* Posts by Ledswinger

4072 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

EU reforms could pave way for smells and noises to be trade-mark protected – expert

Ledswinger
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Re: Only on el Reg

Here is the antidote to all the sprouts and cabbage if anyone's interested

The antidote? The ****ing antidote? Are you mad? Why would we want that? I want a recipe that can guarantee fartological success, and that's considerably upscale of a noisey but characterless lentil-fuelled emanations, or a short lived, weakly sulphurous egg-and-bean derived effluvium.

Ideally we need more research to take the concept forward beyond the current enthusiastic hobbyists. In terms of training and outreach, I'm uncertain whether to go down the academic route and seek City & Guilds accreditation for a national vocational qualification leading eventually to a status of Chartered Farticifer upon completion of both academic training and professional experience under a Master Fartologist (of at least first or second ordure).

The alternative would be to seek IOC approval for the subject to become a demonstration sport at Rio 2016, with a view to joining the full Olympic programme for Tokyo 2020. Imagine the pride of being the first gold medal winner in Tokyo, the adulation of the crowd, the adrenaline rush of climbing the podium, whilst the officials stagger around retching in the brown green miasma.

Obviously we'd need the usual rules banning performance enhancing drugs, and a scheme of testing, but this sort of thing is easily sorted. And the great thing is how inclusive this new sport will be: Couch potatoes and hambeasts will be as welcome a bean poles and supermen. Unlike any other Olympic sport, men and women and the less able would all compete as equals.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Eggs available, please pay now

I could almost smell, taste even bathe in the verbal description given.

My pleasure, sir! And in response to your proffered pint, it occurs to me that a tasteless solution would be a valuable extra market, to be slipped into the drinks of unsuspecting victims.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Eggs available, please pay now

My H2S trademark will be available for licensing real soon now

The H2S is only a base note in the overall smell. The real quality and depth of a good guff is that combined with mercaptans, plus skatole and indole to produce a strong, rich, well balanced aroma with a good half life and character. I'm not sure what it is, but there's also a rare compound that is sometimes released that stings the throat of the lucky audience, giving a pleasing tangibility to layer on the olfactory experience.

I reckon the global market for a pill able to guarantee the production of those compounds would be vast, but strangely nobody has (to my knowledge) even attempted to bring that product to market. Obviously there's the issue of transit time between swallowing and the warm magic occurring, and that represents a risk when popping one of these "Flower-caps", but maybe the concept could be extended to different pill that quickly and reliably produces utterly foul smelling belches. Red pill, or blue pill, the choice would be yours....

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Ledswinger
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Re: Is there any point trademarking e.g. taste

When the sods keep changing the recipe anyway (I'm think of chocolate here).

You're presumably thinking of the once great Cadburys, whose Yank owners are now steadily sliding down the slope (one product change at a time) towards the sort of filthy brown ordure marketed by Hershey.

Maybe Hershey could get in quick, and defend their niche by trademarking the taste and smell of dog foulage before Cadbury reach the same texture, smell and taste?

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Skilled workers, not cost, lured Apple to China says Tim Cook

Ledswinger
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Re: Skilled workers

So, when Apple sets up a factory in India, it'll be because there are no more skilled workers in China then ?

Although local wage rates have been rising in China, the significant and possibly permanent slowdown in Chinese fixed asset formation is already forcing The Party to reduce the exchange rate to try and stimulate foreign demand. With the developed world mired in debt, and emerging markets hit hard by he commodities and energy contraction, it isn't clear that exporting deflation will do what The Party want (of maintaining employment and preventing social unrest), but it will stop the bleed of jobs to other emerging markets, particularly for anything that needs both reliable infrastructure and fairly cheap labour (so all large scale and tech manufacturing).

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Free Wi-Fi for the NHS, promises health secretary Jeremy Hunt

Ledswinger
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I'm sure the devolved Governments of the UK will be really happy to hear that their block grants are getting slashed, but their taxes are being 'gifted' by Westminster for a vanity project which only benefits one part of the country.

