* Posts by Ledswinger

3471 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

Ed Snowden should be pardoned, thunders Amnesty Int'l

Ledswinger
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Re: Perhaps on a freezing cold August day in Texas?

"But he did in point of fact break exactly the kind of law that you don't get pardoned for breaking."

That's true. But the law you refer to is the unwritten one "Don't embarrass the bureaucrats". That's why he's in trouble, nothing to do with national security.

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FBI: Apple and Google are helping ISIS by offering strong crypto

Ledswinger
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Re: Guns and stuff

"When the Iraqi Army runs away from ISIS they leave all those nice weapons and weapon-systems behind in their haste"

Don't forget all the weapons (and indeed training in Jordan) that the CIA provided to "moderate rebels" supposedly fighting the Syrian government. All those trained fighters and their weapons are now part of IS or Al Nusra, and the US government is now in the the bizarre and self-inflicted position of arming and training both sides of a conflict that it is involved in, and by opposing both Assad and IS, they seem to be fighting on both sides.

And the unfortunate thing is that having inflamed the conflict, the Yanks simply won't leave alone. They keep on pouring in more weapons, in the apparent hope of defending the arbitrary borders of Iraq, ignoring that this is essentially a tribal and sectarian split that is caused by those arbitrary borders combined with the locals being unable to operate any civilised and democratic government.

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Gremlins in the first six months? It's the seller's problem – EU court

Ledswinger
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Re: Windows 10

Well, if you're not happy with the free upgrade, I'm sure Microsoft will give you back the money you paid for the upgrade.

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IoT DANGERS: BYOD’s trashier cousin becoming a right tearaway

Ledswinger
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Re: So far, so good...

"Unfortunately the world is moving to a model where "it only works while you have a net connection"......Office365....."

Aahhh, yes. The ghastly abomination that is Office 365. Always f***ing deciding to uninstall itself without a buy your leave, regardless of the actual licence status.

All involved in Office 365's concept, development and specifications should be given free one way tickets to Syria.

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One USB plug to rule them all? That's sensible, but no...

Ledswinger
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Re: Just make it coloured coded

"Besides - colour coding isn't particularly DDA compliant?"

So what? Doesn't seem to be a problem for traffic signals, mains electricity, utility pipes, aviation, shipping, sports strips, video games, and well, almost everything.

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Gamers! Yes, gamers – they'll rescue our streaming Fire TV box, hopes Amazon

Ledswinger
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"I don't see the target audience."

A persistent problem with Amazon products and services, that they don't seem to understand the market, and they're usually late too it as well. Certainly as a general mechandise retailer they're good (although the ongoing slow death of free delivery increasingly makes other vendors more competitive). But when they tried selling tablets they wanted you to pay for a not-full-fat Android device that fired advertising at you, and they came to the market late. With Amazon Prime they want to bundle up a whole load of stuff into what is a fairly expensive bundle that doesn't have broad appeal unless you'd pay the full price anyway for one of the components (and again, for many of the parts others offered this before Amazon did).

And with this latest one we see much the same - a so-so offer for the mass market that doesn't really appeal to any obvious segment, and they're so late to the gaming party you have to wonder if they think gaming is just about hosting the original Wolfenstein. I wonder if they've heard of Steam?

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Elon Musk's $4.9 BEELLLION taxpayer windfall revealed

Ledswinger
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Re: Consumer subsidy per car

"How many prospective buyers were persuaded by the government's 6.8% discount?"

In which case why did the idiots of government give the money away? Don't forget that depending on markets there's other subsidies to EV drivers that equate to a subsidy to the maker, like their frequent exemption from road taxes and fuel and sales taxes.

Here in the UK there's been a £5k cash subsidy, exemption from road taxes (c£400 a year for a car of this class), no fuel duty (£2.60 a gallon, say £1,500 a year for a car of that class), and sales tax on fuel used at quarter the rate (VAT on electricity is 5%, on fuel is 20% - say £400 a year), and exemption from the new car tax (say another one off £400). If you live in a city with congestion charging, EV's are often exempt - if commuting into London that could be worth around £2,500 a year.

