* Posts by Magister

322 posts • joined 4 Jul 2012

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Manual override: Raspberry Pi beginners' books

Magister

Haynes manual

I've got a copy of the Haynes manual and I have to say that I thought it was a really good guide to the Raspberry PI. Like most of the other Haynes manuals, it gives excellent step by step information without making it sound as if they are treating you like an idiot.

If I were being a touch picky, I would suggest that they might have usefully added a little more information about programming the Pi; there is some detail in there along with sample code and it is very helfpul, but I felt that a few more samples from specific example projects to give the user some ideas on how they might use it would have been of real benefit.

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The politics of the data centre

Magister
Unhappy

Re: Stovepipes kill progress

Currently in a similar situation; and in some respects worse. The problem here is that none of the people making the decisions actually have the relevant technical knowledge to understand the implications of their decisions.

It's basically a game of blame throwing; and people spend more time on producing documentation to prove that they did what they were told, than they do on actually doing their job.

So sad to see; especially when you know that it doesn't need to be like that.

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Still pitching to CIOs? You're living in the PAST

Magister
Pint

Sure!

>>almost half of the cloud deals negotiated by value-added resellers will not have an IT team representative present when the technology decision is made<<

And would anyone care to wager how many of those projects without an IT rep will go titsup because the purchaser has no idea of what they have agreed to buy and so subsequently find that it doesn't meet their needs?

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Thatcher’s data protection legacy: Just fill out this 16-page form

Magister

Control

There was an interesting programme on over the weekend; the commentator made the point that both the political far left and the far right have a vested interest in grabbing your details and using them to control you.

Although I don't agree with everything Maggie did, she was very much in favour of cutting back on the huge bureacracy of governement to let people get on with their lives.

Sadly, I think those days are far behind us. Perhaps we need a "Nosey Parker" icon?

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IT salaries: Why you are a clapped-out Ferrari

Magister

damned statistics

>>since IT makes up at least 10 per cent of all wages <<

I've never worked for a company where the wages of IT made up that much of the overall wage budget, not even close. I'm pretty sure that the entire IT budget (hardware, software services etc) was never equivalent to more than 5% of the wage budget. (In one case, I was the only IT person for a company with 400 plus staff).

But perhaps that's just the businesses that I've worked for?

The other thing of course is who the ONS are categorising as "IT workers"; if we have 20 staff sat in front of a PC all day entering sales orders, I would say that they are not IT workers.

But the point is well made - as more people gain knowledge, the scarcity value drops and the cost of hiring that skill drops accordingly.

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'North Korea Has Launched a Missile' tweet sent by mistake

Magister
Mushroom

Re: Why?

I'm not so sure that the threats are entirely empty; their leadership is a bit unstable to say the least and they could quite easily believe their own rhetoric.

Their military may not have the more sophisticated equipment that is available to the South Koreans, but that is not a guarantee for success. They certainly have more people geared up for war; and based on what little I have seen, they are likely to fight fanatically. It could potentially make the situation in 'Stan look like a tea party.

Just because they haven't made good on their threats should not be a guarantee that they never will. Plus, when people are constantly rushing up to the line then pulling back at the last second, it wouldn't take an awful lot for someone to make a mistake and go further than they planned by accident.

Yes they probably would lose; but again, they really do believe that the Western countries are weak, flabby, lacking in moral fibre etc. (Not saying they are right, but an argument could be made...) They might well believe that they could gain ground, then stop and hold that ground without serious retaliation. Saddam Hussein did that in Kuwait thinking that he could get away with it; and he was no where near as crazy as the North Korean leadership.

I think that you are right that it is ploy to get some more supplies (he's a young man, probably needs a lot more pr0n). But the concern should be if someone does go off half-cocked and starts a bloody conflict by mistake. Then it could get out of hand very quickly; and we would need a lot of very cool heads to prevent it escalating.

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IBM Australia on the stand over $1bn blowout

Magister

@ mike007

I regret to say that it doesn't just happen in the public sector; I've seen similar examples in the private sector where a sliding scale of penalties was negotiated, but despite that, they ended up paying the full amount and then even more on top of that, despite the massive delays and serious cost overruns (and in some cases, complete project failure).

I'm sure that part of it comes down to ego; no-one wants to admit that they have made a mistake or that they haven't been as concientious as they should have been in monitoring the project. They do everything (anything?) to keep the project running and end up throwing good money after bad.

