perhaps I misjudge.

You bring up some good points. Certainly some apps need not dominate the screen when working on other things. Though this would seem to be a minor convenience over regular task switching and limited to a select few applications. Perhaps it would be better to not move all apps and only move the ones you specify (a whitelist).

This design might have a few 'neat' features, but samsung's clam-shell/book design seems more practical to me. If you're going after more screen real estate that is. It certainly doesn't tax the processor with facial recognition or drain the battery with the camera. Though I must say the idea of rolled up display in the other design sample sounds ill advised to me. Just seems like it'd wear out faster.

And for the record I'm not trying to make this an Apple vs. Samsung thing. It's just that someone linked a video to the demo of their OLED flexible screens. So that was the example at hand.

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Ragequit
Stop

Is it just me?

Some of these ideas don't seem well thought out. Like the facial tracking. Why have what is effectively a front and back screen when the device is going to move the current app to the side you're looking at? So they're going to power all the screen but only give you effective use of one? I mean what's the other side for? For your friends to look at in envy?

Not to mention the potential problems they'll have with the antennas and the battery. Not that IPhone has a user replaceable battery right? But presumably we can swap caps around. I'm guessing that's the first thing to break if, heaven forbid, you drop the thing. Which would be a bad thing if the antenna really is located there.

Sure, they'll probably work out the kinks if/when they bring this to market, but I'm still puzzled how I'm supposed to use both sides if everything is repositioned to the side I'm currently working on.

Wait.. wouldn't this have a tendency to slide on anything that's not level? It's going to have less surface area touching your desk.

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Chinese game addict MURDERS girlfriend after she leaves him

Ragequit
Facepalm

Re: Doesn't he know...

Right. The issue is his antisocial behavior and his alleged ineptitude with women. Not the fact that he killed someone.

Being both a gamer and a divorcee I can assure you it's quite possible to be more interested in a hobby than the old lady. Especially if it's your only escape from the nagging. Just because he's not walking to the pub every time he needs to get away doesn't make him a loser.

Being an addict and a murderer is another story (assuming this story wasn't just propaganda against gaming and cohabitation). The devil is in the details. He couldn't have been that distracted if he caught wind of his ladies new lover.

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I've got a super free multi-petabyte storage box for you: /dev/null

Ragequit

Long term storage...

While I generally agree with the idea that humans (and especially businesses run by humans) tend to be major pack rats when it comes to data.. This really isn't such a new problem if you consider the warehouses of file cabinets that were common not that long ago (and in some cases still are).

As our ability to store information digitally increases so does our desire to save everything. Nobody dares try to create an algorithm for sorting out what data is truly valuable for fear of making a mistake. Irregardless, we really could use a storage technology that is reliable and whose means of access are adaptive to changing technology.

How about bioengineering a storage medium that uses already established data redundancy and integrity techniques to recover lost data or reject mutated storage. :P You'd just have to engineer new interfaces for the storage over time. Or maybe you could induce a forced mutation to 'upgrade' the entire system? The cost would be in feeding the thing I imagine. And it could scale to any size as needed. lol. Kidding. Kinda.

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Swedish linguists nix new word after row with Google

Ragequit
Meh

huh

Mixed feelings. I don't really know trademark law so I don't know how legit google's stance is. I figured that trademarks, like patent law, merely had a provision to protect prior language (or art in the case of patents). That way someone couldn't trademark a common everyday word. The reverse happening is a little bizzare at first glance. If a product is too successful it endangers it's own trademark because it becomes a common term? Of course this is US law. I'm sure it differs somewhat worldwide.

I suppose it somewhat encourages companies to pick unique names and I suppose some would see this as just deserts for any company who's services become such a monopoly that it's name becomes the name of the tech.

Of course it's every search engines wet dream to have the brand recognition google has. So I'm sure microsoft would take exception to 'obingbar' as well as Yahoo to 'oyahoo!bar'.

As much as I'm for free speech I question why the Swedish linguists really have to add what amounts to slang to their dictionaries. But then I suppose that's what a linguists do to try to stay hip in an age when everybody relies on spell check a tad too much.

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Bill Gates offers big bucks for better condoms

Ragequit
Joke

Hmmm..