Ignore the congestion charge, and over ten years that means the UK taxpayer would be giving a subsidy of £28,000 to people able and willing to buy an £85,000 car. That sort of subsidy certainly does help Musk sell Teslas.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Comparing with a 'competitive' project@ Pen-y-gors

"This situation should be compared to the private finance deals that the Tories give to their chums"

Well the latest Conservative government (shower of useless p***) haven't really had time to do much damage with PFI, it was largely a dirty word under the last Coalition (shower of useless....), but it was under the governance of your socialist mates (particularly useless shower of....) that PFI really flourished, with £56bn+ of deals inked by the financially illiterate idiot Gordon Brown, with total taxpayer repayments of around £220bn IIRC. The preceding Tory (Major) government merely dabbled with PFI, signing around £2.2bn of deals.

So, come again, "Tories give to their chums"? Surely you mean "Labour gave to their chums"?

The vast, toxic, costly legacy of PFI has been bequeathed to the British public almost entirely by the crooks and idiots of the Labour party.

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Ledswinger
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Re: how capitalism is supposed to work??@ PghMike

"The author seems remarkably clueless about the role of government in capitalism"

You must be new round here. Don't feel obliged to stay.

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Your mobile, your car, and you – three become one

Ledswinger
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Re: What's the point?

Another "what's the point" question is why we want mobile displays sticking in front of drivers? Car makers are still trying to sell obscenely over-priced built in satnav, so I can't see them optimising an Android link for this purpose, in which case this seems have the sole purpose of displaying the regular phone screen as a further distraction for drivers.

I suppose it'll make like easier for tw@ts to tweet "Av cr4shed in2 ditch. Ecall as lerted emerg svcs. Hope 2 b rescued soon"

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Mass break-in: researchers catch 22 more routers for the SOHOpeless list

Ledswinger
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Re: The old way@ Rich 11

"I'm still using the cable modem VirginMedia (then Telewest) first gave me more than 15 years ago. I've ignored any offers of a modem upgrade and happily run my own routers off it. I don't know if the old modem is effectively putting a cap on my download speed,"

Depends on your package. I presume you're using a Motorola Surfboard, of which there were several different flavours. From memory the best of them would only achieve 40 Mb/s, and the older ones often a lot slower. If you're receiving and happy with a 20 Mb/s service then there's probably no need to change. If you're on a higher speed (check your bills for the package) just run a Speedtest.net diagnostic and see what it reports. I'd expect VM's routers to be optimised for diagnostics, but for these purposes that's a good thing.

If your download speed is significantly slower than your billed speed, call customer services and ask for an upgrade to a Superhub 2 (they'll probably be very helpful IME, but if asked to, refuse to pay for an upgrade, since you're already paying for the speed and they're not delivering it). Despite the bad publicity, the Superhub 2 is IME a decent fact cable modem, and an adequate if unexceptional wireless router. They usually don't fuss about getting the old modem back, so even if you're not happy with the Superhub 2, you could just reinstate the Surfboard.

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Life after HP cracks off into two: Execs spill the beans – tiny little beans

Ledswinger
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"There has been great upset within the organisation about the quality of work and contractual wrangling from HP/EDS"

Tell me about it. My employers outsourced our IT to the Great Satan that is HP a few years back, we've since had our own major strategic challenges, and a core problem for all of our growth businesses is now the outstandingly poor IT service we get, the appallingly sluggish response times, and the obscene costs for doing the most rudimentary things, and the "SLA says no" approach of HP.

When the outsource deal was signed, our Procurement guys thought they'd done a good job. But as always with ITO and BPO vendors, the vendor sales & legal team was hugely more experienced than the customer side, with the result that HP limit everything they do to the absolute minimum permitted by the SLA, charge the earth for anything overlooked in the contract discussions or considered a "non standard request", and won't themselves be held accountable for SLA breaches because they knew how to insert exclusion clauses that our foolishly trusting project team simply didn't see coming. With HP's balance sheet bloated with goodwill from serial botched acquisitions, any cost saving from their cheapskate operations is more than swallowed by the necessary return on capital they need to charge (something our own directors weren't clever enough to work out in advance, even though many in our business knew exactly how this would play out).

