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* Posts by Steven Raith

1535 posts • joined 26 Jun 2007

Virgin Media blocks 'wankers' from permissible passwords

Steven Raith
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Re: Racial slurs

Chink is still used commonly to describe a small opening, a chink in the armour, etc - it's use is not purely for offensive purposes against the Chinese.

Can't say the same for the others.

Chink still has a legitimate use in language - the others do not (and lets be honest, never really have), other than to offend.

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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Re: Presumably

Or perhaps:

FvcKsT1ck5

?

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Rubbish WPS config sees WiFi router keys popped in seconds

Steven Raith
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Re: WPS stands for...

Don't be daft.

It stands for Worthless Piece of Shit.

HTH.

Steven R

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If you think 3D printing is just firing blanks, just you wait

Steven Raith
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Re: PROGRESS!

Without wishing to be that guy, there's a shitload more to an SLR than just having replaceable lenses.

Unless your snapshot camera can take shots ten times a second, correctly evaluated, at 16mp each, and fire them off to a storage device for 50 shots at a time in RAW format, natch (although I believe quite a few compacts can shoot in raw and have pretty wide/open lenses for shooting in darker scenes, too).

SLRs compared to a point n shoot are like a boutique gaming PC compared to a mid-range tablet in terms of power and scope for expansion. You don't have that power and scope for expansion without having more sophisticated internals, and that increases the cost.

Completely agree about inkjets though - most people would probably be better off with a cheap laser and using their local print shop/online service for the 1 in 1000 colour images/photos they need - or the once in every three months they print something only to find the heads have clogged up, and they have to use half a cartridge just to clean the damned thing out.

IME very few people actually need to be able to print off photos in high quality and those that do tend to do it often, and tend to a fairly high end printer for it, and so accept the cost of ink as part of the process.

Steven R

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BOFH: The current value of our IT ASSets? Minus eleventy-seven...

Steven Raith
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Well, there's a contract, involving terminations. But we needn't say more on that, need we, MrXavia?

*impatiently taps spade handle*

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Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store

Steven Raith
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AC. Read this archived web page.

Web archive image of the promotion to encourage more apps

For the devoid of clickity:

Keep The Cash

Publish apps.

Get up to $2000*

Publish your app(s) in the Windows Store and/or Windows Phone Store from March 8th to June 30th, 2013.

Enter up to 10 apps per Store and get a $100 virtual Visa card for each that qualifies (up to $2000*).

Enter Now

Now, fill out the form below. You can get a $100 virtual Visa card for every qualified app you enter (up to $2000*). So don't stop with just one app! If you're eligible to receive the offer, we'll notify you by email.

That's the sort of thing that really encourages quality development, and not just Apps that download a link to the VLC installer at the low, low cost of $2.49.

Microsoft - encouraging asshattery at every turn.

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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I think everyone has missed the point. The point of this is not Metro, it's that MS's bribery of developers (throwing Money-Per-App at them) means that there are now thousands of apps that offer you, say, a guide on how to install VLC on your machine. At a cost of a few quid. For something that you can google for free. Which are ranked right up there with the genuine app and VLCs own (free) installer.

AC-Twat: That's where your'e 100% growth is coming from, scamming cunts, paid by MS, who never bothered to check whether the apps were actually functional or offered anything of value.

Talk about missing the point by a country mile.

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Gamma's not a goner! UK ISP sorts out major outage

Steven Raith
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If you want to see beheadings, vote for me (or at least, don't get in the way of my glorious peoples coup).

I'll arrange for everyone who annoys me to be 'reconciled' Given how many people annoy me, that'll probably be a solid 80% of the population.

The Running Man, 24/7, on 50 channels. for 50 years.

Let the games begin!

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Tim Cook in Applerexia fears: New MacBook THINNER THAN EVER

Steven Raith
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Joke

Or the Mach(book) 5

Daisy chain them together with Thunderbolt for faster image editing.

Also, really bad razor burn.

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'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder

Steven Raith
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Re: Shouldn't have resigned

Doing what she did means that if someone fancies hiring her, they know she'll stick to her principals in a manner that doesn't cause a massive shitstorm - even if it doesn't align with their eventual direction.

Had she taken the piss and done as you suggest, she'd be marked as trouble and had trouble working anywhere high profile again. No-one likes a stirrer.

I think she did the right thing (given her stance on the subject) in a fairly reasonable way, from what I have read.