I know graphene is flexible but I don't believe it's that flexible. Even if you could get it into that configuration it might chafe a bit. It is an excellent conductor of heat which could be helpful. Supposedly a sheet of graphene of moderate thickness can take the weight of a elephant balanced on a pencil so being hung like one shouldn't pose any issues.

The DVD bake method can even double as a handy applicator.

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CERN re-opens 'Animal Shelter for Computer Mice'

Ragequit
Devil

Good one...

lol nice one Cern. Back in the day I sent out a message asking the recipients to check a sales report for any errors with a link at the bottom. The link redirected to page with the definition of social engineering along with a fictitious offer for some infomercial product (slap chop iirc). Thankfully, no one took the bait to enter in their personal bits but I did have a few people ask what happened to the sales report. Maybe I should have offered two slap chops for the price of one. :P

At least I got the receptionists trained not to answer calls about what office equipment we had. It gets really old having to return toner and office supplies.

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West Virginia seeks Google Glass driving ban

Ragequit
Trollface

I forget...

might google glass have an accelerometer and gps? Couldn't google just have the HUD display either turn off or go minimalist until the user bypassed a safety feature/disclaimer about the dangers of driving with the hud active? (I know it would be inconvenient for passengers but I'm sure they'll live) Lord knows people are going to wear them regardless of the ban. At least force the idiots to acknowledge their own stupidity.

For that matter couldn't google implement a driver mode/app that would detect movement at the periphery of a drivers vision and give auditory warnings? Perhaps it could be part of the solution rather than the problem? High end cars already have collision detection via cameras. Add a feature to use additional wireless cameras. The problem might be processing power though I suppose. Guess we need some hybrid gpu stream processing.

/shrug. I don't really care about glass. It just seems a little knee jerk to ban it without having a discussion about both the pro's and con's.

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The gaming habits of Reg readers revealed

Ragequit

Re: Publishers...

Sure there will be first party games (mainly nintendo), but will it really be enough? These days you hear things like publishers making games exclusive for a limited time and that's of course due to sweet heart deals by the console makers.

Nintendo has traditionally had the strongest first party titles but insist on a formulaic rehashing of existing game properties. Not to mention their games are primarily marketed towards the younger crowd as evidenced by their lower ranking in this poll.

Sony has been bleeding money so throwing money at developers en masse would be foolhardy. I'm not even sure if they've retained all their own game studio's after making necessary cuts for the bottom line.

Microsoft... well Microsoft has a history of failed hardware platforms so I don't think they really care at the end of the day if the nextbox is successful as long as windows remains the gaming platform of choice on PC.

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Ragequit
Pint

Publishers...

are making consoles slowly but surely irrelevant. At least in their traditional model of licensing fees for the privilege to develop for their platform. With almost every AAA game being launched for every platform (except for Nintendo's for various reasons) the exclusive game title is a dying breed and that was really the driving force behind consumers buying one console over another.

It seems to me console companies have conceded to this reality by making their next gen consoles largely glorified PC's with their own attempts a secret sauce (read cloud services) sprinkled on top. That's not to say the form factor is going away, but the lines between console and PC are blurring. That's why you have valve talking about the Steambox. When most of the home platforms are running x86 processors it will be easy than ever for Publishers to push for releases on all of them.

At any rate it's kind of a shame, but in theory it will give the consumer choice over which platform they want to game on. The only problem would be if the market consolidated and someone ended up with a monopoly.

Here's hoping an open source operating system becomes the platform of choice so that we can BYOH if we choose.

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Quantum: No! Object storage CANNOT exchange data with tape!

Ragequit
Paris Hilton

I might be rusty...

But is this not hierarchical storage by another name? Of course back in the day it was optical jukeboxes that seemed to be the flavor of the month for long term storage. To be honest this object storage stuff is new to me but it seems like it might be out of a job if memristor based memory delivers on it's promises. Or perhaps it's complimentary since it seems to be more of storage technique than a new medium.

At any rate I've never been exactly confident about long term tape storage. Seems converting archives to new tape technologies is a time consuming and expensive endeavor as well. /Shrug. Guess it all depends on the volume of data and if you need to ensure data integrity (as in read only WORM media).

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New-age tech marketing secrets REVEALED

Ragequit
Devil

Re: Where do draw the line?

The cloud...

