* Posts by Ledswinger

4281 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

Are Indians too stupid to be trusted with free Internet?

Ledswinger
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Re: Hang on....

India did decide for itself. Didn't it?

That would depend upon your defintion of "India". I would suggest that the evidence is that a small clique of regulators and the political masters decided for India without consulting the poeple. A bit like Sturmbahnfuhrer May's choice to have the Snooper's Charter. By your logic, the people of Britain have chosen to have a Snoopers Charter.

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TalkTalk confesses: Scammers have data about our engineers' visits to your home

Ledswinger
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Re: Junk mail

And still they junk-mail us trying to persuade us to sign up

I like it when TalkTalk send me junk mail. The fully loaded cost of a fully "marketed-up" colour junk mail shot must be about 60p a shot. That's 60p less profit they make, and because they don't know I wouldn't touch them in the lifetime of this universe, they'll keep on trying.

I do wish they'd include a reply paid envelope though, so that I could send their junk back to them, like I do for credit card mailings.

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Ledswinger
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Re: DIdo Harding

It's a matter for TT's board in the first place

So the chairman Charles Dunstone might hold her to account? Funny that his other chairmanship (Dixons Carphone) had a data breach last year as well. Could it be what is referred to as "shadow of the leader"?

The media have, to their discredit, given her a free ride on this;

Well, Charley Dunstone is also a non-exec fat cat at Daily Mail & General Trust. Can't see the tattle mongers of the Fail dishing the dirt on one of their own director's companies, can you?

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Brit spies want rights to wiretap and snoop on US companies' servers

Ledswinger
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Re: If I were a criminal

You mean LondonGrad and Bodessa ....

Money laundering by a few Russian kleptocrats is the least of the US & UK problems (and probably less so than the same by Arab "royals").

All the great (and ongoing) bank frauds were homegrown, led by American and British citizens. The failure to investigate, regulate or prosecute the banks behind the various crises, that too is all homegrown. In the US, criminal behaviour is settled by a "no wrongdoing" settlement with the SEC, in the UK the financial regulators achieve similar settlements (eg over PPI).

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LinkedIn sinkin': $10bn gone in one day as shares plummet 40%

Ledswinger
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Re: The reckoning will come ..

I think privacy issues will finally hit where they should

Why? The whole point of Linkedin is for those who choose to advertise themselves, and to stay in touch with colleagues who don't qualify as friends. If people give too much away about themselves, that's their choice, equally they can screw down the privacy settings as far as the system allows - and if that's not enough they shouldn't have an account.

I use Linkedin as a personal advert, to stay in touch, and to look up business people who I may be expecting to meet and don't know. And I use it to see who knows whom, for when I need a contact or referral at a company where I don't know anybody. For the stuff on my profile, I'm happy for that to be public domain, and happy to tolerate a limited amount of spam (all to my corporate email account, natch).

Just like FB - their system, their terms. If you don't like the terms, don't use it.

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That's cute, Germany – China shows the world how fusion is done

Ledswinger
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Re: I Wonder....@ Pronounce

You don't suppose it might be possible to lose containment on super-heated plasma that turns the Earth into another star, do you?

You're not a member of the German Green Party, are you, by any chance? If not, I'd join now, because your sort of thinking will fit a treat with their Calvinist eco-guilt complex.

In a few years time, some shitty coalition government will be formed in Germany with the Greens as a minority partner, and they once again can wield their "golden ticket" to ban something. A few scaremongering headlines in Bild, and some more measured but still fearful coverage in Der Spiegel, wind up the Green Party, and they'll be pushing to ban this dreadful tech that might one day ignite the planet.

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Ledswinger
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Re: $14 Billion buys you and awful lot of oil

Oh well, money printing and fintech will still save us. Right?

That's right. And all that good stuff like 100% LTV lending, subprime lending, CDOs and MBS, they're all back. Not to mention budget deficits, and borrowing more than your economy grows by each year. Lucky all the money is being spent productively, isn't it?

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Ledswinger
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Boffin

No, it isn't:

OOhhhhhh yes it is!

