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* Posts by MachDiamond

376 posts • joined 10 Aug 2012

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NASA tests crazytech flying saucer thruster, could reach Mars in days

MachDiamond
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Randal Munroe sums up

http://xkcd.com/1404/

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MachDiamond
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Re: @Machdiamond

Chris Miller - If your power source is solar, turn over is going to be much less than half the distance as insolation will be dropping off as the square of the distance. Your estimated mass is also low. It's a much longer duration, more food, water, air and other consumables to bring along. More fuel for a lander. I would also expect that the mission would be more than flag planting, so there will be more supplies to do research with.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Gravity

If the acceleration is only 0.1G, it's not going to be all that useful for astronaut health. A big problem is that we do not know how the human body reacts to different gravitational fields. The only data we have is 1G and 0G. This is why I advocate a return to the moon with stays long enough to get data on how the human body might adjust. It might be a big problem to find that after 2 years on Mars astronauts could not return to Earth. Then what? Continue to send them care packages indefinitely or apologize for abandoning them on another planet to die.

I'm having a bit of a problem with people that think 1kW or even 2.5kW is sufficient to complete a trip from Earth to Mars in a couple of weeks. Regardless of the method of propulsion, it takes a certain amount of energy a certain amount of time to accelerate a given mass to a specified velocity. I'll leave the math as an exercise for the student since I need to get to the post office before they close.

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Tesla and Panasonic to build NOT-SO-SECRET GigaFactory in US

MachDiamond
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Where, Maybe

http://transportevolved.com/2014/08/01/t-e-n-ev-future-car-news-1-august-2014-tesla-gigafactory-confirmation-crash-tests-robotic-cars/

The Transport Evolved website reported previously about a site rumored to be being prepared for the Tesla-Panasonic(-US Government) Gigafactory. The report also stated that the construction company had been sacked after several weeks of running 24/7. Elon trying to be as mercurial as the late Steve Jobs?

The above link also states that Tesla's current production shut down to retool for the Model X should help boost annual projected shipments over the currently predicted 35,000 units. For reference, Ford builds ~35,000 F150 trucks every 36 hours.

Given that Tesla has situated their production facility in an area with one of the highest cost of living indexes, finding employees that can afford to work for reasonable wages might be a bigger stumbling block than the claimed limitations in battery supplies.

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Adam Afriyie MP: Smart meters are NOT so smart

MachDiamond
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"we'd still need near-line generators that can be rapidly brought on line to meed transient demand or to fill in when there's little wind, this can be done with hydro or gas both of which can go from idle to generating in a few minutes,"

Many hydro installations can go from off to generating in 20-30 seconds. NG combustion plants take about 20 minutes and combined cycle natural gas turbines can take 40+ minutes to come online.

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Yes, Australia's government SHOULD store comms metadata

MachDiamond
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Whoops, the drive failed.

ISP's can just follow the American Internal Revenue Service and claim that the drive/tape/alien storage device containing the metadata failed and was disposed of. You know? that sort of thing happens quite frequently with consumer grade drives used in an enterprise application. Ask the experts. Since The Man® isn't shifting cash to the ISP's to buy these drives, there isn't any way they can afford more robust kit.

Yeah, that's the ticket.

Most failed lawyers, err, I mean politicians, have no concept of what it takes to run a competitive business when their brain spasms get drafted into laws. Using the same logic, why not start requiring the post office to open, photocopy and store a copy of every piece of mail they handle in case the information is useful on the next witch hunt? Never mind the cost, just pass a law.

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You, Verizon. What's with the download throttle? Explain yourself – FCC boss

MachDiamond
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Pardon me for reading

I haven't read the Verizon T&C's but I have read them from several other companies which leads me to use the phrase "unlimited, for a certain value of unlimited." Every T&C I HAVE read has a clause that allows the provider to throttle the bandwidth of any users they feel are using more than an average amount of data services. The exact wording I'd have to look up, but it's always very nebulous so the provider doesn't have to commit to a fixed number. I don't have any doubt that the top 5% of the users on any data service use a disproportionately large amount of total bandwidth.

No crime, nothing to see here. It's all written down and the user signed the form at the bottom.

