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* Posts by Ledswinger

2618 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

Never mind bungled Universal Credit rollout, Maude wants UK to be 'most digital' gov by 2015

Ledswinger
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Re: After the General Election

"Maybe then we'll see some consensus politics."

What, like the current coalition shower of piss?

As far as I can see there's nowt to tell between Tory, Labour and Bliberal. The same crappy energy policy, the same inability to control immigration, the same shameful under-resourced but overstretched defence policies, the same inability to control the spiralling welfare or health budgets, the same craven surrender to Brussels, the same inability to solve basic problems like high house prices and inadequate infrastructure, the same chaotic economic policies.....

The only thing the current lot seem to have achieved is freeing schools from the dead hand of local authority incompetence, which (round my way) has worked wonders. But the retards of the Labour party want to meddle with education as soon as they get in, so they'll undoubtedly fuck that improvement up in some shape.

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Workers, guards clash in hours-long Samsung factory RIOT in Vietnam

Ledswinger
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Re: $3.2bn to complete the construction

"$3.2bn to complete the construction? thats an expensive factory!"

Other reports suggest that this the $3.2bn is for a number of closely plants, some of which are already open. In June last year press reports said that Samsung already had 24,000 workers employed at these facilities, so it would seem that we are talking about a very big plant.

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Tizen: We have ignition! Smartmobes will come to fruition in spring - reports

Ledswinger
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Re: Why?@Dan 55

" patrons who think that Sailfish is something that will ultimately take off and make everyone a lot of money. Jolla - the main group behind the OS - just got 20M+ in VC funding a while ago. That's the modern patronage system at work. "

No, you're wrong. You just said "VC", and that's capitalism, not patronage. Patronage is where the benefits to the funder are considerably more ephmeral. You probably know as well as I do that VC's are hard nosed bunch of bastards, hoping to subsidise a few losers in return for each big winner.

"As for your "fairly average piles of code" comment, I think it's pretty clear that A) You don't understand what people like Torvalds actually do in relation to the projects they run and"

You could be right, on the other hand you don't know what my background is. My guess is you are more wrong than right on that, but the simple ad hominem is not becoming of you, IMHO.

"B) You're actually rather biased against these efforts."

Utter. utter rubbish. Re-read my comments, please. I was looking forward to both choice in phone OSes, and choice in the underlying economic models, because what I may want isn't what may suit everybody. I happily use a variety of open source and "unpaid" software, and I appreciate the developers who contribute freely to projects like Mozilla (but that sadly still isn't a work of genius, any more than Chrome or IE are), and I appreciate up to a point what Google do for me in return for aspects of my privacy (although they seem to be working to undermine the pact I thought I had with them).

I'm afraid that at that point I stopped reading due to your mis-representation of my remarks, and the personal nature of your criticism. You're generally welcome to be both abusive and argumentative with me, and I'll happily read and respond, but in this particular case I think you're out of sorts.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Why?@Dan 55

An interesting idea, but I think you confuse things by comparing great artists over a milennia with the fairly average piles of code associated with Linux or Mozilla.

The nearest to patronage that I see in the world of software is Ubuntu, and that's not famous for being either a great work or its excellence is it? Wikipedia is another example you might call on, and there you've got a better case - for all the flaws and all the insults, Wikipedia is fairly reliable, and contains vastly more knowledge than any previous encylopaedic tome. But in that case, the content is mostly user generated, so the ultimate value of Wikipedia is not derived from the source code, and the genius of Wikipedia is the concept not the code.

Coming back to Sailfish, if they give it away for free, who is paying for its development, and who will pay for support and development? And more importantly if it is patronage, why are they paying? Being able to show your tame artists latest work off as a result of your largesse is one thing. But which oligarch is going to fund Sailfish, and then wave it about at society dinner parties as their lifetime achievment?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Why?@Dan 55

You may be right, but your link merely says Sailfish will be "installable", doesn't say how the developers will be paid. If they are handing it out free, how do they feed their families?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Why?

"EUR 399"

That appears to include a free handset. I meant in indicative terms what's the cost to the end user of the Sailfish software?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Why?

"I'm really looking forward to jumping ship from Android to either Sailfish, Ubuntu or Tizen."

Same here. Although what I'm hoping (probably unrealistically) for is a choice of paying cash for Sailfish or Tizen and keeping my privacy, having Android for "free" and paying with my privacy, and a further choice of whatever Ubuntu and Firefox can come up with that makes their business model work.

The hegemony of Android came about because the competing mobile OS were all proprietary systems that were either simply closed to competitors, weak in capability, or costly. That suited Google who wanted users information more than they wanted the users money. But it also meant very limited choice.

If Sailfish is going to be worth its developers' while, how much will that cost me in hard cash up front?