There's a secret cooling system designed by aliens, and that means that the interior is kept cool from those high surface temperatures during the 4 billion year operating life of the sun. Mind you, the warranty ran out after the first billion years, and we've lost the maker's number.

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BlackBerry axes 200 jobs – including a third of its HQ staff

Ledswinger
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Indeed, You've got to give them credit for bobbing around for so long against the force of the water. But even the most determined floater eventually succumbs.

Perhaps the Canadian government should throw so more toilet paper into the bowl, and push the handle again. It will be a sad day, but Blackberry will soon join the pantheon of dead IT giants. Nokia's phone business beat them to the graveyard, the question is who will be next.

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Head transplant candidate sells souvenirs to fund operation

Ledswinger
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he could parts of his old body encapsulated in resin

How about having his skin tanned, and made into stuff like belts, wallets and gloves? Or even sold complete as the ultimate onesie?

Although I'd settle for a china mug, because I like his class in trying to raise the money for his own survival.

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Ledswinger
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So where do I buy?

You could at least have posted a link to wherever I can buy something. Or was cutting and pasting from the Mail as much as could be achieved on a Friday afternoon?

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Virgin gives blessing to O2/Three merger

Ledswinger
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BT may decide to terminate their access to EE's mobile network

That would be a very high risk strategy for BT, because it would invite a CMA referral, and EU market abuse interest. I suspect VM pussyfoot around BT because they are worried that if BT need to be forced to do common carriage, then the effective BT lobbying machine will start pushing for open access on VM's cable network. So the Openreach question colours the arguments on mobile network access.

Open access on VM cable would be a good thing for consumers. It would also be a good thing for VM if I am right in my suspicion that VM's cable network is very lightly utilised, because they'd still be a big retailer of packages, but they'd also get bigger revenues from the network.

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Ledswinger
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Unfortunately, there's a difference between competition and serving customers best interests, and civil servants and bureaucrats don't (generally) understand that.

So Mockridge could be right in what he says, but that doesn't mean that it'll benefit you or me. Under the entirely theoretical "perfect competition", market forces serve customers well. The further you get from that, the more constrained the market becomes. Clearly a market of three players is at best an oligopoly, at worst a cartel - in either case there's insufficient choice to benefit consumers. And with network sharing, there's even less choice behind the scenes.

The asset owners won't like it, but we've reached a point where all fixed and wireless networks (unless owned by the end users, eg as a Co-op) should be forced to operate as open access, with any integrated operation having to operate the network at arms length from the retail operation. We do that in gas, electricity, water. Needs to happen to Openreach, VM cable, and the masts and backbone for mobile comms.

If there's no predatory pricing or profiteering, then the integrated and incumbent players will have nothing to worry about......

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The Mad Men's monster is losing the botnet fight: Fewer humans are seeing web ads

Ledswinger
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I'm glad!

Even though ads can and do support much free to web content, I'm delighted to see that the industry are being defrauded. With their crappy, intrusive, privacy-invading, flashy, blinky poppy uppy shitty shit, and their persistent attempts to ram their message down my throat, and steal as much of my screen real estate as possible, then if THEY are feeling hard done by then GOOD.

I'm no fan of Google benefiting from the fraud, but that's a separate issue. If the on-line advertisers got their act in order, then they'd also have less of a threat from ad and script blockers.

Sadly, I'm not optimistic this will be sorted out well. Ad companies are too obssessed with glittery, shiney, moving images, and the chances are that we'll see more attempts to force us to watch TV style ads to access content. And still the retards behind web advertising won't see the brand damage done by unwanted advertising.

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HPE chases risky business with Autonomy and Stonebraker tech

Ledswinger
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Who is this muppet?

the system would let customers "get in front of a Libor-type event and take action on such information."

Yeah. IMHO the banks senior management knew somewhere between "roughly" and "precisely" what was going on on their trading floors, and as long as the money flowed in and the bonuses could be quaffed in City champagne bars, they didn't want to ask too many questions. I believe the same is true of the forex manipulation, MBS/CDO activity pre 2008, retail mis-selling of pensions, swaps, PPI, ID insurance, RBS's GRG activity, and risky lending. And probably true of HFT, its just nobody has yet been collared that I know of.