I would also say that I've seen some projects where it was doomed to failure; they just didn't get the buyin from anyone involved right from the start; and when the project started going slightly wrong, instead of dealing with the issue, they just swept it under the carpet, hoping that if they ignored the problem it would go away.

The real problem in this case is that a lot of people have really suffered very badly because of the problems (and AFAIK, some are still ongoing). The hearing is highly unlikely to do anything in practical terms to resolve the issues; and I'm betting that as previously, no-one will learn anything from this awful situation. But of course, as it is public money, the tax payers of Queensland end up footing the bill; and they will be paying for this for a long time.

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Finance bods probe RBS over bank-crippling IT cock-up

Magister

Re: Not outsourced

>>A techie is just a techie<<

And that dear children, is the root of the problem. An assumption that "all animals are equal" but when it comes to management, "some are more equal than others"

We all know what happens when you assume? (it makes an ass out of u and me)

Perhaps we need to have a piglet icon?

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New rules to end cries of 'WTF... a £10 online booking fee?'

Magister
Flame

Re: TicketMaster "Ticketfast" Charges

Bought a ticket through these graspers as there is no other source available for the specific event; The have the monopoly on the ticket sales.

Apart from the actual fee for the seat, I was charged a "booking fee" which increased depending on how expensive your seat price was (just under 10%). Then there was delivery charge for the tickets (£5.25 each ticket) which you still have to pay even if they screw up and you have to collect the tickets on the day (which I had to do 4 years ago - I travelled not knowing for definite if I would even get in). On top of that, there is a fee for payment; and that varies according to card, but you still have to pay.

The worst bit is that they skim off off some of the tickets and pass them on to their "sister" site (Getmein). The tickets that they pass over then go up in price by 2 - 5 times face value. If you try to get normal tickets after they have "sold out", they just re-direct you to Getmein where there are plenty available it seems.

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Gartner: RIP PCs - tablets will CRUSH you this year

Magister

Re: makes sense

I have to say that it's not just about game playing. There are more than a few areas where a tablet / slate (of any OS) simply is not the right tool for the job.

I think that we will see a blurring of the lines between the devices, but the PC still has a future, at least until around the time that I am likely to retire (just under 10 years). After that, I suspect that Gartner will be teeling everyone about the potential demise of the tablet or other manually operated devices as it gets replaced by voice activated computing.

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Universal Credit IT system could lead to MORE FRAUD, MPs warn

Magister

Re: blah blah benefit cheats blah blah

Me culpa

>>Approx. 1/10 of our national debt (£1,159 trillion).<<

Should be "Approx. 1/10 of our national debt (£1.159 trillion)."

Spent too much time working with Europeans - getting the full stop and comma mixed up for decimal and thousand separators.

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Magister

Re: blah blah benefit cheats blah blah

>>they could double the amounts that benefits pays and it would still be a drop in the ocean<<

Projected spending on welfare for the year 2013 is £117 billion. Approx. 1/10 of our national debt (£1,159 trillion).

http://www.ukpublicspending.co.uk/year_spending_2013UKbn_12bc1n#ukgs302

I suspect that you actually refer to just a small part of the welfare budget. (such as JSA) Certainly, for the recipients, even modest increases could make a huge difference to them.

As for the new system, chances are that it will cost a lot more than any actual savings they eventually make.

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ANCIENT CURSED RING known to TOLKIEN goes on display

Magister
Flame

Re: Ancient and cursed ring?

I was going to say that I know all about ancient cursed rings

I've been using the cream for ages, but it doesn't seem to have made a difference....

Icon = ring of fire

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Motorola minimum-wage sheriffs ride in to SAVE the HIGH STREET

Magister

In reality

What will happen is that the "managers" will use the badge to set meaningless targets i.e. speak to x number of customers per hour, promote y products etc. and use the data collected to confirm that the staff are doing this; or then (more likely) use non-conformance as a way to avoid paying bonuses, pay rises etc.

They will also probably use it to track where the staff go (4 toilet breaks yesterday; you're drinking too much) or similar.

The problem is that most of the people that end up using the newer technologies don't really understand how it could be used to amke things better; and then fall back on old ways of working. If it is a bad manual process, using new tech will not suddenly make it any better and this will be no different.

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After Leveson: The UK gets an Orwellian Ministry of Truth for real

Magister

Re: There sure as hell is a need for press regulation

I think that here we have an example of where things are going wrong.

