* Posts by Ledswinger

4576 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

Amazon's chomping at the Brits: UK to get AWS data center region

Ledswinger
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Re: Quicker to re-org than build a datacenter, also network

and probably have all sorts of hedging strategies that give them an effective price well under that of retail.

I work in the energy sector, I can assure you that your presumptions are right about big power consumers purchasing wholesale and hedging themselves are 100% right. But that actually makes my argument stronger because these big consumers are exposed to the full heat of the wholesale power market, and (again, unlike domestic users) they take the full pain of DNO charging structures. You can hedge, but that costs money, and in the long term it has to net off - a bit like domestic car insurance, that on a long term basis has to cover the average claim cost and turn a profit for the insurer).

The price they pay may or may not be under the retail level, the key driver is the profile of their demand. If data centre demand had a similar load profile to overall electricity system demand, they'd pay a very similar price to retail, if they have flat demand curve its a lot cheaper, if they can bias usage to off peak then they'll have really cheap power.

That is, until the ever growing renewable generation inputs start to become the wholesale price setter. Then your wholesale price becomes partially randomised, and any fixed demand profile is worth less than a responsive demand profile. So you'd get much cheaper average power prices for a data centre that agreed to stop running when there was no wind, for example, but the overall economics of that data centre might be a real problem for the owners.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Quicker to re-org than build a datacenter, also network

Maybe they they have some clever idea about how to power it.

Probably doesn't matter that much, unless there's places with similar low latency high bandwidth connectivity AND cheaper grid power - and if there were then that's where you'd build your data centre.

UK energy policy is intentionally pushing end user prices ever upwards (eg the ridiculous price that our clueless government are offering for Hinkley Point C, the vastly inflated "feed in tariffs" for crappy solar PV, and the various subsidies for wind), and for this reason alone electricity costs will climb year on year for the forseeable future, regardless of wholesale gas, coal or oil prices. But so long as all competing data centres are subject to the same costs, it just becomes a pass through to the DC customers.

There's a few things you can do to reduce DC energy costs, like running your standby generators across peak demand periods, bidding into capacity and auxiliary services markets, but this usually means giving control of your standby plant to somebody else, could become a diversion from the core business, involves far more regular cycling of the engines with impacts on maintenance costs and reliability. If you're running a Tier 4 data centre, the chances of this really affecting your uptime are really, really low, but why go to all the trouble of export connections and metering to make what is a fairly paltry additional income? It'd be like connecting your car alternator output to an inverter and selling it to the grid - entirely feasible, an additional income on an asset your already own, but really not worth the effort.

Something AWS and the big boys can do to reduce power costs is load shift less critical tasks onto data centres elsewhere that aren't in peak power periods, but the task needs to be suitable for high latency, and if you're taking tasks out of a data centre then it has an impact on technical and financial asset utilisation.

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AMD sued: Number of Bulldozer cores in its chips is a lie, allegedly

Ledswinger
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Re: 80286?

Kids of today, no historical perspective.

Then they grow up and become politicians.

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UK government looks to harness the potential of open data through APIs

Ledswinger
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did a government employee finally understand something genuinely important about people's data?

Indeed he did. But he didn't say who would pocket the extracted value. Do you think it will be:

1) You and me?

2) Some shitty offshore outsourcer being paid to do not much?

3) Some big data company that gets our data, and makes a mint for its Yank shareholders whilst paying no UK corporation tax?

My bet is on 3.

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Cops' IT too complex for quick and dirty revamp – Police ICT boss

Ledswinger
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Re: Apart from the fact

Apart from the fact That speed camera fines are not retained by the police.

Read the detail. The local plods can pocket up to £100 markup on speed awareness courses. Bedfordshire's dimmest think that they'll be policing by consent by setting the speed traps to 1 mph or less over the posted limit and collecting vast income from the M1. Those who don't qualify for a speed awareness courses will pay the usual fines in the usual way.

The curious thing is the fact that the Flatfoot in Chief thinks that (a) people won't react and slow down, so the income ceases, and (b) that this will do no harm to their reputation.

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TalkTalk claims 157,000 customers were victims of security breach

Ledswinger
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Re: Jump on the sinking ship now!

Are you sure that Class Actions don't exist in the UK?

In context of the TalkTalk hack, yes I am sure class actions don't exist. The linked article does explain that class actions can exist for breaches of competition law, but even then need the rubber stamp of the Competition Appeal Tribunal (one of the zillion quangos that somehow missed out on Dave's bonfire of the quangos).

