* Posts by Ledswinger

3304 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

Want a cheap Office-er-riffic tablet? Microsoft Windows takes on Android

Ledswinger
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Re: I bought one of these for Christmas@ DrXym

"The answer is my six year old doesn't care about Office 365 but there's nothing to stop someone from using LibreOffice. "

Maybe I have misunderstood your argument. As I read it, O365 was a big part of the value of the deal, and you were getting a near-full fat PC accordingly. I'd agree that the kids don't need full fat Office, and you can opt out to Libre Office for free, but if that's your choice then where's the value in having it free for a year?

Either O365 has value, but you're on the hook for future year's subscriptions, or you're being offered free time-limited bloatware that you assign no value to.

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Ledswinger
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Re: I bought one of these for Christmas

" It is incredible to think that this is an £80 PC in effect."

How much will it be when you've renewed your Office 365 subscription for a couple of years? And with MS about to launch W10, there's a huge unanswered question about whether you'd need and want to pay again for the fixed version of W8.

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Facebook is MORE IMPORTANT to humanity than PORTUGAL

Ledswinger
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Re: Hmm one does wonder

"If the stock goes higher it does not affect profits or earnings per share, but it does increase the P/E ratio which does not look so good."

That's true, but assumes that tech companies PE matters. In reality Google, Amazon, Facebook. Linkedin and others rarely if ever pay dividends, so from an investor perspective it's not about EPS because that doesn't translate to DPS, and the "investment" is not about an economic return from a future dividend stream, just about capital appreciation assuming the over-priced stock can be sold for an even higher price to some other mug. So it's fairly close to a Ponzi scheme.

In this world, a tech director's life is just one long stock ramping exercise, sucking out as much money as they can whilst the party lasts. When the party ends, the directors stock options will be worthless, but what does that matter if they've had a good few millions out of the trough beforehand?

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SFO: 'Insufficient evidence' for conviction over HP-Autonomy deal

Ledswinger
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"Doesn't this really mean that the US agencies have shouldered aside the SFO because they wish to act as judge & jury on any event anywhere in the world which may impact on US interests?"

No, it means that the SFO have had a good look and concluded that there's no material case. My guess is that they probably did find a range of wide-boy sales accounting that all IT firms seem to favour (compared to most other businesses I've worked in), but evidently not the specific allegations of fraud that HP allege. Given HP's dismal incompetence at everything, I'd be very surprised if there accounting was any better than Autonomy's. And let's face it, which of these two companies admitted to running a range of complex shell companies to hide illegal slush fund payments, and got fined $108m last year? That's right, HP.

Having said that, US regulators are renowned as being the most biased referees in the world, so HP will still be hoping that they'll decide that a bit of creative accounting by Autonomy qualifies as large scale fraud, and that will then vindicate HP's useless, useless management.

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Future imperfect: A UK broadband retrospective

Ledswinger
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Re: What is the right answer to how to run National Infrastructure?

Some good thoughts there mate. Looking at the rather spotty record and high director salaries of Network Rail post Railtrack, and I think that the problem is not ownership but regulation. The mess they made of engineering works this Christmas is evidence of the fact that some cultural and operational problems transcend who owns the capital behind the company.

Regarding Openreach, you're bang on that it needs to be separated from the rest of BT. But that's easily accomplished without the inevitable mess from nationalisation, through requiring Openreach to be a separate legal and financial entity. That would in technical terms just be a demerger of Openreach, and initially would be straightforward. Existing shareholders in old BT would now own equal shares in New BT and in Openreach plc. The regulator would have full visibility of the margins and trading arrangements, and cross subsidy would be illegal and very obvious - this is how energy suppliers who still own distribution grids are regulated. This form of demerger has been done before, for example in 1997 when the old British Gas integrated monopoly was split into three separate businesses doing different things: Centrica (energy sales under the British Gas brand), BG Group (upstream exploration and production) and Transco (the gas distribution operation).

What's required is for OFCOM to understand this and get a grip on the issue. On the plus side there's a new girl in charge, so she might just have some get up and go (unlike Tony Blair's placeman that she replaces), on the downside she's a career civil servant and the civil service is not renowned for doing anything well (or at all).