There is / never was any requirement for press intrusion into the life of the individual; nothing was covered up as the school made an announcement to the parents and they would have had the opportunity to remove their children from the school if they felt this necessary on moral / religious grounds. (I don't personally believe that would have been appropriate, but accept that others might feel it necessary)

However, there are also examples of people that court publicity for various reasons; but want to be able to block any news reports of them that are critical. I'm thinking for example of an elected person that tried to have information on specific illegal behaviour covered up.

We need to have a balance between what is really "in the public interest" and prurient intrusion into people's lives, just because it sells a few more adverts. How do we achieve that? Damned if I know, but I suspect that this is not the last we have heard on this topic.

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New nuke could POWER WORLD UNTIL 2083

Magister

Re: Best choice so far, compared to shivering in the dark.

If this is a legitimate and proven design of reactor they will should jump at the chance.

Fixed it for you.

(Sorry, I'm just too bloody cynical I know, but I doubt that there is a single current MP with the ability to think further than the week)

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Drunk driving: No more dangerous than talking on handsfree mobe

Magister

Concentration

I did an advanced driver training course some years ago (really enjoyable). The instructor made a comment that "the average driver's concentration time is about 15 minutes in every hour". To put that in context, if you are in the middle lane of the motorway, have one car to your left, one to your right and one more each to your rear and front, only one of those 4 drivers is actually aware of your existence; but the problem is, which one?

Essentially, the driver goes into "auto pilot" - they know the road as they drive the same way every day at the same time. Many of the normal functions are done without an actual concious decision; be that gear changing, breaking or indication.

Don't believe me? Try remembering the details of the drive in this morning. What was the colour of the last car in front of you? What was the first road sign that you saw? Often, people will complete a lengthy journey and say that they don't remember parts of it (or sometimes all). This is often without the distractions of mobile phone, radio, passengers etc.

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Copper load of that: Ofcom claims HUGE jump in 'average' broadband speed

Magister

OK for some

I got rid of BT; connection was flaky, painfully slow and every time that I complained, the support staff wanted to go through exactly the same troubleshooting routine (reset the router, change the phone, change the router, change the filter, change the connection to the PC, try a different PC etc. etc. etc.) Bear in mind that I was paying for Business class service, over £200 a quarter phone and broadband.

Now using Tesco at a different location. Total bill, phone and broadband is about the same per year as I was paying per quarter. Not quite getting the full speed that I should, so tried their support. Very helpful, but ultimately, they have had to refer it back to Openreach. In turn, they turn up when I am not there, say that they can't test the line, and clear off; so no improvement.

Still, at least I am now getting a constant connection of 1 Mbps rather than the iffy 0.1 that BT used to give me.

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Ten serious sci-fi films for the sentient fan

Magister

another couple

"Destination Moon" - considering when it was produced, it got an awful lot right.

"Moon" (with Sam Rockwell and Kevin Spacey) - an example of just how good an intelligent script can be in the right hands.

Alien Nation" was pretty good - simple story with some solid acting

(I'd also promote "October Sky" - OK technically it's not SF, but it does show how it was possible for younger people to get into rocket science back in the 50s.)

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UK's £500m web dole queue project director replaced after JUST 4 months

Magister

IT Project?

I would argue that although there is an element of IT in this project, it is not an IT Project; it should instead be viewed as a Business Change Project and approached accordingly.

The requirements for the hardware, software etc. are not simple, but by far the biggest issue will be getting the buyin from senior managers and the end users to required changes within their processes; without this, the project is doomed to failure no matter how good the design of the systems. It's not like rolling out a minor upgrade to a piece of software, but rather like a oil tanker changing course.

This is not a new concept, nor is it confined to the public sector.

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IT sector needs to keep getting greener: Alcatel-Lucent study

Magister
Windows

Sobering

No doubt there will be those that question the validity of this assesment. But we've seen a massive growth in use of telecoms and that needs the infrastructure to support the growing demand. People insist on creating videos, photos, music files et al. which they than upload to the cloud for the world (in reality, a couple of friends) to share.

An increasing amount of this is now in HD, making the files much larger and taking up yet more space; and it's stored on systems spread around the world that run 24 / 365 just in case someone wants to look at it during a drunken midnight session once a year.

Add to that, the growth in the demand for the services in the developing world and it doesn't seem that unlikely after all.

(Grumpy Old Fart time again)

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USA is the best country in the WORLD... for sending spam

Magister

Looking at the figures

I'm not too surprised that France is that high up. Many of their businesses (large & small) are actively running bulk email campaigns; they don't consider what they are doing is spamming people (although they hate spam just as much as we do).