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Don't panic! Japan to send nuke fuel rod into MELTDOWN in Fukushima probe

Ledswinger
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Re: Expensive Renewables

"Unfortunately, the nuclear industry has a very powerful lobby, which has done a very good job of influencing government policy"

No. EdF had to be bribed to build Hinkley Point because they don't want to. RWE and E.ON both bailed out of their Horizon nuclear JV, like the rear gunner exiting a doomed Stuka. SSE and Iberdrola have likewise left their nuclear JV by the back door, like Elvis leaving the building. The driver for new nuclear is not industry, who simply don't have the money for this (after the politicians have fucked up the market and driven returns so low that investors don't want to know). No, the driver for new nuclear is politicians and civil servants, hooked on the opium of low carbon power, paid for by YOU.

"away from doing anything other than pretending to promote commercial alternatives (micro generation has never been any serious threat, and this has been the only successful government scheme in renewables)"

Micro gen successful? Nooooo! Nooooo! You really think that letting well off pensioners have a big discount off their power bill by carpeting the roofs of their bungalows with PV panels, and paid for by the largely less well off average consumer is a good thing? Or bunging money at middle class country folk to install a "biomass" boiler, at the expense of the masses? Or worse still, for those with a country mansion, a subsidy for laying a ground source heat circuit under Jemima's paddock? Micro-gen is a toxic non-solution, in which subsidies are thrown at weak ideas because they appeal to the beards and sandals at DECC. If these ideas gained traction in the mass market, then the costs of the grid would get recovered on ever smaller volumes, making it uneconomic (despite centrally generated and despatched power being the potentially cleanest, safest, cheapest, most reliable solution we have for electricity.

People who believe in "micro-gen" should be forced to live completely off grid. A few would cope, most would freeze or starve (and that would be a bloody good thing).

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Ledswinger
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Re: the government refuses to properly invest in fledgling technologies

"Must be different in the UK. "

Not at all. The problem is that having carpeted the land and a lot of the shallow coastal seas with crappy wind trurbines, the fuckwits have finally woken up the fact that wind power is intermittent and unpredictable. As a result the only thing keeping the lights on is the decline in industrial power demand because of the economic depression we're enjoying. So, following the same "carbon is the breath of satan" logic, they looked round for a supposedly carbon free power source, and thought "nuclear, that's the answer". And so we're offering comparable subsidies to companies to build expensive and unproven nuclear plant designs as those pissed up the wall on wind.

Don't worry - if your government are fannying around with wind farms, they'll be on the new nuclear bandwagon next.

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Ledswinger
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"As a smug Brit living on the east coast of the UK can I just say...."

...that you're a bit worried that we've got a few current and decomissioned nukes on the east cost (Bradwell and Sizewell, and Dungeness further south), given that there is credible evidence of major tsunamis hitting the coast of the UK?

Admittedly the frequency of tsunamis in this country appears to be in the order of a few every thousands of years, but I wonder what the impact on our nuclear stations would have been if one had hit any UK coast now?

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Ledswinger
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Re: What is Renewable about Renewables?@Velv

"You can argue all you like about how much "renewables" is costing, but the pure and simple fact is that fossil fuels have a finite volume remaining on earth and we need to develop alternatives"

You miss my point, sir! I'm more than happy for renewables to be developed and installed when they work, and I agree that fossil fuels are finite (although not anywhere near as finite as the tree huggers make out).

My beef is that DECC and the EU have built out early stage renewables that have poor operational efficiency, dubious durability, poor economic performance, cost a fortune, AND STILL DON'T DELIVER POWER IN THE WAY PEOPLE NEED, nor will they in the forseeable future.

So instead of carpeting Wales with toy wind turbines over the past and next decade, and forcing the broken economies of Europe to pony up for Greenpeace's distopian vision of post industrial poverty, the billions of quid should have been not spent, or partly spent in other ways to improve power generating efficiency and security of supply, as well as grid scale energy storage research. And instead of thousands of crappy 0.2-1 MW turbines that are a waste of money, when we had cracked the energy storage problem THEN we could have built the (by then) properly developed 6MW+ offshore wind turbines with 200m+ hub heights. Incidentally, I don't buy the terrorism argument on nuclear power, but I would agree it's no answer at the moment because (due to insufficient development work largely) it cannot yet be built economically. I'd wager a guess that the fancy, over-expensive and unproven Gen4 reactors like the Areva EPR will never be economic.

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Ledswinger
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Re: What is Renewable about Renewables?

"I have to pick fault with this, ANYONE who would benefit from more insulation in their house (IE it will help to reduce bills/fuel consumption) can (or could don't know if the scheme is still going) have cavity wall insulation and loft insulation installed free of charge."

I'll take your experience at face value, but the actual scheme rules are specifically written to exclude regular bill payers from benefiting from ECO obligations. I work day in day out on matters of "energy company obligations", I spend a fair chunk of my working life looking at the various ways that government force ordinary bill payers to cough up for the "vulnerable", be those the now defunct CERT and CESP schemes, the continung WHD scheme, and the various strands of ECO (HHCRO, CSO, and CSCO) not to mention the various RHI and FIT subsidies and the forthcoming capacity mechanism to throw subsidies (this time) at fossil fuel generators because DECC have wrecked the wholesale market through their previous interventions.

