* Posts by Ledswinger

4465 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

TalkTalk attack: 'No legal obligation to encrypt customer bank details', says chief

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: MBA "Qualification"

Not being an MBA myself I can only assume that there is a module called Complacency 101 that has to be passed in order to graduate.

Having an MBA myself, from one of the world's top business schools, I can assure you that there isn't. An MBA is like any other qualification - it requires a relevant degree of intelligence, application, hard work, and usually some prior qualifications, but it isn't a test of propriety, and as far as I know there's no qualification that stops somebody choosing to act like a fuckwit.

5
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: What happened to

Talk Talk is (supposed to be) a professional company

Don't make me laugh, I might choke! TalkTalk are a bunch of piss pot incompetents, whose idea of customer service is a third rate offshore call centre, who have outsourced even their own recruitment, and whose chief executive is one of the most scandalously over-paid people in this country. Failure to encrypt customer data, and then to say "there wasn't a law saying we had to" is disgusting.

I did briefly have some sympathy for Ms Harding, but that's just evaporated. Stupid, inept cow, and her stupid inept fuckwit colleagues deserve to be taken to the cleaners.

14
0

9 cuffed over £60 million banking scam targeting UK businesses

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Town or country, the fuckers will now be out on bail. If successfully prosecuted they'll cop a maximum six year term, of which they'll serve 40% under Home Office guidelines.

Some years ago, I worked for a £250m capitalised company, bankrupted by board level fraud. The turds responsible got four year sentences and were out inside two years. The chief executive who exposed this, and who at the time turned down an RBS-sponsored bribe to keep quiet hasn't worked full time for the subsequent seven years.

The bizarre message that the UK legal system offers is: If you see fraud, keep quiet, say nothing (whistleblower protection laws will not protect you). But if you see the opportunity for fraud, fill your fucking boots.

1
0

TalkTalk hush-hush on compo for up to 4 million customers after mega cyber attack

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: But Seriously

Announce credible steps towards future recurrence

That's what they evidently did after the last two data breaches.

2
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

You believe it?!!!!

It's possible. Remember how Clarkson challenged world + dog that just knowing his account number wasn't a security risk, and was then proved wrong?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1574781/Jeremy-Clarkson-eats-his-words-over-ID-theft.html

1
1
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: And they're pushing customers towards "Noddle"

Seeing as I and many other people have pointed out the potential problems with Plusnet security, and have been informed that is safe

Write a letter to the ICO. A proper, paper letter, addressed to Christopher Graham. Copied to Plusnet's company secretary. That should spark some interest.

2
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: "Management" 21C style

What do these people do?

I don't know, but apparently it was worth £6.8m last year.

Nice work if you can get it.

2
0

Tardy TalkTalk advertised for a new infosec officer 1 week ago

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Oooh dear. That post wasn't meant to look like that. To judge by my own botched HTML, I may be qualified to join TalkTalk's infosec team.

0
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

<Not so unusual to have a single lowly tech responsible for all duties described in TalkTalk job role. I speak from personal experience currently in a very similar role, also in a company that is national critical infrastructure.</i>

Speaking for my own company, who probably qualify as critical national infrastructure, I'm also unconvinced that infosec has sufficient status and resource. A senior staff grade employee and a graduate for the UK, with the senior staffer reporting to a manager in another country. There's some good stuff been done, our web site passes the "free to web" vulnerability tests, our security staff do try and educate the wider employee base, but its notable that several multiples more effort is put into "customer experience" than into protecting the customer data and thus protecting the company.

One good thing about the TalkTalk debacle is that it has suddenly and dramatically (if temporarily) elevated the priority of infosec. Every fatcat in the land is see Ms Harding looking increasingly stressed and haggard, and hearing as the news seems to go from bad to worse.

1
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Additional responsibilities

12. Capable of wringing their hands convincingly

13. Acting as scapegoat to save the hides of much better paid staff

14. Not raising "difficult issues" that involve spending money on infosec

13
0

Joining the illuminati? Just how bright can a smart bulb really be?

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: No

Still pointless

...and expensive.

At the moment the Internet of Tat seems to offer benefits that range from "none" through the whole gamut of insignificance up to an including "negligible", whilst still costing a ridiculous amount.