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DNS cockup locks Virgin Media customers out of ntlworld.com email

Steven Raith
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Re: dig ntlworld.com mx

Interestingly, and on a seperate and most likely totally unrelated note, Critical Path/Openwave are having issues with their rDNS lookups not passing through some Cisco ISA devices due to buggy firmware, and Critical Path/Openwave run BT Internets mail servers.

Basically, if BTs filtering system does an rDNS lookup request of 4.3.2.1.IN-ADDR.ARPA, it fails.

If you do 4.3.2.1.in-addr.arpa it passes. But BTs system can't do it in anything other than uppercase.

I'm fully aware this is likely completely unrelated, but I thought some people might appreciate that if they run a mail server/DNS behind a Cisco ISA (or their network provider does) and find odd behaviour. In the case I was working on, the upstream DNS provider (Who provided the rDNS lookup thingies - look, I said I wasn't that hot at internet level DNS ;-) ) claimed to have just bounced the nameserver (one of two was causing an issue) which fixed it, but I suspect that bug may have been part of it.

Contact CriticalPath/Openwave directly on their support email addy if required, BT postmaster doesn't do a damned thing (still not had a response three weeks on)

Just a semi-related (from a loose tech perspective) tidbit for you kids.

Hugs and kisses

Raith

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Steven Raith
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Re: This means mail has been lost

Good point Blane - good point.

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Steven Raith
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Re: This means mail has been lost

Apart from the senders 'sent items' folder.

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Steven Raith
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Re: dig ntlworld.com mx

It can't really be as simple as someone cocking up a DNS update and leaving the damned things blank, can it?

(I'm not that au-fait with Dig, but I know when I do that with my own MX, there's, you know, an ANSWER entry there. Where there isn't here)

Steven R

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Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows

Steven Raith
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Re: Standard Windows timings

Tranche three of those updates - 450+mb of 'recommended' updates.

Nice.

Machine has been nothing but Windows Updates since 0930, now 1400.

Glad I have other things to be doing....

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Steven Raith
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Re: Standard Windows timings

Oh, and for reference - Windows 8.1 install, fresh out of the box (Acer OEM).

Told to install essential updates only - no extras, or addons, etc. Just essential updates.

Tranche 1 - just over 900mb, some 80 updates.

Install, reboot.

Tranche2 - one update, 896 mb by itself.

So those who think Windows Update ain't that bad? Stick that in your pipe and smoke it.

That's nearly 2gb on a fresh machine out of the box, on an operating system that isn't even a year old.

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Steven Raith
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Re: Standard Windows timings

Ey up,

After the subsquent reboot after that tranch of updates, there were another 40mb of updates and then it was done - after another reboot.

And that was only critical updates - no third party apps or 'recommended' updates.

So the thick end of a gigabyte, three hours, and three reboots.

Go Windows Update, it's so FAST!

WRT to accessing a Gallileo machine, RDP using WinFX is pretty tasty, so I hear, but I must admit I've never had a reason to test it with anything in anger (other than RDPing servers, which doesn't count really).

Not had an excuse to have a PXEboot server in here for a long time, not since my last laptops CDRom drive died and I had to rebiuld it. VM of a PXE boot server on Debian, add image, whoosh, sorted!

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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Re: Standard Windows timings

Update - I can confirm that the first tranche of critical updates for a freshly set up machine, today, is a whopping 700mb.

That's the *first* tranche.

HTH.

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Steven Raith
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Re: What software will it run?

"Microsoft has mostly dumped 32-bit Windows but it's still around for some Atom powered devices and of course there is a substantial legacy of such machines."

Unless you get Office 2013, where the recommended install is still the 32bit variant.

Seriously, check your Live account if you have it and have a look at the other install versions - 32bit is the one they expect you to use.

On the OS side, though, 64bit is the way to go, and the way it implements 32bit compatibility is pretty good - better than Linux in some cases.

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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Re: Standard Windows timings

“Funny, I call bullshit on you last statement. I just did a Win7 install with a 256 GB Sata drive and it was AHCI from the start, the Windows install took less than a half hour. THE UPDATES took another 40 minutes. Please stop the FUD!”

So on an SSD with a fast fibre connection, it takes about 20mins to install and maybe a bit under an hour to install just the critical updates - i doubt your specific numbers (I’ve built more Windows boxes than you’ve had hot dinners, including 20 machines a time from the Windows DVD - it would have taken more time to make a proper system image than to do them individually on a 'production line' system). On an SSD system if you want it with all critical updates installed, you’re talking at least an hour. If you want all recommended updates (.net etc) then it’s far, far longer - there are about 2gb of updates, and the .net ones are crushingly slow to install.