I doubt that HP's fat cats read these pages, but in the event that they do, I'd just like to say how much I hate you, your "rape & pillage" ITO business model, your soiled brand, your bungling mis-stepping company, your crummy enterprise service, your ineffectual GSD and your low rent missing-in-action on site support. And that's a real pity, you've recruited and TUPE'd some brilliant IT people over the years, you had a heritage of talent and enterprise in Hewlett Packard, but in the pursuit of your own obscene and undeserved bonuses you've sh@t on these people and replaced them with underpaid, poorly trained and demotivated drones.

Did I made it clear how much I dislike and despise HP?

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My life under Estonia's digital government

Ledswinger
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Re: the previous posts

"ANPR in the UK only provides information on vehicles that are already flagged as being "of interest" to the Police. "

Not true, and hasn't been true for some years. You can see this in action on those dreary reality traffic cop shows, where the plods with car mounted ANPR are alerted to passing cars being untaxed, un-MOT'd, or uninsured even if they aren't of interest. And if you still doubt it, there's some UK police website FAQ's on ANPR that are quite clear that the technology is used to pick up those "minor" offences. Or you could go back to the 2005 Register article explaining about the plans to roll this all out.

Not all ANPR kit is wired up to all databases, so it doesn't follow that the police will send a snatch squad if a Tesco forecourt image shared via the National ANPR Data Centre shows your untaxed car filling up, but if you think you're clean simply by lack of a VOSI flag, you're wrong.

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Ledswinger
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Presumably the "digital" bit is the porky digits on the Estonian plod's hands as he types the number in. Here in the UK the car camera will already have read the plate by ANPR, automatically checked the police, insurance and DVLA databases and flagged it up without the rozzers having to lift a finger.

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Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV: The new common-as-muck hybrid

Ledswinger
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A lot I could live with...

I could put up with the crummy electric range, the apparently complicated regenerative braking (Oi! Mitsubishi! Automate it, it's 2015), the sluggish performance, the so-so off road performance....

..but I'm sorry, there's no excuse for those unforgiveable pipe & slippers styling. Was the entire design budget spent underneath the car, leaving a handful of yen to pay for the appearance? Or did they misunderstand the idea of recycling, and recycled the design from a hearse designed for fat people?

It's a shame, only Tesla seem to understand the need for EVs to be striking and aspirational. Mitsubishi, Toyota, Nissan etc seem to think that you can put a rechargeable battery under a turd, and that's the job done.

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Taming the Thames – The place that plugged London's Great Stink

Ledswinger
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Re: If only

There is no technology know to man that can flush away the disgusting stench of corruption, greed and incompetence that lingers around FIFA. Hopefully the Yanks will soon have an orbital ion cannon.

The Swiss have soiled their reputation both by providing Septic Splatter, and by hosting FIFA, so if the outcome is that all of Switzerland is sterilised from orbit, with the loss of all the cows, nuns, escaping nazis, and clockmakers, then I think that's a fair price.

Toblerone's fairly shit as well, so I won't miss that either.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Agree.

"lets not forget that most of it was built by "slave" labor."

Don't type shit. Living standards were certainly abominable for the majority BY PRESENT DAY STANDARDS in Victorian times, but what was the alternative? This wasn't for one moment slave labour, it was paid employment, with little alternative but the rather unattractive option of the workhouse.

But now, in the UK, we pay around 2m people to sit on their fat, idle arses being "unemployed", whilst we're (apparently) short of critical infrastructure like a high speed railway from London to the North, further airport expansion around The Smoke, the lack of capacity on our road network is visible on a daily basis to anybody with eyes, and people across the nation weep and gnash their teeth at the lack of fast broadband.

A situation played out a hundred times over in the economically dysfunctional states of Europe.

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China spending $182 BEEELLION on net construction by end of 2017

Ledswinger
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"So they will have infrastructure, technical skills, production skills and America owing them trillions, just about all the cards they need really."

Until they try and cash those T-bill IOU's and find that the dollar is worthless?

Meanwhile as living standards rise, and Chinese people speak more international languages, more and more understand that there's alternatives to corrupt one party government*, and that's not going to pan out well for the Communist Party.