48
1

TalkTalk shares drop 10.7% despite research that breaches don't cause drops

Ledswinger
Silver badge

It's better than that, much much better. TalkTalk Business invite their business customers to outsource their IT to improve network security

http://www.talktalkbusiness.co.uk/news-events/news-ttb-listing/video-news/outsource-for-better-network-security/

There's a video that could be very amusing, but since I've expunged Flash from my computer I'll never know what it says.

1
0

TalkTalk: Hackers may have nicked personal, banking info on 4 million Brits

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: What about ex-customers?

And Dido Harding saying she's a TT customer and has been a victim too just makes me even more angry. I mean, if she had something to lose then shouldn't she have been making sure the defences were rock solid.

Well don't forget that most of the customers are proles, who's only contact with their bank is via a low powered call centre worker, or a teller at the counter. With Ms Harding's multi-million pound package, she'll be with somebody like Coutts, and whoever the bank is, they'll have assigned a "personal wealth manager" to slobber over her and keep a beady eye on her account security. She doesn't have anything to lose.

0
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Date of birth

This is IMHO a criminal act. Jail time beconing?

What do you reckon? AFAIK there's no offence of "criminal stupidity" or "corporate incompetence". They'll report themselves to the ICO, but even if the ICO opens an investigation and then fines them, he can only levy penalties up to half a million quid. Last year Ms Harding's remuneration was a tad short of seven million quid, so she wouldn't notice if the ICO fine was the maximum allowed, and she had to pay it herself. Enjoy that thought when the scammers are pestering you on the phone, or applying for credit in your name.

As chief executive, the buck stops with her, and the board nominations and audit committees for their collective failure to appoint the right IT people, and to keep data safe. But who really thinks these useless fat cats will be held to account?

3
0

Bracken assembles old GDS crew for Co-op

Ledswinger
Silver badge

All these things are standard in your competitors internet banking interfaces.

The Coop bank was singled out earlier this year by HMT for their precarious core systems and inadequate recovery arrangements, and for this reason alone HMT wanted the whole lot sold to a larger, better organised player (which hasn't happened for a range of reasons). I'd suggest that hanging around whilst they sort out the web interface is a tad unwise, because if the web interface is where the effort goes, the dodgy back office has yet more time to fall over.

And the key concern was that if they had a Natwest style cockup, they simply would not be able to recover, full stop. It took a while for RBS/Natwest, but at least they got there eventually.

0
0

Is China dumping smartphones on world+dog?

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: "moves those emissions to China"

The Church of St Jobs is at least (on the surface anyway) trying to reduce emissions all round.

Window dressing. The whole point of making things in China is that everything is cheaper there for the simple reason that China has lower living standards, lower emission standards, lower pollution controls, lower labour standards, lower human rights standards, no tolerance of dissent or whistleblowing, and a very relaxed approach to forcing people out of their homes to suit industrial or infrastructure needs. Having a few wind turbines connected to your OEM's factory doesn't avoid the vast embodied energy of all the infrastructure, manufacturing and housing facilities, and it doesn't do anything for the embodied energy of the significant raw materials. Or for the transport halfway round the world to sell at high prices into the US or EU markets.

Apple (and anybody else) can claim what they want about reducing emissions in their supply chain, but the only zero emissions smartphone is no smartphone. Even in the EU this still applies: Jaguar Land Rover make a big thing about their low emissions supply chain, but thinking about what they make, and what they make it with, and what and how it is used, is any Land Rover a low emissions vehicle? And would it make any difference if it were an electric Land Rover? Not in my book.

Now, as many will know I'm not signed on to the various globalwarmistpaedoterrorist agendas, so I'm relaxed about buying devices and the emissions that generates. But those who are convinced of the climate change argument really need to go back to hair shirts, crofting, and early death. A few token gestures doesn't decarbonise either an iPhone or a Range Rover. Whilst the British government are so convinced of the need to save me from climate change that they want to exile all of our remaining manufacturing base, eventually they'll find that you can't import everything and export nothing (other than a few token financial services, often supported by a web of offshored support).

So the choice remains: Hair shirts and hope the AGW goes away, or a modified form of BAU and a side order of deal with it if it happens.

11
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

"moves those emissions to China"

You're correct that EU and even more so UK policy is simply about offshoring emissions. DECC glibly claim that the UK economy has decoupled emissions from GDP growth, but that's only on the basis of (1) made up GDP numbers, and (2) only considering UK territorial emissions.