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Ledswinger
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Re: UK Fibre Optic Distribution: It beggars belief@ Tony Green

"because since Thatcher privatised BT its one and only function in life is to return a profit to its shareholders"

More likely because emerging economies don't have to worry about a huge installed base built to old technologies, and have fewer constraints on digging up roads in the way of progress.

"A public utility, on the other hand, would have the primary function of providing service to the people of the country."

Bwahahahahahahaa! Straight from the David Milliband Champagne Socialism Playbook! I take it you're too spotty and young to remember the god-awful service that the GPO offered to its customers? Six or nine month waits for a line to be installed, shared party lines between neighbours because they couldn't be @rsed to put in proper infrastructure, crummy obsolete hardware, legal protections against so much as moving a telephone connection etc etc.

But do keep us amused by telling us what a sterling service we'd have from nationalising the railway operators and combining them as a new entity called "British Railways"?

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Ledswinger
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Re: <interesting> <exciting> oh <sigh!>

"Virgin is available but it appears expensive to me."

If the household is fighting over a miserable 6 Mb/s then I'd suggest you have another look at Virgin, and in particular pricing your full service like for like (so phone rental, phone usage packages, broadband). I've been on cable for over fifteen years and dumping BT for Telewest/VM was one of my best decisions. There's often some good sign up deals, and when your discount runs out you can negotiate an acceptable price with their sales retention team. Obviously avoid anything you don't want in the bundles they push, but IME the broadband and phone work reliably and well, and a particular benefit of Virgin cable (over BT) is that the occasional technical problems are resolved effectively in acceptable timescales.

A quick check suggests that (ignoring introductory discounts of around £6 a month) you'd be paying £39 a month for phone including "unlimited" weekend calls, 50 Mb/s broadband, and the basic TV service. If you just wanted broadband its about £28, and as a standalone that starts to look pricey, but why would you want to have a BT landline and separate cable broadband?

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Ledswinger
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Re: About time councils put their foot down

"a few councils putting this as a requirement for granting planning permission might get the whole FTTP movement kickstarted."

Unfortunately this would have a detrimental effect on customers overall. What happens would happen is what happens with the (supposedly) competitive market for new gas & electricity connections. Big builders sign lucrative contracts with a company who often not only provides the connections free, but actually pays money to the developer and this is the world of IGTs and IDNOs - companies (for example GTC) who then have the new housebuyers by the short and curlies, because nobody will lay duplicate infrastructure. The additional costs to consumers are sometimes hidden, sometimes they are not, but these sorts of developments inflate the cost to consumers for something that doesn't need to be any more expensive than the other 99% of the population. In the case of electricity and gas, you're free to switch supplier, but the supplier doesn't have to offer the same price for IGT and IDNO customers (some socialise the additional costs across all customers, some don't).

And the idea of monopoly non-BT last half mile operators is already here - GTC offer FTTH and claim to reach half a million homes. I can't speak for the cost because I can't find the cost, but I'd be very surprised if they are particularly competitive, and that reflects the IDNO and IGT business models.

It should be part of the local council's job to make this happen (let's face it, they can't even keep road pot hole free), but it could be easily done through amending the building regulations. But this isn't enough, it either needs LLU for all "last mile" connections (GTC, Virginmedia, Kingston, etc) or it needs full and effective regulation of all broadband infrastructure, and either of these last two would be a big ask, given the fact that politicians prattle on about broadband, but understand nothing about it.

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I'll build a Hyperloop railgun tube-way in Texas, Elon Musk vows

Ledswinger
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Re: Pure Genius @Graham dawson

"But why is HS2 so much more expensive than building the original railways in the 19th century, which connected up just about every village and hamlet?"

I suspect in inflation adjusted terms you'd find the costs were not dissimilar for the well engineered mainlines. The main difference is that the original Victorian routes were built speculatively by private capital, and when many proved unprofitable (railway companies being over-invested during the "Railway Mania" of the times) they went bust. In some cases the routes couldn't cover operating costs so they closed, but many others could operate after the original investors had been wiped out, and the new owner took over with much lower capital on their balance sheet.