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Feel free to BONK on the TUBE, says Transport for London

MachDiamond
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Re: How will this work?

"The card needs to be about a centimetre away from the yellow card reader before it will pick it up,"

That's just the software/firmware looking at signal strength. Cards can be read from further away less reliably, but the crooks aren't too chuffed if it coks up 50% of the time.

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In the Land of the Free, Home of the Brave ... you can legally carrier unlock your own phone

MachDiamond
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Mind your budget

If you are handing your teenagers $600 smartphones, that's your poor judgement. If they just "have" to have the latest model or "they'll just die of embarrassment" maybe it's time they got a job or start thinking of how behind they would be with no phone at all.

Phones are a commodity item now. The factories that stamp out the iPhones and Galaxies are probably the same ones producing the off-brand stuff. I picked up a Blu Advance for $99 and it's given me good service for the last bunch of months. It also has dual sims that I use to have a personal and business line. Not going to get that with Samsung or Apple. I also have replaceable batteries (hello Apple!). At the end of the year I bet that I will be able to find another phone in the same price range with 2x the performance I have now and I can upgrade. I'll flog off the old phone if it's still alive and have an amortized capital outlay of $10-12/month instead of $60/month.

I started off unlocked and contract free with the Blu. I can swap between AT$T and T-mobile or one of several service resellers and keep my phone number to boot. Right now I'm with Net10 for $50 month, unlimited everything (for a certain value of unlimited).

I could get insurance, but it will likely be faster to just order up a replacement phone and pay for it myself rather than go through the hassle of dealing with the insurance provider. For me, time without the phone would be a bigger factor than spending the extra $10-$20 over what I would have paid into the insurance.

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Elon Musk GIVES UP ON SEX: He'll make do with a 'cheap' Tesla III instead

MachDiamond
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Re: SF (San Jose) to LA (Pasadena) nonstop??

Gotta have the 3x3 protein style!

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Microsoft swings axe at 18,000 bods in its largest ever round of layoffs

MachDiamond
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Re: Mobile first, cloud first

Executive bonuses first.

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Teensy card skimmers found in gullets of ATMs

MachDiamond
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Re: "unregistered prepaid cards"

It would be handy to get an unregistered PP card when traveling to Europe from the US that uses a C&P system. Just something that will work for walking around money.

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Thought PCs were in the toilet? They're STILL eating Apple's lunch

MachDiamond
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Re: That's because

Altium and Solidworks both work ok under VMware Fusion on a Mac Pro, but if you are using them all of the time, a PC (win7) custom built for SW is the way to go. At my last job I had both a Mac and a PC for SW and Eagle. The PC was not allowed on the internet and stayed and clean the whole 3 years I was there. For all of my other work, I much preferred my Mac.

I had SW on VMware on the Mac so I could grab stuff from Content Central. I was laughed at for being paranoid at first, but that faded as everybody else spent far more time than I did on bug hunts.

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MachDiamond
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Re: That's because

Sorry irongut, Mac's tend to live a longer life than PC's that get replaced every couple of years (maybe they go longer now since XP isn't an option for new models).

If you think that only stupid people buy a Mac, the next time you see a program on NASA, check out what the prevalent brand of laptop is around the conference tables. Yep, they're predominately Mac's.

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FCC commish: We don't need no steenkin' net neutrality rules

MachDiamond
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Re: Good thing

It won't matter where you are in the world if the FCC gets pwnd by the ISP's. If any connection to content you want routes through the US, you may get shunted to the slow lane if the creator can't/won't pay the squeeze.

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Amazon begs Feds for drone test permission slip

MachDiamond
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Re: And where is your warehouse?

Exactly right. Moving and hour or two outside of a major city often means warehouses that are considerably cheaper. That still provides for next day service and the possibility of same day pick up if one wants to drive over or have a private courier make the delivery. There are times when getting something the same day can be far cheaper than waiting for the next day. Large manufacturers will sometimes charter a corporate jet to get a parts delivery within hours. A automobile assembly line might cost a company over £100k/hour to have idled over a missing part.

