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* Posts by Ledswinger

2847 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

Creating your GOLDEN statue of NICOLAS CAGE FINALLY possible

Ledswinger
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Re: Cell

"Did I forget to mention just how cheesy this guy is?"

I think you may have covered it.

But why print a statue in gold then, when it would be a lot cheaper to have it 3D printed in cheese?

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Tablet boom quiets down a bit as growth slows

Ledswinger
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Re: On the positive side

"As for the rest, yes, many will get a new tablet resulting in an temporary extension of new sales, but how many of them will insist on a replaceable battery this time round?"

Very few. The people who worry about replaceable batteries (like you and I) are thinking two years ahead, and about keeping kit in operation. Most people don't think like that, and work on the basis that they'll have a new one. Hasn't done Apple any harm to have non user replaceable batteries, and whilst the batteries can be replaced on almost all sealed devices, I'm not convinced that many are.

The other consideration is that the highly streamlined supply chain means new tablet costs are low, whereas the convoluted supply chain for parts, plus the relatively time intensive work to dismantle and reassemble a device often make replacing the battery relatively expensive if you're paying somebody to do it.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Looks like we are seeing slowdowns across the board...

I wouldn't worry too much about the Feds printing press, the slowdown is merely for maintenance to enable it to run faster.

Consider the consequences of a protracted slowdown or even reversal in the money printing. No politician is going to stand up and deliver a balanced budget, since that means a cut in current spending of 17% (or a tax increase of 23% or thereabouts). This is also before the impact of future unfunded liabilities that are estimated at over $1m per taxpayer.

Like the UK and most of Europe, the US is addicted to big state spending, and doing so with borrowed or printed money. As Japan shows, you can get to a point where other countries won't lend to you, but then you just roll the printing presses even faster, and in effect steal from your own citizens (which is how Greece managed before they pulled on the Eurozone straitjacket).

This has to end badly, but how long before it does - could be weeks, could be decades. No politician with any chance of government is proposing to sort the mess out. In the UK opposition politicians are squealing like stuck pigs over "austerity", when the current government is still spending £100bn more each year than it raises in taxes. In the US the military-industrial complex is putting on a good show of the absolute need to continue spending more on "defence" than the next ten largest economies combined, and the Democrats are still wedded to their unfunded healthcare programme. California is the ghost of Christmas future for the wider US - spiralling public spending, with no political responsibility or accountability.

It's enough to make you give up your tablet, buy a rifle and go to a log cabin in the wilderness.

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Please work for nothing, Mr Dabbs. What can you lose?

Ledswinger
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Harsh!

"You read it for nothing AND get paid to do so AND you want to get paid a second time to celebrate your poor judgement?"

That's a bit harsh. Even though we salarymen are indeed being paid, (a) we aren't being paid by you, (b) even when being paid by a third party, time spent reading still has an opportunity cost to us, and (c) there's a good chance we were duped into it by a juicy headline (so it's YOUR fault).

So if you were to let us down with a rather dull article (admittedly you've done yourself proud this week), then the cost that I'd need to be compensated for is the entertainment, education or work-related utility that I could have found reading other free to web content, and the disappointment that I'd suffered, naturally expecting good stuff from you. Admittedly that's not going to be a very high value, but where this leads me is the important conclusion that the Holy Grail of micro-payments for web content needs to be a two way transaction platform, that facilitates not just small payments and small refunds, but also small compensation.

Would you continue to write without indemnity insurance under this sort of payment structure? A really top notch article should bring in a lot more than the occaisonal duffer costs you, and you'd end up earning more than the peanuts the Reg are chucking you? And the Reg could stop having to prostrate itself to advertisers, and just take a small share of your income stream.

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Quid-a-day Reg nosh posse chap faces starvation diet

Ledswinger
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Re: It's a gas, gas, gas!

Well, a service is something provided to a third party, and I'm not sure that they'd appreciate FaaS. I prefer the "on demand" concept, so FoD.

For the Kickstarter project, I did think that we could harness home PC users for the basic data collection Folding@home style. They could keep scrupulous records of their diet (including timing) and of the subjective quality of their emissions, under the obvious name of Farting@home. Then we have proper boffins with white coats and pointy heads to undertake some scientific and statistical magic.