So, to be clear, you want the rest of the nation to continue to pay to maintain the situation where Scots currently get significantly better funding for your health services than England (11% per capita, age adjusted, according to the Nuffield Trust), and you still want to tell the rest of us what our priorities should be?

I agree there's far better ways to spend the money, but since haggis munchers currently benefit from an unfair allocation of health funds, maybe you should keep very quiet?

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Ledswinger
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Re: As someone who works in IT in the NHS

If it's purely to give patients some entertainment then I can see some benefit in that,

But there's better uses for the money. Paying to train some doctors that actually speak recognisable English, perhaps? Training and properly supervising more nurses? Paying staff for the hours that they actually work, rather than relying on unpaid overtime to keep a poorly staffed, poorly managed system working? Paying for competent managers that can get my local hospital out of the dismal "special measures" status that NHS careerists have dragged it down to? Eliminating the need for me to pay "arm and f**ing leg" car park charges for a car park that I paid taxes to have built in the first place?

Even after the idiots of government have wasted a billion quid on this, it won't work very well because it won't be possible to deliver the bandwidth to a group of several hundred people many of whom will want to stream different content simultaneously.

That Jeremy Hunt is total and utter Jeremy Hunt.

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Sneaky skimmer scam stings several Safeway supermarkets

Ledswinger
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Re: How was it installed?

To install a skimmer requires physical access to the POS.

No big deal - done well it won't take more than a few moments. Even when there's staff around, if somebody looks authentic and purposeful the chances of being questioned are slim. Could be a bribed employee. A crim in a stolen store uniform. Or looking and acting like an EPOS service technician. In fact, easiest would be one of the crims taking a temporary job at the store as an employee, or as part of the often subcontracted cleaning. Particularly if you're part of the cleaning team then there's a good chance of largely unsupervised access outside of normal working hours. Then again, could be an employee for an EPOS company...

And those suggestions have taken a whole ten seconds of thought to come up with.

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Pandora pleased with 15% rate hike for streaming music

Ledswinger
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I'm feeling all sad

maybe 2 or 3 cents going to the artist.

FX:Sound of sad violin playing, accompanied by these images

When a CD gets sold, the cost is say $10 (or eight quid in real money). The artist gets on average about $1.50 or one gold coin bearing Her Majesty's image. If we say that the album has only ten tracks, then the artist gets fifteen cents/10 pence per track. If in my ownership the album gets played only ten times, the artist is getting 1.5 cents, or a penny per play. Most of my CDs get played far, far more than ten times, so the payment per play drops by approaching an order of magnitude to something around 0.1 cent per play over the first two or three years of ownership.

So, with a CD the artists sell a pre-pack of tracks that they choose, not me (I'll ignore digital downloads, that's for spotty kids), and they get pre-paid, albeit at this imputed 0.1 cent per track. Even if the artist only gets 3 cents per streamed play, they are still choosing to offer an advanced payment + bulk buy discount of 97% to buyers of CDs.

I'd say that if musicians could do maths, they'd think that streaming services were doing them a big favour. The only way that musicians can be better off is if they believe that when a CD is bought, it simply doesn't get played more than a couple of times.

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Windows for Warships? Not on our new aircraft carriers, says MoD

Ledswinger
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Re: Pedant alert

.its quite likely that the second ship will actually be the first to become actively operational on the front line, using all the developments worked out from the first

What, like a flight deck that won't melt under the F35's exhaust?

