* Posts by Decade

169 posts • joined 20 Jun 2012

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Hi, Fi: Google JOWL-SLAPS mobile bigguns with $20/mo wireless service

Decade
Paris Hilton

Re: Wow!

Republic Wireless… unlimited minutes and texts and data at 3G speeds… $40/month gets unlimited 4G…

Ugh. Republic Wireless still advertises “unlimited,” but they actually limit it to 5GB now. It’s in the small print. Still, more data for the money than Google, and the no-data plans are cheaper.

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Decade
IT Angle

Re: Wow!

It's a hybrid of the business plans of Ting (variable month-to-month pricing without penalties), T-Mobile (free international texts and data), and Apple (special SIM card).

Not to mention Republic Wireless. In fact, a few days ago, Republic Wireless announced that they intended to start testing a cell phone plan that pays you back for data you don’t use. The concept renderings show that they might give you control over which processes are allowed to use cell data.

In the meanwhile, Republic Wireless already has WiFi to cell handover, and $25/month (before taxes) gives unlimited minutes and texts and data at 3G speeds. That’s only 500MB on Google’s plan. $40/month gets unlimited 4G on Republic Wireless, but only 2GB on Google Fi. I’m not especially tempted by Google.

The downsides of Republic Wireless are that it’s Sprint-only, you have to buy a Republic Wireless phone with a Republic Wireless firmware that is several months behind Google and Motorola’s firmware releases, handover is not actually seamless in my experience, and there’s practically no roaming. I’m willing to overlook a lot, though, because I’m personally on the $10/month (before taxes) no-data plan. That’s half of Google Fi before data.

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D-Link router patch creates NEW SOHOpeless vuln

Decade
Linux

Re: FOSS that you can rely on

99.999999986%

Because of course a fully open-source Linux distribution for routers doesn’t exist, so only the most dedicated of nerds is able to install and use it.

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Decade
Linux

Re: FOSS that you can rely on

The thing is, I hate shopping for networking equipment, so I don’t do it that many times more than I have to. The OpenWRT Wiki is one place to start, but I think doing shopping there is a waste of time.

My current hunch is that Qualcomm Atheros is the best combination of open source friendliness and speed. I don’t care about top speed anymore, as long as it works well enough, because no matter what you get, it’s obsolete in a few months. My router is a Buffalo WZR-600DHP flashed with OpenWRT, and I think the most promising of the AC1750 routers is the TP-Link Archer C7.

I don’t know any good AC3200 routers. I would look for both radios being Atheros, because it looks like a bunch of companies now pair an Atheros WiFi SoC with an open-source-hostile 802.11ac radio. WikiDevi looks like a fun web site for tracking this sort of information.

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Decade
Linux

FOSS that you can rely on

The more I see, the more I am convinced that Free Software is the only long-term reasonable software. And not the fake Open Source with Closed Extensions, like DD-WRT does with its pervasive use of proprietary kernel modules.

I would not buy the D-Link DIR-890L because I would look it up and see that it’s based on the Broadcom BCM4700-series SoC. Those things don’t have usable open-source drivers for either wired or wireless network adapters. Plenty of people compromise and use only the kernel that ships with the device, so that the drivers work, but I prefer to buy devices where I can actually patch any vulnerabilities and recompile the firmware.

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Cisco boss Chambers: It's our fault H-1B visa shakeup is struggling

Decade
Facepalm

Win the American public with American jobs

Over in Lala Land (Washington, D.C.) the executives and lobbyists keep on saying that they can’t hire enough tech workers, please give us more visas.

Meanwhile, in Silicon Valley, I’m applying to many tech jobs, and the hiring managers all say that they have no trouble filling those positions. When they say, “Hot job market,” they mean they have both plenty of openings and plenty of people to fill those openings. Google and Microsoft have strict limits on applications, and Apple just throws applications away. Facebook allows job seekers to apply to only 10 positions per year, to cut down on the work. This is not the behavior of an industry that has a problem finding people willing to do the work.

This isn’t really about immigration. This is about the capital class exploiting the labor class.