This still happens. Both the Channel Tunnel, and HS1 (the high speed line from London to the tunnel) never covered their build costs, and the shareholders and creditors had to take a bath (in the case of HS1 the British taxpayer nobly stepped forward to shoulder some of the losses). And so it will be with HS2. Late, over-budget, uneconomic, with somebody destined to take a savage haircut on the cash "invested".

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Ledswinger
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Re: Pure Genius

"I'm crossing my fingers that his next project will be either flying cars...."

If Hyperloop can be made to work, then there won't be much of a market for flying cars, nor for overland passenger aircraft. That could do wonders for reducing emissions (for those that care), and for reducing fossil fuel demand, which has very tangible impacts on energy prices and resource use. I would imagine aircraft makers will soon be busy lobbying against this with all the resources they can muster.

Sadly, here in Britain the government is busy apeing the state of California, with an unfeasibly expensive, unproductive and largely unnecessary high speed rail line which will cost many tens of billions, yet is essentially being designed on the basis of giving the British taxpayer by 2030 a short length of line built to standards that were high tech in 1980. If HS2 were either maglev or Hyperloop I think it would have far more to commend it, but I think that Musk demonstrates the point: Governments cannot and will not innovate, always preferring the obsolete, the expensive, and the vested interest every time.

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'We will SNORT UP CRYSTAL DUST and then do a MAJOR software update'

Ledswinger
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Re: I fucking love science me

When you're not reading Viz

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PROOF the undead STALK Verizon users: Admen caught using 'perma-cookie'

Ledswinger
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Re: Hangin's too good for 'em.

"The managers and CEOs, not necessarily the worker bees punching out the code."

Why exempt the drones? They're taking money, they know what they're doing.

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For pervasive 5G and IoT, prepare for wind turbines on cells

Ledswinger
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Re: wind+solar

"Now if they had mentioned a big battery that can span several days..."

OK, so you've strapped on a battery, charging electronics, you've got both wind and solar collectors, and you've oversized these both to fast charge the battery when the power's there, and because you''ll lose 25% of power in the charging/discharge cycles. Not looking either simple, cheap or efficient. Heath Robinson would be proud.

The long life of PV panels is correct (although in dusty locations dirt builds up on the panels, requiring regular cleaning), the durability of unattended wind turbines is more questionable, and the life of the battery depends on the extent of cycling. Since I assume it would be running on battery overnight you could be talking about a three year battery life.

I'd also wonder about the volume of resources used in making such a low power base station. Probably less efficient end to end than a grid connection.

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Bacon-smoking locals provoke noxious Chinese smog

Ledswinger
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Re: Diesel and Coal are...

"But even that minimal control will never happen in China as they don't use emission controls properly on anything. The diesel fuel is high sulphur and so is the coal...."

There's a lot of myths about Chinese coal power plants. It's worth remembering that virtually all Chinese coal power plants are far more modern than Western coal plants, and are (in relative terms) cleaner and more efficient. Between 2012 and 2014 all grid scale plants were subject to international-class emissions limits. The continuing local pollution problems are probably linked to coal heating fuels and industrial processes, as is reported in this case (although I'm also behind the commentard suggesting that the trigger was inadequate profits at a smoking plant owned by a party official).

Of course, the current China slowdown (from which I'd hazard a guess we won't see a rebound) has resulted in dramatic reductions in demand for steel and concrete, so the invariably dirty manufacture of cement and iron will reduce, and with it the less efficient producers will go to the wall, and that will help reduce the less well controlled emissions.

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Spavined RadioShack to file for bankruptcy next month – report

Ledswinger
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" I remember their (Tandy's) pricing strategy in the 80s"

For UK readers, this 1980s experience is still available, by going to Maplin. But be quick, because they'll be gone soon, for the same reasons. Just like Radio Shack's boss, I can't understand why they're still in business, and I'd guess their management don't know either.

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Crap broadband holds back HALF of rural small biz types

Ledswinger
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Re: Pity the poor rural business

"Enjoy your "made in the city" milk and your "roof top garden" lamb."