I had a conversation with a couple of people over there and they were horrified that I consider what they were doing as anything other than normal business practice. Having managed a set of email addresses for them on one of our mail servers, I introduced them to some better practices and their junk mail levels dropped considerably.

Had a similar re-action from those in the Fatherland; although I think a lot is generated because they are actively engaging with the countries in the east that they once tried to invade are trying to sell to.

I think that the UK is further down the list primarily because we are actually doing slightly better at keeping the b****** out. Not enough to be overly pleased with ourselves, but a little pat on the back would be appropriate.

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BT to slap overalls on 1,000 new bods in fibre broadband boost

Magister
Thumb Up

Thumbs up

Normally rather cynical about this sort of thing, but if they are serious and these are new additional jobs (not just replacements for people "retiring") then I would be quite pleased. The national infrastructure needs to be kept up to date and they cannot do that effectively without the live bodies to do the physical work of installation and maintenance.

Just a shame that it has taken so long to get this organised; but better late than never.

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Carrie Fisher dusts off THAT bikini for Star Wars VII

Magister
Coat

"Elderly"?

Perhaps not a spring chicken, but I think Carrie Fisher still looks pretty damn hot. If they age Leia to match the actress, she will still be able to get a few pulses racing.

Mine's the dirty old mac, with the suspicious stains down the front ....

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Farewell, Reg: This hack is hanging up her Apple jacket

Magister

One last time

Felly hir, ffarwel, hwyl fawr,eich gweld yn fuan, byddwn yn colli eich

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No.10 guru: UK tech scene is AN EXPLODING CHEESE

Magister

Title probably tells you all that you need to know

Basically, the government are relying on "advisors" (I use the term in the loosest possible sense of the word) that think marketing is more important than substance.

"It is a tale

Told by an idiot

Full of sound and fury

Signifying nothing. "

(Macbeth)

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Welsh bureaucrats busted for getting political on Twitter, Facebook

Magister

Re: Beth wyt ti'n meddwl?

Byddai angen i chi gael miloedd o siaradwyr Cymraeg ar El Reg i gael miloedd o hyd-pleidleisiau! (neu bobl a allai ddefnyddio google cyfieithu!!)

Mae yn hyfryd

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MWC 2013: The Chinese are coming - and you ain't seen nothing yet

Magister

@Daemon Byte

Have to agree with your comments. I bought one of their small mobile phone handsets; really good price and it looked as if it would just what I needed.

But it was very buggy; lots of issues with the touch screen and some of the apps were very flaky, working well one minute and then suddenly falling over. The battery life was good and the call quality wasn't too bad, but after trying to use it for about 5 months, I finally gave up.

Would I buy another one? Not too sure. Having had such a series of issues once, it makes you wary of trusting them for a second bite of the cherry. The only real advantage was that it was cheap enough that I didn't feel too bad about sending it off to a recycling firm.

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First, servers were DEEP-FRIED... now, boffins bring you WET ones

Magister

Re: I think it was something similar...

>>I think your BCS speaker is slightly out of touch<<

I don't think so. He highlighted that water has been used in the past, but has many potential issues and is now considered "old" technology.

It's still common for cooling amongst supercomputers yes, but he was referring to any size data centre; which could include the single cabinet installation types and any size of server.

The fluid he referred to is a product with high heat conductivity properties, but very low electical conductivity properties. (Hence not water) safer for the systems and the people working on them.

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Magister
Pint

Re: I think it was something similar...

Halon is a CFC and has been phased out; currently they supply HFC-227 or HFC-227ea which is a halocarbon (Can also be referred to as FM-200, Solkaflam 227 or MH-227). Apparently it's also used in medical inhalers such as those for asthma.

I went to a BCS event earlier in the week and the speaker was referring to the topic of power use in the data centre. He made the point that the current growth rate in power used is unsustainable and among the options might be to use the liquid cooling instead of HVAC; then use the heat from the liquid to provide heating to offices (or as per his tongue in cheek suggestion, a greenhouse to grow cannabis!)

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HP shareholders bay for blood in $19 BEELLION writedown aftermath

Magister
Flame

Not a shareholder

But if I were, I would be pretty pissed off right now. To have to write off that amount of money in such a short space of time is absolutely unforgivable and indicates that the senior managment are not doing their jobs correctly.

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Curiosity Mars rover flashes pics of GREY drilled powder sample

Magister
Windows

Re: Am I the only person...