* Yes, I know the alternative is generally an alternating arrangement of corrupt two party government, but if you've just been given a kicking by state goons for using Facebook to mock the party, then any alternative looks better.

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Singapore to trial 10Gbps home broadband

Ledswinger
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"8k 120fps 48 bit Color depth is coming"

So good you said it twice. But what's your advice? Should we walk round the streets with placards proclaiming "8k cometh, and all your porn will be obsolete", or were you thinking more along the lines of telling us all to run for the hills?

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Nokia getting there with HERE as rivals talk up price

Ledswinger
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"You are a corp, you wanna make $$$$ by fsck'ing the competition"

And you want to make a shed load of cash from the sale of over-priced options. I've not checked Audi's price list, but as a general rule built in satnav is about five to eight times the cost of a standalone Garmin unit, and map upgrades are charged at obscene prices through the dealer network.

Car makers profits are intrinsically tied up with options added to the base vehicle, and built in sat nav has been one of the higher margin options for many years. Even if Audi funded OSM, that would not result in any lower cost for the built in navigation or for the upgrades.

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City of birth? Why password questions are a terrible idea

Ledswinger
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Re: Spell it phonetically

" using the same non-relevant answer to a particular question ....Favourite food: Kylie Minogue"

Non relevant for you perhaps. There's some people round here would be delighted to have a munch.

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Factory reset memory wipe FAILS in 500 MEELLION Android mobes

Ledswinger
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Re: I think I can answer a question

" so the manufacturers and carriers would need to do the update"

Ideally they should be legally required to under consumer protection legislation. For Google it'd be a reminder "don't be incompetent" when coding, and for the carriers it'd be a welcome headache that might eventually persuade them to stop the nonsense of custom skins and bloatware.

Outside of the warped reality space of the carrier's marketing departments, I don't believe a single person on Planet Earth wants their new phone to be soiled by the carrier's logo, or the memory they've paid for to be filled with unremoveable but often barely functional bloatware, but it is specifically these undesired features that seem to be a barrier to fixing this.

The obvious solution (short of rooting and SIM free purchase) is for the handset makers to offer their nearest-to-vanilla versions of Android directly to consumers. The carriers could still skin up the phones before sale if they're so desparate, but then they'd have to add some real value with that to keep it on people's phones.

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Russia will fork Sailfish OS to shut out pesky Western spooks

Ledswinger
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"Get out of Ukraine and then we'll talk."

But all the US led regime change in Kiev, Iraq, Syria, Libya, that's just dandy?

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Please no non-consensual BACKDOOR SNIFFING, Mr Obama

Ledswinger
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Re: Struggling for words

"I struggle to understand how any policy makers are so ignorant of the underlying principles of.... "

In my experience or working fairly close to policy makers, the politicians spout idiotic crap without consulting the policy makers, and then the policy has to be back fitted to the ignorant mouthings of politicos (eg Cameron's "four energy tariffs should be enough for anyone"). However, even if you consult the policy specialists, they have such narrow, siloed remits that it is very, very difficult to get a holistic picture, and despite individual good intentions that leads to bad outcomes (eg the rest of UK energy policy).

In technology things are worse, because there's no real ministry of tech, meaning that all you have is the ramblings of gob5hites like Cameron, but not even a gang of tech specialists trying to do the right thing round the back.

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Milking cow shot dead by police 'while trying to escape'

Ledswinger
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Re: Wikus van der Merwe: Cow Morph!

"how many of the bluejackets are recycled veterans"

Very few. That's part of the problem IMHO, that the military have discipline and a healthy respect for weapons, along with a general reluctance to use necessary force. The civil police don't all appear to have that same respect for the power of the weapons they carry.

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Ledswinger
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Re: A cow is actually quite dangerous

"A week ago when I commented that the UK firearms units (the ones allowed to carry weapons) are as trigger happy as their USA bretheren."

But luckily we have few firearms equipped units, generally kept on a short leash, and the result is that UK police have shot 23 people dead in 10 years, compared to somewhere between 300 to 600 people US authorities shoot dead every year.

I think many people would agree that outfits like SO19 should have been replaced with Army personnel on permanent deployment to assist the police, but to suggest that our armed police are as bad as the cowboys apparently operating with impunity across the US is simply libellous.

