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* Posts by Steven Raith

1201 posts • joined 26 Jun 2007

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Inside the Hekaton: SQL Server 2014's database engine deconstructed

Steven Raith
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Hekaton?

So does that mean the desktop verisons of this (the old SQL Express thingies) will be called Waggleton P. Tallylicker?

Apologies.

Steven R

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Microsoft reissues Windows 8.1 Update for enterprise customers

Steven Raith
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Re: how does one know if they have updated to the Update?

Pretty sure it comes as part of Windows Updates, I know for sure that if you update any machine to Windows 8.1 through the store from Windows 8, it's rolled into it anyway - so you'll get the limited window controls and taskbar in NewUI mode from any Win 8.1 update you do as of last week or so.

I think an OEM Win 8.1 build taken out of a box and put online today would also get those updates before presenting you with Userland, but I've not tested that yet.

Still, it's a bit of a stupid move - wonder what's caused them to enforce this? Some kind of gaping hole, or just something implemented in Update1 that makes life easier for them from a future updates sort of thing?

Steven R

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A scanner, darkly: Master data-miner Google tweaks terms of service

Steven Raith
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"First we slurp, then we burp, you berks"

Sounds like a pretty cheap trick, that one.

You pay more for better manners I suppose.

Er, I mean, um, nice wordplay.

*cough*

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GoPro's new lens: Like a GOOGLE STREETMAPS car... for your life

Steven Raith
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Re: "Took a couple of laps"

I recognised it at the first entry into Druids - which is a bit disconcerting as I've only been there once, and that was as a spectator/amateur snapper with a semi pro mate, and another chum who was banging his Peugeot 205 GTi stockhatch around.

(he went into the kitty litter, alas, but it was a great race to watch - XR2s, Golf GTis, 205s, etc all swapping paint)

I have some great pics of the MG classics race, and of some Formula Something cars, somewhere...

Found 'em. You'll have to C+P the links as I can't remember how to do linkys here. All safe for work, unless FB links get you in trouble. All should be public, I think.

The Alleged 205 Gti

https://scontent-b-lhr.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/t1.0-9/p180x540/21083_10200933265550905_29180281_n.jpg

Black cat*

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc1/t1.0-9/p180x540/249160_10200933291591556_385105184_n.jpg

*yeah, it's probably a westie, gerroff!

Taking a wide line. Kitty litter wide:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/t1.0-9/p180x540/260082_10200933292031567_219583238_n.jpg

Made pretty light though:

https://scontent-a-lhr.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/t1.0-9/p180x540/485511_10200933292431577_871359269_n.jpg

Formula Something:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/t1.0-9/p180x540/945946_10200933289271498_1788820526_n.jpg

And again, this time without focus or proper panning:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/v/t1.0-9/p180x540/603873_10200933288751485_1181332792_n.jpg?oh=9eb23559a22aef67fcfc216c1da52deb&oe=53C02147&__gda__=1405935612_0d1ea80fbe106c1e7a2b6cacbb15137f

(don't know why that link is so long)

It took the 911 driver some time to catch that little MR2:

https://scontent-b-lhr.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/t1.0-9/p180x540/283952_10200933270631032_1744508953_n.jpg

Sorry, but of a photo spam there. But to be fair, it was a nice day, lovely light, and some interesting cars out there. Brings back good memories, so downvote away and see if I care!

As for the 360deg lens- I was fiddling with one of them of a very similar design (as others have noted, it's not a new thing, just this particular implementation of it is) which I thought was a terribly neat trick of physics if you have the software to unwrap it. Mind you, the lens was physically mounted to the Coolpix 5100 (IIRC) it was on (not removable) so it's turned that camera into a bit of a one trick pony!

Steven R

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Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray

Steven Raith
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Re: £17 for an album

I think the problem is the lack of any well regarded, current music that has a high dynamic/frequency/pretty noises range. Most *cough* good (aka popular) music these days can be fun to listen to, but it's not as...well, interesting. Try some Led Zeppelin next to...and damn, I can't think of anything good. Some Elbow, maybe? I'm so not down with the kids.

I for one would be interested in a SuperDuperHighDefinedBadgerTastic version of Queens Of The Stone Age : Songs For The Deaf, however - that's a thumping album filled with interesting little ditties. I'd need a hifi that could justify it though, and my bank manager - and my neighbours - would probably strongly suggest I stick to FLAC and £120 in-ear monitors, the dullards.

