* Posts by Ledswinger

4411 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

China launches 'pollution-free' rocket

Ledswinger
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@lawndart & Dantium

Thank you. Again, I prostrate myself before you higher beings.

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Ledswinger
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you get better efficiency by not burning cleanly,

Bowing down before the rocket scientists, could I humbly ask why efficiency improves? I follow the logic about keeping combustion temps down, but surely the less efficient the burn, the more fuel & structure weight you're having to lift. Is it really more efficient to lift fuel and then hose a proportion of it out the back end unburnt?

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Microsoft starts to fix Start Menu in new Windows 10 preview

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Not curious

It is still curious though, first that Microsoft could release Windows 10 with a major bug in this critical and sensitive feature, and second that even the fixed version apparently still has a limit.

I beg to differ, I'd say that was Microsoft meeting the low expectations of the world. Notwithstanding the fact that the start menu has been a HUGE intellectual and coding conundrum at Redmond for three years now, nobody really expected them to get it right, did they? We had to go through three versions of Windows 8 before they admitted defeat of a sort, and then they still flunked up with W10, which they filled with ordure like Cortana, and messed up user privacy, and STILL they haven't yet given users back the start menu that they've been asking for since 2011.

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Hutchison will float O2 … as soon as the Three merger is done

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I presumed that the merger would create a single brand; O3.

Bringing together the concept of O3 and their many notspots, there's a better brand name: nOzone

It's even got the w@nky illiterate capitalisation that tells investors "this is a tech sector company", in the same way that random punctuation does. Maybe they could double down and call it nO:Zone

That's have the secondary capital markets gushing to throw money at Cheung Kong.

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MoJ admits to splashing out on 2.3 MILLION Oracle licences

Ledswinger
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Why would Oracle offer a discount, UK publilc sector business is <1% of revenues

Because software licencing has gross margins approaching 100%.

The whole point of software licencing is to sell something that you've previously made and sold before. Faced with a customer who is going to take tens or hundreds of millions of pounds of gross margin away, that costs the supplier nothing to deliver, they'd have to be mad to allow them to walk away, because that converts £xm into £0m. Far better to take £x/2 m.

Strategically Oracle might want to hold out if they think it sets a precedent, but I would guess that commercial customers have a pain threshold that they'll migrate at, and their will be discounts on offer for those willing to call Oracle's bluff. In this case though, we've got civil servants spending the free money that they extract from taxpayers, and they simply don;'t care if they spaff your and my money up the wall - we can't take our tax affairs to another UK government.

And worth noting that Oracle UK made all those sales to government, and yet paid no corporation tax in previous years (and I'd guess nothing has changed). If government were not run by clueless @rseholes, then they'd start a project to run Oracle out of the UK altogether.

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SPACED OUT: NASA's manned Orion podule pushed back to 2023

Ledswinger
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Re: I feel for NASA

I don't have any real faith in the 'reality show colonization' of Mars but I would like to see !someone! on Mars before I die

Build cheap but untested technologies, and man them with criminals.

Letting convicts have Australia (rather than transporting the law abiding there) now looks to have been a mistake from the point of view of the resident Brits, but in this case I don't think Mars is looking the sort of place you could see as a great destination.

In fact, once the rockets have stopped going "bang" or whizzing off course spreading crim DNA across the galaxy we could make Mars a penal colony, and send everybody sentenced to more than six months.

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Oracle: Over here, look over here! At the cloud! No, not at our glum licensing numbers

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Re: Mark Hurd?

You sure? That pair look like the perps who look surly as they get cuffed at the end of Batman move. The evil, designer-leather clad villainess, and the wicked corporate suit.

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'To read this page, please turn off your ad blocker...'

Ledswinger
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They can both...

...fuck right off then. I'm sick of being force fed a diet of flashy, jiggly, obtrusive crapverts for products I don't want. If that onanist Bezos thinks I'm going to tolerate that to access any news content, then he's got another think coming, and likewise Scroogle. Cat videos aren't funny enough to tolerate garbage.