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MachDiamond
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Target rich enviroment

Cracked's story has the clear ring of possibility to it. UAS delivery is going to be expensive and that means that the only things worth shipping with it will also be very expensive. Knocking one out of the air to nick the contents of the bin is likely to be very profitable.

Another dodge is using the service to get items delivery quickly and within a specified time frame. If somebody is going to use a stolen credit card number to make a few purchases, they can have the bounty shipped to the already listed address within a narrow time frame instead of having to wait around for the delivery truck to come around and pose as the purchaser. One could even go a step further if they know the routes the UAV's typically follow. Order what you want with the stolen credit card, wait for the UAS to fly over using the instant GPS online tracking I'm sure the marketeers will insist on, and knock it down.

It must be MBA's freshly recovered from their required lobotomies that are pushing this project. As an engineer, I can come up with a dozen ways to "acquire" a delivery UAS without expending too many ergs thinking about it. An express courier service traveling by car (or bicycle) would be far less expensive and more secure than any UAS could ever be. The insurance would be cheaper as well.

Quite aside from the value of the kit being delivered, parts from the UAS will fetch a few quid too.

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'Our entire corporation cannot send or receive emails from Outlook'

MachDiamond
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Re: There are always trade-offs

dan1980, you should also point out that if you were unavailable, another IT professional could be brought in to troubleshoot the system and get it back working.

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US Supreme Court: Duh, obviously cops need a warrant to search mobes

MachDiamond
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Re: cant this be solved

There exists a phone copying device that doesn't need for a phone to be unlocked. Maybe somebody can remember the post and link back. This kit was/is being sold to law enforcement and it contains an assortment of cables to connect to nearly every phone. A couple of keystrokes and they have a dump of everything on your phone. While you think you have nothing to hide, it might be discovered from your GPS track that you were in the area of a crime at just the right time. While that had nothing to do with you, keep thinking happy thoughts about that while you are sat on the curb in handcuffs for a hour while the doughnut patrol "does their best" to figure out that you aren't involved.

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MachDiamond
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Don't carry IT around

It's about time the ancient board of inquiry… errr, the Supreme Court did a little catching up and at the same time, the right thing.

Beyond this one sane action of the US's highest court, it's not a good idea to be walking the streets with all of your important information on a device that can be easily lost or taken from you. Look at what you are storing on your mobe and ask yourself if it might incriminate you in some way. It doesn't matter if it's pictures of something that was completely innocent, what might it look like to a cop. Do you really need one-click access to your bank account? Do you really need to keep billing statements and sensitive emails in your pocket? Convenient to you is also convenient for The Man® or a thief.

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Google: Glass goggles are a 'fairly lousy surveillance device'

MachDiamond
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Re: What does Andrew Paterson think Glass does?

Strangely enough in the US, only one person in a conversation needs to be aware that it's being recorded. I think it was written this way to outlaw illegal wire taps (except in the case of permission from a secret court with no accountability) by third parties. Anything that you can photograph from a publicly accessible place is fair game. If you are on your own private property, you can take pictures of anything that can see from it. That can include women sunbathing, kids, pets or over a garden fence if the fence is easily seen over without using a ladder or stepping stool. There was a case in New York where a photographer was taking pictures of people in the high rise across the street and selling limited edition prints. The people were furious when they found out, but the judge ruled that it was ok. The judge stated "if they wanted privacy, they could have closed the blinds." A embarrassing look into the quality of judges in the US.

My concern with Glass is that if there is a unquestioned universal acceptance without limitations, lots of bad things can happen. Would you want to hand your credit card and ID to a clerk wearing Glass? Would you be comfortable if the man at the next urinal was recording? Somebody using a phone or dedicated camera to take pictures/video is pretty obvious. It also takes more effort to get the device out and take the images which leaves a few seconds for both brain cells to consider if it's proper.

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Elon Musk: Just watch me – I'll put HUMAN BOOTS on Mars by 2026

MachDiamond
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Re: M'arse

Kharkov, the supplemental oxygen story works to illustrate your point only so far. We had data on people living at altitude and a quick trip up a mountain for some medical tests might point to how much oxygen would need to be supplied to the pilots. To figure out the least amount of spin that would be needed for a long journey spacecraft, we need at least one more datum. The moon looks like the best place to do that.