Properly adjusted the data looks to indicate that (through spending rebound effects) over forty years, GDP remains as carbon intensive as it ever was. And fiddling around with energy policy won't fix that, because domestic energy use is only a fraction of our combined territorial + imported emissions. All that the idiotic energy policy does is increase the cost to users, whilst in net terms making a paltry reduction in net emissions. The scandalous deal just signed by that intellectual flyweight Cameron for Hinkley Point C only makes the situation worse, because the costs are out of this world, but even before it is operational the existing AGR's will be reaching the end of their already extended lives.

A consequence of this is that the EU ETS could never work, and never will work - it just pushes up costs for EU industry (although France & Germany bend the rules to support their industrial base). And it also means that if carbon emissions haven't been decoupled from growth, you have only two options: Adapt to any climate change, and push for cheap, nuclear or fusion as a longer term goal, or go back to middle ages standards of living.

Unfortunately DECC, and the retards of Westminster are in firm denial on all of this, so we can expect the same failed, flawed, expensive policies to be continued.

10
0

Microsoft's top lawyer: I have a cunning plan ... to rescue sunk safe harbor agreement

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: If the UK votes to leave the EU...

If the UK votes to leave the EU...and you live in the UK it will be open season on your data.

Sorry to burst your bubble, but it's already open season on UK citizens data, because GCHQ get all the powers they want, have zero accountability, and no need under UK law to get warrants. In the the highly unlikely event that GCHQ can't help themselves to your data they'll outsource the job to NSA and their mates, under the reciprocal Five Spies umbrella.

No matter what the EU say about data protection, and the supposed "rights" you have, successive UK home secretaries have worked ceaselessly to ensure that your data is readily accessible to the stasi. Your optimism in the benefits of EU membership is quite touching, though.

8
3

Bosch, you suck! Dyson says VW pal cheated in vacuum cleaner tests

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: "Brit vacuum-cleaner maker Dyson"

MADE in Malaysia. OEM'd by V.S. Industry Berhad.

Well you can thank the British government for that, with their cr@p headed approach to energy policy, business rates, payroll taxation etc etc.

Dyson did try for years to make the cleaners in this country, and it is simply too expensive, but if you want to run a manufacturing business you're not welcome in Britain.

3
2
Ledswinger
Silver badge

The wattage limits seem crazy.

Why? Dyson is right, you don't need to use even 1,400W for a vacuum cleaner, but for years lazy vacuum makers have produced obscenely noisy, inefficient room warmers that masquerade as vacuum cleaners, because it's easier to market a cleaner as "more powerful" than "more effective". For years the German vacuum makers (like the German car makers) have lobbied successfully against tighter controls, simply for their own business benefit.

And Bosch are marketing a 1,400W vacuum cleaner at the very same time that their own marketing department claim their circa 25W cordless vacuum cleans as well as a 2,400W mains model. Now, either Bosch shouldn't be making heavy, energy wasting mains vacuum cleaners, or they are lying about their cordless model. As the owner of a Bosch cordless upright, it cleans really well, it's not noisy, and its lightweight - so I'm thinking that their over-powered models are unwarranted, and Dyson is correct that the power limits are nowhere near low enough.

4
2

Virgin Media boss urges UK watchdogs not to pick wrong BT battle

Ledswinger
Silver badge

You're right on most of those, except the USO. They can't force VM to lay nationwide cable. But they could realistically force them to offer wholesale access and arms-length pricing. Interestingly that's coming to water companies before the sleepy headed cretins at OFCOM manage to dish it out to VM, but my guess is that for VM it is only a matter of time. Likewise Openreach - they could stay as part of BT - but as a separately accounted, discrete legal entity under a proper regulatory framework.

2
0

Get ready to register your drones in the US – or else

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: How are they going to enforce it?

and you get done for not registering your drone

If you're caught. A rather high proportion of the publicly reported air misses appear to involve the drone operator not being caught. So I think you're believing the flawed logic here: "If all drones were registered, we'd know who to go and arrest". This is the same failed logic that says if guns are registered then you'll know who to arrest when one is misused.

By definition, those dim enough or dangerous enough to fly into controlled airspace will be dim or dangerous enough not to register their drone. Typical knee jerk law making, involving extra admin and nuisance, more box ticking public sector numpties, but not addressing the problem. The obvious solution is the same way that some airports deal with birds - use a shotgun wielded by somebody who knows how to use it safely. The risks of a falling drone are considerably less than the risks of collision with a manned aircraft. And the idiots will soon learn when their toys have been destroyed.