I imagine in 15 years time, some of the more recent stuff will get re-appreciated (there's lots of stuff I liked from the recent hit parade, but nothing I've bought as I've been more into older, or more niche stuff) and that might get a second lease of life. Be interesting to see what that is, but I suspect that musical taste isn't what's at the heart of the matter here, and that I'm just rambling.

Ramble on....*goes to dig out Led Zeppelin FLACs, headphones*

Steven R

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Forget the beach 'n' boardwalk, check out the Santa Cruz STEVE JOBS FOUNTAIN

Steven Raith
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It's true, it's all in the Loch Ness Monsters autobiography.

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Russian deputy PM: 'We are coming to the Moon FOREVER'

Steven Raith
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Re: Makes sense

Upvote.

I had mental images of the whole russian thing going quiet, then in thirty years time, the US making another attempt, and coming face to face with lions in spacesuits, silently roaring at them.

But then I have had a long day...

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Heartbleed vuln under ACTIVE ATTACK as hackers map soft spots

Steven Raith
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Re: OTT?

To be fair, given the potential for problems if it was exploited in a widespread manner, the IT press going batshit insane over it (and admins patching it ASAP) is not a bad thing.

Sometimes hype is a good thing. Not often, but sometimes.

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Tesla firms hot bottoms: TITANIUM armor now bolted to Model S e-cars

Steven Raith
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Re: Historical

Just a quick note, I never thought typing that diatribe against morons would get 24 upvotes.

Kudos to the commentard community for their common sense. That bottle of wine I just necked has been drunkenly attributed to you all. You delicious people.

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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Re: Historical

I'm a shade under 6ft, but I like to have the seat dropped all to the floor (in the Milly, it's an electric height adjuster, don't you know *puts in monocle*) and even then I can't H+T because my legs are too long and my knees foul the steering column.

Also, on a related 'not fitting' not, if you go back through my posts for a couple of years, you'll find one where I reference sitting in one at a dealership (just idle browsing) and determining that I'd have to lose weight to get one as the bucket seats were quite...tight.

Hey, guess what, turns out if you sit in them long enough (and corner hard enough) the seats bend to fit my fat arse. Huzzah!

Prices on Pumas have bottomed out - if you want a cheap, nippy car that handles fantastically and you don't need to lug wardrobes around (although I got two ten foot by three foot sheets of MDF in there today with the aid of some rope and a bit of luck - and a lack of cops to do me for having a shonky secured load, erk), snap one up while they are cheap and it's easy to sort the good ones from the bad, I say.

But please pay top dollar for Milleniums, I want values to go up ;-)

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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Re: Historical

@Jonathan Donnelly - my one is a Millenium, so it's also a stonking yellow colour, with leather recaros.

Many a 'sports car' has been given a wake up call by my shonky little ford zipping past them on the exit of corners with an 'interesting' speed differential because they don't know how slow in, fast out works.

Tremendously flattering car - if you're looking at front wheel drive cars, as far as I'm aware pretty much the only thing better is the DC2 Integra Type R - which is generally regarded as the best front wheel drive car ever made.

Not a bad thing to be second to if you ask me....and not bad given that ten years previously, Ford were lambasted for making some of the worst cars on the market.

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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Re: Historical

Excellent point Ledswinger - I wasn't thinking about it that deeply!

That said, I don't dislike petrol cars - in fact I love them. My ratty, old, near 130,000 mile Puma 1.7 still pulls all the way to the rev limiter in second, third and fourth with aplomb, which is staggering when you think of the abuse those components must be taking.

But it's still more likely to catch fire than if it had a properly isolated electric motor and battery pack under the bonnet - that's just plain old risk assessment right there, nothing fancy!

And on that note, the fact that petrol cars don't catch fire all the fucking time is another good example of why engineering rocks.

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Steven Raith
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Re: Historical

That, and Porsche, one of the best regarded manufacturers in the world, recently had to pull their 991-style 911 GT3 RSs because the conrods exit the crankcase and set fire to the car by throwing oil on the exhausts.