There's four ways you might have got it done free:

First this may have been a mop up action by one of the companies that failed to meet their CERT and CESP targets the previous year.

Second under the current ECO rules you may live in an area designated by government as a "super low output area" which broadly speaking means well below average incomes, even if you are well off. Often this is postcode lottery stuff, so if you've got a nice house with a dodgy postcode then that would explain it.

Third would be that the installers are third parties rather than the energy companies who are obliged by law to pay for this, and they (shall we say) have been economical with the truth on the eligibility criteria. Not that I'm suggesting the bureaucratic mess that DECC's obligation programme has become is a flawed mess with plenty of dodgy installers looking to cash in, oh no, not me, wouldn't suggest that in a million years.

Fourth is simply that an energy company who are struggling to meet their obligation targets are giving it away in a pell mell panic in the hope of avoiding penalties, and their programme is out of control. That was certainly the case for about half of all companies at the end of the CESP programme.

Consider yourself lucky, because the rules were drafted by DECC specifically to stop the "able to pay" from having energy improvements installed through ECO!

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Ledswinger
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Re: What worries me about this news is ...

"Makes one wonder what other components of nuclear tech have been insufficiently tested before their use in commercial plants, doesn't it?"

We could ask the people who ran Chernobyl that question. Certainly in terms of UK regulation, which I suspect is fairly consistent with other developed economies, there's sh1tloads of safety and regulatory approvals needed for almost everything short of the toilet roll holders when you want to build and operate a new reactor. The problem I suspect is that this is all down to paper trails and civil service desk analysis, and you get your chit if you jump through the hoops in the right order, and that rarely includes full scale testing (and in this case, lets be clear they are only testing a very small scale model of a single rod). Other sectors often have similar problems - I'd suggest the example of the Boeing Dreamliner is one, having got certification for its dodgy batteries and perhaps over-ambitious electrics.

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Ledswinger
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Re: What is Renewable about Renewables?

"Of course the windmills wear out as do the solar panels, then like EVERYTHING else they need to be renewed, is that what makes the damned thing 'renewable'?"

No, it is the subsidies that are the "renewable" bit.

So the old Non Fossil Fuel Obligation was an early effort by government to funnel customers money into unproductive and unreliable technologies. They renewed NFFO in five annual tranches. Then that was a worn out old pile of badly drafted rules (like all of government's energy policy) and renewal occurrred with the Renewables Obligation, and they had five annual rounds renewing that. Then they brought in Feed in Tarrifs as a new way of throwing good money after bad. You've got negative subsidies like the European ETS charged on proper generating assets, and poorly qualified and inept Westminster politicians made that worse by introducing the Carbon Floor Price. Then we've got other sh1te like the Renewable Heat Incentive to throw yet more money at schemes to cut down half of Canda's trees and ship them over here. And of course the rules require wind farm operators to be paid even when there's no need for their output - yet another subsidy in the guise of "Constrain Payments" - only £30m in 2013, and what's that when you're saving the planet? Not to forget the Renewable Heat Premium Payment scheme, the Climate Change Levy, Levy Exemption Certificates, and in future Contracts for Differences (such as the one guaranteeing Electricte de France twice the current market rate for electricity if they'll build a new reactor at Hinkley Point)......

Meanwhile, latest DECC data issued yesterday shows that the circa 11 GW of wind capacity that these subsidies have been splurged on had a less than 22.8% load factor for offshore units in Q3, and onshore units a miserable 16.4%.

The total cost of this grand, unproven experiment is around £18bn, that has been and will continue to be funded by electricity bill payers. About two thirds of the cost are not visible in the government (or even industry views) of "subsidy", but the capacity factor tells you all you need to know. By pressing ahead pell mell with the hippy idea of renewables, DECC have created a huge rab-bag portfolio of poor quality assets - onshore wind turbines always have poor load factors, so should never have been built (and never would without the fat subsidies). By going early the existing asset base comprises huge numbers of crappy, low durability and undersized turbines, instead of letting the technology develop and installing huge offshore turbines. The chaotic thinking at DECC has made a complete pigs ear of the connection arrangments for offshore wind farms that pushes costs up even further. And at the end of all that, without energy storage wind power is not suitable for grid energy use - even if we re-engineer all our CCGT as fast response OCGT, the costs of the conversion and the greatly reduced efficiency outweigh the "benefits" of wind. Unless you're DECC or a politician, and fully paid up to the Climate Change agenda with its need for Urgent Action to Save the Planet (tm).

Recent claims about reducing the cost of energy bills are mere pantomime - the politicians are still committed to their mad, glassy eyed dream of "renewable" energy at any cost (in fact, your cost), and the only bit they've played with is a modest reduction in the insulating of houses of people who by and large are ultimately having their energy bills paid out of the welfare budget anyway.

