* Posts by Decade

151 posts • joined 20 Jun 2012

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You have a 'SIMPLE QUESTION'? Well, the answer is NO

Decade
Paris Hilton

Apple doesn't change connectors often. That is not the problem.

I don't know why you're complaining about the Apple connector, Dobbs. Apple has changed the connector only 2 times in the 13 years since the release of the iPod (from Firewire to 30-pin, and from 30-pin to Lightning), and they've used the Lightning connector for 2 years already. Likewise, Apple laptops have changed power connectors just 3 times in the past 16 years. I know you're slowing down in your old age, but I think this complaint is something you should keep to yourself.

In the same time, other companies have gone from proprietary mini-barrels to mini-USB to micro-USB to micro-USB 3, and now they're contemplating USB 3.1 type C. And you almost never can use the same power adapter for 2 different PC laptops, even from the same manufacturer.

What annoys me is that the Apple cord designs seem to be inspired by explosive seed pods. Bring your cable around and use it regularly, and before long the shell is splitting apart and the wires are unraveling. I get around that by exploiting the power-efficiency of Safari and the marvelous battery life, to leave my power cable safely at home. And Apple charges way too much for their cables; you should be buying Lightning cables on sale from an online retailer like NewEgg.

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Armouring up online: Duncan Campbell's chief techie talks crypto with El Reg

Decade
Childcatcher

Re: Abandon SMTP

I disagree. The problem is SMTP. It can transmit using TLS, but that is trivially removed by ISPs. The source and destination are completely clear to the mail service, and it turns out that the metadata are important. And encryption is something that takes additional effort to add, so nobody will do so without an IT department doing it for them.

S/MIME is nice, within its limitations, but it just proves that SMTP email is flawed. As long as email is plaintext by default, the email clients don't sound off klaxons about it being insecure. Instead, security is represented by the addition of a small checkbox in the corner. Watch for the checkbox, or else your email is just silently in plaintext.

You can install a CA-signed S/MIME certificate for free from StartCom. So nobody does so. And even if you get one, you can't install it in the default Android email client. Because plaintext is the default. We need a new protocol where encrypted and authenticated is the default.

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Decade
Mushroom

Abandon SMTP

We should just stop using protocols that are not secure by design. Encrypted email is hack after hack on top of SMTP, and it's just not realistic to expect anybody to use it correctly, consistently.

The problem is that I don't know of any viable alternatives. Silent Text seems nice, but niche. Any viable solution needs to be free and open-source. I don't have time myself to make such a solution.

As for the web of trust problem, I don't think normal people can make it work. The problem tends toward centralization. I like Moxie Marlinspike's idea of Trust Agility, with certificate authorities who work for you rather than for the services who want you to trust them enough to give them money. This is a social problem more than a technical problem.

1
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This week it rained in San Francisco and the power immediately blew out. Your tech utopia

Decade
Mushroom

Disruption from mild weather is not unique to San Francisco

I think this storm damage is just a sign of how wonderfully mild the weather in San Francisco is. We have high winds and heavy rains so seldom that it hasn't been worth it to make the infrastructure resilient to it. Just like Atlanta, Georgia, with snow.

Also, in my area of San Francisco, there was no power outage.

5
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Intel: Grab these platform shoes and dance to OUR Internet of Things standard

Decade
Facepalm

What platform?

"MQTT, HTTPS, CoAP, REST, XMPP, QOS, etc." That is not a standard. That is a bottomless fountain of work for consultants, trying to get everything to work together.

2
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Yahoo, Bing beg 'right to be forgotten' wipers: Don't FORGET about US

Decade
Devil

Google is becoming too slow

Sometimes I use Bing or DuckDuckGo. Not because of fear of Google, but because Google search is becoming glitchy. I would enter a search term, and it would take half a minute for Google to respond. And their search results page has become bloated with advertisements for their other services.

If my device is showing icons for alternatives, and I don't feel like risking a wait, then I'll click on one of them. So far, DuckDuckGo and Bing have been nice and speedy, and relevant enough for the searches that I've been doing.