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Affirmative wrist action: Pebble Time raises 20 MEELLION BUCKS on Kickstarter

Decade
Meh

Re: hmmm...

For me, the appeal of a smartwatch is as an alternative control and notification system.

I stopped wearing a watch 5 years before I got a cell phone, when I started carrying around a PDA. It's just much better at everything a dumbwatch can do, except for immediate access and battery life. Now I use a smartphone.

But a smartphone sucks. To interact with it, you enter the unlock code and then hunt down the app that you want to use. Taptaptaptaptap, swipe swipe, tap, wait which messenger app, tap, wait, tap... I'm getting repetitive stress injury from this thing.

Part of it is that Android sucks. I miss Maemo and its extensible chat program. But I imagine that I can decrease the pain by using a watch to unlock the phone, and to do other routine interactions.

With a little more independence and a lot more security, I think a watch could be pretty useful. For example, I hate carrying keys. It would be nice if I could do that watch-door-entry trick from the hotel, but at my home and work. I guess a lot of people like the heartrate/pedometer sensor thing, too.

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Decade
Boffin

Re: Not quite as hacker-friendly as I want

Luckily somebody's already figured out how it works without an account...

https://f-droid.org/repository/browse/?fdid=nodomain.freeyourgadget.gadgetbridge

That's interesting. It didn't show up when I searched for alternatives for Pebble's proprietary software...

Oh. That's why. I read the Terms of Use and discovered their offensiveness on March 13, and this AGPL-licensed alternative was first published on F-droid on March 19.

At this point, I prefer to wait for somebody else to confirm that Gadgetbridge works with Pebble Time, and maybe also see if somebody releases an alternative to the software on the watch itself. A lot of people didn't like the original Pebble's software upgrade to 2.0, and it's nice not to depend on such a deceitful company.

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Decade
Boffin

Re: Not quite as hacker-friendly as I want

I actually tried to look this up and failed - do you have a link for those claims...?

God forbid you actually read and interpret the Pebble Terms of Use that I linked to.

1) Figuring out how it works so you can use the watch without the account.

Section II paragraph 2 sentence 2: You may not decompile, disassemble, reverse engineer or otherwise attempt to obtain or access the source code from which any component of the Services or the Service is compiled and interpreted, and nothing in this Agreement may be construed to grant any right to obtain or use such source code. (Emphasis added.)

2) Using anything you learn from the Pebble to make your own anything, competitor to Pebble or not.

Section II paragraph 2 sentence 3: You agree not to copy, duplicate or imitate, in whole or in part, any concept, idea, business model, business process, product, service or other intellectual property or other ideas or content embodied in the Services or learned by you from your use of or access to the Services. (Emphasis added.)

3) Disparaging Pebble in public.

Section III paragraph 2, excerpt: You may not: 12. portray Company or its affiliates in a negative manner or otherwise portray its services in a false, misleading, derogatory or offensive manner;

4) Accidentally breaking the Pebble service.

Section III paragraph 2, excerpt: You may not: 13. use the Services in any manner that could damage, disable, overburden, or impair our servers or interfere with any other party's use and enjoyment of the Services;

“If a term is illegal, act like it’s legal anyway.”

Section XIV sentence 8: If any provision of this Agreement is found by a court of competent jurisdiction to be invalid, the parties nevertheless agree that the court should endeavor to give effect to the parties' intentions as reflected in the provision, and the other provisions hereof shall remain in full force and effect. (Emphasis added.)

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Decade
Unhappy

Not quite as hacker-friendly as I want

I thought the Pebble Time was quite tempting, with an open SDK and useful battery life without excessive bulk (It's amazing what comparisons against the competition will do to your perspective), but it's actually a walled garden every bit as restrictive as Android Wear or Apple Watch.

To make the watch anything more than a decoration, you need a Pebble Account. And the Pebble Account Terms of Use prohibit, among other things:

1) Figuring out how it works so you can use the watch without the account.

2) Using anything you learn from the Pebble to make your own anything, competitor to Pebble or not.

3) Disparaging Pebble in public.

4) Accidentally breaking the Pebble service.