From a technical standpoint, petrol engined cars are more vulnerable to 'unexpected fire' than electric ones, primarily because while electric cars have more electric, electric is a damned site easier to control than fairly weighty pieces of metal being reciprocated at anything up to 9000 times a minute, and being lubricated by potentially flammable fluids. And that's before you get to the gallons of fluid specifically chosen for it's properties to combust under pressure, or when subjected to pressure and an outside ignition source, that are stored in either the front or the rear of the vehicle in a perfect spot to be crushed, spilled and ignited in the event of an accident.

I'd still rather have a 991 GT3 RS than a Tesla anything at the moment, but to claim that electric cars are inherently unsafe because they are electric shows a staggering lack of physics and chemistry knowledge.

After all, pretty much every appliance in your house is electric, and I bet you sleep at night fine with all those potential fire hazards around you....

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AMD unveils Godzilla's graphics card – 'the world's fastest, period'

Steven Raith
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Anandtech tested it in their standard overclocked i7 test rig, total system draw at load was under 700W under either gaming or Furmark (which was the only thing that made it throttle).

Given that an OC'd i7 can draw 90w by itself, I'd say the 500W figure is pretty much on the nose.

oh, and idle power draw for the system? Under 100W.

We've come a long way, baby...

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Steven Raith
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Re: Diminshing returns

I'm running a 7770 and it's doing me fine.

That said, I recently watched some playthrouigh of Metro Last Light, and as it's on Linux, I think my birthday present to myself this year might be a slightly newer GPU, now that the current crop of fast-as-feck and low power (in comparison to previous GPUs in watts-per-FPS terms) cards seem to have hit real world (IE sub £200) prices.

Don't think it'll be this though, seeing as the only other games I really play are half Life and Serious Sam 3, natch.

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Steven Raith
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Re: For people who don't get laid.

Mini-displayport sized?

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Steven Raith
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Holy crap..

I'll bet that runs Crysis!

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Google-funded boffins figure out age-busting facial prediction system

Steven Raith
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They don't - the 'mapped' faces were pasted into/into the same images - so add facial structure image, then photoshop the hair (or, indeed beard) to see if it looks roughly the same.

Unless you think those photos also predicted the image backgrounds, too? ;-)

Steven R

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Spy-happy Condoleezza Rice joins Dropbox board as privacy adviser

Steven Raith
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Hold the phones, kids.

I think this announcement may well be true definition of irony.

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Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'

Steven Raith
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Correlation and causation

Some people need to learn the difference.

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Who wants a ROBO-BUTLER? Google and pals do – and they've just put $2m towards it

Steven Raith
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Cool

Robot butlers down, now where is my bloody flying car, dammit?

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Windows XP is finally DEAD, right? Er, not quite. Here's what to do if you're stuck with it

Steven Raith
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*facepalm*

An unpatched systems AV has less resources to work with - a perfect example is the XP SP2 Security Centre, which monitors AV software for unexpected behaviour by allowing the AV software to report it's status to the system at a low level, which wasn't previously part of the OS. Your AV software might report that it's tipping along happily - or a very clever infection might put a fake AV systray item in startup - but the SP2 Security Centre will notice that your AV softwares realtime scanner isn't running and will flag it.

To go back to the Security Centre example, you not updated to SP2? Then you'll never know there's a keylogger running and that your AV software is dead until your computer craps itself, or your credit card is used to buy 700kg of chocolate milk in Botswana. Post SP2 systems will immediately flag up a lack of AV software operation and you can deal with the problem before it becomes a catastrophe - IE before you put your credit card details into a website and have them scraped.

There have been patches to allow AV software greater access to protected memory space, running system level processes, to allow pre-userland scanning, etc. None of this stuff was safely possible before the patches added the functionality and API hooks because that is the entire function of a patch.

Plenty of these patches that come out to cover 'security updates' deal with patching exactly these sorts of issues and enabling extra functionality or APIs to the AV vendors - sometimes in response to known infections, sometimes in response to researchers informing MS of flaws they've found, but the simple fact is that running an unpatched system is asking for trouble - no matter what AV software you have.

Just because you don't understand it doesn't mean it's FUD.

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Steven Raith
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They'll be the people blaming the local petrol station for their credit card being used to make fraudulent purchases no doubt. Not realising that they had a keylogger running which the AV software wasn't able to see running because that relied on an OS patch to flag up the process traits to it...

Welcome to Kafka IT!

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Cyber hostage-takers SCAMMED six times as many people last year

Steven Raith
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I dunno about PAs - I've met PAs who do most of the job of the person they are PAing to, with said Important Person basically being a customer service rep for the operation, in effect.