I see from the downvotes that the smock-wearing, pitchfork wielding mob are out to day. If you can imagine me mooning at the lot of you, then you will appreciate the high regard I have for you. Of course, whilst I can upload a high res image of Ledswinger's Moonrise fairly quickly on my fat cable pipe, I suppose it could clog your 57k dial up for quite a while, so (being a caring chap), if you can imagine it we'll all be happy.

But back to the point that the downvoters can't understand, maths. Far more urban workers are inconvenienced by broadband woes than rural ones. If you're putting resource into fixing SME broadband problems, then the urban scenario trumps the rural one many times over, even at the same cost. Factor in the costs of fixing rural broadband, the the economic answer is "move to the town".

I remains, sirs, sympathetically yours, etc etc

Bwahahahhahahahahahahahahaha!

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Ledswinger
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Pity the poor rural business

"We risk seeing the emergence of a two-speed online economy resulting from poor rural broadband infrastructure."

Given that there are 3x as many urban SMEs as rural, and these urban businesses employ 7x as many people and generate over 10x the turnover, any logical analysis would conclude that the focus should be on the quarter to a third of urban SME's with broadband problems, rather than the rural tiddlers who (presumably) hope for the rest of society to pay for urban utilities to be expanded to the countryside?

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BT bemoans 'misconceived' SUPERFAST broadband regs

Ledswinger
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Re: hang on@ A Non e-mouse

"I thought this was already impossible as this was why BT became all these fragmented groups so they couldn't cross-subsidise."

In theory yes, in practice very much no. In most regulated businesses that a (competent) regulator wishes to see prevented from dodgy transfer pricing and cosy intra-group sales, the regulated business has to be a separately accounted legal entity, filing its own statutory accounts. OFCOM never required BT to do this with Openreach, and as a result they are wholly dependent upon BT's management accounts. As a result it is very difficult indeed to know the truth, even as the regulator - ultimately they have to trust that BT are telling the truth. As an outsider it is impossible, because BT will qualify information they provide to OFCOM as commercially sensitive, and that then doesn't go into the public domain.

My personal opinion is that this new OFCOM ruling is pointless - any competent management accountant can massage management account numbers to prove black is white, and there's no statutory evidence to the contrary in a complex group. BT's complaints are probably to disguise their ongoing satisfaction that OFCOM still haven't had the cojones to force the demerger of Openreach, and it would look like bad form to be seen publicly springing open the bubbly.

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Samsung's first Tizen smartphone is HERE ... by which we mean India

Ledswinger
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Re: @PNGuinn: Where's my Sailfish?

"Personally, I'm watching Jolla / Sailfish."

Unfortunately watching is all you can do, as for mere mortals there's no way of loading it on to an existing phone. If you're a developer, willing to hack and put up with a part finished product then yes, otherwise it's a firm no.

If Jolla want Sailfish to see any serious adoption then they need to release some fully functioning phone images for a handful of popular kit with large user bases (Sammy S3 and S4?) in a manner similar to (but hopefully more user-friendly) than Cyanogenmod. When you've got a few thousand early adopters on board you can build your reputation, brand and experience, and get much better feedback than developers can offer, but as things stand it seems from the outside that Jolla have followed Nokia's "mañana" approach to software development. When the tech sites are full of chatter by the early adopters about how excellent (hopefully) Sailfish is, then they would create the sort of traction for more mass market approaches. I would have thought if the device images were full functioning they could even sell it - I wouldn't expect them to be able to charge a very high price, but if you sold 7,000 downloads for a tenner that'd pay for a developer for a year (and I'd guess Jolla's accounts are currently notable for a complete lack of income).

Come on Jolla, get your @rse in gear! There's ten quid on offer in this house. Individually that's not much, but it's probably a lot more than your total sales income last year.

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What will happen to the oil price? Look to the PC for clues

Ledswinger
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Re: Fracking

"Saudi pumps oil to crash the market to drive fracking out of existence."