I'm sure at least some of those terms are illegal in the state of California, and they even insert a provision at the end that basically goes, “If a term is illegal, act like it’s legal anyway.”

But, you know, nobody reads the terms of use.

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Apple takes ACID-compliant NoSQL upstart FoundationDB

Decade
Linux

Re: FOSS that you can rely on

Did you miss the part where these guys pulled their Github repos?

If it's FOSS, then there are copies elsewhere. Like when Oracle ended OpenSolaris, the illumos project continues. The primary sponsor of Node.js just released work that they've been doing to put Docker containers on illumos. Or when Oracle made MySQL less attractive, the founder forked it and started MariaDB. The benefit of FOSS is that a company can't revoke your access to it.

No, FoundationDB was never FOSS. Its Github repositories were mostly bindings so you could use FoundationDB from various languages. They're useless by themselves. And an SQL parser, which was actually forked from Apache Derby, and there are copies elsewhere.

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Decade
Linux

FOSS that you can rely on

The more I see, the more I am convinced that Free Software is the only long-term reasonable software. And not the fake Open Source with Closed Extensions, like Monty Widenius originally did with MySQL.

You just can't build a lasting business on somebody else's proprietary software. It is always vulnerable to the changing priorities of its owners, even if the owner is as rich and developer-friendly as Microsoft, as the users of Visual Basic and FoxPro have discovered.

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Broadband routers: SOHOpeless and vendors don't care

Decade
Facepalm

Re: Why does this problem exist?

The problem exists because of tradition.

The networking companies have always sucked. Back when NICs were add-on parts, unless you got your NIC straight from 3COM or Digital, it would just be the lowest-bidder chip and board. You could never depend on the model number, because they completely changed the insides without changing the model name.

When they started making routers, they just brought these bad habits with them. They make no promises about what's inside, because they like to have the option of changing it when they find a way to save a few pennies. This makes it difficult to shop for a device for use with open-source firmware.

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Superfish: Lenovo? More like Lolnono – until they get real on privacy

Decade
Linux

Re: Problem is inherent to closed source

Alright, I was in a hurry when I wrote that first reply. Properly, I should have said, “free software,” but the distinction is too complicated to explain quickly, and Eric Raymond and Bruce Perens are bad men who made “open source” the instantly recognizable phrase instead of “free software.”

The crucial bit is the freedom to seek your own software providers. Don’t trust Canonical? Then take advantage of their hard labor and use Linux Mint. Don’t like OpenSSL? Then sponsor development of LibreSSL. Feeling cynical about Code.org’s message of universal coding? Just code for yourself.

The open aspect is also nice. Apple sends your searches to spammers? Nobody knows until somebody does a packet capture or something. Canonical sends your searches to Amazon? There’s immediate outcry, and, before it even ships, multiple opt-out methods are provided. Including that Linux Mint option.

Everybody knows that nobody upgrades the software on their computers. Part of that is the training: Everybody is told that they are not supposed to modify the software on their computers. This goes all the way back to the beginning of the software industry, exemplified by Bill Gates’ Open Letter to Hobbyists: Since he made the software, only he has the privilege of modifying it, and everybody else should pay him to do so.

That set up a dysfunctional dynamic, so that the bosses of Lenovo thought it was a good idea to put a little piece of unvetted closed-source software onto their customers’ computers. After all, the rest of the software is unvetted, all the way down to the operating system and the firmware that runs before the operating system runs. What more harm can one little bit of software do? (Plenty, it turns out, this time.)

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Decade
Linux

Problem is inherent to closed source

The truth is that privacy has no real meaning when you use closed source software. Open source might make your heart bleed, but everything is out there and open. There are no secrets. With closed source, it's ultimately just a trust game.

That's why I say that, in the long term, open source is the only reasonable option.

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Smartphones don’t dumb you down, they DUMB you UP

Decade
Flame

GPS maps are not the same

The main difference between a GPS and a proper map is that a GPS is angled and automatically oriented, so in theory you could look down at the map and up at the street and see where they correspond. No need to tilt your head and compare street signs to see if you're going the right way.