Completely agree with marketint types, however. Although I think a B-Ark might be more expensive than my choice, which is just an AK47 and a good deal on bulk 7.62x39 rounds...

Steven R

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Google woos enterprise developers with 'Glass at Work' program

Steven Raith
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Re: "How many 'Thumbs Up' would that get?"

I was thinking more of haemorrhoids (piles) but I'll take any help I can get.

Other commentards - refer to ACs explanatory note to make my 'joke' borderline entertaining.

Thanks all, peace out,

Steven R

PS: Upvote for multilingual humour assistance.

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Steven Raith
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Re: "How many 'Thumbs Up' would that get?"

That'd be a video that's piles of fun to watch.

(sorry. I'd add a JokeAlert icon, but I'm not even sure the above classes as one)

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Skype pimps pro-level broadcast service

Steven Raith
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CatCall

"C&M developed a Skype video/audio routing system called CatCall, which offered call quality optimisation, and took care of video resizing and adjustment without scan converters."

*whistles*

"Here love, nice pre-emptive buffering! I'd overscan you any day and I might even let you deinterlace me, phwoar!"

(with apologies to...just...everyone, really)

Steven R

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BEHOLD the HOLY GRAIL of TECH: The REVERSIBLE USB plug

Steven Raith
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Re: Remember Edwin

They certainly do, my hand to god. Baby geese. Goslings.

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Steven Raith
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Re: Remember Edwin

Hey, some people juggle geese.

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WD unborks MYSTERY My Cloud borkage

Steven Raith
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Oh fuck that, I'll stick with what the Syno box does - log into it over a direct IP connection (DynDNS, fixed IP, whatever) to my home DSL line with it's ports forwarded and use it's web interface to access the files.

One assumes this was possible with the WD devices. If not, they truly are a useless heap of shit, as opposed to just slow.

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Not your father's spam: Trojan slingers attach badness to attachment WITHIN attachment

Steven Raith
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Re: Xzibit believed to be behind this worrying development.

And a sausage dropped off my fork onto my shirt from snorting with laughter too hard is what I get for reading El Reg comments when eating me tea.

Upvote APPROVED, sir.

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Steven Raith
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Re: Don't expect software to save you

That serious resistance will be renaming them as stuff.abc, rather than stuff.zip, which seems to fool 90% of attachment filters I've come across (all of which are presumably blacklist powered, rather than whitelist)

"Yar, just rename this at your end, it'll be reet".

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Steven Raith
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Re: Can I get pwned by ZeuS...

....and Rex Harrison as Abraham Lincoln.

This recursion trick obviously works - it got through our paranoid-configured Purity spam/AV filter, which is otherwise imrpessively robust.

Cheeky.

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Wookiee! CHEWIE'S BACK in Star Wars Ep VII – blab Hollywood 'sources'

Steven Raith
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Re: WORTH THE PRICE OF ADMISSION....

Do you really want to see an old Harrison Ford combing the tagnuts out of Chewies matted fur?

Sorry if I just ruined a childhood there....

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Steven Raith
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These rumour starters....

Don't they realise there are probably other tall people who can make vague arm gestures and tilt their head while dressed in a fur suit?

Most Tenous Link Ever.

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The... Windows... XPocalypse... is... NIGH

Steven Raith
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Re: Garage PC

To be honest, that's a perfect candidate for a Linux install by the sounds of it.

Drop the RAID if it's hardware based (or soft-hard, like the SilI3112, etc) and just drop Linux on it, and you can set up a linux software RAID mirror if you really feel the need.

If it really is just an internet client, throw a live Mint/Ubuntu/SUSE boot disk at it, and see if it behaves itself. If so, back up the data, nuke it, and carry on.

Bear in mind that if that machines talks to any network stores you have, and you get Cryptolocked - you're humped, period.

I'm not one for pushing Linux on everything, but if it suits, it suits. I'd say it's worth a sniffle if you find yourself bored in the garage at the weekend with a couple of beers to keep you company.

Steven R

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Samsung's thumb-achingly ENORMO Galaxy Note Pro 12.2

Steven Raith
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Paging Dom Jolly...

Dom Jolly to the stage please, Dom Jolly to the stage, thankyou.