Not for that reason. Most of the costs in resource extraction are in the capital and setup. So once you're in the game, you keep pumping all the while each barrel makes a marginal profit, even if you're losing money overall - this applies to fracking as much to conventional oil exporters. Eventually, if you keep losing money you go bust, but until that time it makes financial sense to keep pumping. There's also the fact that the Saudis and all other oil exporters have huge public spending budgets based typically on a minimum oil price of $80. As a result, these countries are running huge budge deficits at the moment, because they can't reign in the bread and circus spending that keeps the hoi polloi anaesthatised (and avoids them toppling undemocratic governments).

The other thing is that the oil price collapse needs to be seen in the context of collapsing iron ore, copper and other commodity prices. Fundamentally the world has geared up over the past two decades for a "one time" Chinese infrastructure build that has inflated world demand and inflated prices. As China both runs out of money and out of opportunities to productively invest, the demand for concrete, energy, steel, copper falls dramatically. This has knock on effect in consumer demand. The West (and Japan) are debt-addled and can't take over the economic baton, so you have the mother of all slow downs taking place.

Even if OPEC could force the price up, they'd reduce demand further (and further again by multiplier effects), so that the reality is that they'd not get much more money.

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Euro security agency says MORE crypto needed in gov policy

Ledswinger
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Re: UKIPpers take note

"It worries me that we need protecting from our own governments ..."

Why? Nothing has changed in hundreds of years, in that government is by the few, for the few. Laws are enacted to increase the power of the state to do the bidding of the state, and we now have some token pretence of choice every few years, between parties with the same policies, run by a like-minded parliamentary elite most of whom have never done a proper job for any length of time. The Labour front bench is studded with millionaires pretending to be men & women of the people, and is a mirror image of the Conservative front bench.

In centuries gone by the threat that government "protected" you from was famine, or Napoleon. Early last century it was Bolsheviks. Then it was the great depression. Then back to the red peril. Since then we've had various other things that government needs to act to protect us from, including terrorists and climate change. I wonder what government will be busy protecting me from in fifteen years time? Aliens or comets seem the most probable.

decades gone by

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You go fast, but we go 'further' and 'deeper' – Voda tells 'Speedy' EE

Ledswinger
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"Skodafone" To use this as an insult shows that you've probably not driven a Skoda for may years.

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Ledswinger
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Re: What is the point?

"the big problem with rural areas is the NIMBY types, they don't want masts near them"

I doubt it. That's a problem in urban and suburban locations. In most rural areas the most likely problem is the subscriber density and traffic volumes that are too low to justify the cost of the mast plus backhaul and power connections. I'd also guess that the mast can be shrunk in size and cost, but the real deal breaker is the cost of any new backhaul. Throw in the ongoing 4G roll outs, and the stretched technical resources, and I'd suggest that NIMBYs are a relatively small problem.

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Ledswinger
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"20Mbps is not broadband according to the FCC"

And what would Vodafone or the rest of the world care? The FCC do a bad job of regulating US telcos and Vodafone have no meaningful US presence since the sale of their Verizon stake.

To a large extent Vodafone are right when they talk about the bandwidth demand of mobile devices, and even for fixed line, most of the world aren't seeing anything like 20 Mbps.

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Bloke in Belgium tries to trademark Je Suis Charlie slogan

Ledswinger
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Re: WELL DONE

"Well done for having the guts to show the cartoon,"

Just a pity that it isn't funny.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Interesting graphic

"Ayatollah Khomeini is Shia Muslim, you ignorant oink."

If you're playing Grand Pedant, you might want to get the spelling right, it's "oik". Not to mention you need "was", rather than "is".

Unless Ayatollah Khomeini is a post, a bit like Dalai Lama. Or a clone. Are clones allowed under Sharia law?

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Windows 7 MARKED for DEATH by Microsoft as of NOW

Ledswinger
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Re: Interestingly for once...

"wont be released until all the PSoS terminals are updated to Windows 8.1."

Is that the now-unsupported-for-security-updates vanilla 8.1, or the still-in-support-until-MS-change-their-mind 8.1 Update?

The question should give a clue to how badly this will end, because your vendors will try and lock you in (with expensive day rates and change clauses), and Microsoft will already be plotting to end support for 8.1 Update as soon as they possibly can. Whilst the obvious solution is to foreswear all Microsoft products, and support your own Linux build, I can't think of any examples where this has actually worked. Anyone?