0
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systemd row ends with Debian getting forked

Decade
Boffin

Re: What is systemd

For the most positively biased introduction to systemd, I suppose there's Lennart Poettering's seminal blog entry, Rethinking PID 1. His entire blog is like a stream of consciousness of the current state and intended future of systemd.

For a whole lot of tedious technical details, there's the freedesktop.org site, with links to download the source and the documentation. Yes, they do have an entire section about the canonical way to write the name of systemd. A lot of the documentation is just linking back to Lennart's blog, though.

If you want to hack it, you need to keep in mind the principles of the systemd cabal: POSIX is obsolete and cross-platform is irrelevant, so don't bother with it. Backwards-compatibility is harmful, so don't worry about the past. Use and depend on the features of the newest Linux kernel.

14
3

Google Chrome on Windows 'completely unusable', gripe users

Decade
Gimp

Re: How Widespread?

MacBook Pro - i5, OSX Yosemite, plenty of RAM.

I've taken to launching Chrome only rarely as needed. I find that Chrome makes the system less stable; for example, randomly, control panels that require password input would not unlock until I quit Chrome. Why does Chrome interfere with System Preferences? I don't know. It's frustrating. And playing video in Chrome runs both cores at 100%, draining the battery very quickly and making the UI very unresponsive.

On the other hand, right now, Chrome in fullscreen on a rotated screen on Mac does correct subpixel antialiasing. No other program does this. Chrome in desktop on the rotated screen also doesn't do correct subpixel antialiasing. WTH, Apple?

I've had bad experiences with Chrome on Windows, too. My favorite period was back in May, when Google Drive crashed Google Chrome. I had to use Chrome for Flash and Firefox for Google Drive. (I also no longer install Adobe's Flash Player separately. Flash sucks.)

2
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Post-Microsoft, post-PC programming: The portable REVOLUTION

Decade
Angel

Sailfish

I wouldn't depend on Ubuntu for a powerful tablet. The Vivaldi tablet was a neat idea, but couldn't get funding. Now, the most promising tablet appears to be the Jolla Tablet, reported in a certain disreputable publication here.

0
0

The cloud that goes puff: Seagate Central home NAS woes

Decade
Meh

Oh lucky you

When my Seagate devices fail, they tend to fail because the hard drive develops errors. I try to read the drive in another enclosure, but it never works.

0
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Renewable energy 'simply WON'T WORK': Top Google engineers

Decade
Thumb Down

Did you read the same article I did?

I read the paper in IEEE Spectrum, and I think it says something very different than what Lewis Page seems to think.

The PhD engineers didn't say that renewable energy was insufficient for producing electricity. They were saying that even if we could wave a magic wand and turn all electricity production into renewables, we've already exceeded the “safety threshold” of CO2 concentrations. We exceeded that limit about 25 years ago. And besides electricity, there are plenty of uses of energy that are not anywhere close to ready to be replaced by renewable energy, so at best RE electricity will just slow down the increase of CO2.

Their point is that renewable energy is necessary, but not sufficient, to halt the climate change. We need to focus on the bigger picture, and fund the research and development to fix it.

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Sailfish OS tablet is GO: Fans stuff cash into Jolla's cap in hand

Decade
Thumb Up

Atom 3700? That's good news

The Atom 3700 series is the Bay Trail platform with the Intel HD 2000-compatible graphics. I'm not sure what's its performance, but it's way more compatible with open source drivers than anything else out there.

Now to find out about the other parts. Is it too much to hope for a Qualcomm Atheros wireless chipset, with freely distributed firmware and open infrastructure/monitor modes?

0
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China BLOCKS Verizon's EdgeCast before internet meeting

Decade
Facepalm

Let's roll out DNSSEC already

GreatFire.org suggested thousands of websites had been affected, after China "DNS poisoned" edgecastcdn.net.