Obviously we'd need to protect the IP, so that (for example) appropriate mixes could be sold to the highest bidder, and protected against imitations and copy cats. I can feel a whole business model coming on: Company name: Miasma Natural Fragrances Ltd, Fast Food Product lines: "Boffburger", "Kids Party Guff Box", "Quarter Pounder With Attitude", Pre-prepared meals for supermarkets under the MNF Vilest brand: Duckstepper Beans, Braised Lamb Gutrotter, and so on.

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Ledswinger
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Re: It's a gas, gas, gas!

"--> Think gas mask."

Not IME. You get the gas volume from pulses, but you need plenty of spices and ideally some meat to get a good strong aroma. So a bland pulse laden diet gets you noisy cold farts, but if you spice it up and mix in some meat you can produce rewardingly warm, aromatic and often silent trumps.

It really is about time that we had some proper research on what diet produces the fastest, richest, and most reliable flatulence, to bring this everyday pleasure closer to an "on demand" experience, rather than coming as an unplanned delight.

Do you think that Kickstarter could fund the "On Demand" research project?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Healthy body fat percentage@DocJames

"Obesity is a societal issue, with social change required to fix it."

Not in my book. That's a cop out to the overweight who don't want to take responsibility for being lardy. I've dropped a couple of stone and kept it off, but it requires me to take the action.

I'm not sure that you meant it, but for the public health specialists "societal change" seems to involve fat taxes, outlawing large fizzy drinks, regulation of where shops are allowed to put the sweets and other nonsense. As per Fluffy Bunny's excellent post, much of the advice people have been given is wrong, although the reality is they don't even follow that advice. But this wrong advice extends to things like encouraging exercise - most people simply don't do enough to make a difference to the considerable over-eating most of us do of our own free will.

If people are happy being fat, is it society's (or rather government's) job to intervene? And if they aren't happy being fat, isn't it their responsibility to reduce the amount of junk they eat? All very well blaming McDonald's and demanding regulation, but I don't see long queues of people at salad bars, and closing the fast food industry down would have the same effect as the War on Pubs, which has simply meant people drink at home.

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Ledswinger
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Re: you may not starve as much as you think

"900 calories per 100g is uncooked though"

Well, I wasn't suggesting that Lester or the other cooked and ate either themselves or each other. Although if they do could we have pictures? Some readers may recall the tragic tale of Horace, the boy who ate himself (those who don't should google it).

But to our commentard quizzing the high energy content of fat, yes it is (subject to my maths), because biologically that is the very purpose of fat, to form a flexible, compact, energy dense resource that you carry round with you until you need it. In the developed world most people never burn it off, leading to the high incidence of obesity, and resulting health problems.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Bulk buying

"Doesn't a full freezer cost less to run than an empty one as you don't have to keep chilling the warm air that gets in when you open it up?"

In theory yes. But unless you're loading it with pre-frozen goods the marginal air-exchange heat losses of (say) three openings per day become relatively small compared to the energy use in freezing home cooking, even from room temperature, largely because there's three orders of magnitude between the volumetric heat capacity of air and typical solids.

In practical terms the primary inefficiency of an under-utilised freezer is down to the fact that you've got a steep heat gradient across a larger surface area than you need, and you've got continuous heat loss/gain on that unnecessarily larger surface area.

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Ledswinger
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Re: you may not starve as much as you think

"If I ate the whole lot then, I'd be on 2,190 Calories per day, by my new reckoning*. Still not enough to fuel heavy digging."

Of course it is. unless you're already at 15% body fat, and I doubt that many of us are.

A typical "not fat" male still carries around 20% of their body mass as fat. You could burn off down to 15% and still be carrying more than an athlete, and not looking underweight, so that's 5% of say 85 kg, meaning that there's a minimum of 4.25 kg of lard you could force your body to use.

At 900 calories per 100g, that's a built in bum-bag of 38,000 calories just asking to be used. If you're less than svelte then your resources may be far greater.

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Study: Users don't much care about Heartbleed hacking dangers

Ledswinger
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Re: People don't have time to get worried

Never mind giving a ****, there's the problem of what Mr Average can do about this. There's no point changing passwords until all vulnerable servers have been patched. But Mr Average doesn't know whether the servers he logs into were vulnerable in the first place, he doesn't know when or if they're fixed. And if he's got to change all his passwords, they all get saved or written down somewhere.