You might want to read this, for a summary of what the Land of the Free enjoy:

http://davidstockmanscontracorner.com/rising-police-aggression-a-telling-indicator-of-our-societal-decline/

And a search on "militarization of us police" will bring up some juicy detail. My particular favourite was the headline "Obama calls for turret mounted cameras on all police tanks".

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Border Force bureaucrats become super-spooks

Ledswinger
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Re: For a country started by criminals...

"The British Government ' started' Australia but due to a lack of interested emigrants they started to transport criminals to provide a slave/labour force. "

A lot of us back in Blighty wish our ancestors HAD stolen a load of bread and been transported. As things were, they didn't (or more likely, didn't get caught), so we're stuck here, we've already got mass surveillance, an incompetent "border force", three times as many people on an island a thirtieth of the size, and we have to put up with shit weather.

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High-level, state-sponsored Naikon hackers exposed

Ledswinger
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Re: over and over and over

"Surely if they're even hire-able in the first place they can tell departmental business from garbage."

If, as the article suggests, they're highly placed government workers, they will be expected to be up to speed with goings on in local and foreign politics, what the press are saying, and the output of numerous external analysts and think tanks. If you routinely receive unsolicited external emails with work-related attachments then you're going to be vulnerable to clicking on something that looked credible, but has a payload. You could have a rule that bans opening attachments (or even have the mail server delete them automatically), but it then creates a very embarrassing problem when the head honcho screams "why wasn't I aware of X?", and the answer is "because the IT people deleted the documents which would have told us about X".

You'd have thought that any competent IT department would be able to strip out commodity grade malware, but dealing with a state sponsored hacking team, there's every chance that they could be using zero day exploits against which your defences are weak. Defending against state sponsored hacking is always going to be very difficult.

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Ofcom: Oi, BT! Don't be greedy – feed dark fibre to your rivals

Ledswinger
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Re: How does this affect investment decisions?

"The return on investment calculation shifts in favour of not installing so much spare capacity to begin with. In the long term that doesn't benefit anybody."

You'd be right if dark fibre cost serious money. It doesn't, because the cost of the actual fibre is a tiny part of the installation cost. Not only is the actual fibre optic cheap, the marginal costs of installing additional capacity when you're already on site to the job are very low indeed - another couple of hours on site when you've already got the people and equipment there.

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Ledswinger
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Re: I'm confuzzled

"Which bit of BT owns the dark fibre? OpenReach or someone else?"

Due to regulatory failure at OFCOM, Openreach isn't a separate legal entity from the rest of BT, so Openreach technically own nothing. A cynic would say that this is VERY convenient for bamboozling regulators, competitors, and politicians, and enables a multitude of sins to be hidden, such as the margins being made by Openreach, the cost of internally provided services and the like.

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Ledswinger
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"why aren't 'the rivals' investing in dark fibre networks of their own"

Because BT have some history of not fully utilising their assets, then when somebody proposes to offer a separate solution they'll move to undermine them using the assets previously left to languish.

You'd have to be mad to invest in your own new fibre if there's any dark fibre making the connections you propose to build, because you could sink millions into your project, the dark fibre suddenly gets put into service, and then your traffic modelling and whole business plan disappears up Brown Creek.

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Californians get first chance to be RUN OVER by a GOOGLE ROBOT

Ledswinger
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Re: Brings to mind...

" cars with no one inside"

Nooo, no, no, no. There's the "safety driver", a superfluous meatsack cargo in everyone.

Presumably this will create a new sport amongst the yobs of California, in which the objective is to cause the Googlecar to either go off the road, or screech to a near instant halt, by spoofing the sensors intro thinking that a collision is imminent,

Do in on a bike or in a car, and the angry meatsack won't be able to chase you because you'll be able to outrun his 25 mph limit.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Booring

The most boring thing of all will be the job of "safety driver". Imagine sitting in a car, moving sedately around slower than a pushbike, for hour after hour, with instructions to do nothing unless something exciting happens. How will the poor beggars stay awake?

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The Internet of Things: a jumbled mess or a jumbled mess?