Don’t even start on how long it takes over a 16mb internet line with spinning rust storage.

“They got this thing called slipstreaming now. You integrate the updates into your install image so you don't have to piss around installing updates post install.”

Yup, which is great if you’re constantly rebuilding Windows systems. If you’re a home user, or only occasionally rebuilding machines, that time is spent making the slipstreamed image - assuming that it doesn’t cock up the slipstream build when you’re creating it, which because I've done this several times, I have seen. All that saved time, ruined!

As I stated, Linux makes a small base install from one standard OS install disk (no slipstreaming or custom images required), then applies the updates in one shot, then boots you into a working OS. You just can’t do that with Windows as it stands. Linux is, quite simply, better at this - it’s demonstrably true.

“Simple you edit the reg before switching to AHCI mode in the BIOS. or had that thought not occurred to you ?”

So I should do a full install of Windows, then go into the system registry, where one slip up can destroy the machine, change a value, then reboot?

Why can’t it just work this shit out by itself?

That’s less a stab at you and more at Windows, but given that they sorted out most of the uniprocessor/multiprocessor stuff in NT6, I’m hoping that NT7 will be more capable in this regard, because storage types they-are-a-changing and more flexibility will be needed with this stuff.

“Oh and my win 7 installs take 5 minutes from an image via usb 3. About another 2 mins to set up the user. Drivers can take a while maybe 10 minutes to find on the web. Guess you dont know what you are talking about”

How long did it take to create the image? How much did the USB drive cost? What if your machine doesn’t have USB3? What if the image wasn't prepped properly and it accuses you of piracy?

Do you see the inherent problem here? It’s not how it works *out of the box* and as such, doesn’t count. I could image a linux install and have it running in five minutes too, but it’s not massively faster than just booting the standard install image from USB if you have a zippy enough internet connection, so why bother?

“Well, I've done Linux install unattended that took 40 minutes total, on 7 computers, all at the same time. So that would be less than 6 minutes per machine. None of the machines were identical, but it helped that they all had bios setup to boot from ethernet, and Linux compatible hardware.”

I’ve used WDS and Server 2008 to PXEboot 30 bare metal machines with sys prepped images to join the domain, source their drivers from network shares (the network drivers were in the image, natch), apply GPOs to them, install applications and boot to a genuinely complete login screen in under 40 minutes. Admittedly it needed £20k of server and switching behind it, but damn it’s impressive to see it do it. I’m looking forward to trying those tricks in Linux in my new job, frankly - linux sysadmin stuff. That’s also not a barb, I really enjoy this level of automation, it’s awesome.

“Last time I looked (which was two days ago) those 150 updates came to about 500Mb.

If you're only doing an install ONCE I don't see the need for bitching - 500Mb is nothing.”

That’s the first tranche of critical updates - as I noted elsewhere, if you do recommended settings, you’re talking a couple of gig, including lots of very slow .net installs. I agree with your statement that if you’re doing more than half a dozen, you owe it to yourself to learn sys prep and imagex.

As for Ubuntu updates, you get a couple of hundred megs of updates that install in one shot, you might want to reboot to get the latest kernel, and that’s it. I get a couple of megs of updates a day on my home Dev box, and it’s been running for about three weeks before I decided to reboot it to get the latest kernel, which requires a reboot to install. You don’t need to do three updates with a linux system out of the box - typically just one.

Lots of bollocks posted on here (and some reasonable, if moderately inexperienced conjecture). Long and short is that Windows really needs a better update mechanism, ideally one that allows on-the-fly slipstreaming of the install image. the rest (all the updates etc) would require serious, core changes to the way Windows and NTFS work, and I can’t see them coming till the next major NT revision update.

Which is a shame, as much as though I’m ranting here, I quite like Windows for it’s general usability. I’m just really glad I won’t have to work with it (and fix it, and install it, etc) on a day to day basis soon.

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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Re: Standard Windows timings

Installing Windows isn't the problem.

It's the gigabytes of updates it requires post install that are the issue, which can take anything from hours to days to install depending on your connectivity and performance levels.

Windows 8.x seems to improve this though, grabbing and applying updates post-install seems to be much improved - I think it may be doing some slipstreaming of the install WIM as it goes along or something - proof will be in the pudding in a years time when there are more, larger patches for it.