And even after all that, look at the appalling security that some commercial companies apply to sensitive data. There's been a series of major security breaches that show companies have a cavalier attitude to customer data. So why would an average user worry too much about the remote possibility of being hacked, when the likes of Target, Neiman Marcus, TJX/TKMaxx are so remiss in their responsibilities as data custodians?

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Script fools n00b hackers into hacking themselves

Ledswinger
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Give these people an award!

With all the "bad" hacking going on, the people behind this deserve an award. The unprincipled script kiddies get a cyber-wedgy of their own doing, Farcebook gets more noise, a nice trade in "likes" can be started, which keeps marketing dweebs everywhere happy. And for those of us who don't run scripts we don't understand, and don't give a tinker's cuss about FB, well, it's simple amusement.

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Twitter's got a new UK public policy wonk... 'You are the product' Big Brother Watch bloke!

Ledswinger
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Re: @AC "Oxymoron"

"Although with Stewart Lee, he's probably just thick."

I'm sure you're right.

His ethics are probably negotiable, but I can understand that - from scraping around to make a £50-60k living at BBW, he's suddenly on the Farcebook payroll on a six figure package with a bottomless expense budget and a brand name that people listen to simply because they've heard of it.

In terms of questionable ethics, though, what about Farcebook. I daresay they'd be able to buy (if not already have) a very well paid and very effective Head of Lobbying, Greasing, Free Lunching and General C***ery. So why go for Pickles? Simply to behead an organisation that might be making your life difficult, IMHO.

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BSkyB broadband growth chopped in HALF

Ledswinger
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Re: broadband customer growth halved

"I always find this panic about "less growth" quite ridiculous."

Not so much a panic, but a concern. When a takeover or asset transfer deal is one, the companies agree a valuation based on the customer numbers, projections of churn etc, almost always resulting in a valuation based on a growth scenario. As you say, this can't go on for ever, but the valuation models probably project it forward for a few years, so when the forecast numbers turn out to be optimistic, it means that Sky's shareholders are losing money.

But in the grand scheme of things although everybody knows that most takeovers are bad for customers, and bad for the acquiring company, M&A remains wildly popular in boardrooms up and down the land. It's a useful diversion from the thorny problems like delivering good customer service, good value, and a product that works. Why enter the world of pain that is frontline delivery, when you can w@nk around with investment bankers, spending millions of quid on other people's money so that you can claim on your CV to be the brains behind the "successful acquisition and integration of <insert company name here>". Look at Notsirfred Goodwin - why address pressing problems of culture, performance and risk in your core business, when you can earn a fat bonus by outsourcing and offshoring huge numbers of home market jobs, and big it up acquiring dodgy foreign banks?

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The quid-a-day nosh challenge: Anyone fancy this fungus I found?

Ledswinger
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Re: Re. Silent Spring

"Hate to say it but Carson might have been on the right track, "

A fair point. But can I have some household fly spray that actually works? The smelly, weak permethrin rubbish masquerading as fly killer in British supermarkets is no more effective than hair spray. It would be more effective to us a cigarette lighter James Bond style to kill the 'orrible little blighters.

What I'd give for a tin of good old fashioned organophosphorus based stuff.

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Australia told to follow UK's 'Digital by default' strategy

Ledswinger
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"but local political sensibilities deem budget deficits disastrous and unendurable"

A very sensible position. Greece has demonstrated the problem of imbalanced budgets in some style. Japan may be next, with public sector debt at 200% of GDP and rising, even as the economy slows and an ageing population retire. And too many of the major European economies are looking at impoverished futures. The UK, for example, will have public sector net debt of £1.5 trillion by 2017. At typical long term interest rates, that's both £60bn a year spent on interest, plus an obligation to repay or roll-over the £1.5 trillion on future generations.

So not only will kids (if they go to university) end up with huge tuition fees and three years of living costs as a circa £50,000 loan, but by the time they join the workforce in the later tweny-teens or early 20202's they'll also be having to shoulder something of the order of a £50,000 per head share of the national debt.

There's a small number of countries averse to public debt, and as far as I can see they are the sensible few. As for the rest (US, Japan, China, UK, Eurozone), how long can you keep spending more than you have?