The whole F35 saga has the makings of the world's most expensive mess. Can you imagine the discussion:

"Let's build a new strike aircraft"

"Yep - better make it strong so it will be a stable weapons platform and robust at low altitude"

"Great idea! But lets make it capable of Mach2 as well, so it can get in and out fast"

"Great thinking! Since it's Mach 2, we'll make it capable of air defence and interception"

"Bingo. So double the avionics, and high altitude dog fighting to please the top brass"

"Genius, man, genius. Don't forget stealth, you're nobody if you don't do stealth"

"We're onto a winner here! Lets make is carrier compatible, so the Navy will buy it too"

"Don't forget then, different wings, different undercarriage"

"You are The Man! And I say we do a S/VTOL variant for the marines and idiot foreigners like the Brits"

"So cool! Make sure we've got fly by wire, and incredibly advanced software to manage EVERYTHING"

And so began the sorry tale, wherein the Yanks have committed themselves to a vastly complex programme with a current expectation of a whole life cost of $1.5 TRILLION. And meanwhile, their security services maintain the biggest threat to the US is a bunch of bearded arse wipes straight out of the middle ages. In many ways, of course, the F35 programme is like the original Harrier programme - driven by the cutting edge of what you could do with technology, rather than a practical, realistic need by the military.

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North Wales Police outsourcing deal results in massive overspend

Ledswinger
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Re: I work in the public sector.. I constantly fight against outsourcing

I used to work in the public sector. My impression was that management would rather believe consultants/contractors as they were paid a lot more money compared to in house staff.

Well there's no difference in much of the private sector (particularly large corporates), where dopey managers and directors believe the snake oil salesmen, and then get shafted. I work for a business with UK turnover of several billion quid, and global turnover in excess of £100bn, and our main board decided to shake up all support services to "save money". Even the in house functions have gone to pot as a result, but the IT outsource has been a disaster, with worse service, total loss of flexibility and agility, and higher costs for the same thing. We pay more in two months to lease the kit in a VC-equipped room than I could buy the hardware for, and even with the kit on site we were recently quoted a cost of £3k to run a single one hour webinar to 100 members of staff.

Don't get me wrong - outsourcing is a valuable tool, in that it is like a pay-per-use rubbish bin for business activities: If you really don't care how well a job is done, and you don't care how much it finally costs you, then outsourcing is your friend.

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MPs question value of canning Raytheon from e-borders

Ledswinger
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Early on there was a difference in expectations in how contract would have run

Yes, the government had an expectation (not based on experience) that the system would work. Raytheon had an expectation that they could ream out the tax payer whilst delivering nothing.

And here's a thought for the arseholes responsible: If the £1.1bn was generally spent on people (given there's diddly squat hardware), and the average salary of all involved were £60k, then there has been EIGHTEEN FUCKING THOUSAND MAN YEARS pissed up the wall, with nothing to show for it.

Bring back the death penalty, say I.

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EE recalls all 'Power Bar' USB batteries due to 'fire safety risk'

Ledswinger
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Re: Screw that. Cough up the refund.

Just imagine if you'd spent just 10 seconds of your valuable time doing some basic research on the story instead of creating an invective stream

Where would the fun be in that? I preferred the glorious invective to cold, dull logic.

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How to build a real lightsabre

Ledswinger
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Re: How is this an article?

I find your lack of a sense of humour disturbing....

The farce is weak in this one.

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Ledswinger
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Re: How Not To Do It.

Well, not after you'd torched the shareholders as well.

Business strategist top insight: Once you've got their money, shareholders are just surplus baggage, you can flambe them and their money with total immunity (the umbrella term for this concept of corporate larceny is "joint stock company").

Even the share price on secondary markets doesn't matter so long as it retains sufficient pulse to avoid breaching bank convenants or attracting "activist" investors who might take away the punch bowl before you've drunk your fill and then vomited back into it. Although it might matter if you've been counting the value of any options.

The best strategy for non-investors is to style themselves "serial entrepreneurs", which loosens the wallets of future marks, but actually means that you've repeatedly burned through vast amounts of early stage funding and produced nothing, whilst paying yourself a six figure salary, lounging in expensive serviced offices in a fashionable part of town, drinking coffee and preening your LinkedIn profile. After you've done this a couple of times, try and get cosy with whatever scumbag party is in government, because that will open the doors to becoming a special advisor on innovation, after which you can expect a patronage in the House of Lords.

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NZ unfurls proposed new flag

Ledswinger
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Re: I'd quit now if I were you !