Admittedly the Washington Post isn't aimed at the right side of the pond, but I'm sure Turdoch and his mates are thinking the same thing. The key point here is that newspapers don't own the news anymore, but clearly don't want to recognise that fact.

Oi! Bezos! Shove your newspaper where your Fire tablet had to be shoved!

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It's not broadband if it's not 10 Mbps, says Ovum

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Re: Lies, damned lies, and statistics....

How much would it cost per broadband line to put OpenReach under a universal service obligation to deliver 10Mbps to anyone, anywhere in the UK?

In cash terms, probably not much - a few tens of billions, which is going to be about a third the price of HS2, or about twice the cost of Crossrail or Heathrow R3. The money is readily available for projects like those, or the circa £30bn probable outturn at Hinkley Point C, so one must reason that the money for universal broadband could be found if the will were there.

Given that about half of the cost would be digging holes and filling them in again, our army of circa 1.2m unemployed could be put to good use and costs reduced a tiny bit, but the overall problem is that the actual economic returns on most infrastructure are very low, in fact lower than the cost of capital. Which means that there might be better uses for the money, even if HS2, XR, and H R3 are not among them either.

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Ledswinger
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Re: As I understand it

Broadband isn't specifically related to speed, it's the method of transmission used

Technically that may be true, but the marketing peeps have sold the idea that broadband=high speed internet to the great unwashed.

A more pressing problem than the terminology is the maths of this survey. Average speeds tell you little, since if 99% of the domestic customers got 9.8 Mb/s the country would show a lot worse in such rankings, but relatively few people would be complaining compared to the current situation. I'm on 100 Mbps cable, and in all honesty the difference in normal domestic use and the 10 Mb/s is only observable when downloading gigabytes of data. 4k streaming might make 10 Mb/s inadequate, but I'll worry about that when there's 4k content worth watching, when it's been filmed by somebody who understands what 4k can really do, and when all the viewing devices are compatible. By the time that occurs my eyesight will be so decrepit that I won't be too fussed about the fine grain details.

The leaderboard should be set not by the highest average speed, but by the country with the lowest proportion of customers unable to access sub-par high speed internet, based on actual achieved speeds. We'd still have the issue of arbitrary thresholds, but if the UK wanted to leap close to the top of this survey, on the current method they could simply bribe Virgin Media to put all customers on a 150 Mb/s package, which would probably shift the national average sufficient to lift the average a goodly measure. In fact, if we're just chasing surveys, lets stop bribing BT to connect redneck country dwellers with crummy slow ADSL, because it'd be cheaper for VM to offer paper speed increases in urban areas.

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HP going public on more job cuts, say expectant analysts

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Wow

Go Meg, sack more workers!

http://dilbert.com/strip/1994-01-06

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Attempted bank robber demands cash transfer ... to his own account

Ledswinger
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Re: A bit of a holiday?

Not to get too graphic either but at our advanced years a bit of sex might be nice too.

What, you mean he's so desperate that the prospect of two years "picking the soap up" appeals? Surely there's easier means of getting his oats?

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Disney's light-bulb moment: build TCP into LEDs for IoT comms

Ledswinger
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" PoE can provide >30w over cat5, slightly more over cat6 - so I think this is a great idea"

Don't forget the voltage drop on longer cable runs, and the fact that LEDs are typically quite a reactive load. Even if you've got a couple of zones, you'd need to think about the capabilities of the PSU that's producing the power to go over the ethernet. Much easier to simply use a proper LED driver and real wires.....

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How did jihadists hack into top UK ministerial emails if no security breach took place?

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Probably been said before

But that picture looks like the People's Front of Judea, which might be defeating its intended propaganda purpose. Although I suppose those susceptible to propaganda will be incapable of seeing it that way.

IS is a US-created mess, but clearly beyond the capability of the Yanks and their British poodle to sort out. I say let the Iranians and the Russians go sort it out, in the old fashioned way.