This is precisely the sort of problem that DNSSEC was invented to mitigate. The DNS root is signed, and the keys are stored safely outside of China. The .NET zone is fully secured. Why isn't Verizon signing edgecast.net?

0
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EVERYTHING needs crypto says Internet Architecture Board

Decade
Facepalm

How much to encrypt?

For a small part of the dispute, there is the noise about DNSSEC vs DNSCurve. DNSSEC is more widely deployed, but Daniel J. Bernstein (author of DNSCurve, and also the discoverer of Elliptic Curve 25519 and other important work, but a rather difficult individual to work with) has denigrated DNSSEC as a "DDOS amplifier." However, by considering encryption to be "free," DNSCurve would eliminate DNS caching, and the load on authoritative DNS servers would increase... dramatically. So nobody uses DNSCurve.

Because nobody uses DNSCurve, your every DNS query is open to interception and manipulation. DNSSEC makes it harder to forge the responses, but that may be small comfort when you're jailed for looking up torproject.org.

What I'd like to see is IPsec with opportunistic encryption, but I don't expect that to be widely available... ever.

0
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Firefox decade: Microsoft's IE humbled by a dogged upstart. Native next?

Decade
FAIL

Firefox is deliberately slow

I don't use Safari on my Mac because I don't know about other browsers. I use Safari because nothing else works as well.

Firefox's problem is that it's not native to anything. The XUL toolkit was supposed to make cross-platform development easier, but it's slow and not native anywhere. These days, computers are fast enough to run XUL decently, but back when it was introduced with Netscape Communicator 6... It was part of why Netscape lost all its market share.

And then development has issues. I use Firefox on my Android because I loathe Google Chrome, but I put up with a keyboard glitch for almost a year, because it was doing something nonstandard with input and that's how long the fix took from being identified to being in the stable release.

Now I've stopped using Firefox on the desktop, because it can't handle multiple monitors correctly on MacOS X 10.9 Mavericks, and now I've installed MacOS X 10.10 Yosemite and multiple monitor support is unusably worse. Considering how long it took for the keyboard glitch to be removed from the Android version, I'm not holding my breath waiting for the desktop version to be fixed.

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BOFH: SOOO... You want to sell us some antivirus software?

Decade
Facepalm

Stupid PDFs

These days, I mostly use the PDF readers built into Firefox, Chrome, and Safari. Sometimes I use (Apple) Preview. This is on a Mac, obviously.

What I'd like to do is banish them to an untrusted AppVM, as in Qubes OS, but I'm rather addicted to my computer having performance. Maybe next time I build a computer.

0
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A Game of Storage Thrones: Enterprise IT, meet gripping drama

Decade
Facepalm

Michael the Usurper of Dell?

The story was going so nicely, but my engagement was lost when you called the founder and namesake of Dell its usurper.

0
0

Return of the disk drive bigness? Not for poor old, busted WD

Decade
Alert

Re: WD or Seagate? Hmmmm....

As useful as Backblaze's data are, they're using the drives in a completely different way than I am. They're buying the drives in bulk, and they're using proprietary replication software to stay ahead of hardware failures. I can't afford to buy drives in bulk, so I need each drive to be as reliable as possible.

In particular, I'm noticing that they do not have Toshiba drives. I don't know how reliable Toshiba drives are. HGST drives are more reliable, but their per-TB costs are much higher than Seagate and Western Digital. Digital storage technology sucks.

0
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Apple, Google take on Main Street in BONKING-FOR-CASH struggle

Decade
Childcatcher

This is really about liability

As far as I can tell, the retailers are upset about how the payment processors are trying to get them to move to more secure payment methods. Starting some time next year, the retailer is responsible for any fraud done using old-fashioned swipe cards. I guess the retailers don't like to be pushed around, so they're retaliating through their customers. This is the best explanation I can find for why they want to push such a consumer-hostile system as CurrentC.

As for me, I don't trust digital payment systems with all their tracking methods, so I pay for most purchases with cash.