0
0

Our intuitive AI outperforms (most) puny humans, claims MIT

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: mind reading still required

That is the whole point of such technologies.

Well let's see them put it to some use. I propose the Ledswinger test, in which a machine qualifies for AI status only when it comes up with a coherent and realistic plan for resolving the complete mess that is the Middle East at lowest cost and minimum inconvenience (without resorting to WMD or "final solutions").

3
0

Online pharmacy slapped with £130,000 fine for flogging customer data

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: And this was a 'legitimate' online pharmacy

Removal from NHS England pharmaceutical lists for a few months

Sadly not within the remit of the ICO. However, it would be within the remit of the General Pharmceutical Council who routinely suspend pharmscists registration for misconduct, and a quick gander at the GPC's standards of conduct suggest that this shower could be held to be in breach of clauses 2.2, 3.5, 3.7, 6.5 and 6.6.

It seems a bit much to hope that the GPC will see this and be proactive, but any affected customers might care to report them.

9
0

GCHQ to pore over blueprints of Chinese built Brit nuke plants

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Hold on

The British public are just too cheap to view infrastructure investment as worthwhile.

The money (or rather debt) is there, the technical vision on the part of government is lacking. So there's money and technology to build Crossrail, to speed wealthy Thames Valley commuters to the City. There was money to divert Eurostar from Waterloo to less convenient destination. But no money to build a proper high speed route under London to link HS2 and HS1, or to overcome the idiocy of London's Victorian plutocracy, who insisted that the railways stations must not come anywhere near the centre. Even when government did waste £2bn tunnelling under London for HS1, it was some vacuous Blairite scheme to route it all round the @rse end of London to buy votes, and then bring it into the poorly connected St Pancras - even less convenient for the City than Waterloo, but equally unsuitable for everybody else unless they want to go to Derby.

In the case of nuclear, they're continuing in the madcap scheme to buy the unproven and expensive EPR, and at the same time offering money to Toshiba to build a different design at "Moorside" (the toxic dump formerly known as Windscale, Sellafield, and before that Calder Hall). So we incur vast debts but won't even get standardisation.

1
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Maybe they should have just underwritten UK investment in the first place

With what? The same unfunded, cashless promises that underwrite all the other commitments that the UK bunglement has made over the years?

Because our idiot, idiot politicians signed free trade agreements without caveating them with a requirement for a balance of trade, the West has got progressively poorer in cash terms (fundamentally wrapped up as accumulated private sector debt, made worse by government deficit spending). Meanwhile, having exported but not imported China has foreign exchange reserves approaching four trillion dollars. It could spend that imports stuff from the West, but prefers to invest it in assets - so rather than buy Jaguars off the UK, they'd rather buy what will be the most expensive power station in the history of the world, and then collect rent off us forever.

2
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: About time too

and have had an opportunity of a 10% tax free ROI with PV but nothing when your money goes to finance nukes.

Actually, its the same. DECC promise obscene payments of £90/MWh for Hinkley Point C, and until the end of this year they've been paying about £140/MWh for solar. In both cases the investor benefits at the expense of all other electricity users. The Hinkley Point costs are totally unwarranted, and DECC are backing the failing and over-priced EPR technology, but at least a modern nuke plant should get about 90% load factor with scheduled outages, and can run all through the winter peaks. Solar generates most electricity when prices are lowest, so we're paying 14p/kWh to PV owners for electricity when the wholesale market value is about 2p/kWh, and as a knock on effect it forces mid-merit plant to operate intermittently, so that modern CCGTs are being downgraded to OCGT, reducing thermal efficiency from say 65% to low 50s.

Generously rewarding PV as a generation source in a cloudy country situated on the top surface of the globe must go down as one of the most stupid ideas ever conceived by a British government, and that's saying something, given the epic infrastructure, investment, industrial and foreign policy fails they have to choose from.

3
0

BBC shuts off iPlayer to UK VPNs, cutting access to overseas fans

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Free the beeb

Too long for a haiku, and the repetition isn't true to form.

How about:

Free the beeb?

A few wept,

Millions yawned.

2
0

Ireland moves to scrap 1 and 2 cent coins

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Finland did this ages ago

And actually very sensible since you don't end up wandering round with groaning pockets and the shops don't have to carry such large floats.