I'm pretty sure the two inflatable test habitats that Bigelow has launched are still up there. It's been a while since I have seen any mention of them. I should have seen something if they have been deorbited or destroyed.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Prediction

Yes, I have built a business from the ground up. Got clobbered by the Chinese on cost of manufacture.

I've worked in the aerospace business on some pretty wild projects. I know many people that work for and have worked for SpaceX. This is why I would never take a job with them. I am privy to some exceptionally damning information on Elon that I will not repeat.

Elon is very good at blowing smoke up people's, ahh well, you know. There is so much work left to be done to send a crewed mission to Mars that even a guess at when it could happen is premature. I will qualify that by defining a successful manned mission as one where the crew arrives living and either returns to Earth alive and in good health or are able to live a full life on Mars. At present there isn't a commercially viable argument to go to Mars, so any mission will have to be by a government or funded by a group of wealthy individuals. Mr. Musk, according to some, has far fewer liquid assets than many assume. Just a few years ago he was said to have to borrow money from friends to meet his monthly bills. Banks prefer cash for mortgage payments and not stock options. Strangely enough, so does the electric company.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Prediction

Whoops, I erred.

--- Unveiled a reusable, crewed, powered landing space craft;

Crewed? Not actually even designed for a crew yet and others have been there already--

I was thinking of Grasshopper and not the capsule mock up.

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MachDiamond
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Re: What Mister Musk needs...

There is the small problem of oxidation rates between petrol and chocolate chip cookies. My waistline provides some evidence of that.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Prediction

- Sent his in house designed space ship to the ISS, twice;

Against how many Soyuz flights? Orbital is sending up supplies on their rockets too.

- Announced plans for a gigafactory for Li batteries;

Yeah well, let's see if it happens. Hasn't Panasonic backed out?

- Completed a trans continent charging infrastructure for his electric cars (which isfree to use);

Free to use if you own a Tesla. It's a strange route too.

- Soft landed, for the first time a first stage rocket booster;

It's still left to see if it will be worth the effort.

- Unveiled a reusable, crewed, powered landing space craft;

Crewed? Not actually even designed for a crew yet and others have been there already.

- Announced plans for the worlds largest solar panel factory.

Please hold your applause until the final act….. building it and shipping product.

So if he thinks they can land people on mars in 10-12 years it would be a fool who would bet against it.

If I casino in Las Vegas wants to make book on that prediction, I'll happily bet against Elon.

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MachDiamond
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Re: 10-12 years

6 months to get from Earth to Mars. 10-12 years to build some hardware to do it.

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MachDiamond
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Mars? Pah!

The "public" is all excited about going to Mars. It makes great sound bites for politicians when they campaign in tech heavy regions. Engineers and physiologists shake their heads and moan.

With the relatively recents success of MER, Phoenix, and Curiosity, the tally is up to a 50%ish success rate of getting to Mars. Many of the failures have made their "mark" on the surface of the Red Planet. That's pretty dismal. There will be plenty of people that will sign up to go, but a 50/50 chance of crashing at the end of the first leg isn't good enough odds to spend the billions of dollars it will require.

On the hardware side, there is a lot of work to be done on just recycling human waste. For a vehicle to have a mass that can be sent, there will need to be a very high reuse rate of water. I don't think there is anybody on the planet that could go 6 months without bathing while confined in a small space that wouldn't drive their own nose into revolt.

It won't be just one rocket taking the crew and all of their stuff. There will need to be many launches to deliver the tools and supplies before the crew is sent. All of the gear will need systems to check that it has arrived in good condition. If anything is damaged or destroyed, replacements will need to be sent the next time the planets line up again for a Hohmann transfer orbit. Around 2 years, and then that delivery has to be verified. A F9H launcher to push enough mass all the way to Mars is only the first step. The mass that it's pushing also needs engineering.