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UK 'copyright czar' Edmund Quilty quits as Blighty's Director of Copyright Enforcement

Ledswinger
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Are Quilty's "skills" portable?

And if so, is there any area of the British economy in need of mindless and misguided trashing?

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EE and Voda subscribers to get 2G and 3G INSIDE the Channel Tunnel

Ledswinger
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Re: How about on UK train lines?!@ dotdavid

"Actually the logic works against the business case for HS2, because it assumes that time on a train is unproductive time and therefore can be seen as a cost "

Depends which bit of the logic. For both HS2 and the asked for 4G coverage of railway lines the logic is the same because both are seeking to address (in different ways) the supposedly unproductive time of a train journey. My points are that for anybody other than a few writers, proofreaders, and coders, train time is and always will be unproductive (so resolving train time or the alleged barriers to working on the train won't help). And even if you could overcome either journey time or make the train a secure virtual office, it wouldn't matter because most business travellers are not continuously productive.

Outside of transactional activities most "overhead" staff typically do add value to their employer, but in fits and starts, and fill in the balance of nominal working hours (in some cases outside as well) with "pretend" work. You know the stuff - project updates, team meetings, mandatory training in things that don't affect you, one to one catchup meetings, conference calls, business reviews, and indeed travel itself is perfect calendafilla for some people.

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Ledswinger
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Re: How about on UK train lines?!

"but proper 4G coverage along the main long distance routes (east coast, west coast, east midlands and great western mainlines) would be a big economic boost as people could be much more productive while travelling for work"

No it wouldn't be any sort of economic boost, this is the sort of sh1te logic used to make up the comedy business case for HS2. Suits (which in my defintion includes myself and most of the white collar commentardariat) are an overhead, and should be bright enough to realise that. Making our lives a little bit smoother when out and about on business travel won't save our employers any money, win any new contracts, or result in new products or services. If you can do valuable things remotely, why would you be travelling in the first place? And how will most people do anything commercially valuable in a public place like on a train without compromising commercial secrecy?

If full national 4G coverage (including all air, ground and underground) were economically valuable, then people would pay the price and the networks would happily build the infrastructure. In reality a minority of people want it, a minority of them would be willing to pay the price, and a minority of that group might actually do anything economically useful with the continuous connectivity.

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Space Station bags extra 10yrs of life as SOLAR STORM scrubs resupply

Ledswinger
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Re: Who's next to visit the ISS?

"Just in case it's the Jehovah's Witnesses..."

If the docking port bell rings then there's probably every reason to hide behind the sofa, but it won't be to hide from the Jehovahs, or through any shame at not having tidied up before receiving female Chinese visitors.

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You... (Sigh). You store our financials in a 'Clowds4U' account?

Ledswinger
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Re: IT can be a pain in the arse too

"It is exactly this laziness, and it IS laziness from IT departments who either refuse to spend the money on existing tools to make the systems easier to use or fit into the business model or refuse to learn/change existing software"

I think this does require rudeness: You moron.

Do you really think that the IT department have NOTHING better to do with their time or their limited resource than enabling effing graphic designers to work from home? Do you think that the business case will hold together when the Finance bods are asked to approve a project to reskill the IT department on Macs, set up the necessary systems and protocols, rewrite the policies and controls, all so that somebody needn't strain themselves coming into the office to do a job they applied for in the first place?

WFH is a nice luxury, and I do it from time to time. But I recognise it's a luxury, and it typically only exists where the wider business need for IT mobility makes it achievable at near zero cost to the company. There's a lot of people who'd like to WFH but can't (or are not allowed to) for reasons much wider than the technology, so I've no sympathy with your friend. If they want the full "luxuries" of corporate IT, then the only short term answer is to get with the herd and use WIndows, not to carp on because IT don't jump through hoops to satisfy relatively trivial requests from a handful of users who insist that their needs are "special", when these users are actually not the value creators for the business. Like it or not, the value creators for the business are probably the front end sales people who win new business, the accounts teams who collect the cash and pay all the bills, and the call centre/shop front staff who deal with customers.

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Whoa, hold on, Earth: Wolfram's discovered the 'Internet of Things'

Ledswinger
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"If my house kept tabs of whether I was in or not, it could save me money by lowering the heating as described."

Is a programmeable thermostat beyond you?

Admittedly for unexpected movements you'd be saved the effort of turning the heating on or off, but for short term movements you'd save nothing because the thermal mass of the house and heating makes the system too slow to respond to you going out the house for twenty minutes.

If the summary benefit of the whole internet of things is relieving the idle of the need to program their heating, or switch it on or off as required, then I have to ask why bother?

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US Navy trials GIANT ROBOTIC SPYBIRD for coastal patrols

Ledswinger
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Re: The UK should sign up now

"Why buy from the US? we're developing our own!"

Mmm. From the same people who brought you Nimrod AEW3 and MRA4. The first cost a billion quid twenty years ago for no working aircraft, the second cost four billion a couple of years back, again for no working aircraft. The MoD is incapable of specifying kit and letting contractors get on and build it, and the contractors are too reluctant to tell the MoD to stop arsing around with the spec every single day. Mix in corrupt and incompetent politicians, the results we see are inevitable.