I'm finding smartphone GPS to have some pretty bad directions. For example, when I'm in the middle of a block, and the road curves, sometimes Google says, "Slight right." A completely useless command because, if I don't "slight right," I'll run off the road or into oncoming traffic. Other times it will say, "Turn left," but when I stare at the GPS map, it shows a sharp right that I must take before I can turn left. And you always need to beware directions that are illegal and/or unsafe.

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‘Whatever happened to Vladimir Putin?’ and other crap New Year prophesies

Decade
Boffin

Re: IPv6 and local clouds

That's because they have the riches necessary to secure a supply of globally reachable IP addresses. In exchange, whenever you want your devices to communicate, Google/Amazon et al. act as pervasive men-in-the-middle.

What I want from IPv6 is the ability for my devices to communicate with each other, even if they are not on the same LAN, without designing backdoors right into the architecture, and without horrible hacks like OpenVPN.

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Decade
Boffin

IPv6 and local clouds

One of the reasons I've long been eager for the IPv6 transition is so you can run your own cloud-like things. The Internet was built to be decentralized. Why should your activity be held hostage to one provider?

Now that I'm older, I see the impossibility of security updates, so I'm going to reserve the cloud-like thing to myself.

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You have a 'SIMPLE QUESTION'? Well, the answer is NO

Decade
Paris Hilton

Apple doesn't change connectors often. That is not the problem.

I don't know why you're complaining about the Apple connector, Dobbs. Apple has changed the connector only 2 times in the 13 years since the release of the iPod (from Firewire to 30-pin, and from 30-pin to Lightning), and they've used the Lightning connector for 2 years already. Likewise, Apple laptops have changed power connectors just 3 times in the past 16 years. I know you're slowing down in your old age, but I think this complaint is something you should keep to yourself.

In the same time, other companies have gone from proprietary mini-barrels to mini-USB to micro-USB to micro-USB 3, and now they're contemplating USB 3.1 type C. And you almost never can use the same power adapter for 2 different PC laptops, even from the same manufacturer.

What annoys me is that the Apple cord designs seem to be inspired by explosive seed pods. Bring your cable around and use it regularly, and before long the shell is splitting apart and the wires are unraveling. I get around that by exploiting the power-efficiency of Safari and the marvelous battery life, to leave my power cable safely at home. And Apple charges way too much for their cables; you should be buying Lightning cables on sale from an online retailer like NewEgg.

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Armouring up online: Duncan Campbell's chief techie talks crypto with El Reg

Decade
Childcatcher

Re: Abandon SMTP

I disagree. The problem is SMTP. It can transmit using TLS, but that is trivially removed by ISPs. The source and destination are completely clear to the mail service, and it turns out that the metadata are important. And encryption is something that takes additional effort to add, so nobody will do so without an IT department doing it for them.

S/MIME is nice, within its limitations, but it just proves that SMTP email is flawed. As long as email is plaintext by default, the email clients don't sound off klaxons about it being insecure. Instead, security is represented by the addition of a small checkbox in the corner. Watch for the checkbox, or else your email is just silently in plaintext.

You can install a CA-signed S/MIME certificate for free from StartCom. So nobody does so. And even if you get one, you can't install it in the default Android email client. Because plaintext is the default. We need a new protocol where encrypted and authenticated is the default.

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Decade
Mushroom

Abandon SMTP

We should just stop using protocols that are not secure by design. Encrypted email is hack after hack on top of SMTP, and it's just not realistic to expect anybody to use it correctly, consistently.

The problem is that I don't know of any viable alternatives. Silent Text seems nice, but niche. Any viable solution needs to be free and open-source. I don't have time myself to make such a solution.

As for the web of trust problem, I don't think normal people can make it work. The problem tends toward centralization. I like Moxie Marlinspike's idea of Trust Agility, with certificate authorities who work for you rather than for the services who want you to trust them enough to give them money. This is a social problem more than a technical problem.

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This week it rained in San Francisco and the power immediately blew out. Your tech utopia

Decade
Mushroom

Disruption from mild weather is not unique to San Francisco

I think this storm damage is just a sign of how wonderfully mild the weather in San Francisco is. We have high winds and heavy rains so seldom that it hasn't been worth it to make the infrastructure resilient to it. Just like Atlanta, Georgia, with snow.