I mean, come on.. time you learnt about your own sovereign state, then you can start pontificating on flags !

Nope. I didn't come here for well informed debate, and in that respect I came full prepared myself.

"Ignorance shall be my shield, vitriol shall be my spear."

(The Book of Ledswinger, ch 14 vs 54).

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Ledswinger
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Re: Yes please

Looks like you need educating on your own flag matey.

Fair cop. But it still looks pants with a red x superimposed on a red +. And if we're letting the Scots take the high road, quietly making Wales a sovereign nation whether they like it or not, we'd have to let Ulster decide its own destiny.

So, back to the sub topic of a flag for England, how about this distinctive and appropriate design.

In heraldic terms: Black yellow and grey stripes, with a tenné roundle offset, and tenné zouche adjacent.

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Ledswinger
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That's one of the opponents' objections.

But the people behind this will be a small, noisey political elite with a pre-judged conclusion, probably that the existing flag has to go. If they'd started off asking "do you want a new flag?", they know the debate would have been closed off forever because nobody would have bothered to vote, and any outcome would have had no legitimacy. By doing it this way round, they create the debate with a prospective winner.

Of itself, as a Brit I don't have a problem with them changing their flag, and the "winning" design is pleasantly distinctive. But if I were a Kiwi I wouldn't like the manipulative way it has been done. But then again, what can we expect from the lying, thieving, self interested turds that are our political classes?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Yes please

Next can we do something about all those near-indistinguishable European flags

Ahh, but what happens when the Scots decide to secede and form the Scottish Soviet People's Democratic Republic?

The union flag would have to drop the saltire. Nobody really recognises the cross of St David anyway, but if we can get the Scots to shove off, then it'll make sense rebuilding Offa's dyke and giving the Welsh the perpetual single party state they want (and we in England will be better off because we won't be paying for these two public sector theme parks).

Then when thinking about boring European flags, is the cross of St George sufficiently distinguished on its own?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Typical

No need for a new Welsh flag. All English rugby fans know what that looks like, right?

Well, any driver in Wales will conclude that this is the Welsh national flag.

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Expert welcomes UK’s digital health recommendations

Ledswinger
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Re: Free Wifi, health/personal data, GOV involvement...

what could possibly go wrong?

Your question generates a near infinite number of answers, with an infinite number of permutations (pedants: feel free to wade in). I suggest you reverse the question and ask "what, realistically speaking, might go right?"

Answers on the back of a postage stamp...

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Ledswinger
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Re: "impactful"? Seriously?

Yes. But by describing it as a digital roadmap developed within an MSU methodology then they can charge serious money for it.

Luckily there's bottomless pockets to pay for it. Yours and mine.

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Russian friends make German web scum the 'best' in European Union

Ledswinger
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Re: Keeping up

It would be nice to read exactly why the Germans hackers are so few in relation to the rest,

1) Germany: 80m pop'n, Russia + Brazil: 340m pop'n

2) Germany per capita income c$41k, Russia, Brazil per capital income c$8.5k (before the recent commodity price collapses that hit both Russia & Brazil hard)

3) Transparency international corruption index - Germany 12th in the world, Brazil 69th, Russia 136th.

4) By less developed country standards, internet access is very widely available in Russia (70% of population) and Brazil (60%)

So, in summary, there's more Russians & Brazilians, they are driven by worse economic prospects, they have internet access, and their respective states are less able or less willing to enforce the rule of law.

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US government pushing again on encryption bypass

Ledswinger
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Re: Whenever this issue comes back to the table

Does it have to be only 1%?

It would be a start. Maybe we could have them executed in the North Korean style with flamethrowers, antiaircraft guns and the like, whilst the other TLA donut eaters are forced to watch.

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Volkswagen blames emissions cheating on 'chain of errors'

Ledswinger
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Re: Though one might reasonably expect

It's no more complex than filling the screenwash.

This is the Reg forums, well informed fact is NOT welcome here!