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Jeremy Corbyn wins Labour leadership election

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Re: Congratulations!

Any party that wants to stand up for ordinary people must be completely round the bend.

What on earth makes you think that Corbyn and his cronies will "stand up for ordinary people"? What ordinary people want is jobs, security, a decent standard of living. The Labour party, particularly the left leaning versions, have done nothing but bring misery to the working man, through systematically and repeatedly fucking up the British economy. They've achieved that four times in my life time.

Corbyn's idiot policies guarantee that if he gets into power he'll deliberately repeat the same mistakes as his Labour forefathers, and you can be assured that it won't be the rich who pay for the "workers' paradise" this bearded cretin wants to create. It'll be the ordinary working people of this country, who will have to pay higher taxes, if they're lucky enough to have a job, and when they get to retirement find out that Corbyn's wasted all the money, and there's nothing left to keep them in their old age.

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WinPhone community descends into CANNIBALISM and WOE

Ledswinger
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Re: I too work for a corporate dinosaur

you work for HP don't you

No, but we use them for our IT, and our god-awful customer service, and sense of entitlement are perfectly matched by theirs. It's a match forged in the very fires of hell, and the only thing that keeps our customer facing systems up to date (1) is the fact that we have kept CRM development in house.

Note 1: Not "up to date with customer needs", just "up to date with legal compliance in a heavily regulated sector".

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I too work for a corporate dinosaur

Just like Microsoft we see clever things being innovated and then delivered by other companies, wonder for a couple of years what this might mean, and then fail with a lacklustre me-too offer. We ignore the message of the market, and revamp the product in the direction our directors think it should be taken, and unsurprisingly still nobody will buy it. Our core business remains profitable, but under attack, and we've not invested anything that we could avoid in it. Our bean counters and directors have no stomach for commercial risk, or for backing internal visionaries, having achieved their positions during the gravy years when we could make money just by being us.

It's sooooo dispiriting. HR have a star hand in these sorts of corporate demise, by valuing, recruiting and promoting group-thinkers whose talents are defined by the dominant but declining core business. The mavericks, the inspirers, the doers, they're all unwanted in these wholly avoidable slow motion car crashes. And Finance seem to believe the pointy haired boss maxim of "theoretically, if I cut costs far enough we'll be profitable without selling anything". All new business ideas are harshly judged against the scale of the core business - at my workplace, directors won't consider anything that won't almost immediately generate £10m a year profits. There's a rash focus on acquisitions - the "buy something, buy anything!" model that both Microsoft and HP have followed, leading to overpayment, performance and integration problems and huge writedowns.

Obviously not going to name my own employers, but outside of the tech sector we're busily following this Standardised Model of Corporate Doom (SMoCD).

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Plods waste millions keeping their arses covered and ears open

Ledswinger
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Re: The shadow of government big IT looms...

The idea that this should free up the small research units and institutes from requiring their own costly admin staff for dealing with the day-to-day running. If successful, it was to be rolled out to the other science councils, too.

The logic of combining the support services of the research councils was entirely valid, and other organisations have made improvements in both cost and quality of service by using a shared services approach. For those interested, there is an excellent National Audit Office report on this fiasco that can be found with a quick web search. Key findings were (paraphrasing the findings) that the Research Councils were a bunch of parochial numpties who wouldn't work together, that the costs were underestimated (very little scope change), and the savings overestimated and in particular predicated on unproven procurement savings. The procurement of the project via Fujitsu was a shambles (eg they won the contract despite coming second in the competition), and made the mistake of using an IT company to implement what was basically a business process project.

If the research councils hadn't been such arseholes, the project would have cost about one quarter of the final cost (FFS, the organisations already had systems and processes in place, how can you spend £130m on a back office transaction processing system?). The Research Council bunglers managed to fritter almost £4m just setting up the holding company for the shared service operation. Despite a supposed turnkey contract of about £18m they managed £13m of unbudgeted design and build costs and a further £13m of overspend with Fujitsu, they then spent £11m on "project management".... and so it went on. The most alarming thing is that over and above the (relatively) minimal hardware costs and redundancy costs, all of the costs were staff time. The gross overrun alone (of £50m) is somewhere around 800-1,000 man years of billed effort.