Also, in my area of San Francisco, there was no power outage.

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Intel: Grab these platform shoes and dance to OUR Internet of Things standard

Decade
Facepalm

What platform?

"MQTT, HTTPS, CoAP, REST, XMPP, QOS, etc." That is not a standard. That is a bottomless fountain of work for consultants, trying to get everything to work together.

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Yahoo, Bing beg 'right to be forgotten' wipers: Don't FORGET about US

Decade
Devil

Google is becoming too slow

Sometimes I use Bing or DuckDuckGo. Not because of fear of Google, but because Google search is becoming glitchy. I would enter a search term, and it would take half a minute for Google to respond. And their search results page has become bloated with advertisements for their other services.

If my device is showing icons for alternatives, and I don't feel like risking a wait, then I'll click on one of them. So far, DuckDuckGo and Bing have been nice and speedy, and relevant enough for the searches that I've been doing.

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systemd row ends with Debian getting forked

Decade
Boffin

Re: What is systemd

For the most positively biased introduction to systemd, I suppose there's Lennart Poettering's seminal blog entry, Rethinking PID 1. His entire blog is like a stream of consciousness of the current state and intended future of systemd.

For a whole lot of tedious technical details, there's the freedesktop.org site, with links to download the source and the documentation. Yes, they do have an entire section about the canonical way to write the name of systemd. A lot of the documentation is just linking back to Lennart's blog, though.

If you want to hack it, you need to keep in mind the principles of the systemd cabal: POSIX is obsolete and cross-platform is irrelevant, so don't bother with it. Backwards-compatibility is harmful, so don't worry about the past. Use and depend on the features of the newest Linux kernel.

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Google Chrome on Windows 'completely unusable', gripe users

Decade
Gimp

Re: How Widespread?

MacBook Pro - i5, OSX Yosemite, plenty of RAM.

I've taken to launching Chrome only rarely as needed. I find that Chrome makes the system less stable; for example, randomly, control panels that require password input would not unlock until I quit Chrome. Why does Chrome interfere with System Preferences? I don't know. It's frustrating. And playing video in Chrome runs both cores at 100%, draining the battery very quickly and making the UI very unresponsive.

On the other hand, right now, Chrome in fullscreen on a rotated screen on Mac does correct subpixel antialiasing. No other program does this. Chrome in desktop on the rotated screen also doesn't do correct subpixel antialiasing. WTH, Apple?

I've had bad experiences with Chrome on Windows, too. My favorite period was back in May, when Google Drive crashed Google Chrome. I had to use Chrome for Flash and Firefox for Google Drive. (I also no longer install Adobe's Flash Player separately. Flash sucks.)

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Post-Microsoft, post-PC programming: The portable REVOLUTION

Decade
Angel

Sailfish

I wouldn't depend on Ubuntu for a powerful tablet. The Vivaldi tablet was a neat idea, but couldn't get funding. Now, the most promising tablet appears to be the Jolla Tablet, reported in a certain disreputable publication here.

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The cloud that goes puff: Seagate Central home NAS woes

Decade
Meh

Oh lucky you

When my Seagate devices fail, they tend to fail because the hard drive develops errors. I try to read the drive in another enclosure, but it never works.

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Renewable energy 'simply WON'T WORK': Top Google engineers

Decade
Thumb Down

Did you read the same article I did?

I read the paper in IEEE Spectrum, and I think it says something very different than what Lewis Page seems to think.

The PhD engineers didn't say that renewable energy was insufficient for producing electricity. They were saying that even if we could wave a magic wand and turn all electricity production into renewables, we've already exceeded the “safety threshold” of CO2 concentrations. We exceeded that limit about 25 years ago. And besides electricity, there are plenty of uses of energy that are not anywhere close to ready to be replaced by renewable energy, so at best RE electricity will just slow down the increase of CO2.

Their point is that renewable energy is necessary, but not sufficient, to halt the climate change. We need to focus on the bigger picture, and fund the research and development to fix it.