Cooking at home takes too much electricity and produces too much heat so I like to take my ingredients to my favorite restaurant to have them cook it for me. The bill is an alphabet soup of itemized charges reflecting the amount of the kitchen's capacity I've used but at least I don't have to worry about the messy details of maintaining my own kitchen! The total is oft times more than if I had just ordered off the regular menu, but then I wouldn't have a customized private solution... err meal. You know what happens when you special order, right? They do dastardly things to your food! /sarcasm off

Don't get me wrong. I can certainly understand how well content marketing can work for the IT industry. I've fallen prey to even the the more direct type in the course of my early years in IT work when microsoft whitepapers on best practices made me more invested in completing a project with their tools. Despite my reservations of getting locked in it was the solution I had at the time.

I guess I'm always one to worry about what sounds good on paper being a pile in practice. Still, I must admit that it's easier to get a hold of product information than it has been in the past. So perhaps things are largely working as intended. I just can't help that but feel like the message is still somewhat controlled.

As far as trending goes with the release of multiple articles I guess we're in agreement insofar as it has to provide some value. Blog's, in my experience, tend to have a highly variable value in their content.

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Ragequit

Where do draw the line?

I'm not so sure that content marketing inherently calls for truth in advertising. Especially when it comes to reviews. I have been long convinced that reviews for video games are all but paid for advertising (Giant bomb drama?). Defects might be pointed out in AAA game reviews but they're usually downplayed and aren't reflected in scores unless truly egregious. Some sites gave Sim City a 5/10 review yet one was kind enough to give it a 7/10. In this case things seem to be working fine. The problem I have is that there seems to be only two extremes. Bad scores and extremely good scores. Seems like every other AAA game get's an editor's choice or at least a score in the 90 percentile. Then again, perhaps this really an example of traditional marketing but I think perhaps the line is a little blurry in the minds of some marketing departments.

The other annoying aspect of content marketing, well perhaps content marketing done badly, is when sites post bits of barely newsworthy tripe about a product repeatedly in an obvious attempt to keep it topical or 'trending' as it were. I suppose there is something to be said about quality over quantity.

And what of crowd funding? It's like community management and pledge drive all in one! I have mixed feelings about it. On one hand I'm waiting for the bubble to burst when a very high profile project is a complete disaster, but on the other I do enjoy the fact that some long awaited sequels are seeing the light of day.

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Vietnamese high school kids can pass Google interview

Ragequit
Go

Re: confused

They were given a data file describing the maze. Even if you assume that rotating the entire maze 45 degrees would make the math simpler writing the code to do so is a little more difficult than turning a diagram on a piece of paper. I know I wouldn't have been able to apply the math and geometry to that coding problem in under an hour in high school. My high schools idea of a intro to computer programming class was apple basic. There was supposedly an intermediate class teaching C that would be held providing there was enough student interest but that never happened.

Knowing a computer language does not mean you have the skills to tackle any problem. I would have loved to be in a school system that actually challenged me like that. I was bored to tears and spent my time teaching myself via books.

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Feds cuff ex-NASA boffin at airport amid state-secret leak scare

Ragequit
Stop

Suspicious

If this is really a national security concern why are we hearing about it from a congressman before a proper investigation has even taken place? This smells of someone trying to make a name for them selves or a fall guy being used to distract from something else. Like others have pointed out there is too many aspects of this story that shout amateur. The one way ticket, embassy, prior history marking him as suspicious, etc.

Was the Chinese national really a spy for the Chinese government or was he trying to sell information to the highest bidder? Is this orchestrated FUD? Why not just 'accidentally' copy the data to a machine infected with some Chinese APT malware? This just seems really too sloppy for something state sponsored considering how sophisticated these botnets are getting.

The devil is in the details and this show they're putting on doesn't help.

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Nvidia stretches Tesla GPU coprocessors from HPC to big data

Ragequit
Stop

Not sure why..

But I found the last example, the weather channel, the most impressive. Realtime encoding to every device sounds pretty impressive. Yet are they perhaps making it more difficult then it needs to be? It would seem that it would be more efficient to employ some cdn secret sauce. Make the cdn request a particular encoding if it was not already available locally so that you only have to encode once? Even if you were livestreaming it would seem like you could eliminate the redundant encoding jobs. I'm no expert mind you and I've no idea about the costs involved so maybe there is a financial reason. I'm just looking at it from a efficiency stand point.