1
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Disk drive BIGNESS is back: Seagate revenues and shipments surge

Decade
Mushroom

Seagate is big in arrays... Because you need RAID for reliability

3 out of the last 4 hard drive failures that I've experienced were Seagate drives, and the drives aren't that old, but I don't have a lot of drives and that could be a statistical fluke.

For real data, you need a large population, like what Backblaze has done. For Backblaze's usage, Seagate is still economical because their per-TB costs are low enough to cover the failures, but I don't have that luxury.

Hitachi is now the reliable-drives arm of Western Digital. There are only 3 hard drive manufacturers left on this planet: Seagate, Western Digital, and Toshiba.

I think hard drives suck, but all digital storage technologies suck, so the only reasonable option is to have multiple copies with automatic backup and verification. Like RAID-Z with snapshots and replicas.

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Finnish PM: Apple has DESTROYED FINLAND

Decade
Trollface

Apple failed to kill Android

Yes, the problem wasn't that OPK reorganized Nokia so it would become famous for its infighting and elaborate PowerPoint presentations, nor that Elop publicly destroyed their high-margin product lines years before any possible replacement, while neglecting their low-end market.

The problem was that Apple failed to sue Google and the Android Open Source Project for copying the Apple designs. High-end smartphones should have been a niche. Android brought the design to the masses. But instead of suing Android at the source, Apple sued Samsung for being the most blatant at copying.

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Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author

Decade

Kallasvuo not a good defense

“Google and Apple were strong in industries outside mobile communications, who suddenly enter and in a couple of years become market leaders where they have never been before. That is unique in the business history of the world.”

Just like how a maker of paper and rubber raincoats became a global leader in cell phones? Just like how a pair of Ivy League drop-outs founded the largest software company in the world?

Kallasvuo was a horrible CEO and chairman, but at least he didn't kill the business while doing stupid things. Elop did.

1
0

Greedy datagrabs, crap security will KILL the Internet of Thingies

Decade
Boffin

Metcalfe's Law will disagree

Bob Metcalfe (inventor of Ethernet) says the value of a network will increase exponentially with the number of nodes.

Walking across the room to switch on the heat is not a terrible burden, and we’ve had thermostats to do that for decades. (It would be nicer if the thermostat had useful interaction with the seasons. 21° is refreshingly cold when it’s 27° outside, but 21° is excessively hot when it’s 16°.) It’s a bigger problem when you’re managing a commercial building and need to walk up multiple flights of stairs to reach all the thermostats. And you pretty much need the Internet if you’re managing an entire campus (Microsoft’s 88 Acres, which is not online anymore).

For me, the matter isn’t whether it’s online (online is better), but whether I have control over where the data go. That sort of security is crucial and currently missing from the Internet of Things.

0
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Something ate Google's 8.8.8.8 at about eight in Asia's evening

Decade
Trollface

I'm never buying Belkin network equipment ever

Seems like less than a week since Belkin suggested that users switch to Google DNS to go online.

Vendor firmware tends to suck and Belkin is especially stupid.

0
4

NSA spying will shatter the internet, Silicon Valley bosses warn

Decade
Pirate

Internet companies don't understand ownership

The real issue is that I should have control over my data and metadata, preferably on systems that I control. For Schmidt and Zuck, et al, that's no real worry, because they own their super-invasive cloud systems. It's like how you shouldn't worry about keeping secrets from yourself. I have no ownership stake in Silicon Valley, so I'd rather keep my valuable data to myself.

3
0

Countless Belkin routers go TITSUP in massive mystery meltdown

Decade
Linux

Do not buy Belkin

The hardware looks pretty enough, but I do not trust Belkin's software. So let's use an open-source firmware. Oh look, Belkin does not post the open-source software that runs on their routers, and many of them use proprietary drivers and locked bootloaders. For example, the Belkin-Linksys WRT1900AC, announced with great fanfare as an "OpenWRT" router, but not actually supported.

Belkin used to be fine-but-overpriced when they were just a Mac accessory rebrander, but if there's a firmware involved, then I will stay away.