Shared services, done right, is a good, cost effective option. But once the concept crosses the event horizon of the public sector, the costs stretch out towards infinity, schedules extend forever without snapping, and money just falls into the dark, super dense singularity that is "public services".

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Ledswinger
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Re: Cost cutting solution

Why can't we supply them with all the excess,used or last years pantomime outfits...

To judge by the dreadful, ill-fitting, chavvy uniforms that my local force wear, this may already be happening.

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Partially blind albino porn pirate nabbed for £300k bedroom streaming site

Ledswinger
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Benefit fraud is another issue and he deserves time for that.

Arguably the extent of benefit fraud (£1.6bn) shows that porridge is no deterrent. On the other hand, if the authorities sent somebody round to kick people's front doors in, smash their possessions, give 'em a few modest bruises, and shit on their beds, I suspect the level of fraud would go down.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Meanwhile...

Yo! LC! You're sounding a bit reactionary there, and that's my lawn.

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Court battle date set for £300m BT Cornwall termination dispute

Ledswinger
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This is going to be good to watch. Not sure it is going to be good PR for BT to send out, if we fail to meet the contract terms well will take you to court if you legally end it.

Outsourcer SLA's are always long, weasly documents intended to confer rights on the outsource provider over the dim-witted customer. A quick web search on the terms "cable wireless IBM dispute" will show the lengths outsourcers will go to to avoid being held to account, even when the are blatantly in breach of the original agreement.

The most remarkable thing is that no matter how many times people get stung in under-performing or over-priced outsource deals, the world clearly never learns that smartly dressed, smooth talking snake-oil salesmen are not to be trusted.

If these people can't run their own business at an acceptable cost, why did they ever think that bunglers like BT would be either able or willing to do son on their behalf?

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Google to China: Please Play with us, we promise to respect your strict censorship diet – report

Ledswinger
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Don't be evil

...unless it gets in the way of making more money.

At least Google now fit in with the US norm.

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Bored Brazilian skiddie claims DDoS against Essex Police

Ledswinger
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Re: It's like a tragic version of"yes, Minister"

He'll only go to heaven because the devil doesn't want to look at him.

Respect to you, Sir, for that one.

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Ledswinger
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currently carries a maximum of 10 years' imprisonment in the UK

Some of us haven't forgotten that Brazilians have far more to fear from the British police than imprisonment. But apparently that was just a bit of health and safety carelessness.

And in return for her services cleaning the streets of London of Brazilian electricians, Cressida Dick was promoted in 2009 to assistant commissioner. In 2015 she retired on a fat police pension, before accepting an over-paid and undeserved high level appointment with the Foreign Office, and then was given a gong in the 2015 New Year's Honour's List.

I wonder, it I shoot an innocent Brazilian, will I get promoted, honourably retired on a taxpayer funded, gold plated pension and then get sucked up into the bosom of the Establishment, and given a medal?

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Spaniard trousers €60,000 bank error, proceeds directly to jail

Ledswinger
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Re: Spaniard trousers €60,000 bank error, proceeds directly to

Whatever you've taken, I'd lay it off for a while

Not sure which of us that was intended for, but if it was me, you'd probably be appalled by the thoughts I have that don't make it to the keyboard. It's a bit of a curse much of the time, but boy, can it be fun at times.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Spaniard trousers €60,000 bank error, proceeds directly to

please don't answer, skin a banker.

Why? Do their hides make good car seats? I suppose a skilled leather worker could get the banker's face tanned nicely and stitched in as the very back of the seat cushion, so you drive around rubbing your....well, y'know what I'm saying.

But then again, leather seats are a bit bourgeois. What about flaying them all in one piece, putting a fur lining in it, to make a very alternative onesie? I'll bet Fred Goodwin would command a good price for his complete hide. Important question: Would you wear your banker onesie "nude" or put another layer of clothes on top?