What's more, under UK law, the loser is generally liable for the costs of the winner. This means that for a class action to go ahead, the claimants need to be able to show that they can pay the costs of the defendant. Even if TalkTalk could be prosecuted through class action, who would be willing to try taking them on if they put an expensive combination of Slaughter & May, Herbert Smith, and Brick Court Chambers on the job? If the claimants lost they could have to fork out several million quid between them. If you get enough claimants willing to stake (say) £50 each, then it might be low risk, but what if only 1,000 people joined the class action, and they were risking having to pony up £2,000 each?

This "my dog is bigger than your dog" approach is how the big banks avoid being sued left right and centre for their fraudulent behaviour; It works, and government only intervene in the most egregious of cases like PPI extortion.

In the US legal system each side to bear their own costs regardless of outcome, and that's a major contributor to the fact that everybody is suing everybody.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Jump on the sinking ship now!

before the information commissioner and private lawsuits tear the place apart.

You wish. But in the UK class actions don't exist, and the burden of proof will be quite difficult for individuals to claim compensation (and anyway, in the UK compensation cannot be punitive as it can in the US). The ICO can only fine them half a million quid. That's small change for a company with turnover of £1.8bn a year.

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TalkTalk may tell investors to tighten belts after cyber incident

Ledswinger
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Re: If I was an investor...

In fairness to TT (and lets face it I've been firm but fair with them to date), pretty well every large company is like that.

Yes, you're right that investors are the owners, they are the people who have to be pleased. But most companies still have at least some form of deference to customer service, to the fact that (absent a monopoly) they need to at least try and keep customers sweet, and treat them with some respect.

In TalkTalk's presentations, customer service is simply a cost to be slashed, and customers are just "accounts", and the inability to keep customers is referred to solely as "churn".

However, I think we'd both agree TalkTalk aren't going to willingly change. However, the Culture Media & Sport Select Committee inquiry into cyber security and data protection has kicked off, so all Commentards might want to submit any respectful and well informed comments here:

http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/culture-media-and-sport-committee/news-parliament-2015/cyber-security-launch-15-16/

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Ledswinger
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Re: If I was an investor...

Her salary is far better spent on some people who know the meaning of damage limitation.

Actually she's done the marketing version of damage limitation, of appearing at every opportunity on the TV, explaining how it wasn't TalkTalk's fault, how evil teenagers laid them low, and how they'll compensate for consequential losses (up to £30.20).

In terms of investor belt-tightening, what the FT refers to as "suspending the interim dividend" is code for the idea that they'll take a big bath provision to cover all of the skeletons in the cupboard, she can then appear apologetic in front of the select committee, point to the suspended dividend and reduced profits, and say they've learned their lesson (even though it wasn't their fault). But then next year she'll be able to say that 2016 results are a big improvement on 2015 and claim a big fat bonus. TalkTalk's investor presentations are quite revealing, all about corporate performance, margin, growth, cost reduction and never anything about customer service.

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UK's internet spy law: £250m in costs could balloon to £2 BILLION

Ledswinger
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@1980s_coder

After all, this is draft legislation at the moment.

And so you think it a sound idea to even draft legislation on the basis of incorrect, incomplete, or simply absent data? That's worked out well before, hasn't it, looking at energy policy, defence procurement, HS2?

This is the usual shit headed policy making by politicians and civil servants spending other people's money. Their pensions are index linked and state guaranteed, they really, genuinely couldn't give a shit about how much their poorly informed, misguided decisions cost the rest of us. And in this case not only are we on the hook for a vast bill, but what we get in return is the biggest assault on civil liberties ever undertaken by a supposedly democratic government.

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GCHQ 'smart collection' would protect MPs from spies, says NSA expert

Ledswinger
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"dooming themselves to failure by bulk acquisition"

Isn't it soooo predictable, that the UK government decide precipitately to do morally the wrong thing, with no public mandate, at great cost, and guarantee failure up front?

Nothing has been left to chance on this.

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UK's super-cyber-snoop shopping list: Internet data, bulk spying, covert equipment tapping

Ledswinger
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Re: Cautiously optimistic

Be polite now, being rude doesn't advance your valid point

I didn't think that calling the OP a government lickspittle was being rude, more a matter of record.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Cautiously optimistic

This is vastly better than previous Bills, and based on May's statement I am cautiously optimistic

Speak for yourself, government lickspittle.