Still cool to hear what can be done.

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Caught on camera: Fujitsu touts anti-terrorist pulse-taking tech

Ragequit
FAIL

More dodgey tech for the 'war' against terrorism...

There's going to be so many false positives with this. What of people with heart issues? Tachycardia? Never mind all the various more mundane reasons for people's hearts to be racing. This would probably more accurately pre-screen for obese passengers so the airlines can charge them extra. Either way this is just more profiling. Especially since most terrorists expect to die and have made peace with that. They're probably the calmest of the lot.

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EA Origin vuln puts players at risk

Ragequit
Facepalm

Re: Um

It's not FUD when security researchers write a paper documenting an attack vector that has been demonstrated in other software - namely browsers. Fishing or spear fishing attacks against gamers happen all the time so it's not unreasonable to think this could be exploited.

I've not used origin but the fact that it uses URI's suggests that it has a built-in browser like Steam does. Probably means they failed to apply patches to the underlying browser tech they imbedded. Or it may be that they can't because iirc the solution to the URI problem was to limit it's size and/or provide a user prompt if the URI contained scripting. Which may be an issue depending on how URI's are implemented in origin. Wait.. I think it was URI's that had an optional file based format that bypassed sandboxing. Getting old.

At any rate maybe this will be a wake up call to EA. A digital store does not mean pure profit. It takes time and money to maintain it. If exploits like this aren't quickly resolved then how are consumers are supposed to feel about all the customer data EA collects thru origin? They can't keep their client secure what's to say they can keep the back end safe either?

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SimCity owners get free game, EA will get A NEW CEO

Ragequit
Joke

Re: Oh.. I see..

Peer-to-peer distro on origin?? Then they wouldn't be able to 'assume direct control'...

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Ragequit
Joke

Oh.. I see..

So that's why EA has been boasting about a all time high of origin users.. so they have an excuse when users have problems going thru the free offer. "Unanticipated growth".

In other news EA's CEO has been forced to resign. Guess the board had to pin the blame on someone for the continued PR nightmares and declining profits.

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Ragequit
Thumb Down

My suspicion...

Is that this 'apology' has ulterior motives. I'm not sure if EA has attempted to force users to use origin for even boxed copies of games (I seem to remember they at least trialed this with a game or two), but this free 'gift' will be distributed via origin for sure. If they're going to lose a bit of money they might as well try to create a bit of consumer lock-in with their digital store, right? Not to mention the reduced cost as it's simply a download.

They're so desperate for the platform to work that they recently joined forces with their competitor Ubisoft to offer each others game libraries on their separate stores (to combat their nemesis steam). Their foolishness will hopefully backfire when one day when users demand portability of digital games between eshops that are on the PC.

Meanwhile I guess we can only vote with our $.... Yeah, I'm not very hopeful for the future.

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CCTV hack takes casino for $33 MILLION in poker losses

Ragequit
Joke

My bet...

Unsecured wireless AP's. lol. I would hope not. It probably was an inside job or a bit of social engineering. Say someone posing as a CCTV repairman from the hotel's chosen vendor... or even getting a job with said vendor. Whatever it was it was a weak link. There really shouldn't be a physical link between the CCTV system and the internet connectivity in the rooms but...

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Drunk driving: No more dangerous than talking on handsfree mobe

Ragequit

Re: Tested a drivers skill...

Just as important (or maybe more so) is just good driving habits. Giving yourself stopping distance, looking for oncoming traffic at intersections regardless of what the light says, etc. It annoys me to no end to see so many drivers here in the states tailgating and/or weaving in and out of traffic. Of course rubberneckers looking at vehicles pulled off the highway don't help either. Stationary photo radar on highways is a mistake as well imo. People seem more inclined to speed on the bits with no coverage and slam on their breaks every time they see a pole/mast.

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Ragequit
Stop

Tested a drivers skill...

in a simulator... What exactly was tested? Reaction times? I could see how drunk driving and demanding phone calls could be correlated in reaction times. But what of decision making? Someone on a hands free set merely has to stop talking and seriously concentrate on avoiding/mitigating an accident whereas somebody under the influence of alcohol can't instantly become sober.

