* Posts by Ledswinger

4289 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

Still running IE10? Not for long, says Microsoft

Ledswinger
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Re: Edge is hardly an alternative

This is just yet another poorly written piece of clickbait.

We're both here, so it worked. Not much point in complaining about it, when you knew in advance what to expect?

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Ledswinger
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Re: How many corporate pages will break

local government (councils) and NHS will probably be on IE8 still for various "legacy" reasons,....One risk assessment and we're stuck on IE8 indefinitely.

Only so long as the risk assessment includes a caveat that the board of the council/trust acknowledges and underwrites the security and data risks and potential penalties of running obsolete and unsupported software.

Then again, its the public sector, stick your fingers in your ears, and join in with me: "Lalalaa-alalala..alalala..alalalaaalalaaaaa".

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Tablet computer zoom error saw plane fly 13 hours with 46cm hole

Ledswinger
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Errr..clarification

Article says the flight reached Doha without problems, but that the tear breached the pressure hull. Assuming the clowns in the cockpit neither saw the looming end of the runway, and didn't hear the noise of lights hitting fuselage and landing gear, wouldn't the pressurisation systems have warnings that the rate of air loss is abnormal compared to normal leakage?

It's not a big tear, but the pressure differential at cruising altitude is going to be what, 10,000m equivalent, so the air ought to be whistling out, unless aircraft are much, much more leaky than I'd expect.

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US State Department sicko pleads guilty to sextortion from UK embassy

Ledswinger
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Re: ummm...@James O'Shea

Personally, I think that it'd be a lot more fun to tattoo 'my name is Bashar Hafez al-Assad', in Farsi, on his forehead and parachute him into downtown Tehran

As Iran and Syria are (by regional standards at least) allies, I don't think that would have the outcome you imply. Now, if you parachuted him into most other regional capitals then the results might be a bit more messy.

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EU governments reach agreement on passenger name data

Ledswinger
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Re: Good start

the article specifically says ......serious crime.

Meaning what? For local councils, putting your rubbish in the wrong bin is a serious crime. For road safety groups, speeding is a serious crime. For left-leaning liberals, simply using selected words is a serious crime. For HMRC, tax avoidance is something treated as a crime (unless you're a big US corporation, in which case HMRC will happily wave it through).

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Eurocrats deserve to watch domestic telly EU-wide, say Eurocrats

Ledswinger
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Re: Or the better way

I'd be more than willing to send the BBC a couple pictures of some dead presidents each month to access to iPlayer.

I suspect selling individual programmes would be relatively expensive to enable and collect, and if you wanted access to all BBC content then you'd be looking at the sort of telly tax that funds UK public service broadcasting, and that's actually somewhere around $16 a month.

In technical terms you certainly can set up micropayment options, and buy your chosen programme for a couple of bucks, but if you look at almost any regular subscription service (be that phones, streaming music, movie services, cable etc) the lower bound for monthly payments is about $8-15 depending on the service. There's a tiny number of exceptions, but at lower monthly payment levels, it is generally uneconomic to establish and operate full function billing, collection (including forex and banking), and customer service function, and since (outside the UK) this would be purely commercially the cost base needs to cover marketing, customer acquisition and retention activities.

Let's assume the BBC could identify $4 of UK-specific costs they wouldn't charge to international subscribers - would you really pay $12 each and every month for full access to iPlayer?

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Motorola’s X Force awakens a seemingly ‘shatterproof’ future

Ledswinger
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Re: More Apple screens?

Or are Apple device owners more careless?

Not a statistical sample, but I see a lot more Androids carried in flip cover cases, and Apple phones in cover-less back shells, or no cover at all. To be fair to Apple owners, they've paid for what they consider to be premium design, no point in covering that up. For us Android types, there's only a tiny fraction that you'd call designs worth showing off.

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Ledswinger
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OK, so how does the glass "work"?

A very interesting read, but it doesn't really explain how they've made it (apparently) shatterproof. My experience of glass is that it does shatter, and having layers (eg on a windscreen), toughening (windscreen, gorilla glass), still won't stop it shattering.

So what's the special sauce here?

Mutter, mutter, call this a tech web site, going to cancel my subscription, mutter, grumble.....etc

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Enraged Brits demand Donald Trump UK ban

Ledswinger
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Re: Note to El Reg:

nobody stays clean, and nobody enjoys it.

What say you, here in the cesspit of the comment forums? I say you doth protest too much.