For anybody who wants to suggest that short term or purely cyclical deficits are OK, I'd just remind them that UK income tax started off as a temporary measure in response to a short term deficit.

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GOV.UK push in action: Er, FEWER Brits filling out govt forms online

Ledswinger
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Re: Crap online services the reason?

"the SA site is not that bad"

That's true. I'd go further and say that Self Assessment on line is very good. Unfortunately HMRC have been persuaded that their site should use "Government Gateway" ID's, which means that if you lose your user ID (too simple to use the UTR, of course) then you're stuffed. When you've finally gotten a new user ID out of the GG service by snail mail, then you need a new password. Another long slow pain in the arse process, often involving snail mail, and stupid unhelpful error messages.

I wouldn't be surprised if the drop in on line access is solely because of the Government Gateway bollocks. And that's why the tax disc site works so well - they send me a letter with a reference number on, and that's all I need. No stupid, centrally managed user IDs there.

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Google forges a Silver bullet for Android, aims it at Samsung's heart

Ledswinger
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"Don't Google already design and sell premium Android phones/tablets?"

Not as such. The Nexus devices were more "reference" designs than an intention to take on the high end market where the OEMs were slugging it out. Nexus 5 is without doubt a damn good phone, but it isn't slugging it out with the S5, iPhone 5S, HTC One etc. Where the Nexus brand has been pitched is at sensible, rational, cost conscious consumers, where Google evidently want to take their hardware brand is into the profitable, sunlit uplands of the premium phone sector, where "rational", "sensible" and "cost conscious" are just words in a marketing dweeb's bad dream.

I suspect that the experience with Nexus and Motorola has made Google think "Jeez, this smartphone making is just assembly of other people's IC and screens, with distribution and marketing on top. We can do all that, and in fact we can pay somebody else to do the assembly, at whatever passes for minimum wage in China!"

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Ledswinger
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Undaunted

"Today they must be weighing their options – and the daunting cost of creating a joint competing brand to Google's Silver"

Seems to me that with Firefox, Tizen, Sailfish and Ubuntu (and indeed BB), there's a whole bag full of nearly-market ready mobile operating systems out there. Those that can offer Android compatibility manage to avoid the "no-apps, no sale" hurdle, and even if Google puts a walled garden round the Play store, if the software's the same there's nothing to stop developers selling via more than one market place.

If Google go down that route, then they might find that Samsung, HTC or whoever's "Tizen Privacy phone" attracts a lot of attention, and Google cook their own goose. I can't believe that my personal data is worth sufficient that they could gold plate "Silver" to the point where I'd be willing to be locked in a walled garden. If I wanted that, I'd buy an iPhone, and laugh at Google's security and privacy issues.

Is this the ultimate "me too" - Google want to be Apple? Sorry Larry, you're no Steve Jobs.

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FCC seeks $48K fine from mobile phone-jamming driver

Ledswinger
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Re: Yo, Jason!

"Very sad for the deaths, however it has to be pointed out that if there was a chance of the victims surviving and someone like this guy was in the area then no one would be able to call the emergency services to get them the help they needed in time."

Back to the question of whether two wrongs make a right. Doing no more research than Wikipedia, I dug up a US study from 2010 that estimated around 1,000 deaths a year in the US from phone-distracted driving. How many deaths do we think that were caused by mobile phone jammers? My guess is "none".

But it's interesting to note that this bloke, whilst being a bit of a berk (or a 'berger) is being pursued for $48k. What's the fine for driving whilst using a mobile, and how does that compare to the relative risk?

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Microsoft forms 'Special Projects' black ops team

Ledswinger
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Re: Surely this is just Microsoft Research under a different name?

"Microsoft Research has been around for over 20 years, hardly a reaction to the effect of the changing nature of computing technology on Microsoft market share as you suggest"

I wasn't referring to the whole of Microsoft Research, but to the focus of the article, which is the (allegedly new) skunk works division that has been created. And I stand by my comments that this is a belated reaction to the market moving on past.

I suspect (being a charitable sort of person) that you've concatenated the content of my post with the starting one of this thread, since that started off asking if this was merely a rebrand of MS Research.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Surely this is just Microsoft Research under a different name?

"Microsoft should be commended for putting resources into an activity aimed at the public good."