Personally, I don't think that the culture of banking has changed at all. We're already back to most of the big lenders offering 100% LTV mortgages - what could possibly go wrong?

So, HP can tout this, and maybe even sell it. But it will be bought only as window dressing, and in my view if it flags up risky but profitable behaviour, it will be reconfigured to not flag that up.

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Three: We won't hike prices if you say yes to £10.5bn O2 merger

Ledswinger
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Ofcom could be more forceful in its demands for coverage etc.

And your view of the probability of that happening?

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Ledswinger
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I hope the merger doesn't cock it up.

Much to learn you still have, young padawan.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Consumers Vs Business

What sanctions will be available to TPTB if Three either blatantly or stealthily breach their wide ranging (and potentially vague) promises?

If you expect OFCOM to do anything, there is no hope. But if the Takeover Panel can be allowed to adjudicate on the promises that Three make, then there's a very good chance that they can at least be held to the letter of their promises.

After Kraft blatantly made promises it then reneged on after the City sell out of Cadbury, the takeover code was tightened. There are, unfortunately still some cop-outs, but if the make and break a clear promise, then they can be forced to honour it by the Takeover Panel.

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Google to deep six dodgy download buttons

Ledswinger
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Like what? ASA core competencies look to be wringing their hands and looking ineffectual, so if that's what you'd like, then you could be in luck.

If on the other hand you wanted the ASA to act decisively and effectively in consumers' interests, then you may well be disappointed.

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Girls! Girls! Girls! Intel brags about diversity push, Silicon Valley tells itself it's doing great

Ledswinger
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to see who can make the most secure, bug free and efficient code.

Well, we men went first, and we've not set the bar very high, have we?

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German Chancellor fires hydrogen plasma with the push of a button

Ledswinger
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Re: That's Bundeskanzlerin Frau Doktor Angela Merkel to you

Germany - where politicians are sane enough to be allowed to press buttons.

But a bit pointless because the German public will be easily stirred up by the Greens, and it can join fission reactors on the "we're scared, take it away now" list.

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They're alive! Galileo sats 9 and 10 sending valid signals

Ledswinger
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Re: Some folks might criticize cost, but ...

One of the reasons for developing multi-megaton hydrogen bombs was the poor accuracy of ICBMs - if the bang is big enough, targeting doesn't have to be that neat.

I find the same tactic useful when breaking wind after a night of beer and pickled eggs.

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PCS: We'll ballot Hewlett Packard Enterprise members over job cuts

Ledswinger
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Re: Cunning plan?

Makes economic sense to shut offices with only a few 100 people and move to the larger sites that have 1000's of people. Saves on building costs, rates, electricity/heating, food facilities etc, the list goes on.

As somebody with some expertise in this field, I can assure you that once you move beyond SME sizes, incremental economies of scale are minimal unless you've been incompetent and got a large and under-used building at the receiving site.

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Layoffs! Lawsuits! Losses! ... Yahoo! is! in! an! L! of! a! mess!

Ledswinger
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Re: Buzzword Bingo

it's time to pick over the carcass while there is something for the vultures to eat.

They'll need to not be too choosy. But all in all, Yahoo is a heroic story of the Triumph Of The Agents (as in agency theory, not The Matrix).

By the time the sad and tatty SS Yahoo dips below the waves for the last time (2017?), they will have been in business for twenty one years, and never paid a cent in dividend, they'll have burned through (at a guess) $60bn of revenue, and at the end of it all there will be nothing to show for it, other than some very rich ex-directors.

Done right, that could have been the mother of all parties.

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IBM buys two digital ad agencies in a week

Ledswinger
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If you buy it for an undisclosed sum....

...can you write it down for an undisclosed sum, when it turns out you bought a business you don't understand for far too much money?

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Alphabetti spaghetti: What Wall Street isn't telling you about Google

Ledswinger
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How long can a monopoly survive unregulated?

I offer no answers to that question, just that simple question. Absent some remarkable new form of profitable growth, the only way they can now please investors is by milking the monopoly through higher pricing. My view is that won't end well for all parties, although generous lobbying and political donations will help fend off the day of reckoning.