Steven R

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Bright lights, affordable motor: Ford puts LED headlights onto Mondeo

Steven Raith
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Re: Fun factor

Someone in my family - definitely not my dad, cough - used to have some crazy contraption - a Simca or something - with a bigger engine, IRS rear end, etc, and a 100w floodlamp on the back to discourage tailgaters.

He then flashed an unmarked cop car and was asked if he would mind removing that from the car. Right now. Or it's to the cop shop with you, sonny. They didn't notice the fully switchable rear lamps (including number plate lamps) though. He's been somewhat more sensible since. Somewhat.

Mind you, the same set of traffic cops also filled him up with scotch, vodka and gin from the photographers developer tubs (one in each, of course) at the cop shop christmas party where mother dearest worked, when he came around to pick her up. They just told him to drive carefully, he'll be alright....

This was the 60s, in the far north of scotland - different time back then, it seems....

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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Re: It may not matter

The main risk from a xenons is from the ballast unit (it's multiple kv to strike up the bulb, with maintained high voltage to keep the arc going - low current, but not something you want to test by licking the terminals) - as long as the power to the lamps is off, and you hold the bulb by the glass, with suitable protection (As you should anyway - skin oils on a lamp is the fastest way to kill it) you should be fine.

You can reasonably safely (although not especially wisely) change halogens with the lamps on, you should never do this with Xenons, period. They aren't supposed to provide strike voltage at any period other than initial power on, but if the unit is faulty, it'd be a nasty shock to get.

WRT to replacement LED modules, it'd be sensible to have click-lock connectors and a modular system where you can remove the cooling apparatus, lamp module, power reguylator, directional control unit, etc seperately so that you can do roadside repairs quickly (also required by law these days - after a few manufacturers made changing the bulb something that require removing the fucking wheelarch lining!) but I'll put £5 on everything but the lamp module being sealed up.

Ever tried to replace the levelling motor in a standard headlamp unit these days? Fat fucking chance, that'll be £200 for a new headlamp module, thanks*.

Steven R

*unless ebay, and a good screwdriver kit, are your friend, of course - but an OEM garage would insist on replacing the whole shebang.

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So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL

Steven Raith
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I recall four companies who went to replace their Blackberry sync systems - and handsets - with exchange and iPhones/Android handsets once Exchange ActiveSync was good enough, because they didn't need the full device encryption, end to end encryption of content, encrypted remote wipe capabilities, nor the added complexity and micromanagement that the BB systems required. Nor their awful management interface.

EAS (or Kerio mit EAS extensions) and an EAS compatible smartphone was more than good enough, and cost less as it meant they could be more agressive sourcing their handsets, rather than being locked into RIMs platforms.

RIM didn't catch up to those who just needed a basic remote comms platform, and they crashed and burned as a result - it was halfway through the burning they started churning out phones to kids, Playbooks (which, hilarious, required a RIM handset for email) not before, as I recall.

Anyone remember it any differently? Just me?

Steven R

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iPhone owners EARN MORE THAN YOU, says mobile report

Steven Raith
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Joke

Re: Mean salaries

A happy salary is better though.

(apologies)

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The Register to boldly go where no Vulture has gone before: The WEEKEND

Steven Raith
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Re: Grub/nosh/snacks

@The_idiot - I'm blaming you for my oncoming heart disease, that sounds pretty damned good - especially the burger one.

I think we're onto something here with the foodyness stuff - there's an article this weekend about coffee and there were some great suggestions in that comment thread too.

El Reg readership, being pragmatic* foodies? Whodathunkit?

Steven R

*pragmatic foodyism is fine - when it's being fancy with food for nothing more than the sake of being fancy....less so.

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Steven Raith
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Re: Grub/nosh/snacks

I'm with John.

Maybe some post hangover slow cooker recipes to prepare while hammered, post pub?

"Now, when you come to slice the tomatos, remember to focus on just one of the three sets of hand/knife/tomato in front of you, to avoid adding something more than tomato juice to the chopping board"

Steven "hic" R

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Steven Raith
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"We can't do anything about the non-vixens and the free lunches"

*deletes bookmark*

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SpaceX prototype rocket EXPLODES over Texas. 'Tricky' biz, says Elon Musk

Steven Raith
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Re: "Rockets are tricky …"

That actually sounds about right, Phil!

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Steven Raith
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"Rockets are tricky …"

Pff, it's not like it's brain surgery...