A further problem is the (military?) obsession with trying to have cutting edge kit that causes vast cost escalation, and then results in limited purchases and excessive asset lives, so that the crews are often younger than the kit they are operating.

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Ledswinger
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Re: The UK should sign up now

"Since we retired the Nimrods, the UK has no sea patrol aircraft."

The UK has no defence vision nor strategy, either.

Just as well nobody wants to start a proper war with us, given that we've no aircraft carriers either, and no modern ground attack aircraft. And precious few of almost any type of defence asset you care to name, and virtually none of those are any good for the roles we have needed them to perform in the past twenty plus years.

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I've seen the future of car radio - and DAB isn't in it

Ledswinger
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"You'll still interrupt the on-demand music to hear local news"

Not round here. I'd be delighted to be rid of the inane babble of DJs, pretend "local" news from pretend "local" radio stations, incessant and irritatingly cr@p adverts for the same businesses over and over again, and worst of all, DJ's reading postings off Farcebook or Twitter. Thank goodness the phone in is mostly dead.

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Time travellers outsmart the NSA

Ledswinger
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Re: The wet dream of the liberal: "If I had the money ... I would eradicate baldness!"

"Just think how much good we could do in the world with such amounts of money. We could give everyone a decent hairdo and eradicate slapheads"

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Want Google to erase your data? Just wait for it to kill off one of its apps

Ledswinger
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Re: What Google wants.. @Shannon Jacobs

"Actually, from the bean counters' perspective, it's the only smart way to capture technology. "

Yes, but not for the reasons that you state. The best technology doesn't win out routinely, even when buying the innovators, so sub-optimal in house technology doesn't matter. The problem of innovation in large companies is that innovating is very difficult in that environment, and probably isn't what secondary market investors or customers want.

Large corporations are bureaucracies - that's what they do, how they work, indeed quite often why they work. When I turn on a tap or light switch, I want the companies running the system to have very low risk processes that work, I want them to be risk averse, to use proven, reliable technology, and to let startups or dedicated risk takers to focus on innovation. Bureaucracy can certainly kill a company (GM, Motorola), but in both of these examples there were huge R&D and M&A budgets, and the problem was that those budgets were wasted.

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Snowden to warn Brits on Xmas telly: Your children will NEVER have privacy

Ledswinger
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Re: @Matty B

"You get the freedom to spout your tinfoil-attired claptrap."

Actually he had this freedom before the "security" services were able to snoop all and everything. Prism and the various add ons have merely created a new enemy in the form of government, rather than defending anybody against anything.

All the attacks foiled in the UK appear (from the more detailed and authoritative press reports) to have been stopped by good old fashioned policing or by luck, not by mass surveillance and recording. Look at the murder of Lee Rigby - how the f*ck was he helped by all this surveillance? FFS, MI5 even knew years ago about the two primitive, thicky arsewipes behind the crime. Maybe if they put more resource into proper security actions instead of ineffective but sexy, glitzy hi tech big budget data scooping then they would have stopped these two. The same applies to the Boston bombers in the US.

But people like you Matt, you're a Christmas gift to SIS and the politicians. Your (worryingly) devout belief in the benefit, the moral rectitude, of mass surveillance, your willingness to swallow all the bilge served up to justify it, regardless of the evidence. You throw around terms against other commentards like "tin foil hatters" and "sheeple", but if there's anybody believing myths and hopelessly following the government line, then it's you, Mr Bryant.

However, as its Christmas I'll raise a glass to you, Matt, and hope you and your family have a good one.

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British Second World War codebreaker Alan Turing receives Royal pardon

Ledswinger
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Re: What A Crock of SHIT

" The law was grossly unsound "

By modern standards. By the social standards of the day it was widely regarded as a deviant practice which should be illegal. You might not like that, but that's how things were. And the underlying social attitudes persisted long after the law was changed - remember a certain glittery rock star's sham wedding to some Austrlain bird to prove he wasn't gay? Or how a reasonably long list of celebrities and politicians had to resign because they were gay, usually after denying the fact? I don't think Freddie Mercury ever publicly admitted being gay.

It's all very well condemning old laws for being wrong, but often they mirror the social attitudes of their times.

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Party's over in Waterloo as BlackBerry pulls plug on 2014 Live conference

Ledswinger
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Re: Probably wise they cancelled

Well, the title was all wrong. "Blackberry Live" doesn't fit. Take your pick:

Blackberry Comatose

Blackberry Deceased

Blackberry Defunct

Blackberry Inert

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Gift-giving gotchas: How to avoid Xmas morning EMBARRASSMENT

Ledswinger
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Re: Rechargables

I have one. But the problem is I don't want to have to ratch around in the garage or wherever looking for a piece of kit just because rechargeable batteries are shite (and that's not an option for people who wouldn't know what a multimeter was). I had hoped the smart charger would solve all that but it made no difference.