However, in stead of banning Trump on the grounds of what he thinks and says, a far better approach would have been to ban him from entering the UK on the grounds of his hair. I like tabby cats. But wearing one as a wig is just wrong.

Anybody care to start a Downing Street petition that "Donald J Trump be banned from entry to the United Kingdom on the ground of his persistent and heinous crimes against hair styling"?

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Kill Flash Now: 78 bugs patched in latest update

Ledswinger
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Re: Sigh...

Far too many sites demand to use Flash

Because web designers are as bright as Donald J Trump.

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Dailymotion hit by malvertising attack as perpetrators ‘up their game'

Ledswinger
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Re: Defence

how do we make ourselves look like a security researcher, honeypot or web crawler?

Problem is that you then become the target for different malware, seeking to infiltrate those targets.

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Day 2: UK research network Janet still being slapped by DDoS attack

Ledswinger
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Re: The attackers aren't very bright if they are after money

"UK universities are not exactly awash with spare cash"

Bwaahahahahhahahhahaaa! You really believe that? All the ones I know are all busy building like termites to accommodate yet more students, with each student immersing themselves in vast amounts of debt, mostly handed to the university. Maybe you could follow this link and come back and tell us how you still conclude that universities are cash starved, and unable to make ends meet?

http://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/news/universities-make-%C2%A330billion-thanks-to-tuition-fees/

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Microsoft Lumia 950 and 950XL: Clear thoughts of Continuum with a snazzy camera

Ledswinger
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mostly great hardware, now need the software to catch up

The first release of Windows Mobile was April 2000, fifteen and a half years ago. How many more decades will Microsoft need to catch up?

On current progress, by the time Microsoft have a credible and full functional phone OS, Apple will be offering a a neural interface from an earring.

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

Ledswinger
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Could have been a winner...

....if they'd put Android on it.

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Russian "Pawn Storm" expands, rains hell on NATO, air-gapped PCs

Ledswinger
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Re: Well done NATO!

techniques such as fuzzing are the way to go

Nothing wrong with that as a testing method, but it doesn't take away the fact that the code should be properly written and inputs properly constrained. If you think about the core OS and application vulnerabilities, a huge proportion of these are buffer mismatches, integer overflows, or string format risks. These are almost all because underlying code is poorly written without sufficient field validation for both user input and registers. How basic is that? And that's what needs fixing.

<owld git mode>

Back in t'day when I worked on sharp end military systems, the code was written on the basis that at any stage you always handled unexpected input gracefully and securely. And unexpected meant any input or register not within the parameters that the code is intentionally handling. It can be done, I've done it, I'm sure you've done it. But the problem is that commercial software is usually written on the cheap, with cheap or non-existent quality control, and the only fix is rewriting the dodgy bits one line at a time.

</owld git mode>

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Ledswinger
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Well done NATO!

NATO countries have an aggregate annual defence budget of around $1 trillion each year (and that doesn't include intelligence services and homeland defence etc). Which rather begs the question why the defence sectors of those countries are using commercial closed-source cr@pware, notorious for vulnerabilities and security problems for decades?

How much would it cost to take a Linux distro, and make that as near secure as you'd ever get by scrutinising every single line of code? For 0.05% of the annual NATO defence budgets you'd have $500m as a starting fund....

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Windows Phone won't ever succeed, says IDC

Ledswinger
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Re: I could be a future Microsoft phone customer too

I don't see Android being a desktop replacement... Nor ios.

Why not? As implemented on a phone or tablet perhaps not, but Chrome OS is pretty good as a thin client with some offline capabilities. We've already heard that Google are quietly dragging Chrome and Android together. Apple can do the same thing if they choose.

Microsoft like the idea of a full fat WIndows + Office bloatware install on a phone because that supports what they want to sell, rather than because that's either what the market wants, or what is the best technical solution.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Does anyone think this is a good thing?

surely choice is a good thing?

Choice exists, but that doesn't mean people will take it and create diverse and roughly equal ecosystems and markets. So you have IoS, Android (and derivatives like Cyanogenmod), Windows, you have Blackberry, Ubuntu, Firefox. If you search hard enough you might find Tizen, Sailfish and a few others. But the reality is that most people perceive only a choice between Android and Apple.

One of the biggest killers of choice is "free" software. So Microsoft destroyed the browser market by bundling IE "free", with negative consequences still being felt thirty years later. The same vile company did the same thing with its mail client, and again the negative impacts (of lower choice and lower quality in the market) are still seen decades later. The ongoing cr@pness of Android with regard to updates and security is a result of the "free" nature of Android (who will bother to support something they aren't being paid to support?). Adobe Reader, Flash Player, both "free" and infamously cr@p.