Don't get me wrong it's not impossible that a conversation can distract a driver as anybody who has seen the driving 'skill' of soccer mom in a mini-van can attest to, but I don't believe it's so black and white as they are making it out to be.

Besides are they going to make talking to passengers illegal too? Researcher based link bait this is.

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Boeing outlines fix for 787 batteries

Ragequit
FAIL

I put my money on...

Boeing overcharging the batteries because if they could blame the other guys they would do so. Re-certifying the system is a major time and money sink. By not pointing fingers and acting in concert with the parties involved to provide a solution to a problem they're unwilling or not able to describe.... they smell guilty. Either the whole system was truly under designed or outsourced code wasn't tested as much as much as it should due to a lower criticality.

Aerospace industry politics as usual I guess?

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Don't buy a Google car: They might stop it while you're driving

Ragequit
Meh

Regardless...

Of the reasons for this service shutdown it illustrates the primary reason why I'm not a hipster that has bought into the cloud/product-as-a-service act - You're at the complete mercy of the service provider. This is really about the model and little to do with google itself. End of life really means end of life. This would be true for EA's Sim City too.

The big axe I'm waiting to fall is the app/digital software platform. The first time one of these fail what is going to be the fallout? Will another store opt to buy out it's customers and their libraries in the hopes of locking in new customers? Will publishers honor the 'rental' agreement and help users migrate? Will DRM be patched out allowing users to run their software freely (hell freezes over). I just don't see this going over well with every major publisher and online storefront trying to get in on the electronic sales gig. Usually choice is a good thing, but with customer lockin it's really not much of a choice.

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Modder hacks SimCity for unlimited offline play

Ragequit
Mushroom

Thoughts..

When I first read about this on another site (the debug mode bypass) my first reaction was... "Oh, shit here comes EA's lawyers trying to track down this guy for 'hacking' their game, etc". I laugh at the absurdity of my own idea yet I could just see a knee jerk reaction at EA causing a PR nightmare to meltdown even further.

Even if you did buy the snake oil about processing things on the cloud how could that ever be construed as a good idea? It *might* make some sense on lower powered portable devices but it still suffers from an unpredictable factor - the users connection. Even without considering outages you still have latency issues. Forcing saves on the cloud is idiotic too. Anytime I see cloud based features I turn them off. I can manage my own storage thank you and if I really care to backup my data offsite I'll pick my own solution.

For the people calling for more liability on the part of software publishers I'm a little worried that might be a double edged sword.. Wouldn't that have implications for the open source world too? Not that a plaintiff would have grounds on the cost of the software, but in maybe in the case that it didn't work as advertised on the website and caused some financial hardship on the user?

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Apple's marketing honcho Schiller attacks Android, Samsung

Ragequit
Facepalm

Spin

I've already seen one apple loving site reverberating this corporate spin. But more importantly what's up with all the grade school 'marketing' of late? Seems like exec's can't get enough of trash talking lately.

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$1.5k per complaint. Up to 1,900 gTLDs. Brand owners, prepare to PAY

Ragequit
WTF?

Cluster...

No matter how you look at it this seems like a bad idea... and a money grab. Doesn't the ICANN impose some sort of fee/license on operators of a gTLD? My memory is a bit rusty. At any rate opening the floodgates is going to cause headaches for all involved. Even the end user as they have to contend with even more fishing sites.

After reading the article from a few days ago on gTLD's I was left with the impression that only a few more gTLD's were being considered. This seems like open season. With a lot of red tape... ><

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What's most important? Bandwidth over kilo-miles, or milli-watts?

Ragequit

Re: You don't think of laser beams with millimetre ranges,

Interesting. I thought it was weird how they phrased a few things, but I got the impression that they were talking about cabled links that didn't require actual surface space on the board. Perhaps you're right though. They never did mention fiber for the millimeter link. The distance and bandwidth didn't seem high enough in either case. At least for something like a bus between processor/northside/southside. Maybe the plan is to use a bunch in parallel? As far as the dust goes it could be negated in fully submerged liquid cooling, but that makes for an even smaller list of applications.

I can't help but feel I'm missing something obvious. Guess it's time for more caffeine.

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Microsoft unveils even more tempting Kinect offering: Open source

Ragequit
Pint

Re: Plenty of hardware available.

There's been millions of wiimotes sold as well. Doesn't mean it's a killer device. All it proves is the marketing worked.