From what you write, sounds like the thieves still price to odd small numbers, but have no plan on giving you the exact change unless it happens to "round" to five cents. Why don't the EU just introduce the new eurocent, of which there are twenty per euro? Of course, doesn't sit well with their decimal obsessions, but that's a problem they've allowed to occur by not controlling the money supply.

2
3

'Blood on the carpet' ahead for outsourcers, says analyst research

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Hmmm...

The exhaustion of those relationships might very well be the reason these deals are becoming less common.

In part, but there's another major difficulty, and that's the number of companies (like mine) that sucked good and hard on the outsourcer's Kool-aid, and then found that the outsourced service was crap, the savings were illusory, and then found that they didn't have the capacity to take it all back in house because the outsourcer had transferred any good TUPE victims to their newest (or most valuable) contracts, and sacked the balance of moderately good but highly experienced TUPEs on cost grounds.

So when the deal with the first round outsourcer comes up for renewal, all the other board members point at the CIO and say that this time round they hope that there will be both the better service and the savings originally promised. There won't be, of course, but that is for the ghost of Christmas future yet to reveal.

4
0

Standards body wants standards for IoT. Vendors don't care

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: IOT is a lot of bedroom ideas from unskilled techies

IOT and smart home applicaces has to have some long term support and direction to be anything other than expensive gimmicks

Before that, they need to have some genuine benefit. I'm still struggling to see what the IoT will do for me.

6
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Love that typo...

They do need to start getting sued as a hit to their bottom line will be the only thing they understand.

I would suggest that fines on business are a very limited influence on corporate behaviour. They're routinely "below the line" when considering executive bonuses, and the effective impact is on shareholders. Unless the impact is material, the shareholders don't care, and the evidence of repeated illegal and immoral behaviours in the banking sector shows that even when the fines are material the culture is not changed.

Whilst there's far more limited evidence than for the ineffectiveness of fines, I think there's some good anecdotal evidence that suggests that temporary prohibition of sales is far more effective. I suspect that's because it does invariably affect the executive bonuses, and because it paralyses large swathes of the business, who have to sit around for the duration of a ban on full pay, doing nothing. Whilst it might be your vision of hell, imagine yourself as an outbound call centre boss. Now imagine that your company has had its licence (or technical been , having to walk out of your office, and see that the entire building are doing nothing because the company has been suspended from selling. Now imagine that for as little as two weeks. By the end of that time there's huge internal recriminations about whose fault it all was, bitter feuds about cost allocation, employees have spent two weeks surfing job websites etc, and the whole situation is becoming a bit anarchic. As a director, a nice, simple, easily paid fine is far and away the preferred option.

6
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Fridge on the Net

The fridge on the net? Why

Primarily so that somebody can package up the energy demand of a fleet of fridges, and sell that as a demand side response measure. DECC are in love with the idea of "demand side response" as a fix for the electricity system that they have broken, so they're very keen on all of this sort of stuff, although the simple reality is that the value of DSR at the household level is so low that you'd not be interested in changing your behaviour to take part, so it all relies on automation.

3
0

Self-driving vehicles might be autonomous but insurance pay-outs probably won't be

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Traffic? Traffic!!

Oh, and how does one re-fuel the vehicle.

You already know.

0
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Road Markings

Why are you here?

QOTW.

6
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

it seems to show that most people don't give the furry crack of a rats arse about how much litter they drop

Given the general shortage of rubbish bins on stations (largely due to the activities of assorted terrorist groups over the years), what do you expect people to do, carry their crud around all day? And what's more, when I leave my litter on a train, I am proudly keeping somebody in a job. And rail is no different to airlines, where the peasants disembark from an aircraft whose cabin then looks like the inside of a dustbin lorry, and a small horde of heroes climb into the be-shitted hulk, and rapidly convert it into a nearly presentable cabin. Cleaners of the world, I salute you!

According to the Institute for Employment Research at the University of Warwick, there's 448,000 people employed in the UK cleaning industry. I'd argue that at least a third of those are employed in dealing with avoidable litter (as opposed to day to day grime and soiling), so that's about 115,000 people kept in a job by people leaving stuff on trains, planes, or round the office.

So, Tony S, I kept 115,000 people in a job today. What did you do for society?

4
15

Nippy, palaver and cockwomble: Greatest words in English?