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Uni of Manchester IT director resigns after chopping 68 people

Ledswinger
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Gotta laugh!

The spokesman added that the university is "not aware" of any cuts to the IT transformation budget

It's remarkable how much you can be unaware of if you really try hard enough.

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Ofcom's head is dead against Three and O2's merger

Ledswinger
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All very well talking tough

But what will Ms White do if the EU rubber stamp the deal, perhaps with a few tiny caveats? OFCOM have been toothless for years, so my hopes aren't very high.

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Rooting your Android phone? Google’s rumbled you again

Ledswinger
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Is this a threat or a feature?

A feature. But in all honesty, other than a few devs, the majority of people rooting phones do so (I suggest) to escape the clutches of Google. The idea of rooting, installing Cyanogenmod, and then choosing Google as a payments service seems to be totally implausible, so the whole basis of the article seems to be mild outrage at a "problem" that affects nobody.

Still, we read it, and those of us not blocking ads paid our dues for the Reg......

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UK taxpayers should foot £2bn or more to adopt Snoopers' Charter, says Inquiry

Ledswinger
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If it's heaped on ISPs it's hidden, HMG doesn't have to justify the amount & they'll claim the fact it was 8x over estimate as the ISPs' incompetence.

Don't forget the government have form on this. Look at the energy sector. Because the welfare state is (despite its vast cost) shambolic and ineffective, energy suppliers have to pony up the "Warn Homes Discount". That's a third of a billion quid added to your energy bills each year. Then there's the Energy Company Obligation, to insulate selected properties that adds another £0.7bn to energy bills. Then you've got the Feed it tarrifs and renewables obligations, that force energy suppliers to over-pay billions each year for electricity from PV and wind power, currently around £5bn and rising fast. All of which together then create the very problem of high energy costs and fuel poverty that government complain about. By 2020, all of these state-mandated interferences will be an additional cost of at least £9bn a year (NAO, 2020 prices), and that's before the ridiculous bribes for nuclear are factored in. In overall terms, by 2020, more than a third of the costs of your domestic energy bill will be the assorted interferences by government in the energy market. And the liars, idiots and thieves of government have the audacity to claim that they are working to keep your energy bills down.

But as a scheme for (1) spending other people's money without being in the slightest bit accountable, it's great for the wasters of Westminster. And (2) as a means of blaming other people for a problem created by government, it is equally marvellous.

So, coming back to the Snoopers Charter, government are addicted to spending other people's money. They've run out of tax income, and even though in a few weeks they''ll be conducting a further huge raid on pension savers, that still won't be enough for Cameron's tax 'n' spend plans, so the additional costs of the Snoopers Charter will have to be loaded upon ISPs. And don't forget, that by loading the costs through your ISP, the thieves of government actually make 20% of the total costs, because YOU will be charged VAT on the Snoopers Charter costs added to your bill.

There are no polite words to express the depths of my contempt and loathing for Cameron, his lickspittle parliamentary party, his Eton & Oxbridge chumocracy, and his big state champagne socialism.

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Ledswinger
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Re: ICR

The ICR is a list of all the domains you've connected to, but not individual URLs.

And you believe them, for one fleeting picosecond? There's not a snowflake's chance in hell that this will be limited to domains. If you're generous, it'll be mission creep that extends it to URLs, but personally, I don't even believe that they'll start at that level, that's just the fig leaf for gullible.

The interesting progression will be Sturmbahnfuhrer May's response when evidence of visiting a URL is deemed irrelevant in court because the Clown Prosecution Service can't prove what the content of the URL was at the time it was accessed. Do you think she will prove stupid enough and extreme enough to demand ISPs keep a changelog of the entire interent? I think she will.

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Most of the world still dependent on cash

Ledswinger
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Re: There's a good and a bad side to this

Getting rid of everything above 100 Euros/Dollars would turn one suitcase of money into 5 or 10, making this kind of illegitimate transfer much more cubersome.

Yes, but insufficiently to deter money launderers and dirty money transactions. You can fit $1m in $100 bills into a standard briefcase. If that had to be in $20, then it'd only be $200k, but if instead you used a medium sized suitcase, you can fit in 74,000 notes, so $1.4m in $20 bills.