Secondly and most importantly will be the health of the crew. To have a mission that is any use, the crew need to arrive healthy and sane. They may have to spring into action to resolve a critical issue right away. Radiation during the journey from solar flares could have some serious implications. There have never been any studies on how the human body reacts to fractional G. We know about how our bodies react on Earth (1G) and also in freefall (0G), but nothing in between. The visits to the moon were not long enough to get any data. Will the crew be fit enough to survive a return trip and adjust to living in Earth's gravitational field again or will their health be so deteriorated as to make coming home fruitless?

"Initial results from a study of Chris Hadfield and other astronauts who spent months aboard the International Space Station have turned up changes like those seen in someone developing Type 2 diabetes on Earth." -www.theglobeandmail.com

We won't even get into issues of sex and pregnancy beyond that trials with mice and rats in 0G were not pretty.

Being physically healthy has to be balanced with good mental health. Being locked up in a cramped high stress environment with other people pushes some people over the edge. The Russians have had a couple of issues during their programs on space stations. There are reports of some problems encountered with US astronauts as well. Gomez and Morticia might be at each others throats locked in a walk-in closet for months on end.

If you aren't an avid reader of science fiction, you are missing out on some great thought experiments into just the issues that will need to be addressed to make a trip to Mars successful. Read the first book in the Mars trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson, Red Mars. The second 2 volumes and the tail end of the fist one delve almost exclusively into societal and political issues. If you have seen videos and read books by Robert Zubrin, you can see his thinking in the storyline. There are some Mars lectures by Robert Zubrin on YouTube. Time for The Stars by Robert Heinlein and Variable Star by Robert Heinlein and Spider Robinson describe some aspects of living on a starship.

Many of my friends work for NASA, JPL, AFRL (Air Force Research Labs), ULA, SpaceX and other aerospace firms and when we get together we invariably talk about space stuff. Except for one dreamer, the rest of us see returning to the moon and establishing a base there as a needed step in any long term goal of sending people to Mars. While there are challenges in building a lunar base that won't exist on Mars, there are many technologies that can be tested in a real off-Earth environment. The most important item to test is the human body. Some long term data on how the human body reacts in a reduced gravity environment will be of major importance. The benefit of a lunar base might be more valuable than any other endeavor to date. He3 might be a minor factor. A facility that can work on genetic engineering or nasty viruses like ebola would be as safe as one could get. Just don't connect it with anything else. If the worst happens the facility could be opened up to vacuum and raw sunlight or sealed, never to be accessed again. The nearness of luna means that emergency supplies could be sent quickly and evacuating a crew can be accomplished anytime it's needed. Two things that aren't possible with Mars.

I would like to see Jackass Flats reactivated and work restarted on nuclear thermal rocket engines. We could use chemical rockets to get into Earth orbit and a NTR for the trip to Mars. If there were issues, using a propellent depot to top up the chemical (liquid stage) of the rocket for the initial push before starting up a NTR at a further point away from Earth could be a possibility. The objective would be a system that could get a crew to Mars in the least amount of time. We would have to find the best way to collect Hydrogen on Mars to refuel the main propulsion stack (left in orbit) for the trip back.

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MachDiamond
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Re: That about wraps it up for SpaceX

"There are far more difficult things to manage through if you want to be in the business. Politics being the thorniest of those issues."

If I prod you with a stick labeled ITAR, will you vent steam?

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MachDiamond
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Re: That about wraps it up for SpaceX

"It's rocket engineering that's difficult, and right now the only people doing it are SpaceX, the ESA (Ariane) and the Russians (Soyuz and ULA).

If the engineering was that easy, why are the ULA buying their engines from Russia?

Nobody else is making the size of rocket engine needed to put tonnes into orbit."

There are lots of people doing rocket engineering. Orbital is often overlooked, but they are also resupplying the ISS. Blue Origin is developing rockets. Virgin Galactic, Xcor. Up Aerospace, Sierra Nevada Corporation, Space Dev, Firestar, Ventions and a bunch more.

Any question that has the string "why are the(y)" or "why aren't they" can usually be answered with one word, money.

It had been much cheaper for ULA to buy RD-180 engines off the shelf than to spend millions of dollars in tooling to build a copy. I think I read that ULA has a license to build the engines in the US if they want, but at this point it looks like they have an RFQ out to find somebody that will build them a replacement rather than just a copy. It was in the AIAA Daily Launch newsletter sometime in the past week.