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US stakes out 'net battleground ahead of ITU meeting

Decade
Big Brother

Abolish CALEA and CFAA and DMCA, etc.

Governments shouldn't control 'content, technologies or services'

I'm ready to repeal CALEA when you are. That's a Clinton presidency/Democratic Congress law that requires communications companies to include wiretapping technologies.

Also, the DMCA restricts content, and the CFAA makes it dangerous to interact with services online.

0
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Bill Gates, drugs and the internet: Top 10 Larry Ellison quotes

Decade
Boffin

Bill Gates cleverness

Bill Gates in the 1980's and 1990's absolutely thought of himself as being clever. I shouldn't be spending time on citing the sources, so I won't...

Bill Gates claimed that Microsoft was going to beat IBM because Microsoft was run by smart 20-somethings. He wanted to surround himself with more smart 20-somethings when his mind inevitably declined with age. Of course, when he did reach 40, he changed his mind.

Bill Gates liked people to know about the times he would take a week off to do some intensive reading before announcing major strategies for Microsoft. His most important memo being the Internet memo of 1995.

The culmination was when he wrote The Road Ahead, which Bill Gates used to try to shape the future of technology. It didn't turn out much like the book.

I think the real turning point was during the antitrust case, when Bill Gates decided that he was too special to show up in court, but had to deliver his deposition in a video call where he visibly appeared to be dismissive. Though, I wonder if it were not actually very clever, because he managed to enrage the judge so much that the judge was taken off the case.

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Would Apple godhead Steve Jobs have HATED the Watch?

Decade
FAIL

Steve Jobs didn't do PowerPC

Steve Jobs did not approve that partnership. That was John Sculley, the guy who fired Steve Jobs.

Steve sure was happy to sell the PowerPC as long as it was viable, but I suspect that he never really committed to it. There were persistent rumors that Apple had a lab running MacOS X on x86, and MacOS X never really ran smoothly on PowerPC. As soon as IBM stumbled with the G5 and Intel recovered from the Pentium 4 stumble with the Core series, Steve switched the whole Mac line to x86.

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The IT kit revolution's OVER, say beancounters - but how do they know?

Decade
Thumb Up

Re: With you there Tim

The falling costs are a major part of it. My organization doesn't even track assets below a certain size. I haven't asked the beancounters what the exact number was. So, a $10,000 PC in the 1980's would probably find itself on an asset sheet, but a $700 convertible laptop would not.

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Decade
Boffin

Y2K waste

Certainly, Y2K was a non-disaster because of all the investment. Much better than the slow-motion wreck of IPv4 exhaustion.

But there was also a lot of waste. Equipment was bought or replaced for Y2K when it really didn't need to be. For example, I remember someone claiming that my 486 would not be able to boot in Y2K unless I bought his custom RTC. This was not the case.

0
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Red Hat: ARM servers will come when people crank out chips like AMD's 64-bit Seattle

Decade
Thumb Down

Noooo.....

I really liked OpenFirmware back in the day. No need for the peripheral controller to have binaries for every architecture, because they were programmed in Forth, compiled to portable FCode.

ACPI is horrible and should be destroyed. On x86, it works because everybody's given up on doing things the right way and just tried to be bug-compatible with Windows. I read a rumor some time back, that the ACPI committee deliberately rejects any good ideas from outside the committee, so ACPI is a complete design disaster in every way, according to no less a luminary than Linus Torvalds.

Mark Shuttleworth also considers ACPI a security risk.

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Look, no client! Not quite: the long road to a webbified Vim

Decade
Boffin

Who can forget Smalltalk? (Everybody. It was a long time ago and nobody used it.)

I just saw an oblique reference on folklore.org, but Smalltalk was a graphical environment where everything on the screen was an object, and you could trigger a menu on any object to display its code. You didn't have to dig through the page's code to find the object of your interest.

I was sad when the object-oriented dreams of the 1980's degenerated to the stream-of-text model of Unix and Windows. And Java is a very poor imitation of an object-oriented language. We're gradually rebuilding, but it's so slow compared to those days, and it's an uncomfortable fit on the Unix base.