I recommend you go back to paper and quill.

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Lenovo hopes to say Hello Moto to smartphone cash

Ledswinger
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"if they do have a vanilla install"

Maybe to start with. Seems to me that as soon as a company starts getting pretensions, and chasing higher margins, then they start seeing a "need" to differentiate themselves, and if you're a marketing dweeb, that means putting a custom skin on Android, and after that filling the phone with duplicate apps.

Which means that the Lenovo branded handsets stand a low chance of being bloat free, but the newly aspirational Moto brand will stand no such chance, and will soon be cruft central.

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IBM ushers in BIGGEST EVER re-org for the cloud era, say insiders

Ledswinger
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Impressive

Reading the article, I'm left with the impression that IBM are moving from a three silo model to a circa eleven silo model. Either the journalism's not up too much, or Ginny has been listening to the management consultants talking bollocks about matrix organisations again.

I work for a large complex business. Originally run on country lines, the board sucked on the consultant's Kool-aid, and we adopted a chaotic matrix structure. Now nobody knows who does what, who's accountable for what, we have multiple teams sniffing around the same customer deals, we talk about "collaborative working" and never do it.

Good luck with that.

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Tesco tosses loss-making Blinkbox into TalkTalk's basket

Ledswinger
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Re: Alternatives

Chromecast: "only a 20" TV, haven't tested it on a larger one"

Generally works well on our 42" display. At best, you'd never know it wasn't off DVD under the telly, although I did have one instance where there was a bizarre fractional second hesitancy every five or six seconds that made watching the content a challenge, and if your broadband (or wider web) is playing up then you may as well not bother. Probably helps that we're on 100 Mb/s VM cable.

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MI5 boss: We NEED to break securo-tech, get 'assistance' from data-slurp firms

Ledswinger
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"If Cameron had the sense god gave a goose....."

....we'd all be pleased with the marginal improvement. I'm no spring chicken, but I can't recall a more lightweight, ineffectual PM since, well, ever. Look at his latest endeavours to dodge a TV debate. I care not for the things, but for a politician to run away from one, strewth.

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Ledswinger
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"And yet all the snooping did fuck-all good in Sydney or France."

Or in the London 7/7 bombings. Or the botch 21 July attempted bombings. Or the June 2007 attack on Glasgow airport, and linked attempts to detonate car bombs in London. Or the Boston marathon bombs. Or the murder of Fusilier Lee Rigby. Or the Madrid bombings.

And whilst I can't comment on the Madrid cases, in almost all the other cases the assailants were on the radar of the security services beforehand, just like the vermin causing grief in France.

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Saudi Arabia to flog man 1,000 times for insulting religion on Facebook

Ledswinger
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Re: What does it say about Twats in the Quran?

""...which is praised as the West's partner in The War Against Terror (TWAT)."....50 lashes for the twats

OK, I'm happy to hand over Tony Blair for his 50 lashes, on condition that it's filmed in HD so I can enjoy every stroke. In slo-mo. And notorious twat David Cameron can also be handed over as well for suppressing the Chilcot enquiry report.

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CES 2015: The good, the mad and the POINTLESS

Ledswinger
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Re: You've got me brimming

"That alone would be worthwhile to upgrade my LCD for. If they come in with decent pricing, I'm interested"

"decent pricing" on a new launch product? Maybe you'll get that at a decent price by 2019.

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Users shun UK.gov flagship digital service

Ledswinger
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" Far better than the old sites its replacing,"

But it's just a portal to other sites, each with its own logic and purpose. So if you search on self assessment, gov.uk comes top of the list, but then merely directs you off to HMRC that has its own identity, logic and design. If you search on taxing a car then something similar happens, and then you end up at the DVLA's self service web site (which is delightfully painless given the poor reputation of DVLA, or painless until you get stung for hundreds of quid).

Given that gov.uk is generally a bit pointless I suppose it doesn't matter that (eg) NS&I and industry regulators seem to be outside the scope of gov.uk.