There are rocket engines of many sizes that can be made again if there is a market demand for them. Even the hunks of crap they used to stick under the Shuttle. Hell, the plans for the F1 still exist and some of the tooling might be rusting away in a company yard somewhere.

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MachDiamond
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Re: That about wraps it up for SpaceX

Dani, $300 billion… yes and no. A large proportion of that figure is going to be wrapped up in the satellites, not the launcher. Another big eater of budgets is insurance and an army of weenies with their grubby little hands out. I'll have to see if I can find some figures on what percentage of the $300 billion is hardware.

Right now budgets are formulated to include throwing the satellite away after a certain lifetime. You really have to take some classes in orbital dynamics to get a grasp on how big even something as small as earth orbit is. When you start calculating the required deltaV to maneuver a robot around to refuel and maintain a satellite, you quickly see how little if any return on investment you can get.

Xenon Ion drives are efficient, but the isp (thrust) is so tiny that it's useless for what would be needed on your servicing robot. A combination of an ion drive and classic MMH thrusters would work, but you would have to refuel the refueling robot a bunch somewhere.

Look up some articles on "propellent depots" (orbiting rocket refueling stations). There have been some good papers published in the last few years.

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MachDiamond
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Re: That about wraps it up for SpaceX

Don Jefe, I disagree. SpaceX had a pretty phat target to shoot at to get into the market. The old guard, working on cost+ contracts, has grown fat and lazy. To this day they seem to be trying to play politics to keep SpaceX out of the military launching business instead of reworking themselves to be more efficient and compete on a level playing field.

The barrier to entry is still very high. An even higher barrier is finding the right group of experienced engineers to turn the business plan into real hardware. There aren't that many out there to fill very specialized disciplines like navigation and guidance. Youth and energy are one thing, but I have worked with interns pursuing an aerospace engineering degree that didn't know what standard screw sizes are in their 3rd year. That's going to cost a company a bunch of time and money while that person learns about real hardware IF there are some seasoned engineers around to help them out.

The 45th space wing at Cape Canaveral has to be very convinced about quality before they will allow a company to put a rocket on a launch pad and send it off. A new company has a tough battle to get to that point. I've got the T-shirt, I know.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Float? More like Sink!

Robert Hefferman, you are right about the launcher business. From the rumors I get coming from the aerospace industry and knowing a bunch of people that SpaceX has burned out, they can't go public right now. They have been given a s**t pile of deposits on launches and that money has been spent and they still need to put those satellites in space. It's not too hard to keep some secrets when you are a private company. Once you go public, your financial statements go public too.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Off topic

Renault has a plan in some countries/areas where you buy a Zoe and lease the battery. If the battery dies or the capacity drops below a certain level, they install a new one. Renault also has a plan with the Zoe that gives buyers a certain number of coupons for free car rentals each year. That way you can get a petrol car for that long trip to grandma's house that everybody claims they must do and can't because there isn't enough range in the electric.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Off topic

It could be considerably longer than 6 years before a refurbished and much less expensive battery pack replacement is required. Prices per kilowatt hour of battery are dropping. The packs being used in electric cars are very modular and individual underperforming cells can be swapped out by a refurbisher. Just as it's possible to find a larger capacity battery for a laptop or digital camera, by the time the battery in your electric car needs replacing, it might be possible to get a better version that gives even more range.

The Prius batteries (NiMh, btw) that everybody was saying would have to be replaced every couple of years for thousands of dollars are holding up even better than Toyota predicted. There are some taxis in NYC that have gone for 600k miles on their original battery. Many early owners are posting in forums that even at 150k miles, they are getting reasonable range. Pretty encouraging.

I'm looking at a new job (I really need it too) that would be 20miles each way. The place provides charging for electric cars at not cost. I'm looking into a used Nissan Leaf for a good price. My cost to commute to work and run errands around town would cost me zero each month if I do all of my charging at work. The leaf gets about 80 miles or so of range. More than enough to commute a couple of days without charging. If the company suddenly decides to rip out all of the charging (they're not, but let's pretend) I would wind up paying less than $2/day to charge up the car. That equates to a petrol/diesel car that gets 80mpg. The VW Polo isn't available in the US.