Why can't the fucking things just work, simply and reliably?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Rechargables

"When buying for others, it's probably best not to pay the extra cost of rechargeables unless the recipient is already using rechargeable batteries, as the batteries are likely to be thoughtlessly thrown away after their first use."

Bl00dy rechargeables. I've tried umpting different brands, at least four different chargers, and both batteries and chargers have this consistent bad habit of random early death. Made worse by the fact that most chargers need to charge cells in pairs. Even the £40 "smart charger" that could charge them singly and do test discharge and capacity measurement. In fact that f*cker probably only charged about 200 cells before shuffling off its coil, meaning that the cost per battery was 20p just for the charger, never mind the individual cell. As I buy disposable batteries from Aldi, Lidl or Poundland, I never pay more than 25p for an AA in the first place, so the economics have (despite my best intentions and perseverance) never worked out.

Now factor in the inconvenience of the ones that you think are charged and are in fact dead, and the need to establish whether the appliance is at fault, the battery, or the charger, and you start to see the rationale breaking down even more quickly than the bl00dy batteries themselves.

Rechargeable batteries are cr@p. They're worse for the environment, they're more expensive.in the long term, and they're a bl00dy nuisance. So there's a gift idea for somebody you have to buy for, but hate. Get them a battery charger and some rechargables.

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Feuding fanbois in a flap over piracy haven in new iOS 7 jailbreak tool

Ledswinger
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Re: No fuss.

"IOS users have, on the whole, become very institutionalised, so I doubt there will be much fuss."

When you think about all the landfill Android gash being touted in China (along with some decent stuff), and the malware infested cess pits of third party app stores out there, it seems distinctly possible that rather than hoping to break out of the the walled garden, many Chinese customers cannot wait to get inside and hear the clang as the gate shuts firmly behind them.

That's not being institutionalised, it's a very valid response to having your Android UX ruined by malware, crummy hardware, crummy software, or crummy accessories. We all know, after all, what can happen when you don't use an authentic Apple charger.

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World's cheapest tablet just got CHEAPER

Ledswinger
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Re: Cheap as chips!

"But the first year I could find inflation data for: 1751, shows that sixpence in 1751 would be worth £4.12 today."

On the other hand, that 6d was probably a half day's pay in 1751.

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Ledswinger
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Re: British Industry once again

I think you need to do some research. As I recall Datawind is British only by incorporation. It is owned by (IIRC, you can check if you really want the finer points) a couple of Canadian resident brothers of Indian ethnicity, and the manufacturing is done in India from Chinese components, using American software. At these prices the profits will be paltry (even allowing the subsidy), but they'll struggle to get them out of India untaxed, so there's no tax income the UK will make even if this goes well because Datawind will not be taxed twice, and the Indian government will have got their first.

Not sure why the Reg keeps parroting this crap about it being a British company - there's no British interest in this other than for the bloke who audits their statutory accounts for Companies House, and the £20 paid to a bloke to engrave a brass plaque to put on the accountants office door saying "Registered office of Datawind" along with 200 other companies.

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'F*** off, Google!' Protest blockades Google staff bus AGAIN – and Apple's

Ledswinger
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Re: Protesters are protesting the wrong things

"Imagine a new high paid industry comes to your town, one that you have no skills in and the end result is you can't get a job or pay rent any more. How is that fair?"

It isn't either fair or unfair, it's life. Industries come and they go over time, and the employees can't stop that happening. Buggy makers weren't happy when the automobile came along, but would you suggest that was unfair, or should have been stopped?

"Towns and cities that become dependant on one industry don't do well long term, look at Detroit for an example of that."

Seems a bit in conflict with your first point. Do you mean that Oakland shouldn't have become dependent upon dock working jobs, or SF shouldn't become dependent upon the tech sector? If the latter, you may have a point some decades into the future, but what would happen to California's state finances if the tech industry relocated itself to the other states?

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Ledswinger
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Re: bad side effect of a generally good thing

" onto a housing market raped mercilessly by the fetishism of the "everyone should own a house" housing bubble"

Rubbish. Underlying asset prices (and eventually rents) of buy to let properties are just as much of a bubble, and both are caused by the same thing - demand for both rented and bought housing growing faster than supply. In the UK that's mostly down to the twin idiocies of politicians exercising too much control on the housing market so that insufficient new houses are built, and their "open door" policies on immigration that allow in around 150,000 people (or more) each year.

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Used all your mobile data? Why not buy your mate's excess bits?

Ledswinger
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"Hey Mr. Politburo, no need for laws; look how *fair* we a being!"

Hardly an issue in China. Compliance is binary - you're in with the politicians (and probably bunging them some, or even run by them), or you're not. And if you're not then sticking to the letter of the law won't help you one bit. You will soon find your employees have mysteriously fallen out of windows, or been placed under house arrest, and your commercial partners have vanished like rice in a refugee camp.