1
1

Tech patent hoarder Intellectual Ventures to lose a fifth of its trolls

Decade
Unhappy

Hard times... for the lawyers

The Bloomberg report of hard times, that is just speculation. Anybody else see that Humans Need Not Apply video? Jung is saying that IV has automated the lawyers out of a job.

2
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Rupert Murdoch says Google is worse than the NSA

Decade
Big Brother

Google is not opt-in.

"So we've no idea just what his complaint is with Google, why he thinks an opt-in site is worse than a perhaps-not-entirely-constitutional surveillance program that collects data on individuals it has no reason to suspect deserve any scrutiny whatsoever."

People keep forgetting that Google is not just that cheerful lab that produces the best web search engine.

It's also Doubleclick, the biggest and most feared online ad network.

It's also Google Analytics, which webmasters invite onto their own web sites because web hosts suck at providing useful data. In the process, Google gets even more data from me about every site I visit that has Google Analytics. I didn't sign up for this.

It's also Google Maps, that has pictures of my house and my place of work from many angles, along with detailed information about all my wireless routers. Sometimes, it has recognizable pictures of myself or someone close to me; they blur it, but I'm sure they have access to the originals.

It's also Chrome, which is influencing web standards in a negative direction. We do not need a new binary web app format, since the demise of Flash and ActiveX. We do not need more patents. We do not need more DRM. All of these, Chrome is promoting.

It's also Android, which is increasingly Google "Play" and not Android Open Source. That flap about Facebook Messenger? That could totally have been avoided if Google had finished developing fine-grained privacy controls for Android. Instead, they're going the opposite way, allowing programs to share permissions with less user awareness.

I don't know why Murdoch has issue with Google, but I can understand why people think it's not good for privacy.

5
2

Sir, sir, my cloud ate my homework: Google touts grading tool to teachers

Decade
Meh

Forget the students. Think of the teachers!

"Now, with Classroom, teachers can view and comment on students’ work to help them along the way."

Like the teachers don't work enough for pitiful pay. Now they get to work after school, too.

2
5

America's hot and cold spots for broadband revealed in new map

Decade
Unhappy

High tech does not mean high speed Internet

Here in San Francisco, so far Google, Monkeybrains, and Sonic.net have tried and failed to bring affordable high-speed Internet to the City. The only high-speed option is Comcast, with a normal speed in the 10's of Mbps. In my work place, Comcast was not available, so we switched to Sonic.net's bonded ADSL2+ service, which runs over AT&T's lines.

In this area, AT&T and Comcast are the most common options. Not far away from the urban areas, like Robert X. Cringely's house, the options dwindle to about 0. And in some random parts of the Bay Area, gigabit fiber is available. It's a mess.

0
0

Beware WarKitteh, the connected cat that sniffs your Wi-Fi privates

Decade
Terminator

Re: Wide open?

The open guest network is not that bad. Presumably the owner would not be using the guest network, because that's tedious. And guests aren't normally an everyday occurrence. You'd pretty much have to lie in wait, biding your time, until a guest comes and enters the password. If it's traffic you want, it's much more efficient to go to the nearest coffee shop.

Much more fun are the crappy Cisco routers where the supposedly "secure" network is vulnerable to the Reaver attack.

2
0

Top Ten 802.11ac routers: Time for a Wi-Fi makeover?

Decade
Facepalm

IPv6 or no sale

We are long past IPv4 address exhaustion. I refuse to buy a new router unless I know its IPv6 support actually works.

And it has to work with my ISP. Comcast does DHCP-PD. AT&T does 6rd. Sonic.net does 6in4. I need to know what the router supports.

2
0

The final score: Gramophones 1 – Glassholes 0

Decade
Boffin

Admit it - You think it would be useful

A lot of the pictures are going to be banal, but sometimes it would be convenient to have a camera immediately available to capture illegal actions. I commute by bike, and so many times I wish I could capture pictures of people cutting me off, or blocking the bike lane and the pedestrian walkway.