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Euro Parliament: Time to rethink DRIP, other snoop laws

Ledswinger
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Fat chance

I would suggest that the ongoing unpleasantness in France (which may yet trigger similar outrages elsewhere in Europe) will be used by security services as grounds to get their national governments to tell the EU commission to go swing. And that will occur whether data retention has any relevance or not to the sad events in France or not.

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Toyota to Tesla: we can play the free patent game as well

Ledswinger
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Re: Could be useful

"Id be unsurprised in the overall efficiency of leccy to fuel to wheel wasn't at least as good with syndiesel in a modern TD as electrolytic hydrogen in a fuel cell."

Be unsurprised. I work for a company with large and pioneering investments in producing H2 from electricity, and that's exactly the situation. Fuel cells produce heat and power, that gives them their high theoretical efficiencies. But unless you can continuously use all the heat and all the power, the efficiency nose dives. And you're right that methanation (converting H2 to CH4) is the only logical application of dissociation of H2O, because most spark ignition engines can be converted to use CH4, and CH4 is easy to store and handle.

Sadly the end to end system efficiency as CH4 is still diabolical (if better than H2), and you'd need to cover the planet with wind turbines and PV to get anything useful from it, and the costs of doing that are not credible.

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FBI boss: Sony hack was DEFINITELY North Korea, haters gonna hate

Ledswinger
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Yeah...

...we'll believe you, given your track record. Not.

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It's 2015 and ATMs don't know when a daughterboard is breaking them

Ledswinger
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Re: It's hard to feel sorry for the victims

"You realise any losses the bank incurs are recouped one way or another through you being a customer?"

To an extent. Or they just get the government to bail them out, and keep paying the obscene bonuses typical in financial disservices.

But when the banks' crooked City gamblers repeatedly get fined billions by regulators for an ever changing kaleidoscope of new and novel frauds, and they then repeatedly stuff customers, shareholders, or the state with all the losses, they don't need to change their rancid, thieving culture, so why worry about a few tens of millions in ATM or card fraud?

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Elite: Dangerous 'billionaire' gamers are being 'antisocial', moan players

Ledswinger
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Re: Just like real life then?

I wonder if he'll eat, shoot and leave?

If he's Bill Gates he'll eat shit and leave.

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YES, we need TWO MEELLION ORACLE licences - DEFRA

Ledswinger
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Re: ....and they say the public sector is cut to the bone.

" If heads don't roll, lessons will not be learned."

Culture survives the elimination of individuals. What's needed is the complete closure of DEFRA. As far as I can see they don't do much of any use, other than refuse to accept scientific evidence on everything from BSE to bovine TB, fail to fight effectively for British agriculture in Europe, at the same time ignore scientific advice on fisheries whilst still selling British fishermen down the river, etc etc.

I'm with the badgers, and I vote for all of DEFRA to be gassed in their offices, or be trapped in cages as they commute to and from work, and then shot by marksmen.

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Sardine fishing in Kerala: Who benefits from mobile phones?

Ledswinger
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@TheOtherHobbes

"You clearly know nothing about actual information science and have no business 'educating' anyone here."

I think Mr Worstal has just delivered you the academic equivalent of a wedgie, and well deserved it is, too.

So, how about you bugger off back to the warm, fluffy pages of the Graun? Seems to be where your understanding of both technology and economics originated, to judge by your generally anti-corporate, anti-market, pro-state posts?

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Whew, US cellcos... Better find a new revenue stream, QUICK

Ledswinger
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Re: Reason for M&A @ Charles 9

"So put it this way, if it's between going to the big telcos and simply disappearing, which would you prefer?"

Your argument is fatally flawed. Buggy makers went bust because even the earliest cars were better value investment for buyers - the demand for transport never went away, the customers simply went from the buggy maker's shop to the car maker's shop. In terms of this topic, mobile communications, where are you suggesting the customers for mobile communications go? It's not like somebody's come up with telepathy.

Punters either need to pony up for LTE (which industry are claiming they won't), or industry needs to accept that there isn't an economic demand for LTE across the whole mobile market. Maybe some fraction of the market does have an economic demand (that is, desire for a product and the willingness and ability to pay for it), but that means that MNOs need to position themselves as mass market 3G providers using existing assets, or they can try and take a smaller, premium market position offering LTE - if the economics stack up.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Reason for M&A have nothing to do with cost savings

"too expensive to keep customers, yet not expensive enough to get the revenues you need to invest in improving yourself."