(with apologies to, I believe, Monty Python? correct me if I'm wrong about the one-upmanship sketch)

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BAT-GOBBLING urban SPIDER QUEENS swell to ENORMOUS SIZE

Steven Raith
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Re: Not just Oz.. happening in the UK aswell

HandleOfGod - you're spot on about the speed, apparently it's just over 1mph, maybe it just seems faster when you watch them as they scamper across the floor like something out of a cartoon!

As for the daddy longlegs spiders, to counter your debunking of my info, I'll debunk yours, in a reciprocal debunking session (that sounded far dirtier than I wanted it to)

http://spiders.ucr.edu/daddylonglegs.html

Basically there are two types of daddy long legs spiders that people refer to - one is the one with only one body section, which has no venom at all (And is in fact a scavenger), the other one does have venom, but has never had it's venom tested for toxicity because no-one really gives a toss (no reported injuries from it) - so there's no facts to base the rumour on. Even the 'not able to bite humans because fangs too short' thing is a bit woofly.

Anyway, spiders are cool. Have an upvote.

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Steven Raith
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Re: Not just Oz.. happening in the UK aswell

Looks like either a giant house spider (yes, that's its real name) or (less likely) a hobo spider.

GHS are pretty laid back things, and very, very docile. Seriously, they are utter softies and are fine to be handled - they won't bite, in fact trying to get them to bite at all is a challenge - you really have to harass them. They're pretty happy to go hand-to-hand if you need to move one to calm an arachnophobic flatmate/missus down.

Hobo spiders are territorial and can be aggressive if disturbed and have been known to nip, but they can't do any harm - a bee sting is far worse unless you're allergic AFAIK, and that's pretty rare.

GHS's kill hobo spiders. Among dozens of other unpleasant multilegged motherfuckers (slaters, etc)

So take that chap, and pop him in a corner somewhere out of the way - he's your friendly eight legged pest control who works for free.

Also - point of fact - GHS are the fastest true spiders in the world. On a hot day, they can run at 15mph or so. I'm not a massive fan of spiders, but even I think they look insanely cool running at that speed.

Steven R

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BOFH: We CAN do that with a Raspberry Pi, but think of the BODIES

Steven Raith
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Indeed. The ending particularly pleased me.

"And who will you turn to?"

"You," the PFY sighs once more.

"And what will I turn to?"

"The roll of carpet."

-------

I approve.

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Mac OS X 10.10 Yosemite and VPN's...

Steven Raith
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I've not had any problems with it, but then I've only been connecting to PPTP connections on Drayteks. My biggest issue was that the notification breaks on the 'dark' UI.

There's been another update to Yosemite (which also fixes the dark status area problem) so it might be worth updating and retrying?

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Not really very live at all from London - It's the Vulture News videocast

Steven Raith
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Playmobile

Come on, surely it was obvious? You could use it for reconstructions.....er, I mean, live feeds, too.

Optimus Prime would approve, I'm sure.

Steven R

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Best shot: Coffee - how do you brew?

Steven Raith
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Re: Aeropress fan here

Ah, overdoing the coffee, I've done that.

The ex (who I still get on great with) donated me her espresso machine after she got one of those capsule things (nespress methinks) and she didn't need it any more. Fine.

I spent a couple of nights drinking the coffee, but thought it tasted oddly strong. Two or three cups a night, and had some major problems sleeping.

Of course, after two days, I realised there was a difference between a filter coffee machine and an espresso machine.

Woops.

I now only break it out on a Sunday, and I dilute it properly to make americano things (IE just black coffee). I'm thinking an Aeropress is a good idea though, as I've always been a coffee drinker, it's just normally I'm prepared to put up with the slightly crappy taste of Gold Blend for the convenience. If the Aeropress gives me the convenience with better coffee as a result, then why not?

Steven "hyper" R.

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Claim: Microsoft Alt-F4'd Chilean government open-source install bid

Steven Raith
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Re: Chile first, Munich coming

" And of course as per the user complaints - the result sucks too."

Just wait till they see Windows 8... ;-)

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Steven Raith
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Re: Chile first, Munich coming

Unlikely - subsequent reports have stated that the (recently elected) mayoral staff were talking out of line, and the rest of the council have rolled their eyes at them so hard that their eyes nearly fell down the back of their throats.

Munich has sunk a lot of physical and development time into this (reportedly, not as much as subsequent MS updates would have cost) and it'd be financial suicide to rip the whole lot up and start again with current MS tech. Which no-one in Munich actually plans to do, from all accounts.

Steven R

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Stand clear! Will HTC's One act as a defibrillator for Windows Phone?