Has to be said, it won't take a huge amount more functionality for something like this to replace a tablet - the screen is nearly the same size as the shonky old Macbook I'm typing this on, and it's primarily used (at home, at least) for web browsing and pushing stuff to the Chromecast.

OK, I need far, far more out of it at work, but if I had a tablet like that (at a more reasonable price, come on economies of scale) I could leave the laptop in the bag when I'm not in work and just use one of these.

Then root it, so it can do some of the things the laptop does. Ah, bugger, I've gone in a loop again.

Anyway, nice to see the form factor (that I, many years ago, said I couldn't see a use case for!) being expanded to see what takes off. Be interesting to see what sales are like compared to the 8 and 10 inch variants.

Steven R

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Microsoft's Windows 8.1 updates also tweak Windows Server 2012

Steven Raith
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Re: The beginning of the end of Microsoft.

I suspect that the people who decide UI implementation and the people who decide AD tool integration and functionality are not the same people.

I agree though, I was gobsmacked the first time I right clicked a DHCP addy and there wasn't an option to just make it reserved - instead having to copy and paste the MAC addy over into a new reservation.

I mean, hell, 90% of consumer routers support that sort of 'one click reservation' functionality, why can't a full blown, so called enterprise network service OS do it?

Haven't tried in 2012 yet, or maybe I have, and I just don't remember it as it didn't stick out as much as it not working....etc.

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Steven Raith
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Re: The beginning of the end of Microsoft.

I've said it before, and I'll say it again; ironically, despite it's Fisher-Price looks, the NewUI thingy actually works pretty well on Server2012; it makes finding esoteric admin tools quite a lot easier (typing 'acti' then hitting return is easier and faster than going through four levels of nested menus to find ADUC - then clicking on the wrong one because the user decided not to upgrade their ball mouse from twelve years ago).

Other times, you just don't notice it very much. Surprisingly, it rarely gets in the way. I've not noticed any tools that go into NewUI fullscreen mode, either (which lets face it, is the really annoying part). Anyone know of any?

My more major concern is the idea of rolling yearly major updates for a server OS. Strikes me as a bit...annoying. Hey kids, want a more secure network stack? You need to reboot your server three times to get it! Windows was never too hot to trot on that one anyway, though.

Anyways, point is, Server2012 is not some weird hybrid of pain - it works pretty well. And I say that as someone who has a Mac for generally work use, a main Linux box at home, and who works on Windows Servers to pay the bills. They're all a bit shit sometimes, but calling out Server 2012 over a feature that genuinely isn't much of a problem (and has some fairly neat underlying features, as well as the awful-in-desktop-land-but-works-oddly-well-in-server-land UI) and people claiming that it is, most likely haven't used it in anger, or they'd see that for the most part, it just isn't a problem, strangely enough!

Seriously, fire up a VM and have a deek, it's not as bad as you think it is, if you use it the way they intended. I wouldn't go as far as to say it's a good feature, but it's not bad by any means.

Now, the 'Windows will reboot upon logon in three days after installing updates' feature, that's annoying and I believe is the default option. Ugh. There's now a fix to stop it from rebooting outside of scheduled maintenance times, but that caused some grief for some of our clients. We know better than to trust Automatic Updates now though.

http://blogs.technet.com/b/askcore/archive/2013/10/08/window-8-server-2012-computers-reboot-outside-of-maintenance-window-after-installing-updates.aspx

You wanna be pissed at something, be pissed at stupid shit like that.

Steven R

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Mechanical monster macropod LEAPS out of the lab

Steven Raith
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What's that skip?

You want to kill all humans? Well, I'm not sure that's *GGRRAAAK*

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Siri set to rival Windows beauty Cortana after Apple eats Novauris

Steven Raith
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Does anyone actually use these systems...

...in anger - you know, as opposed to just for fun or to see if it can recognise 'navigate to galasheils' correctly?

Not trolling, just curious!

Steven R

(PS: I noticed that Googles voice stuff has gotten *much* better recently - it previously couldn't navigate me to Bridlington at all, now I struggle to get it to make mistakes. I still don't use it though!)

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Helpdesk/Service Desk Recommendations

Steven Raith
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Kaseya?

Used it before in a school with 400PCs/1000 users, I'll be honest, I can't remember if it does all that stuff, but it certainly worked well enough, and had integrated remote desktop tools etc.

If anyone has used it recently, feel free to knock me down, but that's the first one that comes to mind as it wasn't too bad at all as I recall.