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Sailfish OS tablet is GO: Fans stuff cash into Jolla's cap in hand

Decade
Thumb Up

Atom 3700? That's good news

The Atom 3700 series is the Bay Trail platform with the Intel HD 2000-compatible graphics. I'm not sure what's its performance, but it's way more compatible with open source drivers than anything else out there.

Now to find out about the other parts. Is it too much to hope for a Qualcomm Atheros wireless chipset, with freely distributed firmware and open infrastructure/monitor modes?

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China BLOCKS Verizon's EdgeCast before internet meeting

Decade
Facepalm

Let's roll out DNSSEC already

GreatFire.org suggested thousands of websites had been affected, after China "DNS poisoned" edgecastcdn.net.

This is precisely the sort of problem that DNSSEC was invented to mitigate. The DNS root is signed, and the keys are stored safely outside of China. The .NET zone is fully secured. Why isn't Verizon signing edgecast.net?

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EVERYTHING needs crypto says Internet Architecture Board

Decade
Facepalm

How much to encrypt?

For a small part of the dispute, there is the noise about DNSSEC vs DNSCurve. DNSSEC is more widely deployed, but Daniel J. Bernstein (author of DNSCurve, and also the discoverer of Elliptic Curve 25519 and other important work, but a rather difficult individual to work with) has denigrated DNSSEC as a "DDOS amplifier." However, by considering encryption to be "free," DNSCurve would eliminate DNS caching, and the load on authoritative DNS servers would increase... dramatically. So nobody uses DNSCurve.

Because nobody uses DNSCurve, your every DNS query is open to interception and manipulation. DNSSEC makes it harder to forge the responses, but that may be small comfort when you're jailed for looking up torproject.org.

What I'd like to see is IPsec with opportunistic encryption, but I don't expect that to be widely available... ever.

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Firefox decade: Microsoft's IE humbled by a dogged upstart. Native next?

Decade
FAIL

Firefox is deliberately slow

I don't use Safari on my Mac because I don't know about other browsers. I use Safari because nothing else works as well.

Firefox's problem is that it's not native to anything. The XUL toolkit was supposed to make cross-platform development easier, but it's slow and not native anywhere. These days, computers are fast enough to run XUL decently, but back when it was introduced with Netscape Communicator 6... It was part of why Netscape lost all its market share.

And then development has issues. I use Firefox on my Android because I loathe Google Chrome, but I put up with a keyboard glitch for almost a year, because it was doing something nonstandard with input and that's how long the fix took from being identified to being in the stable release.

Now I've stopped using Firefox on the desktop, because it can't handle multiple monitors correctly on MacOS X 10.9 Mavericks, and now I've installed MacOS X 10.10 Yosemite and multiple monitor support is unusably worse. Considering how long it took for the keyboard glitch to be removed from the Android version, I'm not holding my breath waiting for the desktop version to be fixed.

2
4

BOFH: SOOO... You want to sell us some antivirus software?

Decade
Facepalm

Stupid PDFs

These days, I mostly use the PDF readers built into Firefox, Chrome, and Safari. Sometimes I use (Apple) Preview. This is on a Mac, obviously.

What I'd like to do is banish them to an untrusted AppVM, as in Qubes OS, but I'm rather addicted to my computer having performance. Maybe next time I build a computer.

0
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A Game of Storage Thrones: Enterprise IT, meet gripping drama

Decade
Facepalm

Michael the Usurper of Dell?

The story was going so nicely, but my engagement was lost when you called the founder and namesake of Dell its usurper.

0
0

Return of the disk drive bigness? Not for poor old, busted WD

Decade
Alert

Re: WD or Seagate? Hmmmm....

As useful as Backblaze's data are, they're using the drives in a completely different way than I am. They're buying the drives in bulk, and they're using proprietary replication software to stay ahead of hardware failures. I can't afford to buy drives in bulk, so I need each drive to be as reliable as possible.

In particular, I'm noticing that they do not have Toshiba drives. I don't know how reliable Toshiba drives are. HGST drives are more reliable, but their per-TB costs are much higher than Seagate and Western Digital. Digital storage technology sucks.