This is the sort of behaviour that for years we've known to be the province of totalitarian regimes like East German and North Korea. I don't need to read 200+ pages of poorly written rubbish to know that this is a mad, bad and stupid idea, from mad, bad, and stupid people.

If that pasty faced rich boy and his boot faced home secretary thinks they are going to solve anything by spying on the entire population, then it only shows even more what a pair of vacuous twerps they both are. I don't want my government spying on me and everybody else just in case the police, taxman or bunglers of local government think it might be useful. I don't buy all this "terrible, terrible threats" nonsense that the security services peddle.

I don't believe it to be the case, but if not being able to spy on my computer use hinders the plods, maybe that's the price of freedom.

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Opera Jon's sparkling Vivaldi proves the browser isn't dead

Ledswinger
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Re: Welcome back

The financing is covered in the article

Alright. Alright! I admit, it was in the article, I didn't read it properly. But I did read all of it. It just didn't sink in.

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Ledswinger
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Welcome back

...but how are we paying for this? I know it is beta at the moment, but in a world of "free" browsers I can't see Jon von T being able to charge real money, and if not, then how will his company survive? Am I the product again, and if so, to what extent?

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Hi, um, hello, US tech giants. Mind, um, mind adding backdoors to that crypto? – UK govt

Ledswinger
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Poor Dave.

I often wonder what made the blue-rinsed twerps of the Parliamentary Conservative Party back that clown Cameron. Then I see how the Labour party sold their soul to rictus Tony and had a hangover afterwards, allowed Gordo the Idiot to become king, and then buggered up their own leadership election arrangements such that a scruffy, Britain-hating marxist now "leads" them.

I think the best solution for the state of British democracy would be to round up all the MPs who have sat in the past two decades, and hand them over to DEFRA to be gassed.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Mathematics...

whenever politicians mastered mathematics?

Unfortunately they're all Oxbridge arts graduates who couldn't recite their three times table. And as a result, all the really important things that government could do get done wrong or not all, and all the things that governments should never do become a central purpose.

This also explains the mutually contradictory nature of almost all government policies.

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The $53bn 'startup': Hewlett Packard Enterprise begins life

Ledswinger
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Re: HP : Where the parts are worth 100% less than th sum

I now work for Hewlett Packard Enterprise....And other point is I am literally amazed how well the split 'appears' to have gone. No internal disruption that I've noticed, everything has continued to work, etc.

I'm an end user at one of HPE's large enterprise customers, and you're quite right, nothing's changed. We get the same shit, expensive, unresponsive service we had before, the same laughable first line offshore support, the same one-sided approach to delivering the bits of the SLA that benefit HP. Well done to all of you!

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Here's how TalkTalk ducked and dived over THAT gigantic hack

Ledswinger
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Isn't it about time TalkTalk just held their hands up and accepted they were stupid, apologise properly and give a detailed explanation of what went wrong.

Ladies & Gentlemen, I offer you incontrovertible proof that aliens both exist, and live amongst us here on planet Earth. The look like us, they sound like us, but they are still struggling to understand how and why things work as they do.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Let's try to weather the storm

And the gamble's paid off.

Only so far. According to one of the Reg hosted whitepapers on data breaches, the average cost of a data breach (investigation, resolution, restitution, trust winback campaigns, lost business) is over £100 per record. If that plays out true to form for TalkTalk, then this is a £100m+ hit. I have a suspicion that because of the high churn rate in telecoms reselling, and the vast publicity this has had that the costs to TalkTalk could easily be a lot higher. They've just had to pull all their marketing campaigns, and those are probably contractually committed costs, so they won't be seeing their money back, and that will affect customer acquisition rates. The sales teams are (hopefully!) sitting on their arses waiting for a phone to ring (and hopefully, again) when it does ring, its a wrong number or a scammer asking if they've been missold PPI.

I was subject to data breach by the incompetent fuckers at a Dixons Carphone subsidiary a few months back. Funny isn't it that the chairman of both Dickhead Carphone plc and of TalkTalk plc is Charles Dunstone? Could it be that he fosters a "think of the money" culture that puts short term profits ahead of customers every time?

I'd like to nominate Dunstone for a board position with Thomas Cook - they appear to have the same values.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Why Is Dido Harding Still in a Job?

Why Is Dido Harding Still in a Job?