Bwahahahahahahahahahaha! You think for one nano-second that this has ANYTHING to do with the public good? Or on reflection you might want to consider whether some PR drongo dropped in that term "because it reads better".

The only reason MS are doing this is because their market share in the overall tech market is sliding relentlessly, not because they aren't selling more OS, server and productivity software, but because the internet, tablets, phones, smart devices and the whole internet of things is passing Microsoft by like a 20k road race passing a fat old bloke gawping from the pavement.

This skunkworks project is a reaction to Microsoft's belated realisation that they are the gawping fat man, the problem is that the reason they became so corpulent was the massive success in desktop and OS productivity. No growth businesses ever got the visibility or support, they never passed any threshold of materiality, and the core businesses simply became unreactive cash cows. Those cash cows stopped listening to customers years ago (eg fixing the crummy help and syntax issues or appalling chart functionality in Excel), and drove their own agenda (like ribbon interfaces). They have failed to make their software secure for the internet age after a decade of claiming to try, despite finding time to foist dog's breakfast's like Vista and W8 on the world. Can a business as non-customer centric as Microsoft has become ever build new relevance? We'll see, but I doubt it. I wouldn't trust them with cloud solutions, I'd convert to open source rather than buy their software on subscription, and I wouldn't touch WinPho unless I was actually paid.

Critically, this isn't because their solutions don't work, it is that I (and I suspect the rest of the world) don't love or desire Microsoft - we just need them as the current lowest common denominator in Office and OS. Look at things like Surface, and the most enthusiasm you'll hear is "that'll be worth a mint in twenty years". Nokia had a lot of customer goodwill and affection that under Elop's control they have squandered. Google I have no affection for, but lots of respect - they do a lot for me, I just need to keep an eye on what the actual cost to me is. Many people fawn over Apple hardware (and software sometimes).

But who looks forward to buying a Microsoft product, or takes pride in owning one?

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Customisation is BAD for the economy, say Oz productivity wonks

Ledswinger
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Re: Productivity Commission is Redundant

"note= BMW motor car company is very proud of the fact that just about every new car they sell is a 'Custom Job'..."

Only BMW drivers believe that shite. BMW are a volume car maker. All major components are standardised, and the trick is to offer a few options that the gullible can believe amounts to "customisation". By the dictionary definition that BMW use, every single Ford Fiesta is a custom job.

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Marauding quid-a-day nosh hack menaces teepee hippie villages

Ledswinger
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Re: Does he

"It's not all about calories. "

It is when the challenge is to eat for a week on a fiver.

In a comment on a related article I suggested next year's challenge could be the cheapest nutritionally balanced diet that somebody could subsist on, I suspect that involves quite a lot more planning.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Is it foraging still if......

" I'm actually going to pass on this one and let the donkeys do it."

I can understand that. Of course, if you didn't pay for the donkey, and don't pay to have it killed, it too might count as foraging?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donkey_Burger

That photo looks quite enticing, but I suppose I shouldn't be surprised given that nobody seemed to complain when Findus were serving horse meat lasagne all across Blighty.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Drinks

"Don't think anyone else has an additional beverage."

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/urine-the-bodys-own-health-drink-467303.html

Bottoms up!

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Ledswinger
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Re: Is it foraging still if......

Yes. Raiding bins and skips is also legitimate, and stealing pet and bird food also qualify. Insects (and all other wildlife) would count so long as there's no marginal cost of production eg bullets used in shooting and eating a dog have a marginal cost, whereas if you already own an axe and use that then there's no additional expense (ignoring fines or compensation to dog owners).

Eating grass is also on the foraging agenda, If it's not too parched, Lester should eat the lawn. A quick google suggests grass has 4.5 kcal per gram, so a kilo of wet grass would sustain him for a couple of days - although allowing for the less efficient human digestion of grass (cf ruminants) he'd either have to eat his own tods (like rabbits do) to get the full energy content out, or accept a lower metabolised gain, in which case he might be looking at a couple of kilos of fresh grass to give him one day's worth of energy. A quick google warns that the silica in grass will wear teeth down, so he'd need to stew the grass and swallow it without chewing.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Does he

I don't know. But he ought to treasure them, because a quick and possibly careless analysis suggests that the milk & tea bags consumed 18% of his budget but delivered only 6% of the energy content, so that's an expensive luxury that's cost him the thick end of an additional 2,500 kcal. Tomatoes are another expensive luxury, using 5% of the budget for 1% of the energy content, or another 1,500 kcal.