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Ledswinger
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Never mind your wife, what's in it for China Mobile?

I would guess that one of the biggest earners for mobile networks around the world is people incurring the punitive data and voice rates when they go outside their bundle. With this "innovation" the mobile operator gets nothing for a net increase in network data use (or gets none of the pure margin extra revenue that it currently would).

Why not simply offer a fair call and data rate to all users outside of the bundles in the first place?

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Fanbois, prepare to lose your sh*t as BRUSSELS KILLS IPHONE dock

Ledswinger
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Re: Give some credit where it is deue

"This is a nice example of the EC getting things right"

Only if your view of supra-state government is that its purpose is to dabble in the really important stuff like forcing a profitable and hugle successful company to adopt a rather flimsy connector that for valid commercial or technical reasons they've decided they don't want to.

If it was important to the fanbois, they'd vote with their feet. I don't own any Apple kit, but I think Apple corporation and their customers are the people to decide on how their stuff works, not a bunch of tecnhically illiterate c*nts in Brussels who can't even get their own accounts audited.

However, just as you are delighted with this sterling performance by the EU, leaping into action like a greased panther, I'm sure the 57.4% of Spanish youth who are unemployed will be f***ing delighted to hear that the overpaid @rseholes in Brussels have decided that Apple will have to use micro USB. Or the 41% of Italian young people, or 36% of Portugese youth.

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Mosquitoes, Comets and Vampires: The de Havilland Museum

Ledswinger
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Re: A fascinating place.

Anybody in that neck of the woods shouldn't miss out on visiting Old Warden, a few miles up the road in Bedfordshire.

When I first went I was expecting it would be rather dull, full of stuffed stringbags, but the reality is that it is alive, with many of the exhibits in flying condition and brought out on special occaisions, lots of detail on the engineering and the history. If you're there during the week you can see the guys restoring aircraft, but even at weekends the place reeks of fabric dope and engine oil. Compared to the sterile, odour free RAF museums at Cosford and Hendon, Old Warden shows what an aircraft museum should be,

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Harvard kid, 20, emailed uni bomb threat via Tor to avoid final exam, says FBI

Ledswinger
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Re: Missing the obvious...

"The stupid part was confessing. "

Only stupid if voluntary. Given that the police spend a lot of time interrogating people, they are usually as good at it as you will be at your jobs. Keeping a completely straight face, and telling a coherent and unchanging story when being questioned by the police is not as easy as it seems, and I'd wager that any non-career criminal will struggle to avoid dobbing themselves in it.

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Suffering SPITZER! Boffins discover Milky Way's MISSING ARMS

Ledswinger
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"But (rather like art galleries) my mild shame at not doing more civilised things myself is at least balanced by awe at and gratitude for those who do"

If you're ever in St Ives, visit the Tate Modern. It is a five star attraction that offers a "kill or cure" outcome for undecided visitors. The building's fantastic, in a great location. In my case it confirmed that modern art is mostly shit, with pride of place given (for example) to a single sheet of A4 paper with a single large solid black diamond shape on it. Or weird bronze castings that look like an experimental French urinal (as opposed to Marcel Duchamp's "Fountain", which is a urinal). Boxes of books you rummage around in and then insert cut out text in between the pages to "create art". The obligatory whole room devoted to some woman who you've never heard of, but who produced a lot of rather dull and uninteresting paintings and junk sculptures then "went and lived the rest of her life as a man on the West Bank in Paris".

And the whole experience is rounded off by traditional po-faced babooshkas to shoo you away when you mistakenly sit on an exhibit because it looks like a bench. YMMV, you might find you love it, but I commend the place to anybody: Those who love modern art (and can't see when an "artist" is talentless and simply taking the piss); those who are undecided; and those who are fairly sure they won't like it, but have a good sense of humour.

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IT bods: Windows XP, we WON'T leave you. Migrate? Chuh! As if...

Ledswinger
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Re: I believe it

"there are many applications that only work with the specific quirks of IE 6, and are too expensive or impossible to reasonably upgrade. "

Nothing is impossible. All IT comes down to binary at the end of the day. Too expensive is a matter of choice.

In most of these enterprise cases idiot CIOs allowed business critical dependencies to develop, when exercise of their professional responsibility should have recognised that third party code isn't supported for ever, and that nailing stuff to IE6 (which was shit at the time, please remember) was a really bad and short sighted idea.

It may now be expensive to undo a badly done job, and redo it all properly, but RBS shows what happens when your IT is one vast pile of sticking plasters. From my dealings with the company I believe Vodafone's IT is equally unreliable, so I'm guessing that their IT strategy is a similar "elastoplast + outsource to cheap and crap foreigners", and there's plenty of other companies who've made the same mistake.

Choices are tougher in the SME sector, but for any big corporation running XP after next April, I hope they get trashed, and then clobbered by the regulators for their incompetence and stupidity.