Ledswinger
Silver badge

I think the correct word is obstreperous

No, that's a different word, and you perhaps are being blinkered by the narrow scope of dictionaries. Obstropolous is a most marvellous new word that should be added to the OED forthwith.

However, this fine invention does not address the tragic shortage of good quality obscenities in English. The primary colours of obscenity are about seven core words, then extended with modifiers and combinations. The number one position is held by "fuck" a fine obscenity, and a short blunt word with a lovely mouth feel to it, even onomatopoeic when used as an adjective, but you very quickly run out of swear words after that. As any Two Pint Screamer demonstrates after they've had a few on Saturday night:

"Yer fuckin fook-headed fooker, yer spilt me fooking drink, fook yer, yer f-ffucking fookwit fooker!"

So, commentards, could we have some new swear words. Ideally not related to the existing rather small collection.

1
0

Navy engineer gets 11 years for attempted espionage

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Just curious,

Handing over secrets of your own country to the benefit of a foreign nation (in this case Egypt) is treason.

Actually it's just silly. Who (that doesn't already have them) would want the plans to make themselves a vastly over-budget, still-not-working aircraft carrier? The entire Egyptian defence budget is less than the cost of a single Ford class carrier.

On further reflection, instead of villain or buffoon, maybe he was a true hero working for Uncle Sam. It'd be a huge win to have foreign nations copy the US (and British) strategy of bogging yourselves down building pointless, non-functional military assets that they can't afford.

4
3

Slacker vendors' one-fix-a-year effort leaves 88% of Androids vulnerable

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Get updates quicker for less money....

Over the time of your contract, it is actually alot cheaper to get a sim-only deal for £12 and buy your phone outright,

Sometimes, yes, but there are exceptions. Search around the reseller and price comparison web sites, and you'll find last year's models on contract at prices that you will often struggle to match SIM free. Of course, that lumps you back in the "what updates?" world, but the cheapest way of getting a half way decent phone for my daughter was to buy a full fat Sammy S5 on contract.

1
0

Ring Chime: Needy wireless doorbell or $30 bling t'ing?

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Another way

One of my better decisions was throwing away our wireless door bell. Complete POS, because it had a long range but only eight different "channels", so real risk of conflict with neighbours, when the mains power went down the mains sounder would resync to the first pushed door bell, and the battery in the bell push gave no warning of its demise. I flinch in horror at the needless complexity of an IoT or phone connected door bell. A simple bell wire connected unit powered by a couple of D cells is sooooo much better.

But even then half the delivery drivers are now trained to ignore door bells because they so often don't work. The best solution is a damned great brass door knocker. Traditionalists can opt for a dog's head, but I've been on the look out for a big brass tallywhacker, resting on a pair of pods - strangely these don't seem to be widely stocked.

6
0

Windows 10 preview on death row, will be executed on Thursday

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Windows 10 mobile also on death row

What then, is the unique selling point of Windows phones?

Cheaper than Apple, not as painful for IT departments as the million and one unsupported Android variants a business quickly finds on its asset register.

Note that "popular", "nice to use", "requested by users", "good" aren't part of that proposition. The day of WIndows Phone may yet come, but if it does, it will be exclusively in situations where somebody else decides what phone you should have.

0
1
Ledswinger
Silver badge

I've used Classic Shell with 8/8.1/8.1u since launch, and it is excellent. But why should I need it for Windows 10? Classic Shell was required because the clowns of Redmond messed up the whole UI. WIndows 10's only promise was a fixed UI, and a side order of silly toys like Cortana.

They delivered the silly toys, they didn't fix the UI, so why would anybody upgrade from either W7, or W8+Classic Shell? And that's why I'm not taking up Microsoft's "free upgrade", because it isn't. It might be free, but it isn't an upgrade, so why take a chance on having to find where they've hidden everything, risk things that work suddenly not working, and have to reinstall Classic Shell?

I hope that business schools around the world are teaching Microsoft's OS strategy as a real time masterclass in how not to do things.

2
0

Playboy drops the butt-naked ladies

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: In Japan it's pretty much

For a time Playboy Japan carefully airbrushed out any sign of pubic hair, because it was on the 'thou shalt not show' list.

Time moves on, and now the airbrush artiste finds their skills unwanted, even with PSP....

0
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

"Penthouse" tested the legal waters in England with a full frontal centrefold in 1971/72. "Mayfair" followed suit - and probably "Playboy" wasn't far behind.