At the root of the problem of "free" are three simple issues: 1) that new entrants are unable to create any revenue stream to give them traction thus crushing variety, 2) the lack of successful new entrants reduces pressure on incumbents to innovate and maintain, and 3) the lack of revenue streams from user-choosers reduces the incentive to keep the dominant "free" products secure and up to date.

Unfortunately "free" presses an evolutionary button in most of us, some sort of scavenger instinct that over-rides common sense, and makes us think that we are getting something for nothing. Not sure how you can undo that.

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Doctor Who: Oh, look! There's a restaurant at the end of the universe in Hell Bent

Ledswinger
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Coat

Re: End of the Universe

The 'Time Field Buffer', the ultimate form of temporal transduction barrier, prevents travel into the past of future of Gallifrey, though it was theorised........................

Let me help you on with the anorak over here ----------------------------------->

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Ledswinger
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she's there so 70% of the audience tune in to drool

You've got me there. And if the scriptwriters are reading, could I just say the snug fitting fluffy jumper was a choice of genius. But WTF did the other 30% tune in for?

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Ledswinger
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Sack Moffat +1

No, I say let Moffat keep doing what he's doing.

Personally I'm finding this series tired, predictable, too many of the sets and plot lines samey. Look at the repeated "shuffling monsters, run away, run away, in dark industrial environment, with emphatic exclamations" crap. I suppose at least the four billion year time loop doffs its cap at the concept of retreading, although I think that's an in-joke at the expense of the audience.

Capaldi is a good actor, was excellent in Musketeers, but as the doctor he's just not the man. His impressively vehement "I will hunt you through the universe" and "be afraid, very afraid" type declarations are then completely frittered by the inability of the over-arching story to allow a vengeful doctor, and that undermines the point of casting the rather grizzled Capaldi.

The rot started with the wet-lettuce of Matt Smith. Capaldi is far better, but still doesn't fit. I suggest a petition to Downing Street demanding a change in the law to force David Tennant to work as the doctor until the end of his days.

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Beardy Branson bangs birds on Boeing

Ledswinger
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Mushroom

Re: Because the Pegasus worked out so well for Orbital.

but it was cancelled even before it started when Russia effectively mothballed its Tu-160 fleet for 10 years due to economical reasons in the early 1990-es.

But its good to see them back in service now. Unless you're anywhere in Syria, and particularly if you're a Turkish aligned insurgent. Here on the right you can see an IS oil convoy taking an unscheduled stop whilst heading towards Turkey.

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Revenge porn 'king' Hunter Moore sent down for 2.5 years, fined $2k

Ledswinger
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Re: Sanctimonious much?@ Stevn Roper

You're a witch-burning, pitchfork-and-torch-waving mob, who collectively and individually represent the gravest threat to freedom and justice this world has faced since the Inquisition.

Boohoo, what a shame, how sad.

The bloke is a cunt. He deserves to be hounded for the rest of his miserable life, for ruining other people's just for a quick buck. If it was your sister or your wife, or your daughter, you wouldn't me mouthing off that he deserves another chance and he should be left alone to get on with his life. If Brittain can never work again for the rest of his life, I would be quite pleased. And if he feels a shiver of fear every time there's a knock at his door, then that'll be good to.

If that's the spirit of a pitchfork wielding mob, then get me a flaming torch: Let's march.

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JD Wetherspoon: A 'hacker' nicks 650,000 pub-goers' data

Ledswinger
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Re: Hacking a pub...

a pub...

I don't tend to think of anything bearing the Wetherspoons name as a pub, merely a corporate retailer that does on-sales.

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Manchester 'wins' £10m to test talking bus stops

Ledswinger
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Re: Deny reality

Over time buses are going to slowly become obsolete

You wish. The council sees its job as producing "public services" and it sees your job as "consuming public services and picking up the tab". And as part of that, the council regard the War on Cars as a sort of sacred duty.

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Microsoft encrypts explanation of borked Windows 10 encryption

Ledswinger
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On a related note, I've had to do a system restore today because this week's Windows 10 update screwed up my PC.

Don't worry, it'll just download the screwy update and fuck your machine over a second time for you.

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Booming Ballmer bellows 'bulls**t' over Microsoft's cloud revenue run rate

Ledswinger
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Re: Quite right too...