Look at the two previous commentards hissing and spitting at each other in a fine display of mutual ignorance. And now you've spoilt it.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Is VW the sacrificial lamb

VW is an uppity German company making inroads and apparently not greasing the right hands.

Bears defecate in woods et al. The politicisation and petty nationalism of US regulators is well known (and certainly not unique to the US). If VW wanted a piece of the US car market, then they knew the official rules - and the unofficial one that when furrin companies are caught breaking the rules, they have the book thrown at them). In part that's an occupational hazard of doing business in the US, and applies to all foreign companies, regardless of their foreign domicile or their market. But in this particular case VW should have evaluated the consequences of being caught cheating, and understood that the consequences would be public shame and a big fat fine, probably in the low multi-billion dollar range. One thing they might have also assumed would be lost sales and brand damage, but a quick google suggests that those apply more in Europe than the US.

So on balance, VW a sacrificial lamb? Nope. Just a reckless company who decided to try and outwit the regulators regardless of the likely consequences.

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Microsoft to OneDrive users: We're sorry, click the magic link to keep your free storage

Ledswinger
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Re: Oh Microsoft,@ Roq D. Kasba

You are a good company, you produce some decent software

Actually, "no" and "no" respectively. But the rest of your post was spot on.

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Motorola’s X Force awakens a seemingly ‘shatterproof’ future

Ledswinger
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Re: Obvious (or stupid) question..

Same reason they don't make aircraft out of the same material as the black box that always survives.....

Whatever that is.

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Ledswinger
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Re: More Apple screens?

Or are Apple device owners more careless?

Not a statistical sample, but I see a lot more Androids carried in flip cover cases, and Apple phones in cover-less back shells, or no cover at all. To be fair to Apple owners, they've paid for what they consider to be premium design, no point in covering that up. For us Android types, there's only a tiny fraction that you'd call designs worth showing off.

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Ledswinger
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OK, so how does the glass "work"?

A very interesting read, but it doesn't really explain how they've made it (apparently) shatterproof. My experience of glass is that it does shatter, and having layers (eg on a windscreen), toughening (windscreen, gorilla glass), still won't stop it shattering.

So what's the special sauce here?

Mutter, mutter, call this a tech web site, going to cancel my subscription, mutter, grumble.....etc

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Adobe: We locked our customers in the cloud and out poured money

Ledswinger
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Re: "things have clearly settled down"@ Pascal Monett

I never thought I'd read a post on the Reg, and think "what an incredibly eloquent prose, its almost a work of beauty in itself". But today is that day.

Note to any prospective grammar nazis: Grammar is for nazis.

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Mozilla backs away from mobile OS as Android looks invincible

Ledswinger
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Both mobile OS' have humongous lead over everyone else that nobody can catch

At one time Nokia had a humungous lead that nobody could catch, along with what (at the time) was an adequately populated app and media store, accompanied by the best mapping and navigation.

The market is fickle, loyalty is uncertain, and contracts last at most two years. Apple is a brand, with some TLC it will endure. Android is used because its (by most people's reckoning) the best cheap alternative. Who is locked in to Android by the ecosystem, by media libraries, or by the brand?

Android leads the market only because nobody gives away anything better. Corporate history says that markets don't predict innovation, but that it always does happen, and incumbents usually don't see it until too late. Think about all the great "has been" names on the big IT tombstone. One day Android and Google will be on that stone.

How long until that happens I wouldn't hazard a guess, nor whether the name Microsoft will appear on the stone before or after Android.

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Ledswinger
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Re: "This depressing picture"? Aye right...

This depressing picture

I thought you meant the picture of the fox having a shit that heads up the article. It looks a bit constipated and angry, although I'm not sure it's that depressing.

But like Brer Fox, I too had an unshiftable dreadnought the other week, and that wasn't good for my temperament either. And most of you wouldn't have liked a picture.

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Tablet computer zoom error saw plane fly 13 hours with 46cm hole

Ledswinger
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Re: Errr..clarification

"at altitude the baggage holds aren't (to my understanding at least) pressurised anyway."