My guess is that those trafficking in million dollar settlements wouldn't struggle if each briefcase had to be replaced by said medium sized suitcase. And a single drag bag full of $20 bills must be about $5m.

How many dodgy transactions exceed $5m, do you think?

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Brit airline pilots warn of drone menace

Ledswinger
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We need a general sign.

Nope. We need good practical penalties that the hard of thinking (or hard of consideration) could understand. Like the confiscation of inappropriately flown drones, and said drone being broken up before the pieces are publicly stuffed up the errant operator's arse. You'd have to insert about four drones up bottoms before the message got through, but I reckon that'd cut the number of mis-flown drones by an order of magnitude, in a way that neither fines nor imprisonment would.

We could do the same for drivers on mobile phones (except me, this last Friday, because rules ALWAYS apply to other people).

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Why a detachable cabin probably won’t save your life in a plane crash

Ledswinger
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Re: Looks as though it requires a high-wing aircraft configuration.

How many large jets do you see like that these days?

The inventor's Ukrainian, and you have to remember it's still 1961 over there......

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Ginni Rometty to pocket $4.5m bonus for IBM leadership

Ledswinger
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Re: IBM

Your fourth paragraph is just perfect

Small and perfectly formed, as I tell the ladies! But that's because I see this time and again, inside my (non-tech) company and in others. A particular tragedy of many of these entirely avoidable cases of slow lingering deaths through corporate obesity is the hand played by the company's HR department, who fail to serve up management able to challenge, correct, (or even work round) the ineptitude of the current board.

HR departments the world over harp on about "leadership" when they don't have a clue what they're talking about. They establish "talent" schemes that act as a gateway to the promotion escalator and training, and they filter out the non-conformists. And the result is that even though a good brand will always attract a very high calibre workforce, HR actually weed out those with energy, innovation, those who might grow the business, and preferentially promote group thinkers, people whose skills fit old business models, people who don't rock the boat. For most of the corporate dinosaurs, the best thing they could do now would be to sack their HR director, and all of "HR professionals", put the work of redundancies and disciplinary with the legal team, and just retain HR administrators to do the paperwork. Next step would be to scrap the "talent" programme", meaning they need to trust their business and line managers, and let them decide who to promote.

And pigs might fly.....

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Ledswinger
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Re: IBM

How much longer after that it continues to stagger forward without slaughtering the entire GDF division and selling it to Tata I do not know.

And therein lies the problem. GDF was one of IBM's growth ideas after they tried and failed to own a big share of "productivity" software. Of course, just as the productivity adventure was crushed under IBM's relentless bureaucracy, so the benefits of outsourcing and offshoring turned out to be a mirage for both clients and IBM's investors. Cue panic at Armonk. Everybody runs round like headless chickens looking for the next bandwagon to pile onto. And then two (separate) words spring to mind: Security! Cloud!

In the security space, I'm unconvinced there's any credible proposition from IBM. And in cloud they're arriving at the party five years late, and the technology has bypassed them, and the pricing reached commodity levels.

Ultimately, IBM is like HP, General Motors or the old Motorola: A self serving, heavily siloed, lard arsed bureaucracy that is slowly withering for lack of entrepreneurship. Within all four companies they did enough R&D and product development to have saved themselves. But the cancer of bureaucracy is virtually impossible to remove once it gets hold, risk is forbidden, consensus trumps adventure, and the board play at corporate finance and M&A because that's easier than real work. And so we see a slow drift to irrelevance.

I work in business strategy, and all the time I see a battle between the forces of light (good ideas, passion, risk taking, entrepreneurship) and those of the dark side (inertia, complacency, risk aversion, sloth, bureaucracy). This battle goes on every day in any large business, but at IBM, the dark side has won. It could yet be turned round, but it won't, because the management are entrenched and overly comfortable. They will mostly do very well out of the slow decline - why take a risk, or take on more hard work? And because of the way Wall Street works, even if the entire board were (quite reasonably) sacked without notice and without compensation, unfortunately their replacements would be exactly the same sort of C-suite leeches, with the same selfish values, the same lack of closeness to customers and markets, the same cluelessness, and the same contempt for shareholder value.