If *you* enjoy flailing around in front of a camera just for the sake of it then more power to you I guess. I'll stick with a control scheme that's not likely to knock over my beer and go to the gym when I want exercise.

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Ragequit
Facepalm

Re: Plenty of hardware available.

Anyone that says kinect changes games is not much of a gamer. The general consensus these days is that motions controls are a novelty that quickly wears out it's welcome. Kinect Starwars is a great example of the gimmick that is motion controlled games. That's not to say that there's an occasional game the concept works well with. It's just few and far between and many developers were quick to buy in to the hype by slapping motion controls onto games that were not designed with them in mind.

In other fields it might hold promise.

Kinect wasn't the first attempt at camera based motion controls so it is hardly revolutionary. Evolutionary perhaps. Still it is cool that they released some of the code. Devils in the details. Doesn't seem like a microsoft move to do something that won't make them money or help with consumer/developer lock-in.

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Curiosity succeeds – Mars was wet enough for life!

Ragequit

Great, but...

I wonder if they ever got the primary computer sorted.

That said it'll be interesting if they can find actual evidence of life. Not just the recipe.

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Rise Of The Machines: What will become of box-watchers, delivery drivers?

Ragequit
Mushroom

Wait...

Why are some of you blaming google in all of this? I'm not saying google can do no wrong but beware the trolls. Sure google has one of the only examples of a working commercial driverless car, but darpa has had a few autonomous vehicle challenges over the years. Plus many of you are ignoring the fact that they still require a human ride-a-long as backup. The first hurdle in this proposed scenario is that the safety types give the thumbs up to truly autonomous vehicles. That, to a lesser extent, is probably going to go the way of the flying car. There's a lot of FUD surrounding that after 9/11. In some cases autonomous trucks are scarier. Load it up with heavy explosives and drive it into your target of choice?

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Ragequit
Pint

I'd be more worried..

... about the rush to automate huge amounts of infrastructure/logistics when we can't even secure what we have already. Think about it. Do we really want to suffer huge amounts of economic damage because the most popular vehicle kits have been hacked?

Still I think it's a little alarmist to think this would happen rapidly. Retrofitting or replacing vehicles would take a lot of time and money. Not to mention that there will probably be a tax grab that will slow adoption. I mean the government would look at that as a loss of income tax and would try to make up for the shortfall. Never mind voters being up in arms.

I don't see a problem with automated solutions being used to bring back manufacturing from overseas. But the problem is coming up with a solution that is cheaper.

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Amazon tries to shut .book in face of authors, publishers

Ragequit

Re: Do new tld's really matter?

Well... isn't that a bit counterproductive? The more TLD's there are the possible combinations of FQDN's there are... ultimately making for an alphabet soup that the average end user will be annoyed to deal with. I understand the land grab mentality but don't major sites register on other tld's simply because they don't want anyone else infringing on their precious trademarks? How confusing would it be if it became common to have multiple distinct (popular) websites spread across multiple tld's?

I have to wonder if these new tld's make more sense from a need to reduce the amount of subdomains or to segregate user content to a separate domains to avoid security whitelist issues. I.e. you trust x.com but get infected by malware on blog.x.com because you whitelisted x.com and all subdomains.

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Ragequit

Do new tld's really matter?

Between google searches, social media sites, barcodes with imbedded links, etc how many punters actually bother to remember a sites name much less which tld's it exists on? Is this a case of much ado about nothing or am I just too lazy? Of course there's the venerable bookmark and rss feeds. I'd be interested in learning the statistics of the preferred methods of finding sites... are tld's relevant?

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Era of the Pharaohs: Climate was HOTTER THAN NOW, without CO2

Ragequit
Facepalm

Meh...

Even if there is 'radical' climate change in the next 100+ years it's going to be so gradual that we'd have to raving idiots to be unable to adapt. We're talking about sending a mission to Mar's and we can't use any of that know how to adapt to comparatively minor changes? Sure it's on a much larger scale but if nothing else the article proves humans have managed through a volatile climate for a long time. All life for that matter and life tends to be a big producer of gases.

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Seattle drinking den bans Google Glass geeks

Ragequit
Meh

Re: Hmmm..