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0

Apple, Google take on Main Street in BONKING-FOR-CASH struggle

Decade
Childcatcher

This is really about liability

As far as I can tell, the retailers are upset about how the payment processors are trying to get them to move to more secure payment methods. Starting some time next year, the retailer is responsible for any fraud done using old-fashioned swipe cards. I guess the retailers don't like to be pushed around, so they're retaliating through their customers. This is the best explanation I can find for why they want to push such a consumer-hostile system as CurrentC.

As for me, I don't trust digital payment systems with all their tracking methods, so I pay for most purchases with cash.

1
0

Disk drive BIGNESS is back: Seagate revenues and shipments surge

Decade
Mushroom

Seagate is big in arrays... Because you need RAID for reliability

3 out of the last 4 hard drive failures that I've experienced were Seagate drives, and the drives aren't that old, but I don't have a lot of drives and that could be a statistical fluke.

For real data, you need a large population, like what Backblaze has done. For Backblaze's usage, Seagate is still economical because their per-TB costs are low enough to cover the failures, but I don't have that luxury.

Hitachi is now the reliable-drives arm of Western Digital. There are only 3 hard drive manufacturers left on this planet: Seagate, Western Digital, and Toshiba.

I think hard drives suck, but all digital storage technologies suck, so the only reasonable option is to have multiple copies with automatic backup and verification. Like RAID-Z with snapshots and replicas.

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Finnish PM: Apple has DESTROYED FINLAND

Decade
Trollface

Apple failed to kill Android

Yes, the problem wasn't that OPK reorganized Nokia so it would become famous for its infighting and elaborate PowerPoint presentations, nor that Elop publicly destroyed their high-margin product lines years before any possible replacement, while neglecting their low-end market.

The problem was that Apple failed to sue Google and the Android Open Source Project for copying the Apple designs. High-end smartphones should have been a niche. Android brought the design to the masses. But instead of suing Android at the source, Apple sued Samsung for being the most blatant at copying.

2
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Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author

Decade

Kallasvuo not a good defense

“Google and Apple were strong in industries outside mobile communications, who suddenly enter and in a couple of years become market leaders where they have never been before. That is unique in the business history of the world.”

Just like how a maker of paper and rubber raincoats became a global leader in cell phones? Just like how a pair of Ivy League drop-outs founded the largest software company in the world?

Kallasvuo was a horrible CEO and chairman, but at least he didn't kill the business while doing stupid things. Elop did.

1
0

Greedy datagrabs, crap security will KILL the Internet of Thingies

Decade
Boffin

Metcalfe's Law will disagree

Bob Metcalfe (inventor of Ethernet) says the value of a network will increase exponentially with the number of nodes.

Walking across the room to switch on the heat is not a terrible burden, and we’ve had thermostats to do that for decades. (It would be nicer if the thermostat had useful interaction with the seasons. 21° is refreshingly cold when it’s 27° outside, but 21° is excessively hot when it’s 16°.) It’s a bigger problem when you’re managing a commercial building and need to walk up multiple flights of stairs to reach all the thermostats. And you pretty much need the Internet if you’re managing an entire campus (Microsoft’s 88 Acres, which is not online anymore).

For me, the matter isn’t whether it’s online (online is better), but whether I have control over where the data go. That sort of security is crucial and currently missing from the Internet of Things.

0
0

Something ate Google's 8.8.8.8 at about eight in Asia's evening

Decade
Trollface

I'm never buying Belkin network equipment ever

Seems like less than a week since Belkin suggested that users switch to Google DNS to go online.

Vendor firmware tends to suck and Belkin is especially stupid.

0
4

NSA spying will shatter the internet, Silicon Valley bosses warn

Decade
Pirate

Internet companies don't understand ownership

The real issue is that I should have control over my data and metadata, preferably on systems that I control. For Schmidt and Zuck, et al, that's no real worry, because they own their super-invasive cloud systems. It's like how you shouldn't worry about keeping secrets from yourself. I have no ownership stake in Silicon Valley, so I'd rather keep my valuable data to myself.