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Israeli drones and jet signals slurped by UK and US SIGINT teams

Ledswinger
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Devil

Wouldn't US slurping of Israeli intel...

..create the mother of all feedback loops?

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Zuck's bucks are now the world's 6th-largest cash pile

Ledswinger
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FB will never make money

I don't think that was absolute, merely an observation about the returns on investment for shareholders. With a current market cap of c$300bn, and earnings for FY2016 that might get as far as $24bn, its looking more like a utility but with more risk. And as free cash flow is only circa $6bn a year, that's not much of a hypothetical dividend, is it - ignoring the fact that they don't pay any dividend.

The vast wealth of Zuck is (like the other FANG founders) is based on high capitalisations of their owned stocks, when the real economic value of those stocks is a fraction of the price the market is currently paying. And the reason the market pays those? QE, bank bail outs, and the flood of fearful or dirty money out of emerging markets. There's no long term case for the FANG stock prices.

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Hewlett Packard Enterprise axing services techies again

Ledswinger
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Re: I would propose a law stating that...

After massive sacks, bonuses can't be paid to executives for the following five years.

That's the sort of protectionist legislation that's left the French economy as the sick man of Europe. I think companies should be at liberty to dump staff whenever they want, subject to two caveats:

1) Where jobs are moved offshore, duties should be imposed equivalent to the avoided UK employment taxes. At c13% employers NI, say 12% employee NI, and an average rate of 7% for income tax, so that'd be about 32% of the UK salary. That'd make UK based companies think twice before hollowing out the UK economy.

2) Statutory redundancy pay to be significantly higher, and with few get out clauses for employers. If companies need or want to get rid of people, let them do it. But as somebody who has been lucky enough to be paid off handsomely twice by virtue of generous employers, I'd like to see that cushion far more widely offered. And the thieves of government could also raise the tax free element by about double.

I suspect that there's more than a few of HP's discarded workforce who are actually delighted to have gone, if they've had decent exit terms.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Going to get hard for the marketing team

When they try to convince a prospect that HPE can do on-site support they're going to start hearing "Oh yeah ? With who ?"

Sadly not. The ITO (and BPO) markets are driven by knowledge asymmetry between client and vendor. The decision makers at the client don't have a clue what costs the vendor has, and suck up the promises of vast savings AND superior service. By the time they find out otherwise they've signed a long term, and very one sided SLA and its too late.

Even if the client asks the right questions, they'll get the sort "of acknowledge-bridge-convert" response of a greasy politician being quizzed by Eddie Mair, so they they don't actually definitively answer the original question, but leave an impression that they have. This very morning I spent a pleasant hour with one of the leading UK academics on the subject of BPO, at which we agreed that BPO rarely delivers, because the SLA's don't do what the client expects, and because of the information imbalance between the negotiators.

Directors the world over still fall for the idea that a job they don't want to manage will somehow be performed better by somebody else, for less money. Presumably these people still believe in unicorns.

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Home Office lost its workers' completed security vetting forms

Ledswinger
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Re: Too Many Errors

To highlight how utterly odious the Home Sec actually is.

Why particularly this one? Because politicians don't get out enough, whenever they arrive at the HO, they believe the rubbish they're inculcated with, about bazillions of bloodcurdling terror threats, and how the world will end unless they cave in to the spooks and the flatfeet. And as a result there's nothing to choose between them once they get their feet under the desk.

I don't think May had a good reputation to start with, but remember Jack Straw? He had a very good reputation for a politician before he became home secretary (i'm no Labour supporter, please note), and then he kicked off RIPA, which was Snoopers Charter 1.0.

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Two-thirds of Android users vulnerable to web history sniff ransomware

Ledswinger
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Building their own coffin

Google's failure to sort out Android security is well known. I can see the practical and commercial reasons for doing nothing for handsets that have been remaindered, and at the moment this malware is in the badlands outside the Play store. But you can see where this is heading.