Ledswinger
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Re: Why

"Except for the possible remote reading of the meter, (if it works), they are another example of a bright solution looking for a way to create an insoluble problem."

Not even a bright solution. I work in the energy industry, and it is near-universally accepted that the UK smart meter specification is so primitive that it won't usefully function alongside even the mythical Jetsons-style smart home, or even solutions on the market today. The UK plan is to roll out technology that would have been state of the art about fifteen years ago, and to complete this by 2020.

The whole laughable "business case" is a driven by the vile mix of EU and UK governments competing to prevent climate change. Sadly this is going to be a £15bn waste of money, and that £15bn plus interest will be added to your energy bills.

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Election? Pah. Here's the REAL question: Who’s the SEXIEST MP?

Ledswinger
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" Listing those rated least attractive is not nice."

Why the sympathy? They're only MPs, it's not like they're dogs, rats or humans.

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Free at last! Flogging off O2 fattens Telefonica’s financials

Ledswinger
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"then how can it have had any impact on Telefonica's earnings already?"

I haven't bothered to check, but usually businesses making a divestment report the numbers for a business they plan to sell as "discontinued operations" until the deal closes. When discussing performance, and quoting their financials (and indeed awarding themselves bonuses), all the commentary and metrics will focus on continuing operations.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Consolidation?

"How is BT purchasing EE consolidation of the mobile operator market?"

The word "sector" appears to apply, logically enough, to the broader UK telecoms sector, reflecting the fact that both fixed and wireless lines have only two types of traffic, voice and data, and the number of people in mobile-connection only households is slowly rising.

So if you take a step back, and ask what your choices are for voice and data connections, that choice just got smaller.

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Polygraph.com owner pleads guilty to helping others beat lie detector

Ledswinger
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Re: "Lying, deception and fraud"

"If they really were 'lie detectors' then it would not be possible for Mr Williams, or anyone else, to teach you how to 'cheat' the test."

But that doesn't matter. Pseudo science like this is great for the law enforcement authorities - if it supposedly shows you're guilty they'll use it against you, but it it says you're not then it won't be proof of innocence.

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$19 billion made from dumped e-waste every year, says UN

Ledswinger
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@Alan Brown

"Burn them for energy and use fresh oil to make plastics."

You have to have decent technology to burn plastics safely. The Isle of Wight tried to build a waste pryolyser that in theory would burn stuff safely, but turned out to have dioxins in the flue gases. IIRC the project went bust because there wasn't the money for scrubbers in the budget.

They may have since got it working, but the UK has a hate/hate relationship with incineration and energy from waste in general. The economics are unpredictable, and the reliability of steady volumes of combustible waste streams is subject to capricious regulations and a heady mix of untrustworthy councils and untrustworthy waste collection companies. Short of buying an airline, putting you money into UK energy from waste is one of the best ways of watching it go up in smoke.

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Tesco tries to talk Tesco Mobile up from 'Value' to 'Finest' ahead of sale

Ledswinger
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Re: Dammit

"But my choice is about to be stolen from me."

Join giffgaff. Like Tesco Mobile, uses O2's network, and better value than O2. Curiously enough the nipper has a Tesco Mobile PAYG sim, and I can track (my) topup costs, and come rain or shine, on very modest mixed use it costs about £10 a month. Looks to me like I'd be better off with a £7.50 contract sim only plan with giff gaff.

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Mozilla flings teddy out of pram over France's 'Patriot Act'

Ledswinger
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"What parallel world are they living in?"

The parallel world where France has international respect, a balanced budget, competitive world leading industrial corporations, low unemployment, and an agricultural sector paid for the by the rest of the EU?

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Oz battery bossmen: Fingers will be burned in the Tesla goldrush

Ledswinger
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Re: The real elephant in the room

" It's hard to see where batteries with only a few hundred cycle lifetimes will make sense in the US home market."

Or in any mature electricity market. You'll know the arguments, not sure many of the battery fanbois do: Ignoring out-of-balance charges and annual peaks, peak to off peak arbitrage isn't great enough to deliver returns. Aim for seasonal peaks and you get poor asset utilisation, aim for daily peaks and the price difference isn't there (and you've trashed your asset in two or three years of heavy cycling).