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Samsung poaches Apple store guru for US retail push

Ledswinger
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"I'd imagine they are going to pee off a lot of their retailers (John Lewis, Tesco etc.) which could be very dangerous"

Hardly. By definition, dedicated retailers rarely have exclusivity on a brand product, so another few stores opening is neither here nor there. I'd guess Samsung stores won't be offering discounted products, nor will they be shifting any volume - their purpose is simply to be a better and more wide ranging showroom for Samsung's over-arching brand than can be achieved through Argos, JL, Tesco, Carphone Warehouse, PC World etc.

I doubt it will be a success, and they'll close within a year of opening, but even if it is a success, that will probably help other retailers shift Samsung kit rather than undermine them. Having said that, I'm with another commentard above: This shows Samsung's marketing department is out of control, and there's such a big budget that they don't have a clue (even by marketing standards) what to do with the money. Evidently the marketing department see this excess as a solution to the problem that the S4 is too f***ing expensive and not selling fast enough, and they've never heard of the Nexus 5 or Moto G. Peak Samsung, IMHO.

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James Bond's 'shaken not stirred': Down to trembling boozer's hands, claim boffins

Ledswinger
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Which makes the Lancet equivalent to the Daily Star.

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Apple CEO Cook breaks YEARS OF SILENCE, finally speaks to El Reg hack

Ledswinger
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Re: "Best" is not just a word

"Pedant. Or is that not sufficiently sentencey for you?"

You realise that "pedant" is one of the highest accolades a commentard can receive?

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Santa brings Dixons £31m profits as ghost of Comet is laid to rest

Ledswinger
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" sales were up thanks to steady cutting of less profitable subsidiaries"

So the Reg reckons the subsidiaries had negative sales?

Notwithstanding my contempt for Dixons and PC World, I think even they would struggle to deliver a negative top line.

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Excise Xmas prezzie indecision MISERY with El Reg’s gift guide²

Ledswinger
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Re: Jingle bells, batman smells...

"Birmingham 1978 (ish)."

Still current in the Midlands even today!

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Ledswinger
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Re: washable keyboard?

"Put my normal keyboard in the dishwasher (not including the internal circuit board). "

The caveat is important. I had a rather greasy and dirty keyboard, and followed the advice to dishwash it, knowingly accepting that this was "kill or cure". And it was "kill" - dead as the dodo despite partial disassembly and drying in the airing cupboard for a week. I didn't mind too much, but anybody who values their keyboard should either fully dismantle and only wash the mechanical bits, or forgo the siren call of the dishwasher and stick to cotton buds, kitchen roll and a big bottle of ispropyl alcohol.

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Unlocking CryptoLocker: How infosec bods hunt the fiends behind it

Ledswinger
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Re: Offer a reward

" Instead, deal with the Russion authorities and have them take care of matters"

Dream on, mate! A big part of the problem is that the Russian state and Russian criminals exist on a continuum, not a binary scale. And not in the manner of the ongoing till-dipping and employ-your-mates graft prevalent in the US or UK, but on a much larger, more open and more brutal scale. We all know what happens to investigative journalists in Russia for example - murdered, and the authorities never seem to find the cuplrits.

So the chances are that the Cryptolocker gang are already part of criminal/political gang run by a mid level oligarch in some sh1tty oblast in southern Russia. And if they aren't they'll be looking to use their new found wealth to buy friends and influence. The only prospect of the authorities turning on them is if those same authorities think they aren't getting their cut, and have the back up of even more powerful thugs.

Progessively isolating increasingly large amounts of the internet is the only answer, because that would force the Russian government's hand when the tap is about to be turned off. But I simply don't think that US or European politicians are clever enough or brave enough to start such a move. Funny, isn't it. All this NSA and GCHQ data and phone scraping and storing "to keep us safe" and the useless f*ckers can't protect us from spam or business-grade malware?

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Resellers, distributors - your countdown to oblivion starts NOW

Ledswinger
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Re: "Value-add is why people will pay you"

"Any similar IT-specific examples?"

The whole BPO and enterprise services market is lock in. HP, IBM, et al generally can't do things cheaper than the customer when you include their margin, customer acquisition and account management costs. But by promising half wit CIO and CFOs the earth, justified by the illusory magic of labour arbitrage, they persuade big companies to hand over control of IT infrastructure and business critical functions like accounts payable and receivable. AP, AR, the IT helpdesk what are they if not transactional, low value services fit only to be performed by Indians?

And when after eighteen months it becomes clear that like for like costs are going up and up, service is sh1te and getting worse, the same CIO and CFO types find they've been had. They don't have control of their own staff to bring the service back in house, because after these staff were TUPEd to the outsourcer, said outsourcer then sacked them all and employed idiots on a pittance (HP, I'm glaring at you in particular, but the other vermin in the outsource sector are little better).

So that is the IT and BPO lock in: The vendors make sure that the customer is locked in for a good long while by a contract they don't understand. Said customers usually find they can't enforce the SLA on the vendor. And having TUPEd their own staff down the river, the only option is renew with the devil you know, or renew with the devil you don't know.

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