WTF? How did that happen?

Probability. I think that Ballmer has proven the Infinite Monkey Theory is correct. Maybe CERN should investigate, because Ballmer being correct in his own lifetime could only occur if most common probability distributions have integer results (or something like that, mathematicians, bail me out on this....)

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HPE: If we don't give Deutsche Bank right contracted outcome, we'll lose money

Ledswinger
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Re: A more accurate headline...

Because that's almost certainly what's actually happening here...

Well that's what HPE want to happen (my employers are being reamed out for HPE's crummy services at the moment).

But there's a tiny ray of hope, that the financial services sector are masters at the contractual stitchup. And much as I loathe the thieving charlatans of the City, I do hope they stuff HPE this time round. Either way, with these two counterparties, so long as somebody loses out the rest of us can enjoy it.

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NAO slams £830m e-Borders IT project as ‘not value for money’

Ledswinger
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It's irritating for me and a waste of money to run the system behind it.

The bizarre thing is that all this money is wasted on border control, and still we have net immigration of a third of a million people a year (and that's before Cameron welcomes a small town's worth of Syrians). If the government are not going to control the numbers coming to the UK, why even bother with expensive but pointless immigration controls?

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Are you the keymaster? Alternatives in a LogMeIn/LastPass universe

Ledswinger
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Re: What is the problem?

Be ready to pay LastPass ... which I do

Given that the "free" genie is out of the bottle, what proportion of the LastPass user base will pay? Most won't, so will LogMeIn continue to support it for the few that will pay?

And that's before the decisions are taken about code consolidation by LogMeIn. Maybe LastPass will be the best product, will be supported, and the nearest LogMeIn products will be canned. Even if LastPass is the survivor product, the track record of acquired software is poor, since the decision to buy is invariably corporate and financial, not technical and capability based. The new owner rarely keeps the original architects and coders, so they don't know what is under the bonnet, they are only interested in milking the acquired user base to achieve the financials of the acquisition business case.

No, time to bail out, IMHO.

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Pentagon gets green light for WAR ... of web propaganda against IS

Ledswinger
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Re: Seriously, if you're getting your information about current affairs from YouTube,

there will be some questions to my MP to ask in the Parliament on exactly why we are offering military support and to whom

A pointless waste of your time. I did write to my MP, Karen Lumley, on the topics of the ill-advised desire to engage in the recreational bombing of Syria, and the great evil that is the Snoopers Charter, and got back a letter that indicated to me that she is a traditional lickspittle Tory, slavishly following the will of our shiney-faced, vacuous, over-fed turd of a prime minister.

Having swallowed the excrement-coated dodgy dossier to go to war in Iraq, it seems parliament never learn, and will shortly vote to join the hobby war in Syria on the back of Lightweight Dave's claim of "70,000 moderate rebels". What a complete tit the man is.

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Ofcom spins out Wi-Fi checker app just in time for Christmas

Ledswinger
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Re: Bumpkin unimpressed by Virgin comments

Then we can join together in waving to our bumpkin friend and his wet string connection - no point sending an email.

At least he's got a promise from David Cameron of a universal high speed service by 2020. Oh. Yes, I'd forgotten those promises about a referendum on the Lisbon treaty under the last shower. And his promise that Heathrow expansion wasn't going ahead, "no ifs and buts". And the one about not raising VAT. And the promise about not reorganising the health service. Or the one about not means testing child benefit (although I suppose he's kept that for all the scroungers claiming CB but living outside the UK). Or the promise to maintain Surestart, or midwife numbers.

I won't be holding my breath on his worthless promise on an EU referendum, and I'd suggest our AC bumpkin should consider investing in semaphore.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Bumpkin unimpressed by Virgin comments

As for Virgins laughable comments on 4G - my mobile provider supports 4G, but signal so dismally low that download speeds are well below the target 10.

So you won't enjoy my obligatory tauntage concerning the smooth, reliable, deep 150 Mb/s Virgin deliver to my home, with virtually no contention issues because all the neighbours are on Openreach?

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Microsoft wants to be your phone company, at least for voice

Ledswinger
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I'd second that. But I don't think it's bandwidth at the user end. It's either my corporate IT team have specified a really narrow data pipe somewhere in their infrastructure, and/or Microsoft doing the same thing with theirs.

Either way, Lync is a poor solution as implemented, even though it ought to work very well.

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Why are only moneymen doing cyber resilience testing?