I'm intrigued by this idea. Where do you think that the customers that a fragmented industry "can't keep" go? LTE is being driven by technology, the industry, and to a small degree regulators, but the message that industry are giving is that customers won't pay a necessary price to provide the toys they want.

Hey! Mobile operators! Welcome to the real world, where customers want the world, they want it yesterday, and they want if for free. And as happens with good but expensive ideas elsewhere, maybe networks need to accept that if LTE is something that customers won't pay for, they shouldn't invest in it.

M&A won't help unless it increases the customer density. But that reduces competition and moves market power to the telcos, which doesn't seem very desirable to me.

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Ledswinger
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Re: When will they learn

" to get that fast and reliable connectivity, you eventually have to plunk down for more infrastructure: either more spectrum or more cells"

Only as a matter of commercial choice. I see no evidence that LTE will lead to better coverage, nor to any cost effective proposition to replace my fixed line broadband, so my network may as well stick to the current 3G H+ (when you're lucky) offer, and eschew the development of a 4G network.

Eventually such an approach produces a two tier market, with those valuing high speed mobile data paying their way, and those prepared to tolerate the current mix of price and service able to stick with that. Seems to me the problem is only for telco's playing "keeping up with the Joneses" by investing in 4G for which there's not a genuine economic demand.

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Cheap Android phones? Bah! How about a $29 mobe from Microsoft?

Ledswinger
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"And just $29 ?!?!?!? Amazing."

Where have you been for the past few years?

If you want a basic Nokia phone for voice calls then they were cheap as chips long before this - for example, if available in your market look at the Nokia 106, currently being sold for £9 (brand new, major retailer) in the UK. That's less than $14.

If you're not hung up on Nokia, then an Alcatel 10.10 will set you back £5 from the same retailer, less than $8.

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Ledswinger
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Re: No 3G? Useless in some parts of the world...

"Main area is emerging markets, such as Africa."

So they hope. But there's two problems:

Firstly that all emerging markets have seen what you can get for $30 from a Chinese no name, and by any reckoning if you choose well you'd have something equivalent to the first or second generation iPhone or a Nokia 5800. Evidence the world over suggests that the lower battery life of a smartphone is something the vast majority of users will tolerate for the extended capabilities. And even off grid, developing markets have credible options like small, simple PV trickle chargers that are next to useless in frigid and sunless northern climes.

Secondly, in their desire to keep the name Microsoft "exclusive" (hah!) they've created a situation where even if this new cheapy phone is a success, there's no brand upgrade path. Microsoft must have a special strategy department dedicated to snatching defeat from the jaws of any potential victory.

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Samsung forks 4K with Tizen tellies

Ledswinger
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"We want to sell you UHD devices..."

Arguably they don't want to sell UHD tellies at all, because if they did they wouldn't be taking a punt on Tizen. There's no theoretical reason that Tizen couldn't deliver, but based on the precedent of the depressing standard of TV UIs and firmware, the dreadful ad-loaded programme guides and privacy concerns, the lack of software support the moment it leaves the factory, the weak functionality, tumbleweed strewn proprietary app stores, painfully slow processors, inadequate input options........

All these things make me hugely dubious of any maker introducing a new OS.

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Want to shoot FIREBALLS from your wrists, SPIDER-MAN style?

Ledswinger
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Re: Better out of the wrist..

Buy the kit, hack it a bit to release a single tube and you can find out which is better. You might want to wrap that flameproof cuff round your nads, of course.

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Zuckerberg asks the public to tell him where to go in 2015

Ledswinger
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Re: Hmmm.@ Lost all faith

"When someone publishes a picture with faces in it, every single person is blurred out and only when that person agrees to it (opt in not out please), can a specific face be un-blurred."

Oh, come off it. If you really want privacy you wouldn't be on Facebook in the first place, and if you valued your friends privacy you wouldn't be posting their pictures.

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