Yes. I read that. Banning devices is one thing. Kicking people out or starting a bar brawl if they use one is another. I'm not advocating that any establishment should be so draconian as to have a security checkpoint. Lord knows how effective the TSA has been with that sort of thing. I'm simply making the observation that these half measures merely give a false sense of security (or privacy). Not that there really is a solution unless you want to go off the grid. I'm just trying to be realistic.

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Ragequit

Re: Hmmm..

Apparently you failed to read my second paragraph as I suggested he, the owner, could set more meaningful conditions for his establishment then banning one device that isn't exactly subtle. Even if, as you suggest, all bar patrons are afforded the same legal protections they enjoy at home how do you suggest this be enforced? Rent-a-cop? Vigilante justice meted out by drunken customers? Ohh....

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Ragequit
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Hmmm..

As much as I'm for privacy you should have some expectation of privacy loss when you're out in public. This is definitely a publicity stunt. There are plenty of lower tech ways to intrude on others privacy at the local watering hole.

If they were really concerned with privacy they'd do what they could to legally block any wireless standards on the premises as well as have everyone empty their pockets into a locker before coming in... and that's just a start.

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On International Woman's Day we remember Grace Hopper

Ragequit
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Good read

If only more *people* were as driven as her to overcome all forms of discrimination or merely what passed as conventional wisdom. She need not be only a role model for women. Not all men are by definition power hungry sobs belonging to the 'good old boys club'. Still, I understand that things could be better.

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MakerBot demos 3D object scanner that fits on your desk

Ragequit
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Quick!

Somebody mount a Kinect or EyeToy to a turntable and slap together a project on github! Then we can generate the 3D model and the texture at the same time as well.

Joking aside it sounds cool but would probably be impractical for video games as such a scanner would probably make the geometry needlessly complex. /shrug who knows.

What would be even cooler is mounting a scanner like this on a pan tilt zoom mount on a small UAV to fly thru structures and systematically scan entire buildings.

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Georgia Tech proposes terabit NFC antenna

Ragequit
Unhappy

Not mentioned...

is one of the applications of 100 Tbps with such a short range. I read elsewhere they are considering it for use in communications between cores on a processor. Limiting or possibly negating the need for a bus to glue everything together. Sounds like an interesting idea, but I'm concerned that the effective range at which you could listen to such communications might be found to be longer than previously thought. Opening the way up for the ultimate side channel attack against a machine as it would possibly lay bare the entire contents of the chips cache over the air.

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Mark Shuttleworth: Canonical leads Ubuntu, not 'your whims'

Ragequit

If Shuttleworth was really interested in making a free operating system that could compete with closed source alternatives I can think of better ways to spend my time than alienating developers. What was one of the major contributors to MS's rise to power? MS courted developers. They used a carrot instead of a stick.

Honestly the impression I get from what friends that are way more into the community aspect of open source than I is that Shuttleworth is just looking for ways to monetize his investment in Ubuntu and figures he can become the next Apple if he can force feed his 'vision' long enough.

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SpaceX Dragon eventually snared by ISS

Ragequit
Meh

Space exploration has always been a dangerous gambit. I think it's funny how many people are willing to jump on the negativity bandwagon when even NASA (or maybe especially NASA) has had their share of 'glitches' and even deaths. Why even this morning curiosity is having computer problems. You might say it's not fair to compare an over sized rover with a capsule capable of transporting humans. Yet both are examples of hardware not living up to the desired criticality of the systems design. In the absence of any details we can't really say where the fault lies. But at the end of the day it's about solutions when it comes to space programs.

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Nokia wants to build the Google of human behaviour - and share it

Ragequit

Re: Are we sheep?

That's certainly true and is in part the realm of sociology. Humans are social creatures and whenever they interact they influence each other in various ways. What is sad is that there are so many people that let their guard down towards technology despite generally being guarded towards strangers. We're all guilty of it to some degree as we have become reliant on search engines. By trusting search engines to give us relevant and unbiased results we are implicitly trusting it's designers. The technology insulates us.

For example I'd bet most people would trust the results of a google search on a strangers phone more readily than verbal directions from the same person.

It's the automatic part that concerns me. Are people really going to start letting technology make their decisions for them because they trust it to be agnostic? Even supposing that such a technology would fairly distribute searchers between establishments it would have to weight it's relevancy in some fashion. It just seems like a slippery slope to me.

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