She's not going to willingly walk away from a job where she got paid £7m last year just to inadequately oversee a collection of outsourced and offshored peasants, is she? And if she won't go willingly, who's going to sack her, the makeweights and free lunchers of the non-executive directors of TalkTalk? I think not.

The question is, why are you still paying your share of Ms Harding's vastly inflated remuneration? Terminate your contract with them, citing the Supply of Goods and Services Act 1982, and their failure to deliver the service with reasonable care and skill, offering as prima facie evidence the details of the call you had, and the fact that IT data breaches have been going on since at least 2007 but are readily avoided by the application of reasonable care and skill.

I can't see you having much joy with TalkTalk's infamously useless call centres, so probably better to do it as letter to Ms Harding herself at the registered office. She'll never see it, but a flunky will point it in the right direction. They can't dispute your claim using their T&C because statute law trumps the terms of any contract, and then their only grounds for dispute is to claim that a breach of over 1.1m customer records does count as reasonable care and skill, which won't stand up in the small claims court if that's where this goes. Here's a starter for ten:

https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/consumer/template-letters/letters/problems-with-services/letter-to-end-contract-due-to-poor-work-and-lost-faith/

Or rather than letter, offer them notice of termination for the above reasons on one of their social media forums. That way it's all in public view, and the press will be reading it.

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Cash injection fuels SABRE spaceplane engine

Ledswinger
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Re: Someone's been watching

That was my first thought, but you beat me to it.

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Food, water, batteries, medical supplies, ammo … and Windows 7 PCs

Ledswinger
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Re: Linux, still not the way

I can confirm that OpenSUSE install is just point and click

Honest question: Really, really point and click? Or mostly point and click but then needing a couple of obscure console entries using a command line interface last fashionable in 1986?

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Vodafone UK blocks 1,800 accounts after 'external source' accesses accounts

Ledswinger
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Vodeafone have a disgraceful website

Ahh yes, but they differentiate themselves by combining their crummy, unhelpful web site with the worst, most useless IVR telephone menus in the world. These ensure that unless you know the magic combination, you'll never, ever be able to speak to a person.

Vodafone are almost as customer-phobic as Microsoft.

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SeaMeWe-3 submarine cable spur borked until November 10th

Ledswinger
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so it carries more than the usual level of traffic

So what you're saying is that Ozzie grumble mining has worn the cable through from the inside out?

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Linus Torvalds fires off angry 'compiler-masturbation' rant

Ledswinger
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beaten into Microsoft software people "Make money at all cost!

Well, Windows 10 says the beatings didn't work.

I've no doubt that if MS had been taken private by somebody like Silverlake (a private equity outfit focussed on IT for those not familiar) then W10 would have been very different, would have been a winner, and we'd (happily) have been reaching for our wallets because no way on this planet would it have been free.

Maybe I'm alone on that, but on balance I would have payed for W10 if it had worked. So a choice of a pure tiles'n'apps or W7 menus according to my choice, ideally some new whizzy tech to justify the price (that is, not crapware like Cortana), no spyware, better security (including a complete ban on security ground-zeroes like Flash) and all for a cost of around thirty quid.

But Microsoft don't see this. W10 will be rammed down our throats (and when pressure doesn't work, they'll just end-of-life W8 to force us), but speaking for myself, I can smell a couple of things. One is the smell of decay (I thing somewhere Redmond way), and the other thing I can smell is mint. Linux Mint. I'm not there yet, but Microsoft are pushing and pushing, and eventually my patience will give way. I just needed to replace a domestic laptop, and I've ordered a Chromebook. I know that's Google spyware, but the point is that it's the first non-Microsoft computer in this household in nigh on thirty years.

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Get 'em out for the... readers: The Sun scraps its online paywall

Ledswinger
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Re: I've never understood why Murdoch is so hated

I am not sure he is "hated" all that widely: the left-wing commentariat make a disproportionate noise.

Don't be so judgmental! As somebody far enough to the right to despise David Cameron as a ghastly plutocratic liberal, could I (again) put on record that I hate Turdoch?

And not just the wrinkly old scrote himself, but his ghastly offspring, and his ghastly editorial and management staff.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Newspaper websites

The really interesting thing with newspaper actual paper circulation vs their websites is that the websites are more popular because of two factors:

Don't forget international reach. I suspect that the browser stats include a heck of a lot of international traffic from Oz and the US, to judge by both the content that the Graun hosts and some of the comments.