Ledswinger
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Bank of England

Cyber resilience tests are currently mandatory for the financial sector, and this is enforced by the bank of England.

Ahh, The BoE have been busy working out what computers are. That could explain why they were asleep in the run up to the financial crisis, and why they've done nothing to make the banks learn the lessons since, and UK household debt is now a larger share of GDP than before the crisis, and house prices average five times earnings.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Hey !!! I have a great Idea@dcluley

Officially the answer is that it isn't a British Standard, it is the DECC SMETS standards. SMETS2 is supposedly the defintitive version and was ISTR finally agreed about November 2014. Some non-compliant meters can be upgraded in firmware, some can't, and all those will need to be upgraded to, or replaced with SMETS2 compliant meters.

Even with a compliant meter, they can't force you to have one operating in smart meter mode. They can in theory (since it is their meter) replace the asset without your consent and run it in dumb mode, although even that is next to impossible because safety rules mean they have to have access to the consumer side electrics, and if you're not willing to be in, or not willing to have supply interrupted then they can't do it.

Eventually the bureaucrats at DECC will have you on a smart meter, whether you like it or not, because you don't have an option to have a pre-existing meter removed or deactivated. Most of the population will take the pill and swallow it, and when the anti-smart meter types move house their chances of avoiding a meter are greatly reduced.

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BlackBerry to bug out of Pakistan by end of year

Ledswinger
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Re: Blackberry is considered a "mobile operator"?

The numbers aren't huge, IIRC, but out of all the users a significant number were government types

The problem that Pakistan has is that it has no genuinely functioning democracy (and little cultural acceptance of Western democratic structures), and the security services (ISI) are a power player in their own right, widely believed to be in cahoots with domestic terrorists, insurgents in Afghanistan, and supporting (for example) the Mumbai terror attacks.

The difficulty of this request is that it may not be clear (even in Pakistan) who is the prime mover of the request, why they want this, nor what they will do with the intelligence. The worst and perhaps most likely case is that the ISI want the powers to cement their own power base and to subvert what limited democracy does exist, whilst continuing to support terrorism and failing to stop meddling in Afghanistan.

I'd guess that BB asked the Canadian and perhaps US authorities about this, and were told that it was a very bad idea, so bad that retreat was better than acceding to the request.

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Hate your broadband ISP? Simply tell your city to build one – that'll get the telcos' attention

Ledswinger
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Re: Not worth the bother

In the UK we wouldn't want local government to do the planning, spec, digging, investment, or operation because they know nothing about these, but (speaking as somebody working in an infrastructure based industry) co-operation and support of local government is vital.

If you don't have that strong co-operation, you don't get the permissions quickly to dig up roads and interfere with traffic, you struggle to get permission to use council owned land, you have problems getting agreement to site cabinets etc etc. All of which dramatically increases time to completion and cost, and they in turn harm the economics.

There's also a difference between what they say (all councils will say they support fast broadband or other infrastructure improvements) and what they do - the ideal council pledges its functional support, the politicians tell the planning & highways officials to pull their finger out, and then they help make it happen. As a general rule, the cooperation in this respect is best in shire counties and second tier cities and towns. Go places like London, Manchester, Birmingham or Glasgow, and the bureaucratic treacle is so thick that making anything happen is a nightmare.

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Ledswinger
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but I'd be willing to pay money to get a better modem/router with my contract

Crap modem/routers are the norm, because they're built to the lowest possible price for "free" issue. In many cases you can switch the device to modem only mode, in which case you're free to buy a good quality home router. But don't be surprised if a good one is rather more expensive than you might think (like £100+), although it'd be light years better than the integrated devices ISPs dish out.

And if the EE modem/router is so rubbish that you can't run in modem only mode, then you can buy OEM modems that should work with the correct settings. For FTTC connections you'd need a VDSL modem, for perhaps £80, and your high quality home router would be in addition.

All depends on how much you want to spend improving your wifi connections.

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Ledswinger
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personally I suspect it was BT in the server room with the halon +1

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Connected smart cars are easily trackable, warns infosec bod

Ledswinger
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Re: Well doh!@ Unknown Hero

But I am not advocating everyone drives "Noddy" cars, your being foolish.

<invite fate to point out spelling error in my own posts>

Maybe, but at least I can spell.

</invite fate to point out spelling error in my own posts>

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Ledswinger
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Re: Well doh!

Personally I feel it extends beyond the "looks" of the car into all the aspects of the car, generally its whole temperament.