Though, to make it work well, it must be recording all the time. Like Steve Mann's camera. Google Glass is so far behind Steve Mann it's ridiculous. There's way more of Mann's philosophy on his blog.

1
6

Traffic lights, fridges and how they've all got it in for us

Decade
Linux

Re: Free Software is a requirement

Personally, IoT without Free Software is impossible, because I won't buy it.

Trade secrets? Excluded. Patents, especially on the software? Of dubious benefit to society and should be eliminated. If you want me to buy the thing, then I need to be in control of it.

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2
Decade
Linux

Free Software is a requirement

The Internet of Things needs to be Free Software, top to bottom, device firmware and all. There's no other way for it to be secure.

These security researchers are wrong that we just need a security focus. The problem is that a manufacturer's product lifecycle goes from sale to end of useful support typically in much less time than a device's service life. And in many cases, they don't even have the ability to push out security updates.

The normal way I hear these things go, you have a chip platform devised by Broadcom or Qualcomm or somebody, with binary drivers locking it to a specific Linux kernel version, and then you have a product design from some obscure Asian manufacturer, and then you have the big brand OEM's customization, finally releasing a product years later. Neither the OEM nor the original chip maker can release effective updates for this setup, and both want to move on to the next thing.

The real solution is for everything to be run by Free Software. Linux has already proven that PCs remain useful long after the end of manufacturer support. The Internet of Things needs the same opportunity.

1
6

DON’T add me to your social network, I have NO IDEA who you are

Decade
Thumb Down

LinkedIn spams without informed consent

Many people don't intend to send email bombs, but there's something they do on LinkedIn that makes mass emails go out from it.

LinkedIn does not respect people, but it doesn't have any content that I find important. That's why I'll never sign up for LinkedIn.

3
0

Thanks for nothing, OpenSSL, grumbles stonewalled De Raadt

Decade
Facepalm

Because, while they still use the OpenSSL library, they need the early disclosure to prepare packages for their own users.

Also, being developed in the open, LibreSSL is doubtless already being installed in production systems somewhere.

0
1

Google Maps can now tell cyclists how HIGH they will get

Decade
Happy

Re: Ride the City (www.ridethecity.com)

I'm planning a route, and I know that a couple miles of it have a moderate incline that will tire my riding companion. Google says the route is "mostly flat" and doesn't give any elevation data. Ride the City says there's an "elevation gain" of 190 ft, but doesn't say where the gain will be.

0
0

WTF is NET NEUTRALITY, anyway? And how can we make everything better?

Decade
Facepalm

Re: @ Andrew Orlowski

Sometimes, Andrew, I wonder why you're paid for what you do.

4G, WiMAX and 5G should be frightening the crap out of the incumbents. Why aren't they?

Mostly, it's because the incumbents have most of the power in wireless. AT&T and Verizon have the most spectrum, as sold by Congress and regulated by the FCC. It's difficult for a competitor to arise. Wireless is a shared medium, so you aren't going to stuff many household-Netflix-worths of traffic through it. I recently tried WiMAX, and the latency is through the roof, and there is a lot more packet loss than wired.

The carriers welcome wireless. It's a way for them to claim that there is competitive broadband. But unlike real broadband, where you really have to work to hit the multi-hundred-GB bandwidth cap, wireless has a cap of like 0.5 GB to 2 GB. A 4G connection lets you use an entire month's allotment of data in less than a day. If you use more data, you pay dearly. And if they can get Congress to allow them to let go of wireline, then they will happily stop maintaining the wires and force everybody onto cell phones, like a third world country.

12
0

Microsoft: You know we said NO MORE XP PATCHES? Well ...

Decade
Unhappy

Stick to your guns: Stop supporting XP

I'm very disappointed in Microsoft. First caving on MSE updates, and now caving on this Internet Explorer update. XP belongs in a museum, not on a PC with users that goes online.

10
42

Cash slump a Seagate problem, or a hard disk industry problem?