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Ledswinger
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the Independent ........ Looks and loads even worse than the re-styled Grauniad.

That, Sir, is not possible. The Graun has degenerated into a sort of amateur-curated news aggregating blog (although I don't mind, if that's what they want to do with it).

The Indy is a far more painful loss. Remember at launch, it was a fresh voice, a broadsheet with gravitas and indeed an independent voice. Now it's just another shitty tabloid, owned by a Russian oligarch.

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Ledswinger
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disappointing that I still can't read Private Eye (with a subscription) online.

I thought the physical presentation of Eye was part of the core proposition. Like you, I am a man of high literature, although my preference is Viz. That too suffers from the same challenge of the paper copy being the real McCoy, and the screen version not quite making the grade.

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Top cops demand access to the UK's entire web browsing history

Ledswinger
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Re: "though the Home Office tell me ...

Well why do they want it then?

In the hope that it will provide circumstantial evidence that the Clown Prosecution Service can then misrepresent in court against targeted individuals, whether they are guilty of something or not. Worked during Operation Ore, didn't it?

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TalkTalk downplays extent of breach damage, gives extra details

Ledswinger
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If she's "only worried about our customers"...

Then why is she trying to minimise the breach:

Less than 1.2 million customer email addresses, names and phone numbers

That's 2-3% of the adult population of the UK, I'd say that was a significant breach.

As for the 15-20k poor beggars whose date of birth and bank account details have been spewed, that might be small number (of little people) for the Baroness, but it'd be quite a big crowd if they turned up at her office to have a word.

So, state of play on the past few months of data breaches in the UK:

TalkTalk = Incompetent wankers

Carphone Warehouse = Incompetent wankers

British Gas = Incompetent wankers

All other companies = ?

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Chrome OS is not dead, insists Google veep in charge of Chrome OS

Ledswinger
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WSJ in "knows nothing and doesn't do research" shocker!

Lets not forget WSJ is part of the Turdoch empire, famed for its high journalistic standards, for example at the News of the World.

We can't the old buzzard croak? I'm going to crack open a beer in celebration when he does.

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Deutsche Bank to axe 'excessively complex' IT, slash 9,000 jobs

Ledswinger
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Re: Oh yeah...

Remember: work outsourced is work not done. So just save the money and don't do it.

Too late. Deutsche Bank signed an infrastructure deal with HP in February.

HP provide my company's infrastructure, desktop & support. Standard of service is bloody diabolical, and our poor IT is a major competitive advantage for those competitors who have been sold snake oil by outsourcers. Unsurprisingly to everybody (except the C-level halfwits) is the fact that the cost of our baseline services increased, and to keep total IT costs within the allowed cost profile, we've had to slash the IT projects budget. So our HP-delivered cost saving is in net terms delivering less, and to a lower standard than our previous in source arrangements.

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How Microsoft will cram Windows 10 even harder down your PC's throat early next year

Ledswinger
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Re: I hope this works

You have to actively uninstall a number of previous updates and hide them when they re-appear in order to be safe from the malicious downloads.

Do they give up if you install W10, and then use the 30 day window to revert to your previous system? Logically they'd give up at that point.....but then, I suppose that won't apply with a company that only cares about itself.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Linux is working for me.

And it seems to be pot luck whether Adobe Flash content works or not.

Another thing the Clowns of Redmond got wrong. Had W10 completely blocked rubbish like Flash, it would have irritated a few people, but very quickly web sites would have dumped Flash, and it could be consigned more quickly to the rubbish bin of history, where it is slowly (too slowly) heading. In fact, W10 should have been designed to be incompatible with all Adobe software, bar none.

That would have been the biggest single security improvement in Windows history. Instead we get Cortana, and a greater services attack surface, and STILL THE FUCKERS HAVEN'T FIXED THE START MENU.

Out of curiosity, does anybody round here know whether MS monitor blogs, news sites and social media? And if they do, do they simply ignore all the negatives, and then use the (few?) positives to reinforce the bizarre decisions they keep taking?

I can understand that if they did listen to the web, they'd be so depressed they'd get signed off work, so maybe they ignore user views for Health & Safety reasons.

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Open data not a replacement for FOI - Shadow digital minister

Ledswinger
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Re: Sir Humphrey wins again

How could government function if we had any chance of finding out about it's dirty dealings and general inefficiency?

And then they wonder why people are increasingly disaffected by the mainstream political parties, and assorted alternative visions are becoming more popular - be that Corbyn, Farage, Sturgeon.