If the hold were unpressurised then the cabin floor would collapse into the hold (building a flat sided pressure vessel is quite feasible, but it would be too heavy for commercial aircraft). And all the cans and bottles in hold baggage would leak or explode. I think what you are getting at is that the main cylindrical pressure vessel doesn't reach the full length of the external fuselage, and you can have unpressurised holds in the tail sections.

However, I followed the link in the article to read the provisional incident report (nice, short readable, have a look) and it covers all of this. The aircraft experienced no abnormal pressurisation indications, but the data shows the cabin air outflow valve automatically reduce its outflow to compensate for the faster reduction in pressure due to the breach. So yes, it did affect cabin air loss, but the rate of air loss was luckily within the capabilities of the automated pressurisation systems. Interestingly the pilots knew they'd run out of runway, but the report doesn't indicate that they told Miami control, who could have checked the security cameras that showed a strike, or ordered a physical investigation that would have found three damaged lights. This whole incident wouldn't have taken much to have been a whole lot worse - eg if the air pressure had widened the tear and the loss rate gone beyond the capabilities of the system, the aircraft could have depressurised mid Atlantic.

So the usual incident report:

Part A, No fatalities due to blind luck,

Part B, Trust machines, not meatsacks.

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Ledswinger
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Errr..clarification

Article says the flight reached Doha without problems, but that the tear breached the pressure hull. Assuming the clowns in the cockpit neither saw the looming end of the runway, and didn't hear the noise of lights hitting fuselage and landing gear, wouldn't the pressurisation systems have warnings that the rate of air loss is abnormal compared to normal leakage?

It's not a big tear, but the pressure differential at cruising altitude is going to be what, 10,000m equivalent, so the air ought to be whistling out, unless aircraft are much, much more leaky than I'd expect.

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Still running IE10? Not for long, says Microsoft

Ledswinger
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Re: Edge is hardly an alternative

This is just yet another poorly written piece of clickbait.

We're both here, so it worked. Not much point in complaining about it, when you knew in advance what to expect?

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Ledswinger
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Re: How many corporate pages will break

local government (councils) and NHS will probably be on IE8 still for various "legacy" reasons,....One risk assessment and we're stuck on IE8 indefinitely.

Only so long as the risk assessment includes a caveat that the board of the council/trust acknowledges and underwrites the security and data risks and potential penalties of running obsolete and unsupported software.

Then again, its the public sector, stick your fingers in your ears, and join in with me: "Lalalaa-alalala..alalala..alalalaaalalaaaaa".

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US State Department sicko pleads guilty to sextortion from UK embassy

Ledswinger
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Re: ummm...@James O'Shea

Personally, I think that it'd be a lot more fun to tattoo 'my name is Bashar Hafez al-Assad', in Farsi, on his forehead and parachute him into downtown Tehran

As Iran and Syria are (by regional standards at least) allies, I don't think that would have the outcome you imply. Now, if you parachuted him into most other regional capitals then the results might be a bit more messy.

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EU governments reach agreement on passenger name data

Ledswinger
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Re: Good start

the article specifically says ......serious crime.

Meaning what? For local councils, putting your rubbish in the wrong bin is a serious crime. For road safety groups, speeding is a serious crime. For left-leaning liberals, simply using selected words is a serious crime. For HMRC, tax avoidance is something treated as a crime (unless you're a big US corporation, in which case HMRC will happily wave it through).

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Eurocrats deserve to watch domestic telly EU-wide, say Eurocrats

Ledswinger
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Re: Or the better way

I'd be more than willing to send the BBC a couple pictures of some dead presidents each month to access to iPlayer.

I suspect selling individual programmes would be relatively expensive to enable and collect, and if you wanted access to all BBC content then you'd be looking at the sort of telly tax that funds UK public service broadcasting, and that's actually somewhere around $16 a month.