I can remember some epic, teenage eyeball scorching images in "Amateur Photographer" from the 1970s. Some advert for flashguns I think, but the image is still joyously imprinted on my retinas. Thank you, AP of the time. Today it's a dull comic full of black and white dullness.

Mind you, those were the days of desperate schoolboys hoping to find a trucker's discarded jazz mag, and failing that having to resort to the corset pages of the mail order catalogues. Nowadays they probably draw the curtains and watch "The Next Step". Hmmphh. Probably, I wouldn't know anything about that myself.

1
0

Amazon Fire HD 8: Mid-spec Nokia Lumi... er, MediaTek slab

Ledswinger
Silver badge
Devil

Re: "I wonder if that means Mayday was over- or under-used?"

we left some essential DLLs off the installation CD for several thousand units shipping in the runup to Christmas.

Haven't all true techies got a memory like this? I have. Luckily for users everywhere I haven't been a true techie for more than two decades. But working in technology is like the pox - once you've been touched by it, it never leaves you.

0
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: re -Siri, Cortana or Google Now

I really cant see this competing with that more versatile fuller featured full HD Huld 2.

Particularly for those able and willing to pay in Clubcard vouchers. OK, you forgo other choices, but through that route I only paid ten quid in cash for mine. And Amazon want HOW MUCH?

7
0

Credit card numbers stolen from charity America's Thrift Stores

Ledswinger
Silver badge

I quite like the idea of knowing that my donations actually go towards helping people - not to paying for the next years firewall maintenance contract.

Why? If you're entitled by experience and training to read this website, then you (like me) are an overhead to the business we support. A charity might not run for investor benefit, but that apart it is a straightforward corporate entity, needing sales to generate a profit to support its operations, and needing all those horrible things like Finance, IT, HR, Procurement, Marketing, Ops Planning, Legal, Facilities, etc.

The best you can hope for with a charity is that its overheads are efficient by which I mean they get a good bang for their buck. If that requires buying a proper firewall, a proper EPOS, or professionally audited accounts then that's not really a sad state of affairs, is it?

4
3

Smut-slingers' malvertising allowed into Android apps, moan devs

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: easy solution!

OK, so that "easy" solution helps a bit. But you're still exposed through a range of other routes, and given the completely failed model of software updates that Android has, we are stuck with billions of vulnerable phones. Those sufficiently keen might be able to root their phone, stick on Cyanogenmod and consider themselves protected, but that's not an option for the masses.

As far as I can see we're getting to the stage where either (a) Google pull a rabbit out of the hat on security, privacy, and advertising control, or (b) the day of "free" software is over. The probability of (a) is about the same as that of hell freezing over, third party phone OS like Ubuntu, Firefox and Sailfish all appear to have faded away, living on only for tinkerers and phone devs, which really only leaves Redmond's unloved spawn, or Apple.

Personally, I hate Apple. I hate their unjustified margins paid by the technically illiterate. I hate their cludgy "welcome to 2007" interface. I hate the lack of user control. I hate their non-standard everything. I hate them taking a big cut of app and media sales. I hate their smugness. I particularly hate Jonny Ive. But Google seem to be doing everything in their power to force me into Apple's arms. Not that Apple are faultless - but as with computer software, Apple are considerably less blase about security than their main competitor, and when you balance Google's increasingly intrusive spying and ad-forcing, it starts to look like Apple is (sadly for me) the way forward.

3
2

FBI boss: No encryption backdoor law (but give us backdoors anyway)

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: People know

Well, he keeps flogging the Syrian one fiercely. Now with added Russian sado-masochism.

Don't forget the bit-part actors. I particularly enjoyed* Cameron condemning the Ruskies for bombing "the wrong sort of rebel", and "killing women and children" on the same day that the Yanks deliberately bombed an MSF hospital in Afghanistan. Funnily enough, the pudgey faced Etonian forgot to condemn the murder of volunteer medical workers.

* Well, not "enjoyed" as such. Rather, I put aside the tragedy of another US war crime, and reveled in Cameron showing off his finest 's Forrest Gump qualities.

1
0

Meg Whitman: Next Hewlett Packard Enterprise CEO is already on the payroll

Ledswinger
Silver badge

A bit like...

paying your own undertaker.

So sad given the heritage, but let's be honest, nobody will miss HPE.

1
0

Forums