Unfortunately for Google, their failure to fully secure up even the current version, never mind the billions of older devices means that sooner or later something really nasty is going to make it into the Play store, and all hell will be let loose across millions of phones - be it ransomware, some form of APT or botnet, keylogging/bank spying, or whatever. And when that happens, Apple's cash registers will melt, as a significant proportion of people decide that whilst they don't mind Google spying on them, they simply won't tolerate its slipshod security, and indifference to older handsets.

Personally I don't own any Apple products, and I don't like their obscene profits and limited user control. But I can see the day coming when Android is less a phone OS, and more of a malware deployment system.

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Land Rover Defender dies: Production finally halted by EU rules

Ledswinger
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Trollface

Re: Why are they ending it now?

The emissions laws don't come into force until 2020, and the replacement car is due out in 2018 - so why are they ending production now at the start of 2016?

Here's a clue:

... by today's standards it is also monumentally uncomfortable, slow and unwieldy. It's out-of-date, basically.

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Back to the Future's DeLorean is coming back to the future

Ledswinger
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Re: A couple points ...

Wanders off wondering why (British Govt subsidies perchance?)

$120m in 1978. Say £74m in 1978 prices, so about £330m at 2015 values. Which means the British taxpayer paid a subsidy in today's money of £36k per car completed.

Put another way, 2,500 people were employed for two years, so that's £132k per head in current values, and £66k per employee per year, for jobs that (again in current money) would be about £21k average salary.

Good to see that HM Government has always been consistent in the value for money it offers taxpayers.

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ICO says TalkTalk customers need to get themselves a lawyer

Ledswinger
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Re: WalkWalk

I'm still waiting for a call back with contact details for a UK-based manager that I can talk to - since asking for it in November, though ......

No problem, they are over eight weeks and complaint is not resolved, you can refer your complaint to the Communications Ombudsman, whether W*nkW*nk like it or not:

http://www.ombudsman-services.org/who-can-we-help-communications.html

Simply by taking the complaint up for investigation, W*nkW*nk will be charged a case fee of around £400. They'll probably find in your favour - you won't get much by way of compensation, but you'll have your complaint resolved, and you are not exposed to any risk of paying their costs regardless of the outcome, so hit them where it hurts.

The same organisation (as the Energy Ombudsman) and broadly similar rules applies to energy suppliers, so any unhappy energy customers should do the same. You can complain before the eight weeks, but to do that you have to have what's called a "deadlock letter", where the company admit that you and they cannot agree - getting one of those out of an under-performing company is like getting blood out of a stone.

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Lincolnshire council shuts down all IT after alleged 0-day breach

Ledswinger
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Re: Dissapointed

Holds in the evidence better until you can get to the bathroom.

Why soil the bathroom? Unleash the trousered waste in the garden, and tell anybody who complains that you're part of the crew digging an escape tunnel.

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Ban internet anonymity – says US Homeland Security official

Ledswinger
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Re: Feck Off

We'll have the TSA with their rubber gloves at boarding gates for US bound flights soon.

We most certainly will:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3367396/US-guards-guns-patrol-British-airports-time-controversial-new-plans-discussed-London-Washington.html

Excuse the source, just the first news link to this story that Google chucked up.

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Outage outrage: Banks need clear targets for improving IT systems

Ledswinger
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If one judges by the serial mis-selling scandals, and the need to bail out a large proportion of the banking industry a few scant years ago, the banks could start off by getting some genuine financial expertise into their boardrooms, instead of rent-a-director clowns focused solely on trousering vast bonuses.

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Brit censors endure 10-hour Paint Drying movie epic

Ledswinger
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Re: Too easy

Just to make sure they really verified the whole film.

You don't think that they considered that the main risk? It's not like Charlie Lyne kept his plans secret, and the risk was always that if the fast-forwarded through it they'd miss something hugely embarrassing.

Although equally, if they had a digital copy, they should have been able to get a frame on frame analysis to pick up any differences, check those out, then fast forward through at 50x, and the laugh would be on Lyne and his clown-funding chums.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Brilliant

Can't wait to watch it.

Speak for yourself. I shall hold out for the 3D version because it will be so much more immersive as an experience.

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