In technical terms you certainly can set up micropayment options, and buy your chosen programme for a couple of bucks, but if you look at almost any regular subscription service (be that phones, streaming music, movie services, cable etc) the lower bound for monthly payments is about $8-15 depending on the service. There's a tiny number of exceptions, but at lower monthly payment levels, it is generally uneconomic to establish and operate full function billing, collection (including forex and banking), and customer service function, and since (outside the UK) this would be purely commercially the cost base needs to cover marketing, customer acquisition and retention activities.

Let's assume the BBC could identify $4 of UK-specific costs they wouldn't charge to international subscribers - would you really pay $12 each and every month for full access to iPlayer?

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Enraged Brits demand Donald Trump UK ban

Ledswinger
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Re: Note to El Reg:

nobody stays clean, and nobody enjoys it.

What say you, here in the cesspit of the comment forums? I say you doth protest too much.

However, in stead of banning Trump on the grounds of what he thinks and says, a far better approach would have been to ban him from entering the UK on the grounds of his hair. I like tabby cats. But wearing one as a wig is just wrong.

Anybody care to start a Downing Street petition that "Donald J Trump be banned from entry to the United Kingdom on the ground of his persistent and heinous crimes against hair styling"?

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Kill Flash Now: 78 bugs patched in latest update

Ledswinger
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Re: Sigh...

Far too many sites demand to use Flash

Because web designers are as bright as Donald J Trump.

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Dailymotion hit by malvertising attack as perpetrators ‘up their game'

Ledswinger
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Re: Defence

how do we make ourselves look like a security researcher, honeypot or web crawler?

Problem is that you then become the target for different malware, seeking to infiltrate those targets.

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Day 2: UK research network Janet still being slapped by DDoS attack

Ledswinger
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Re: The attackers aren't very bright if they are after money

"UK universities are not exactly awash with spare cash"

Bwaahahahahhahahhahaaa! You really believe that? All the ones I know are all busy building like termites to accommodate yet more students, with each student immersing themselves in vast amounts of debt, mostly handed to the university. Maybe you could follow this link and come back and tell us how you still conclude that universities are cash starved, and unable to make ends meet?

http://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/news/universities-make-%C2%A330billion-thanks-to-tuition-fees/

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Microsoft Lumia 950 and 950XL: Clear thoughts of Continuum with a snazzy camera

Ledswinger
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mostly great hardware, now need the software to catch up

The first release of Windows Mobile was April 2000, fifteen and a half years ago. How many more decades will Microsoft need to catch up?

On current progress, by the time Microsoft have a credible and full functional phone OS, Apple will be offering a a neural interface from an earring.

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

Ledswinger
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Could have been a winner...

....if they'd put Android on it.

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Russian "Pawn Storm" expands, rains hell on NATO, air-gapped PCs

Ledswinger
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Re: Well done NATO!

techniques such as fuzzing are the way to go

Nothing wrong with that as a testing method, but it doesn't take away the fact that the code should be properly written and inputs properly constrained. If you think about the core OS and application vulnerabilities, a huge proportion of these are buffer mismatches, integer overflows, or string format risks. These are almost all because underlying code is poorly written without sufficient field validation for both user input and registers. How basic is that? And that's what needs fixing.

<owld git mode>

Back in t'day when I worked on sharp end military systems, the code was written on the basis that at any stage you always handled unexpected input gracefully and securely. And unexpected meant any input or register not within the parameters that the code is intentionally handling. It can be done, I've done it, I'm sure you've done it. But the problem is that commercial software is usually written on the cheap, with cheap or non-existent quality control, and the only fix is rewriting the dodgy bits one line at a time.

</owld git mode>

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Windows Phone won't ever succeed, says IDC

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: I could be a future Microsoft phone customer too

I don't see Android being a desktop replacement... Nor ios.

Why not? As implemented on a phone or tablet perhaps not, but Chrome OS is pretty good as a thin client with some offline capabilities. We've already heard that Google are quietly dragging Chrome and Android together. Apple can do the same thing if they choose.

Microsoft like the idea of a full fat WIndows + Office bloatware install on a phone because that supports what they want to sell, rather than because that's either what the market wants, or what is the best technical solution.

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