Decade
Flame

Seagate not attractive

I used to buy drives at a pretty regular pace, but I stopped during the Thailand Flood Crisis. I'm very disappointed at how long it is taking for prices to come back down. Yes, "is taking," present continuous, because I bought my 3TB hard drive for $90 pre-flood, and I haven't found any 3TB (or bigger) drives even reach that price since.

So, I'm just getting used to having a fixed amount of space, and using SSDs whenever I can. SSDs have dramatic speed advantages over HDD.

Seagate is also not attractive because their drives have strangely glitchy performance, and Backblaze found their drives to be the least reliable (but cheapest on a per-TB basis), and their SSHD hybrid drives have too small and too slow SSD caching to be worth the expense.

1
0

Awkward? Elop now answers to ex-junior Nadella as Microsoft closes Nokia buyout

Decade
Facepalm

Re: "...grand turnaround plan from Elop that was supposed to save Nokia."

What a revisionist story.

When Elop took control of Nokia, Samsung wasn't even considered a threat. The main reason not to go Android was the very legitimate fear of losing their investment in Navteq. The main reason to go Windows was bizarre (that Nokia would be so big they could influence Microsoft's development), and as it turned out, the naysayers were right. Microsoft's slow development of Windows Phone has hurt Nokia's desirability and their attempts to do phablets.

Windows Phone and Android were not the only alternatives. Nokia was also working on MeeGo, which had a transition plan for their huge Symbian installed base, but was mired in mismanagement. Even after Elop torched his platforms, a small group was working on Meltemi Linux, until Elop noticed and fired them.

With Windows Phone, Nokia was the biggest fish in a small pond. They've managed to sell many phones, primarily by being the only Windows Phone OEM willing to lose money on every device. Microsoft was not "devices and services" back then.

It's good for Nokia's shareholders right now to have a profitable company again, but I'd be surprised if that were the plan. It would have been immensely better to have a profitable company that was also the captain of the industry, and not a 10% market share also-ran.

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DeSENSORtised: Why the 'Internet of Things' will FAIL without IPv6

Decade
Boffin

Hex codes are a good thing

The aversion to hex codes is confounding.

Any competent computer scientist learns hex code. If you don't understand hex, then you shouldn't be holding technical opinions. And average people can't understand normal IP addresses anyway; as far as they're concerned, the dotted quads are hieroglyphs. IPv4 just has shorter hieroglyphic names than IPv6 does.

I find hex codes to be much easier to work with. Each character stands for a unique 4 bits of address. Most allocations are done along half-octet boundaries (prefixes divisible by 4: /32, /40, /48, /56, /60, /64) so each character in the prefix is the same for every host in the network, except for the trailing zeroes in the prefix. Contrast that with IPv4's decimal addresses, where each decimal digit covers several binary digits partially. And IPv4's paucity of addresses means subnets get allocated on awkward bit boundaries.

Concrete example time. Let's say you get allocated 2001:db8:abcd:ef00::/56. Every host on your network will have 2001:db8:abcd:ef00: at the beginning of the address, only varying in the last 16 hex digits, because each subnet is recommended to use 64 bits. If you have more subnets, then the two zeroes at the end of the prefix will change to the subnet address, but otherwise they will all have the same prefix. With the recommended allocation, you have 256 subnets to play with; or you could manually use those 72 bits however you want.

Let's contrast this with IPv4, an allocation of 172.16.64.0/21. Some hosts could have 172.16.65 at the beginning of the address, and others could have 172.16.70, but none will have 172.16.72. Not to mention network masks for hosts that still use those: If you want the final 11 bits to be host address, the mask will be 255.255.248.0, but if you want 10 bits for host address, the mask is 255.255.252.0. You need to do decimal to binary conversions whenever you work with IPv4 addresses. And you have far fewer subnets to play with, or far fewer hosts per subnet.

Hex digits are way easier to use. The vast address space of IPv6 makes it even easier to use. It's not the complexity of the technology that's holding it back, but laziness.

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