The current Tesla Model S and the announced Model X are both so expensive that I could buy and fuel a used Hummer for less over 6-7 years. I'm sorry, why is Tesla so great?

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Canada to Google: You can't have your borderless cake and eat it too

MachDiamond
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Re: Confused

Why aren't a couple of Mounties sent over to the company premises that are selling this kit in violation of the court orders against them and put a seal on the doors? Maybe even arrest a few people. Google is stuck out on the periphery. Google can't have human eyeballs on all of the data they index, it just isn't possible to offer the services they do without a big caldron of automation. What would happen if Google did de-index the site and the operators shifted to another very similar domain name a couple of hours later and showed up on Google again shortly thereafter? Back to court again for another judgement? The out-of-juristiction aspects are as presumptuous as what US courts do. FACTA anyone?

This all has the tang of the DCMA notices that get sent to Google and not to the admins of the accused web sites. Google doesn't own the internet, they're just a big company that sells services. They're aren't anybody's mother either.

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Adobe Creative Cloud 2014: Progress and pain in the usual places

MachDiamond
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I need to get this to my client right away.

I can knock this out in 1/2 hour and be a hero by meeting my customer's deadline.

Log into cloudy tethered software.

Hey! What's this? "Please wait for your update to download"

Please restart your computer to complete the update.

Log into cloudy tethered software again.

Open file.

Hey! What's this?

Completely revamped user interface.

Where did that button go?

Oh crap, all of my custom keyboard shortcuts have be reset to factory default.

Oh great, the drop down menu's have been reworked.

… 2 hours later I have figured out where enough things are in the new UI to finish the document.

F**K, it won't print correctly on my printer.

Welcome to the Push model of software. You're getting updated whether you want to or not.

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Code Spaces goes titsup FOREVER after attacker NUKES its Amazon-hosted data

MachDiamond
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Re: wait a minute

It's the new way of doing business.

Everybody is doing it.

If you aren't in the cloud, you falling behind.

Why not outsource your data and computing to the cloud and save some money?

Tape is dead.

All of your data is being backed up in multiple data centers around the world. You're covered.

It's more secure to keep your data in the cloud.

Stop me when you haven't heard one.

Now that you've discovered your company assets are being held for ransom and might be trashed, it's a great time to enjoy a few hours of music and new product announcements while you are on hold with (insert your cloud provider here). There is always the chance that the person that finally answers the phone will speak your language without a horrendously thick accent.

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MachDiamond
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Re: @Jan 0

Just remember you can't say "c*nt" in Canada.

At least that's what they told Rodney Rude. Saying something like that to a comedian is like handing a loaded shotgun to a drunk redneck.

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MachDiamond
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Re: @Jan 0

"I'm strictly egalitarian. I hate everyone equally, regardless of gender, race or so forth. Bunch of gonadgremlins, the lot of 'em!"

…. and their newts.

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MachDiamond
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Re: RE: background checks

There are lots of inappropriate backgrounds checks as well. Many companies do them because everybody else is doing it and it's fashionable. I owned a small company for many years and employed dozens of people. I never ran any background checks and only sacked one employee for being a bad apple. I had suspicions about a couple of employees, but they did good work so what the hell?

I just told a company that was to hire me as an independent contractor to FO when they insisted on signed permission to do a full background check. I wan't going to be handling money in any way other than cashing the checks they paid me with, so why do they need my credit report? They weren't going to supply a company car or auto insurance, so why do they need my driving record? Their decision to use me was not based on having a degree, so why do they need my college transcripts? I wonder if they asked the plumber to sign those forms before doing any work or did they let him get on with unblocking the loo.

Aside from lying on his application, was the offense this bloke got sent up for in any way relevant to his employment with the company? I've never been handed an job application that asked about a name change. In the US, I think that one only has to fess up to felony convictions if asked.

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Tom Hanks NICKED my COPYRIGHTED PIC, claims Brit photog

MachDiamond
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Gav- "This is typical tactics on many websites. Lift content from elsewhere, add your own watermark."