Steven Raith
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Re: WTF?

Speccy bastard?

Commie twat?

(for the youths - Sinclair Spectrum Vs Commodore 64 was the Xbox Vs PS argument of a slightly....more esoteric, and far cooler generation)

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Steven Raith
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Re: Stand clear! Will HTC's One act as a defibrillator for Windows Phone?

Then that downvote was worth it.

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Steven Raith
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Stand clear! Will HTC's One act as a defibrillator for Windows Phone?

Hahaha.

No.

Steven 'I expect I'll be moderated out for offering nothing constructive - sorry chaps!' R

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Top Gun display for your CAR: Heads-up fighter pilot tech

Steven Raith
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Re: Why?

I've got a heated front screen in my girls car, chaps - you get double reflections meaning everything is a pig to read.

I appreciate the input though, I had used a different HUD thingy, didn't realise Torque had one! Might be useful for checking MAF airflow and badger throughput when testing, etc....

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The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?

Steven Raith
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Re: Some suggestions

I refuse to buy any game that isn't released on Linux these days, even though I do have a Win7 install with Steam on it. Which is not a very effective tactic.

I email the publishers contact email address/contact form explaining why I refuse to buy it, however, even though I could play it on the Windows side, which is probably more so.

My wallet is here, fuckers. Just give me an excuse to throw the contents at you.

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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Re: Reboot into gaming OS???

It seems odd to me that because Windows keeps fucking up your Linux installs, you'll stick with Windows.

That sounds like stockholm syndrome to me, sir. Although in my advanced years (32, I'm such a codger) I'm getting lazy about that too.

I'll give you one tip of advice though, which may well change your outlook; assuming you're using GRUB as your bootloader, try out grub-rescue on a bootable Ubuntu USB drive.

That program is the Arthur C Clarke definition of magic, and a must if you want to dual boot, but don't want to be dicking about with manually remapping your boot sector.

Peace out!

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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Re: Loving it so far.

The beta install is based on an image, taken from a 500gb HDD (As that was the hardware spec for the Steam Machine beta hardware - 500gb hybrid SSD drive).

There are a multitude of ways of getting this down to well under 20gb (I ran it in a VM that was 20gb in size and it didn't have any problems fitting), which I'd expect the final version will managed using a standard Debian-esque guided install.

HTH.

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Steven Raith
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Re: It's unlikely to improve

Don't forget mobile games, which are primarily OpenGL-variant based.

Targetting for OpenGL is very sensible these days and most major engines now have support for both OGL and Linux (Unreal engine, Cryengine, Source, power a substantial slice of all AAA gaming) so building it for linux/OGL is effectively a compile switch and some debug; just like compliling for XBone/PS4/MacOS/Windows is just a compile switch and debug, because PS4 and Mac OS can't use DirectX, so you need to target OGL anyway, unless you are doing a Microsoft exclusive title.

DirectX is not a niche target obviously, but it's dominance has never been less certain, which is a good thing IMHO.

Steven R

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Steven Raith
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Re: Never gonna replace windows

Those people clearly aren't well informed or tech savvy.

Anyway, as noted, Metro Redux will be out on them, and Cryengine has full support, the next Source engine, too.

You are spot on however, that it's a chicken and egg scenario - if they don't make games for it, no-one will use it. If they don't use it, no-one will make games for it!

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Steven Raith
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Some suggestions

Serious Sam 3 and Metro Last Light are available on it, and are both top fun.

Metro Redux should be out on it soon, too.

I like the idea of SteamOS, but my Ubuntu+Steam box does me fine for now.

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Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!

Steven Raith
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Re: Just a note....

In short, it'd be like the depute mayor of Islington council saying that his windows 7 machine that replaced his lovely XP machine is shit, he wishes they could go to Mac OS and iMacs.

AKA brainless spouting by an elected official with no grasp of the technical or financial requirements for such a change, because they have people to do that for them.

Or, AKA, a load of trumped up bollocks from a numpty being played by the MS-friendly press as something it quite clearly is not.

Steven R

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Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer

Steven Raith
Silver badge

Re: Seriously?

I was going to say something similar. Perhaps if I cut nice big holes in the bushes of his control arms, he'd like to come back to us about how important accurate steering is.

As he does involuntary lane changes at 70mph....

I agree with his general point that you don't need 1600dpi to use a desktop WIMP environment, but that has to be one of the more poorly thought out car analogies I've seen lately!

Steven R

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