Now, any thoughts on the flayed meat? We could keep 'em alive and wrap them in cling film for the rest of society to laugh at. Or mash them up for pet food. Or sell them to the pre-prepared food industry, since they aren't choosy about what meat they use. Or just take them to the nearest zoo and feed them to the lions.

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Huge, absorbent iPad rumours recycled – and this time it's REAL. True

Ledswinger
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Re: Would have been exciting maybe 2-3 years ago.

However, I'm sure some young men with bushy beards and too short in the leg trousers are mildly excited.

You just said you were 44. To some of us that is young.

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Samsung’s consumer IoT vision – stupid, desperate, creepy

Ledswinger
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Re: Why....just why?

Now it is cheaper to buy a new Washing Machine rather than change a drum bearing.

But given the falling cost of appliances relative to wages, it is inevitable that a heavily automated production process and a slick supply chain can deliver you a really cheap and often rather good machine. The repair bloke on the other hand has to cover un-utilised time, "free" quotes, travel time, van and tools, time spent ordering one off spares, get the machine out, half dismantle it by hand without the benefit of manufacturer jigs and knowledge, and he then should be charging you VAT on the full repair cost, paying his accountant to sort out his tax and accounts, probably paying for training and trade registrations etc etc.

There's certainly corners cut to make the machine cheap, and some of those impact on both longevity and repairability, but for those who don't want a £350 Bosch machine that'll probably last seven to nine years, there's still the option of spending two or three times that on a Miele, which can be maintained for twenty years. Many people say they want the durability of the Miele, but when push comes to shove they choose to pay for the Bosch (or even cheaper machines from Beko, Hotpoint etc).

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Damn well knew it! Seagate has helium drives in its labs

Ledswinger
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and from my experience die prematurly because of how shingling works

Presumably the He will also leak out over time, given that they can at best control leakage rather than prevent it. I wonder what that means for drive longevity? The write endurance of SSDs might start to seem like quite an attractive problem to have, when you consider the future HDD mix of He filled enclosures, physical risks of high areal density, shingled recording, and the complexity of the laser death record head.

As always, back your data up to tablets of stone.

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BEELION-dollar lasso snaps, NASA mapper blind in one eye

Ledswinger
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Re: Is there a "G" in NASA?

why is NASA spending money staring at the ground so often of late?

Because there's a bottomless pit of money for climate change research, as long as it comes back with the right answer. Of course, if it comes back with the wrong answer, then the University of East Anglia will be able to help out.

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Jeff Bezos trousers $8m Florida rocket sweetener package

Ledswinger
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Re: It could be a star investment or a real lemon...

Well, if it works, then Florida will deserve kudos for their wisdom...

I see no wisdom in giving $40m of taxpayers money to a man with a personal worth estimated at around $45bn. That sort of money won't alter his decision on location other than in the minds of local bureaucrats and crooked politicians spending other people's money.

The reality is that he'll decide where's best from a technical and analytical point of view, have a couple of minions stir up a false "competition" between different states and simply trouser the winning state's bribes as extra profit.

Life's a beach when you're already so rich you can't count how much you're worth.

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The 100GB PHONE! Well, it has shades of Chrome, so not quite

Ledswinger
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Re: Battery Life?

You don't expect a bunch of jerks in California to design something that works in the third world do you?

Well Google Maps showed the way. It worked a couple of times in the car park at Mountain View, and when tested on Rodeo Drive, so they unleashed it on the world, where it turned out to be entirely adequate for slurping the movements of peasants for targeted marketing, but sadly lacking as a reliable navigation product outside of well served urban area.

We expect that Silicon Valley are up their own bottoms, but apparently in those capacious bottoms they've got a reliable 4G service. Only this can explain the three way love affair between app designers, the cloud, and mobile devices.

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Turkey cites crypto software find in terror charges against TV crew

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Re: PKK are not "Jihadists" and why is there an image of the local ISIS dance club?