IP attorneys love it when people and organizations do that. It supports a claim of "Willful" infringement and the possible statutory fine can be $150K in addition to punitive awards and attorney's fees. It can be much cheaper to leave the original copyright mark on.

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MachDiamond
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Re: shock horror...

There are situations where recognized news agencies can use images under the Fair Use Doctrine without seeking the permission of the copyright holder. It's a very fine line and can be a nearly impossible defense if you aren't an established news organization.

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MachDiamond
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Public domain in the UK seems to correlate with "published" in the US. That might only be in the eyes of the public. In law, most first world countries are party to the Berne Convention regarding copyright and I believe that "public domain" is the same for all, ie; a work who's copyright has expired, a work by a government agency that does not qualify for copyright protection or a work that the author has release all claims for (a tough thing to do as copyright is fixed upon creation).

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MachDiamond
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Re: Not subject to copyright laws?

ahhhh, No. Posting an image on the internet does not place it in the "public domain" anymore than publishing an image in a magazine or newspaper. The term "Public Domain" has a very defined meaning in copyright law and does not mean "viewable by the public". It's a very common mistake and can be a very expensive one to make if you copy an artistic work.

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MachDiamond
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Re: @Andrew ... I always knew Tom Hanks' nice-guy image was a sham!!

Creative Commons has no legal standing unless an author specifically provides a document referencing them. On the other hand, the author of a creative work automatically becomes the owner of a copyright for that work as soon as it is in a fixed media (physical or digital. An idea in not copyrightable)

The fine print on many social media Terms of Service does claim a rights grab and they haven't been seriously challenged to date. How does a poor photographer take FB to court? It's better not to post anything to a social media site that you care anything about. Use low quality images or embed a link to them from your own website.

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China embraces Thorium

MachDiamond
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IAS, it's the licensing of patents back from China that bothers me. They are very good at taking things upmarket. They may license certain technologies until than have a manufacturing base (or are shown that one is profitable) after which they will no longer sell licenses without a purchase of physical products. If that continues, they will only sell complete systems. I've seen it happen in many industry's and it's a good move on their part, but sucks for the rest of us.

Germany never had a renewables industry. The feed-in tariffs have made the whole thing an economic sham. Did they sign the Kyoto agreement? I wonder how they are going to hold up their end while replacing their nuclear reactors with coal plants if they did.

LFTR may have failed in its seed in the US since it doesn't produce weapons grade nuclear material and at the time it was being developed, that's what politicians wanted, lots of bombs to protect the country from the USSR.

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Déjà spew: US would accept higher bills for less CO2 by two-to-one

MachDiamond
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Re: it's an odd thing... but

What healthcare reforms? You mean the statutes that make having health insurance mandatory? A government grant program to pay for health insurance with no way to pay for it?

A real reformation would have eliminated women filing lawsuits for "undue and unjust" pain during childbirth ($6million award, probably knocked down on appeal). Awards for grandfather passing away during surgery.

The US has too many lawyers and juries are made up of people that are happy as clams to stick it to anybody they think has money.

Unfortunately, the US hasn't had a proper energy policy for decades. It's going to come to bad times if there isn't a plan. Coal is dirty. Fracked gas wells peak quickly and drop off in production very rapidly. Wind and Solar are very expensive compared to fossil fuels and very inefficient on a watts/acre measurement. I can almost swear that work on newer nuclear technologies, such as LFTR, are actively discouraged by established mega-corps (and therefore by the politicians they have purchased.)

I agree that if the study posed a question like "Would you pay an electric bill 2x what you currently pay to help lower the US CO2 output by 5%?", most respondents would use bad language in response and hang up.

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London commuter hell will soon include 'one card to rule them all'

MachDiamond
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I like cash.

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Let cloud apps manage your systems – if you have nothing to hide

MachDiamond
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Thank you for your business.

Hi, this is your cloudy app/service solutions partner. Due to various economic screws ups, we are closing our doors in 10 days. You will need to download all of your stored data, asset reports and find another solutions parter. We recommend that you prioritize which files will be crucial to your ongoing operations as all of our clients will be trying to retrieve data and bandwidth may be limited.

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