Where it might make financial sense is in niche markets where incompetent regulators have gifted fat feed in tariffs to (say) solar PV, and there's no local demand, or where the incompetence extends to subsidising both crappo renewables and storage. It'll push up system costs for electricity (or require subsidy from taxation), but that's rarely a problem when regulators and politicians are pretending to save the planet.

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Amazon creating 500 ‘fulfilling’ jobs in the UK

Ledswinger
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Re: Creating

"I wish people/press would stop with this 'creating' bullshit."

Why the big deal. It's hardly Amazon's job to report net job market figures, is it?

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Ledswinger
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Re: "order picker in an Amazon warehouse is pretty far along from the worst jobs in the land"

"From what I've heard, it has a fairly high attrition rate. Besides, a job might be dirty and dangerous, but that's no reason for an employer to treat its employees like dirt."

I don't doubt that as a job it has a high attrition rate - probably hard work, unrewarding and shift based. But I don;t hear Amazon-esque abuse of Tesco, who have a high attrition rate, or call centres that equally have a high attrition rate.

But when it comes to treating shift workers like dirt, I'd like to hold up that icon of public worship, the National Health Service. Incompetent, demotivating shit head managers, clinically and managerially incompetent too often, and full of unrewarding, poorly paid jobs that often have quite high vocational training demands.

That still doesn't make treating people like dirt right, but if that's the real concern, then maybe we start with the publicly controlled organisation with almost 1.4m staff, rather than a loss making foreign owned company that employs a couple of thousand in the UK?

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Ledswinger
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Re: As a resident of the town in question,

" I doubt he'll make any mention of an Amazon warehouse being shit place to work"

A valid point, but there's lots of crummy jobs required in this world that most Reg readers will be pleased they don't have to do. Toilet cleaner, dustman, delivery driver, road sweeper, ticket inspector, debt collector, tyre fitter, keeping sewers clear, railway track worker, A&E porter, etc etc. And all those jobs need doing by somebody - they're often dirty, sometimes dangerous, and poorly paid.

I'd suggest that working as an order picker in an Amazon warehouse is pretty far along from the worst jobs in the land.

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Ledswinger
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Re: So...

"applicant beware."

Maybe. But I'd have thought that a brand new warehouse using meatsack pickers just North of London is a major failing of Amazon's technology department. Surely it is about time they had robo-pickers and packers? That way workers can be happily unexploited doing, well, something elsewhere, and I can still access cheap, convenient tat.

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Backwaters in rural England getting non-BT gigabit broadband

Ledswinger
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Re: Isn't this in David Cameron's neck of the woods?

"Silly cliched blather."

What did you expect from a cat?

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Scot Nationalists' march on Westminster may be GOOD for UK IT

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Nukes

"Like most military capability you train and equip to defeat the most violent, biggest, baddest enemy and other roles can be undertaken with ease"

This, my son is self evident rubbish, and I can't believe you typed it. No matter how many SSBN's we have, they make not one jack of difference to the conflicts that the UK (and allies) have been embroiled in fairly continuously for the past few decades. And in a budgetary constrained environment, if you splash your cash on a sea based nuclear deterrent, you find (as the clowns found out at the last SDR) that you can't afford the strike aircraft and attack helicopters for your wars of choice. You can't afford a decent highly mobile army with tactical and strategic transports. You can't afford the maritime reconnaissance fleet upgrade to police your own waters. You can't afford aircraft for your carriers.

Precisely because we tool up for Armageddon with Russia, we find that we don't have the resource or equipment to do other roles "with ease".

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Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Leaving the EU

"England could effectively have to secede from the UK while Scotland, Wales and NI would inherit the EU membership?"

Sounds good to me. Given that Salmond was threatening to secede but take no debt, presumably if it happens the other way round he'll be in favour of the Scots Welsh and Nornirons keeping the full pile of £1.5 trillion of UK national debt when England secedes?

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GCHQ puts out open recruitment call for 'white hat' hackers

Ledswinger
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Re: My cv says I'm a good team player...

"Not sure I can do the free running that bond does though."

Don't worry, to judge by my short time working in IT for the Ministry of Peace, it's Brooke Bond, not James Bond that you should be aspiring to in this role.

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