3
0

Countless Belkin routers go TITSUP in massive mystery meltdown

Decade
Linux

Do not buy Belkin

The hardware looks pretty enough, but I do not trust Belkin's software. So let's use an open-source firmware. Oh look, Belkin does not post the open-source software that runs on their routers, and many of them use proprietary drivers and locked bootloaders. For example, the Belkin-Linksys WRT1900AC, announced with great fanfare as an "OpenWRT" router, but not actually supported.

Belkin used to be fine-but-overpriced when they were just a Mac accessory rebrander, but if there's a firmware involved, then I will stay away.

3
1

US stakes out 'net battleground ahead of ITU meeting

Decade
Big Brother

Abolish CALEA and CFAA and DMCA, etc.

Governments shouldn't control 'content, technologies or services'

I'm ready to repeal CALEA when you are. That's a Clinton presidency/Democratic Congress law that requires communications companies to include wiretapping technologies.

Also, the DMCA restricts content, and the CFAA makes it dangerous to interact with services online.

0
0

Bill Gates, drugs and the internet: Top 10 Larry Ellison quotes

Decade
Boffin

Bill Gates cleverness

Bill Gates in the 1980's and 1990's absolutely thought of himself as being clever. I shouldn't be spending time on citing the sources, so I won't...

Bill Gates claimed that Microsoft was going to beat IBM because Microsoft was run by smart 20-somethings. He wanted to surround himself with more smart 20-somethings when his mind inevitably declined with age. Of course, when he did reach 40, he changed his mind.

Bill Gates liked people to know about the times he would take a week off to do some intensive reading before announcing major strategies for Microsoft. His most important memo being the Internet memo of 1995.

The culmination was when he wrote The Road Ahead, which Bill Gates used to try to shape the future of technology. It didn't turn out much like the book.

I think the real turning point was during the antitrust case, when Bill Gates decided that he was too special to show up in court, but had to deliver his deposition in a video call where he visibly appeared to be dismissive. Though, I wonder if it were not actually very clever, because he managed to enrage the judge so much that the judge was taken off the case.

3
1

Would Apple godhead Steve Jobs have HATED the Watch?

Decade
FAIL

Steve Jobs didn't do PowerPC

Steve Jobs did not approve that partnership. That was John Sculley, the guy who fired Steve Jobs.

Steve sure was happy to sell the PowerPC as long as it was viable, but I suspect that he never really committed to it. There were persistent rumors that Apple had a lab running MacOS X on x86, and MacOS X never really ran smoothly on PowerPC. As soon as IBM stumbled with the G5 and Intel recovered from the Pentium 4 stumble with the Core series, Steve switched the whole Mac line to x86.

5
0

The IT kit revolution's OVER, say beancounters - but how do they know?

Decade
Thumb Up

Re: With you there Tim

The falling costs are a major part of it. My organization doesn't even track assets below a certain size. I haven't asked the beancounters what the exact number was. So, a $10,000 PC in the 1980's would probably find itself on an asset sheet, but a $700 convertible laptop would not.

0
0
Decade
Boffin

Y2K waste

Certainly, Y2K was a non-disaster because of all the investment. Much better than the slow-motion wreck of IPv4 exhaustion.

But there was also a lot of waste. Equipment was bought or replaced for Y2K when it really didn't need to be. For example, I remember someone claiming that my 486 would not be able to boot in Y2K unless I bought his custom RTC. This was not the case.

0
0

Red Hat: ARM servers will come when people crank out chips like AMD's 64-bit Seattle

Decade
Thumb Down

Noooo.....

I really liked OpenFirmware back in the day. No need for the peripheral controller to have binaries for every architecture, because they were programmed in Forth, compiled to portable FCode.

ACPI is horrible and should be destroyed. On x86, it works because everybody's given up on doing things the right way and just tried to be bug-compatible with Windows. I read a rumor some time back, that the ACPI committee deliberately rejects any good ideas from outside the committee, so ACPI is a complete design disaster in every way, according to no less a luminary than Linus Torvalds.

Mark Shuttleworth also considers ACPI a security risk.

6
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