>>I still hold the belief that they should just send up a bunch of tiny robots<<

I believe that there was a project planned to do just that (not sure if it is still active or not though). There have been a number of separate projects run by Universities / businesses that were looking at having small crawlers that would work in a "semi -intelligent" manner, co-operating when required and all sending data back to a central collection point for onward transmission. I saw a demo of one of these a couple of years ago and it was very impressive; but they still had some key bugs that they were working out.

I have to say though that I do still find all of the stuff being produced by the various rovers really fascinating. I just wish that I had more time to spend on following it; I'd really like to have the chance to work on some of the different research.

Oh well, roll on retirement. Maybe I'll be able to make time then.

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Survey: Bosses are DESPERATE and GAGGING for Linux skills

Magister
Joke

Larf

>> The report found that the average salary for Linux professionals was $90,853 (£58,654). T<<

Hahahahahahahahaha hahahahahahahahaha hahahahahahahahaha hahahahahahaha

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Clarkson: 'I WILL find and KILL the spammers who hacked me'

Magister

Re: Time for copypasta

I haven't seen a flame that good in quite a while!

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Tesco dials 999 after Clubcard vouchers are 'nicked' online

Magister

Re: ooohh 200million clubcard vouchers stolen !

>>yep, murdered by a plastic spoon...<<

Now that IS funny

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Magister

Re: ooohh 200million clubcard vouchers stolen !

>>200m vouchers buys you a plastic spoon<<

Did you you check or did you just assume?

1 point is worth one penny; 200 million points would be worth £2 million. Add to that, if they were able to convert to the "Rewards" scheme it increases the value by 4 times. (not that 200 million points were taken; the article doesn't specify the amount.)

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Burger King's tweets fried after hijackers pimp Big Macs

Magister

Re: A confused old fart writes....

>> In the US, these firms maintain(ed) very tight traceability on their supply chains. >>

That's been true over here for the last couple of decades. The amount of paperwork involved is extremely high. (I know this having worked in a slaughterhouse for 5 years, some 12 years ago; one that supplied about 20% of the beef to the burger processing plant for McDonalds). The beef all came from UK and Eire; none came from outside of the UK.

They knew which animals went into the production facility, what food they had during their lives, what medical treatment, where they had been and when they had travelled between farms. They knew their dams and sires going back over 30 generations; and although the DB was a bit antiquated by todays standards, they could still analyse it to see if there were any medical abnormalities in related animals.

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Brace for MORE ZOMBIE ATTACK ALERT pranks, warns security bod

Magister

Zombies!

I caught part of a recording of a live debate by the Canadian Parliament concerning a potential Zombie invasion from the south (Zombies don't recognise borders!)

http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/02/15/watch-canadian-parliament-debates-zombie-invasion/

Perhaps if all politicians spent more time on these things, they'd have less time to screw up the planning for other more important issues?

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BT copper-cable choppers cop 16 months in the cooler

Magister

Re: Police don't prevent crime any more, just a half arsed attempt to clean up after

>> trace the reg number of the van <<

Assuming that the address is actually valid

A while ago, the DVLA admitted that they don't have the correct details for about 1 vehicle in 10 - that's over 3 million of them out there.

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Magister

>> police officer had no idea what road he was on <<

Many years ago, the policeman would have a beat and would probably only be responsible for a very small area. These days, they cover an enormous patch; talking to one copper a few years ago on a Sunday, there was just him and two other plods to cover 100 sq miles - population approx. 0.7 million people

They have a shitty job and very little thanks for doing it.

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Magister

Re: Should be 5 years at least, ideally 10?

>>Cost per prisoner £41,000. 2 prisoners x 10 years = £820,000<<

Any idea what the cost was to all the people that lost their connections? ( I haven't, but when we lost connections due to a fire in the ground damaging cables, the loss of business over 3 days was about £100,000 for the one company)

>>A 3 year 7pm - 7am curfew and long term (5 year) community service sentence would be a better option.<<

Assuming that they would actually abide by the terms of the service order. Based upon how effective these things normally are, it probably won't stop them for more than the time it takes them to realise that they have no milk / beer / curry / fags etc. Once they see that there is no penalty, they'll be straight back to nicking copper cable.

>>Like cleaning dog piss and graffiti off green cabinets, for example.<<

That I could definitely support; let the buggers out for parts of the day and earn their keep for a change.

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Curiosity raises mighty robotic fist, punches hole in Mars

Magister

Funny

That looks just like one of my DIY jobs!