Spiceworks isn't one I thought of, but looking through it, it's probably worth a look - would need to open up WMI on the network though as I recall.

I'll be keeping tabs on this thread as it's always worth knowing what the current good support systems are, might want to update our own internal stuff at some point.

Steven R

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David Cameron defends BT's taxpayer-funded broadband 'monopoly': It's a 'success story'

Steven Raith
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Re: If you're going to plow billions into telecoms infrastructure...

Just for reference, Pedanto The Wonder Horse, I was typing (and spelling) that as I was working on three PCs and a server, and I may, just may, have pulled that figure out of my capacious backside for the sake of an example of a very large number. ;-)

I don't disagree with any of your particular points, however - it's just that at some point, the copper network will have to be pulled if we want more than 100mb/sec to the home at an average level. How that is going to be done is going to be....well, it'll be an interesting day when they announce the hows (and how much's) of that little trick.

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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If you're going to plow billions into telecoms infrastructure...

...then why not do it properly - throw £30bn at the telecoms network as a PPP and replace every duct and run with something more accessible, resite the cabs so that no-one has more than a mile of post-cab cabling, and then you are set to roll out whatever cable-based connectivity you want.

Hmm. I think I just made a case for renationalising the physical telecoms infrastructure.

That makes me feel sad.

Steven R

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El Reg's Deep Outback XP upgrade almost foiled by KILLER ARACHNIDS

Steven Raith
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As I recall, they follow a german-ish model for derestriction - that is, it's up to the traffic officer to decide if you're driving dangerously, and penalties for being a dick about it are pretty severe.

100mph in a Micra - might well get a ticking off.

130mph in a BMW 5-series with a V8? Less likely.

Still, interesting to see derestriction used sensibly - especially given that speeding laws around the rest of Oz are tightly policed.

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Molyneux: Working at Microsoft is 'like taking antidepressants'

Steven Raith
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Re: I was on anti-depressants

Yes, I upvoted you, because six years ago I had the same thought - hence staying away from train platforms!

(standing at edge of platform, get brainzap, stagger forwards, realise what's happening, lean back and fall on arse to prevent it. Funny looks from commuters > being train paste...)

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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Re: I was on anti-depressants

I was on (lots of different) antidepressants.

Venlafaxine - I think - was by far the most interesting in terms of withdrawal symptoms - great big spasms/zaps down your spine that would seriously jerk you - made walking difficult.

Suffice to say I stayed away from train platform edges.

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Homeopathic remedies contaminated with REAL medicine get recalled

Steven Raith
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Re: Water music

If homeopathy were real, we'd all be immune to urinary tract infections.

And piles. Probably.

:-)

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Ancient telly, check. Sonos sound system, check. OMG WOAH

Steven Raith
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Re: Is it a joke??

I get jzlondons point about the connectivity, but is there really that big a market for multiroom sound of quality better than the average AppleTV connected to a Line-in/spdif could provide?

I realise some people have large houses and have an upstairs 'play room' (gaming, films, music etc) but surely in that case, you'd be better off with, say, two apple TVs and two AV amps set up, rather than two sonos soundbars that will have compromised audio from the outset due to the design parameters?

I'm not trying to be arsey to jzlondon, but even my techy mates who are substantially better rewarded for their work than me (it's a running joke that I know more than most of them and am paid worse than all of them ;-) ) run seperate hifi systems tuned to that room, and have Apple TV or a Squeezebox rather than the Sonos stuff as it allows them to really mix and match the equipment to suit.

I suppose that the Sonos stuff must appeal to people who want better than average sound, better than average connectivity, but aren't fussy about detail stuff - takes all sorts, eh?

Steven R

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Nvidia, VMware join to pipe high-quality 3D graphics from the cloud

Steven Raith
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Re: More cloud frauds going on...

Stuff the (internet delivery) cloud - I can think of half a dozen clients of mine who use CADCAM stuff, but rarely concurrently under load, and having one or two beefy GPUs sharing their power in a server, rather than a dozen GPUs doing not much most of the time, would probably save them the cost of the server side hardware alone. Bandwidth/latency would not be an issue.

I'm not in a position to implement any of this stuff (I've fallen behind in the VM stuff as most of my clients just aren't of the scale to justify it, annoyingly) but I think I'll have to read up a bit...

Steven R

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