Presumably, the world will be a better place if the styling of all cars was close to that of Noddy's car (in the event that convertibles are allowed)?

Clearly you don't recall the relevant facts, primarily that Noddy was assaulted and robbed by the goblins in order to TWOC his car, showing that regardless of the appearance, a car will still incite envy and anti-social behaviour in the lower social order. And on another occasion Noddy himself was arrested for inconsiderate driving.

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UK.gov pooh-poohs Virgin Media's whinge to Brussels over beefy broadband pot

Ledswinger
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" doesn't represent "value for money"

At least Mockridge is speaking of that which he knows. Virginmedia certainly don't offer their customers value for money, to judge by the latest of a series of inflation busting price rises, in return for speed increases that are not perceptible to the vast majority of customers.

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Amazon's new drones powered by Jeremy Clarkson's sarcasm

Ledswinger
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Re: @James Hughes 1 - Once again

Yes, all those problems *can* be solved, but, ..... WILL they? And if so, WHEN?

What about WHY?

Amazon need to stop w@nking around with drones and concentrate on the day job. They are nowhere near optimising logistics based even on meatsack-in-a-van technology. In this day and age there's no reason they can't offer me a precise delivery time hours, days or weeks ahead. Tesco can reliably achieve one hour slots when I order, why not Amazon?

Airlifting anything other than small blocks of polystyrene uses a lot of energy, so this isn't going to be cheap. The limited lifting capacity also means low asset utilisation per drone. So we're into use cases: Low mass, high value, delivered in internet connected low population density areas. Not looking like a mass market to me.

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All hail Firefox Dev Edition 44 – animations, memory and all

Ledswinger
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Re: It's great but...

Same donkeys in charge of the user interface as ever, I see.

Still the UI could be a lot, lot worse, couldn't it? Not mentioning any particular Redmond-based company, by way of example.

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So why exactly are IT investors so utterly clueless?

Ledswinger
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Re: @Ledswinger -- Opportunity Knocks...

It's idiots who don't wear underpants.

I agree, sounds bizarre. I suppose these people also don't use bog roll, as the carelessly trimmed fabric edges on the inside of a typical pair of jeans would go a good job scrubbing an unprotected nipsy. After a few days use those jeans might be a bit, well, musty, but I suppose the glamour of going commando has its own unique price.

You know how old pants get farted out? I presume that's the hydrogen sulphide reacting with some sweat to form sulphuric acid, but if you're depositing neat clag on the jeans, is that going to rot them through in no time? Have you seen the price of a pair of Levis?

Post script: Don't read this post whilst eating your dinner.

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Ledswinger
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Re: @Ledswinger -- Opportunity Knocks...

The ladies of the house will embrace it as they know the seat will be down upon entering the Room of the Throne. The males... it will be raised.

But blokes going to see a man about a dog with some haste will always find the seat in the wrong position. And if they're fiddling with tightish jeans and button flies* as well, then things could come to a head**

I suppose a fitbit-type of affair might be able to detect the racing pulse and rising blood pressure of a Man On A Mission, and alert the toilet seat to lower at maximum speed, but like all IoT stuff, it's looking like a solution searching for a problem. But....tell you what, we both grow goatee beards, don trousers that are too short whilst forgetting our socks, you write an investment prospectus that talks of a $14bn market by 2020, I'll act the sullen, Asperger's afflicted, sociopathic, withdrawn technical genius in front of the investors, we drink coffee for nine months on six figure salaries, then we start all over again.

* Which knob-head designers think button flies are a good idea? We invented the zip a hundred years ago, and some tossers keep putting buttons on trouser fronts. W*nkers.

** A turtle's head

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Who owns space? Looking at the US asteroid-mining act

Ledswinger
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Re: @m0rt

Their hooks got slung

As, apparently did Dominic Connor's, more's the pity for all of those losses. And instead the Reg ply us with endless dull-as-ditchwater articles about containerisation and flash-in-the-datacentre, read and and understood by about 10% of the Reg's readers, and of actual interest to about 2% or less*.

* Yes, yes, I made them up. But prove me wrong.

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German ex-pat jailed for smearing own pat all over Cork apartment

Ledswinger
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Re: The, ahem, marvellous variety of the human race

wonder if insurance will cover "ripping up all the floorboards because they've been marinading in shit for a year."

A good loss adjuster will have those floorboards put on Ebay in minutes. And I'll wager he'd get a good price for them from scat fans.

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