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El Reg contemplates the ultimate cuppa

Magister

Location, location, location

The real problem here is that the water used will affect the taste of the tea.

Different parts of the country have different water sources; they will pass through chalk, limestone, granite, clay etc. etc. This changes the quality of the water. You can use the same tea in two different locations and you will get two completely different tastes. This is why many of the brands are more popular in one area rather than another.

For example, living in East Scotland, the only tea worth drinking was Tetley - but the same tea blend in the South West tastes truly vile. The only thing worth having there is PG Tips; but that will produce a very indifferent brew north of the border.

Anyway: hot, in a mug, 1 sugar, splash of milk. Don't rinse, repeat!

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Paper computers: Not mere pulp fiction

Magister

Re: The paperless office.....

You mean that you don't know how to use the three seashells....?

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Good news! UK IT jobs up. Bad news? They're with a bunch of bankers

Magister

Re: Are they all different jobs?

Have to agree. Most jobs seem to be advertised on multiple job boards (not always the same recruiter either), so you have to be a bit careful about just how many distinct jobs are actually being advertised. (I've also noticed that the same vacancy might get re-posted several times on the same job board as well.)

Add to that, there are still a number of recruiters out there that are placing adverts to get a load of c.v.s that they then pimp out to all of the employers that they know. In many cases, these "vacancies" exist only in the minds of the recruiter. It's a bit frustrating to put it mildly.

However, looking at it from another angle; my landlady is doing some temp HR work for an engineering firm and they are currently recruiting graduates. She has been surprised by the lack of applicants and the quality of those that do apply is not good. The wage offered compares favourably and they are offering additional training options that make it quite an attractive provision, but they are still struggling to find sufficient warm bodies to even fill all of the interview slots. Add to that, a number of the applicants didn't even bother to show up (which I find appalling).

I also spoke to an engineering director (or another company) yesterday; they have closed their production faciltiy in this country. I suggested that it was due to costs, but he said not; the biggest problem they faced was getting sufficient people to actually work in their factory to maintain production levels to fill booked orders. After having worked on it for the last five years, they finally gave up last August and moved it all further East.

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UK web snoop charter: Just how much extra info do spooks need?

Magister
Mushroom

Re: re: all replies

>>If you oppose the bill, then you're clearly for child pornography! <<

Universal affirmatives can only be partially converted. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrzMhU_4m-g

Unfortunately, this is exactly the same twisted thought process that has lead to every evil the human race has ever committed and the same logic is still being used today.

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Magister

Really?

>>Anything that keeps me and my children safe from terrorists and pedophiles is a good thing<<

Not sure if if that was a bit tongue in cheek or not; still too early in the morning.

"I have a magic stone; it keeps me safe from tigers. How do I know that? Because I've never been attacked by a tiger."

The reality is that most people still cannot accurately define a level of risk for many events; the more common the event, they will underestimate its likelihood, the rarer they will over estimate. You and your children are at greater risk of being struck by lightning than being killed by a terrorist. They are at far greater risk of being killed by you than they are by a stranger (peadophile or not).

The current obsession with introducing new snooping laws is about one thing only; political power. There are groups of people that want to be able to control certain aspects of everyone's lives, without they themselves being subject to the same kind of scrutiny. Anyone that supports that should be viewed with the utmost suspicion.

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Stricken 2e2 sacks 627, winds down, retains a few data centre caretakers

Magister
Facepalm

@Eagle One

As you only registered this account today and have made only one post. I'm tempted to believe that you are someone hoping to "talk up" this rather poor situation. Have to say that it smacks a bit of a marketing droid type communication!

>>The people that remain are still 100% committed to providing the best level of service to customers, <<

I'm sure that they are really good people and only want to do the very best for the customer; but the fact is, their jobs are going one way only and every single one of them will be doing everything that they can to quickly find another position. This is only human nature. Pretending otherwise does no-one any favours.

>>The "S.S. 2e2" may not sail again, but she won't leave those who depend on her high and dry.<<

Until the plug is finally pulled - at which point, anyone that is reliant on them is well and truly up the creek. Hence any of those that are using 2e2 systems that take their responsibilties seriously will be making plans now to reduce any impact. If they aren't they are totaly derelict in their duty to their organisation.

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Kickstarter project says open source can blast Death Star costs

Magister
Coat

Re: Open source death star?

>>Still, that's probably why I ended up in IT while Luke shagged a princess<<

Sister, SISTER

Or are you thinking of Anakin

Mine's the long flowing black cloak and the matching black helmet

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