It is very apparent that Turkey currently supports/looks-the-other-way irt ISIS while bombing Kurds and PKK

"It is very apparent that Obama currently supports/looks-the-other-way irt Turkey bombing Kurds and PKK"

FTFY. Very, very sad that the Yanks have made so much of the Peshmurga, but then totally abandon them in return for temporary access to a few Turkish air bases. The approved US establishment message to possible allies is apparently "Never, ever trust us, we're C*NTS".

Out of curiosity, given the deep wisdom of the commentariat, are there any parallels in history of a non-involved nation getting so deeply involved on all sides of three/four-or-more way civil wars, and systematically fucking their prospects with all sides?

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Ledswinger
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Re: EU membership? In their dreams!

If you did a blind test simply looking at economy you sure would let Turkey in before Greece

That would depend on whether you let the crooks of Goldman Sachs make up the numbers, wouldn't it?

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OH DEAR, WHSmith: Sensitive customer data spaffed to world+dog

Ledswinger
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Re: Slightly disappointed by the ICO

Slightly disappointed by the ICO

To be fair to the ICO, you have to remember that they were only really set up prior to the days of large scale on-line fraud and privacy abuse, with a main purpose of investigating intentional mis-use of your data by the marketing dweebs. We can dress that up with the full scope of the DPA, amd talk about consent and proper processing, but in reality the DPA was drafted back in 1997 by civil service amateurs who wouldn't know one end of a computer from t'other. Any relevance to real 2015 problems of spam, identity theft, fraud, and privacy incidental, and shows up in that the ICO is both under-armed and under-resourced to fight large businesses on matters of privacy and real data protection.

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ICO probes NHS clinic's data blunder that exposed HIV+ status of 800 patients

Ledswinger
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Re: Simple solution

Why there are still not safeguards in email clients in 2015, I just have no idea.

I would hazard guess that it's all Microsoft's fault:

1) for handing out Outlook Express free to retail customers since donkey's years ago. With no money to be made, there was little incentive to develop third party email clients, and as a result very little was done.

2) for monopolising the enterprise software world, so that again, there was no competition and no development. "Hey! You wanna a ribbon? You gotta ribbon". But nothing that actually made bulk emailing easier and more secure.

I have to occasionally send out a newletter to several thousand colleagues, and the poor quality of Outlook for this purpose is truly dispiriting. Not only are there no safeguards on too many names in the To/CC fields, but the whole way that Outlook manages large contact lists is such a mess you have to assume that the designers wanted it to be a mess.

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Boffins clock MONSTER BLACK HOLES inside quasar-hosting galaxy near Earth

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I wish...

..I were clever enough to contribute to this thread, but sadly it not to be :(

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Jeep Cherokee 2.2: Capable, comfortable ... but just not very Jeep

Ledswinger
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Re: Hmmm

Far better visual appearance than almost anything from Japan, for example.

I'd agree that too many Japanese cars look bland or odd (with quite a few exceptions), but the Koreans aren't even going to let the Japanese own the "Weird & ugly" niche, to judge by the Ssangyong Rodius. In fact, even the Europeans have had a crack, in the shape of the Porsche Cayenne.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Hmmm

I see what you mean.

But there will be important, hidden differences that the Jeep/Fiat brands offer: beneath the skin of the Cherokee the traditional values will run deep. So presumably buyers should anticipate abominable reliability, dealers that are somewhere south of abominable, and resale values that sink faster than a depth charge.

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Germany to fork out BEELLLIONS for farmers' broadband

Ledswinger
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Re: 50 Meg Everywhere, eh?

They got a multi party democracy 25 years ago, the likes of which Bavaria can only dream about.

You make Bavaria sound like Scotland, but with decent roads.

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Ledswinger
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Re: 50 Meg Everywhere, eh?

I am less than confident that the promise will be kept.

But if we shared that view, we British would struggle with our self-deprecation. Far better to believe Germany to be a paragon of everything organised and clever, talk ourselves down, and take comfort from our treasured national collection of war jokes.