With the Liberal Democrats annihilated, the Labour party unable to understand whether to follow or fight Corbyn, the last survivors of the traditional parliamentary plutocracy are Cameron's Conservative party. Despite managing a bare 12 seat majority against a disorganised Labour rabble still hamstrung by their prior fiscal ineptitude, Cameron continues with old and new policies that are both stupid and unpopular, that simply gild the lily of discontent, broadening the disconnect between the political classes and the electorate.

I'm not sure what can be done to get through to 1%'ers like Cameron (or for that matter the remnants of New Labour), other than to actively vote for one of the upstart parties. A starter for this will be the EU referendum, where the British establishment, the Yanks, Brussels, and even the Chinese want us to remain part of the EU. By definition none of these centres of power (including Westminster) act for this country or in its best interests, so it'll be a "no" vote from me.

As for others, I wouldn't presume to canvass, other than to observe that at the next general election, a vote for Labour, Liberal Democrat or Conservative is a vote for the Snoopers Charter, and more secretive government by the few for the few. I suspect that if enough people made alternative votes the outcome could be chaotic for some years, if that's what it takes to reform the complacent oppressive thievery of the mainstream political parties, then bring on the chaos.

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Safe Harbor 2.0: Judges to keep NSA spying in check – EU justice boss

Ledswinger
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Re: True Worth

Any agreement with mericun's is not worth the bog roll it is printed on.

That evidently includes their own constitution. I propose the thirty fourth amendment to the sacred document:

Now wash your hands.

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GCHQ starts hunt for tech-savvy apprentices

Ledswinger
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a few years back the starting salary for a grad was something like 22k.

Aldi's graduate scheme pays a starting whack of £42k, and at the end of every day their graduates can go home knowing they've done a fair days work, and not undermined democracy.

But let's be realistic. GCHQ know their offer is pitiful, but what they're hoping to get is some pointy heads, people who are exceptionally clever, exceptionally focused, but so narrow in their outlook that they neither know nor care that GCHQ are paying not much above the "living wage", and indifferent to the societal impact of their work so long as they get to play all day with computers.

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Ledswinger
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and questionable morals when it comes to respecting other peoples privacy.

To be fair, I think you need to differentiate between the junior oiks, most of whom simply believe the official line about "protecting the country", and whose crime is simple naivety, and the more senior people, who know that what is being done is an affront to democracy. That latter category includes whining DCI Andrew Gould, now jointly famous for his lack of success in tackling cybercrime and his thin skin.

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Northrop wins $55bn contract for next-gen bomber – as America says bye-bye to B-52

Ledswinger
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Re: B52s/B2s...

as in the 2001 air attacks that helped drive the Taliban out of power in Afghanistan

Up to a point and temporarily, as it now appears.

I would agree that the air force softened up and supported, but the only reason that the Taliban were temporarily removed from power was actually the grunts on the ground taking and holding territory. About 5,000 allied soldiers didn't come back, and in excess of 20,000 were wounded, which shows the limits of air power even for the richest country on the planet, with the most heavily armed and technologically advanced military on the planet.

Doesn't look like all that high glamour air power was too effective fighting against a bunch of bearded rag heads, mostly armed with improvised explosive devices, carrying a light machine gun designed seventy years ago, and some propelled grenades designed fifty five years ago.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Just remember...

where they were bombing the hell out of commies in Vietnam

Ineffectually, whilst also raining napalm on civilians, and spraying dioxins all over the environment in the bizarre defoliation programme.

for me the B52 is the image of American power,

Errr... the US was kicked out of Vietnam, so that's not really a good image of American power, is it? And arguably the B52 plus B1 and B2 didn't stop the US getting kicked out of Afghanistan or Iraq (ignoring the token forces still there), didn't help deter the Russians in Ukraine, and have been largely ineffectual in defeating IS. On the basis of the evidence, the new bomber is a pointless piece of military bling, a bit like the Ford class carriers and my own country's QE class carriers.

Now, given that the US government spend more than they take in tax, to the tune of $10,000 dollars per second, or thereabouts, how will they afford this new toy?

http://www.usdebtclock.org/

I'm sorry if this comes across as anti-US, it isn't intended to be. Your and my government have virtually indistinguishably stupid foreign and defence policies, and because both of our countries have entrenched political classes they repeat the same expensive mistakes time and again, whilst enthusiastically spending money that our children will have to repay (in addition to any student debt our kids may start their careers soaked in). Spending money on assets that really defend your interests is a good thing. Spending money on exporting death-from-the-sky to distant lands doesn't pass that test in my book.

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Cops use terror powers to lift BBC man's laptop after ISIS interview

Ledswinger
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Re: "Yes, go on kiddies, mod me down"

Ad hominem - the usual response of the those of the left leaning persuation.

As a self appointed representive of the libertarian right, could I join in to even things up by saying that you Boltar, have dug yourself a pit and kept on digging, and there's a plaque at the bottom that says (in its politest form) "Boltar is a Berk". Is that sufficiently ad hominem enough?

Spying on journalists or snatching their data is the work of the Stasi, past and present. Regardless of who journalists are speaking to, I don't want the bumbling flatfeet and Sturmbahnfuhrer May to have their grasping hands on it. These are the people who maintain that the unlawful killing of Jean Charles de Menezes, and that the subsequent parody of an inquest was an acceptable cost of our "freedom". Not in my name, mate.

Moreover, why do the police need to snatch journalistic data? If the police weren't so bloody inept, they'd already know who the putative jihadis were. FFS they've got enough powers to intercept and store our communications, CCTV on every street corner, recording of cell phone tower attachments and ANPR movements, etc etc. If an essentially one man band journalist can find himself a handful of bearded lunatics, why can't the entire resources of state do a better job, without having to seize journalists data, potentially endangering intermediary contacts, the journalist himself, and press reporters trying to cover extremist activity around the world?

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IBM splashing $2bn on Weather Company – reports

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Namely that correlating data and identifying trends isn't the same as delivering pertinent and meaningful insights to any given user in an open-ended userbase.

So, in English: The weather forecast will still be shit, but great for extrapolating scary climate change forecasts to back up the hair shirt brigade.

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Ex-Microsoft craft ale buffs rattle tankard for desktop brewery

Ledswinger
Silver badge
Pint

Re: Doesn't look that hassle free

thats exactly why its better to use polypins for storing it

Nooooooooo! You mean you store your beer in a plastic bag?

I could forgive a rigid food grade plastic pressure barrel, but CO2 injectors, plastic baggers, instant beer making machines.....the end times are upon us.

You deserve a Party 7 of Watneys Red Barrel.

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Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Will it fit...

next to the bread maker you no longer use

The bread maker in this household gets plenty of use. In fact its the second we've had, and I've worn out at least five of the mix/bake pans. One of mankind's finer achievements, a good bread making machine.

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Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Doesn't look that hassle free

CO2 cylinders etc

CO2 in cylinders? Pray tell, what part does that play in beer (or even cider) making? Bottle conditioning, that's the way.

The messy way, should you make the sort of error I made a few weeks back. The bang was audible in a double glazed house, even though the bottle was in an outbuilding forty feet away. That distinctive BOOOooommmppphh! tinkle tinkle sound whose cause you intuitively know without having to investigate. Lucky it was a single bottle experiment.

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Ledswinger
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If you buy one, you deserve to drink the stuff

A "craft beer" (by which I presume they mean real ale) in 5-7 days? The basic brewing process can be done in that time, you can clear with filtration or chemicals, but what then? Drink the stuff green?

This is a toy for people to lazy to even use an extract based kit. And a toy for people with more money than sense.

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TalkTalk attack: UK digi minister recommends security badges for websites

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Brilliant this, isn't it?

And the shareholders are best people to withhold bonus to CEO, through board of directors.

Sadly not. Most shares are owned directly by institutions, and only indirectly by individuals. You might think it wrong, but (if I had one) I would want my fund manager to be spending far more time on portfolio management than attending AGMs, and a tracker fund may have no active human manager. HFT and algorythmic trading often involves machines buying and selling shares without people in the owning company even knowing. The few activist investors tend to identify a weak company, call up a coalition of investors (their mates, natch) and then step in a force changes, but this is the exception rather than the rule, and there's little empirical evidence that activist investors improve things for customers or regular employees, nor much that they improve corporate behaviours.

Even within a company, it is the remuneration committee (made up of non-exec directors) not shareholders who decide on bonus structures and pay. Things need to be REALLY bad before the remuneration committee act, usually so bad that the shareholders are in open revolt. That's rare because most institutions go with the board proxy, hoping the directors behave.

You'd be right if you conclude that this is a flaw in secondary equity markets, but there's not really much way round it.

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