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BACS Bank Holiday BALLS UP borks 275,000 payments

Ledswinger
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Re: The bank could close for a month and I'd be OK.

you're an OAP, which means you were working, and earning, at a time where reasonably paid employment was available for pretty much all,

Loyal Commenter, you don't half spout some s#it. As a proportion of economically active adults, UK unemployment hasn't been below 5% for three decades, and has averaged around 8% for most of that time.

I'm not sure what makes you think that the past three or four decades were some magical period of easy jobs and high living standards, because they certainly were not.

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Ledswinger
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... and it's nearly beer o'clock so...

In the good old days this was beer o'clock. Sadly the tradition of drunken slumber over a keyboard all Friday afternoon is now all but gone (although I'm not sure if that's true in journalism).

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Honor 7 – heir apparent to the mid-range Android crown

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Re: good article but

If fact I didn't bother until I went out of the plug range for a week (traumatic!).

I'm firmly in the camp that says "no removeable battery, no sale", but that's not because I want to swap a flat battery for a charged one, simply that I've seen enough li-ion batteries lose capacity or fail outright over a year or so. I'd rather be able to spend £15 on a new battery than be without the phone for weeks wrangling with a supplier over whether the warranty covers the problem. I'm sure that under UK consumer law I'd ultimately win the argument, but sometimes it's not really worth the inconvenience to stand on your rights.

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Fugitive UK hacker turned ISIS recruiter killed in Syria

Ledswinger
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Re: Glorifying killing

Yeah, I'm in bits!!!!

No, no, no! He's in bits, and you're in one piece, enjoying a coffee in front of your computer.

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Malware menaces poison ads as Google, Yahoo! look away

Ledswinger
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So, if you refuse to pay for things that bring you joy, what DO you pay for?...

To be fair, I'm paying at the moment by not blocking adverts too aggressively, and in smaller part by my written contributions (as you are). If the Reg weren't making money they'd go bust, and there'd just be a "For Sale" sign up on the domain. But its difficult to have sympathy with those content owners who unfortunately have happily embraced the dark side of the force, preferring to take the money and ask no questions.

What do I pay for? Anything that I value and need to pay for. But not always financially, and sometimes the price paid is low. You will follow that, as will all commentards, but we're the minority. In the case of Windows 10, punters are lapping it up because either they mistake a £0 price for free, or because they set no value on their own privacy. Microsoft, on the other hand, must have a very good idea of the worth of a user's privacy - and based on prior OS pricing it must be a present value of around £70.

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Legal eagles accuse Labour of data law breach over party purge

Ledswinger
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Re: ROCs?

Well they'll be progressively replaced by CfDs for new installations (which I suspect you know). There's plans in the consultation to control future CfD costs because the whole subsidy boondoggle is out of control, and will have added a cumulative £40bn to consumer's energy bills by 2021 (not including probably another £10-20bn of networks costs related to the renewables).

But it's up on the DECC website, have a gander

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Ledswinger
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didn't Labour lose a lot of supporters to the Greens as they moved further to the right?

By whose definition? Millipede was branded Red Ed for his big state and interventionist plans and whilst nothing like as traditional old wolde commie as Corbyn, he was well to the left of NuLabour.

Mind you, anybody who defected to the Greens will be dead by 11.00am tomorrow, having choked to death on their muesli as they read the Graun's being-scribed-as-I-write coverage of the Feed in Tariff cuts proposed by DECC today. Personally I'm rather looking forward to reading the apoplectic response of the tree huggers and financially vested interests.

Does George Monbiot have any hair that he can pull out?

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Angry Birds maker Rovio takes aim at staff, axes a third of them

Ledswinger
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Re: Greed to put it simply ....

Sadly most of these game companies are very much a one trick pony, it has happened time and time again where companies like Rovio come from nowhere, get heavily invested in, go to shit then go bust.

Remind me again, how much did Twerpsoft pay for Minecraft?

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