If he'd swapped the milky tea and the toms for extra rice, oats, pasta or pulses then he'd be looking at around 2,000 kcal per day rather than the 1,500 he's committed to.

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Target finally implements chip and PIN card protections

Ledswinger
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"Target has long been an advocate for the widespread adoption of chip-and-PIN card technology," said Target CFO and executive vice president John Mulligan"

...........although few believed him, and the evidence was also stacked against his outrageous claim.

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Victory for Microsoft as Supremes decline to hear Novell's WordPerfect whine

Ledswinger
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Re: I'm still trying

"The success of Word is, I'm convinced, not based on the merit of the program, but rather on the unscrupulous use of power by Microsoft and major marketing blunders on the part of the various owners of WordPerfect."

Certainly true for the spreadsheet. 123 was always the craftsman's tool, easier and more intuitive to use than Excel, but now Excel (and its ghastly macros and pivot tables) rule supreme.

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Cuffing darknet-dwelling cyberscum is tricky. We'll 'disrupt' crims instead, warns top cop

Ledswinger
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Not our fault!

""But [NSA whistleblower Edward] Snowden has made it more difficult for law enforcement to hunt down the wolves,"

And of course, the cyber-plods were soooooooo successful up until that point.

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Brit IT workers are so stressed that 'TWO-THIRDS' want to quit

Ledswinger
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Re: Biased from the start

"In the key finding they only list the negative responses even though there were some quite happy IT admins."

I suspect the pool of happy IT workers is a much smaller scale than the ocean of unhappy, stressed IT workers. I'm not biased - I don't work in IT any more, and I just sit on the outside looking in, with good contacts who are on the inside and are feeling the pain.

However, rather than worrying about the motives of the survey's commissioner, the two pieces of jigsaw that I'd put together are the skills shortage that IT employers spend entire lifetimes carping about, and the fact that said IT employers often treat their staff like s**t. CIO's probably don't read the Reg (1), but if they did then the message would be that if they managed their staff with competence and respect, they wouldn't then spend 80% of their working time fighting to cover vacancies, pi55ing off users and fellow managers with cr@p service, or embroiled in life-sapping recruitment exercises.

Note 1: I suspect some CIO's do. But like a useless manager reading a Dilbert cartoon, they laugh without realising that they are the butt of the joke.

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Quid-a-day Reg nosh posse chap fears for his waistline

Ledswinger
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Re: I think...

" I think...You will live, don't worry about it. "

It's his bank balance he needs to worry about. By buying apples, tinned pulses and lentils in brine, most of what our man has paid for (by weight) is water. He'd have got twice the calories and nutrients by buying dried pulses. On the apples I'm less clear what makes sense, but dried prunes are probably a better bet, or bananas if you want fresh.

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A real pot-boiler kicks off Reg man's quid-a-day nosh challenge

Ledswinger
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Next year's challenge

Whilst lauding the aims, next year's challenge could perhaps be to see what the cheapest acceptably balanced diet would be. So rather than simply balancing your energy needs and a basic protein/carb mix, for one week at the lowest absolute cost, to actually see what can be done on a diet that won't give you scurvy, rickets, anemia or whatever after a couple of months?

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New .london domains touted tomorrow amid usual tech hypegasm

Ledswinger
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Re: Bah humbug.

Indeed. The amusing thing will be when Boris wakes up tomorrow and finds that 90% of ".London" addresses have been registered by businesses in China, and 90% of the others are based in the Londons in Ontario, Arkansas, California, Kentucky, Texas, etc.

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Press release scam pelts poor PRs with volley of UNTRUE invoices

Ledswinger
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Re: Fake invoice scams are old

"Accountants may appear anal, but they're dealing with scum and crooks like this so have to be"

Nah, you've missed it mate. The beauty of this scheme is that it targets the shambolically disorganised, spendthrift, goldfish brained wastes-of-space who work in PR and marketing. These people (IMconsiderableE) are always receiving big invoices for stuff they commissioned verbally with no paperwork, no PO, no GRN, no framework agreement or contract, and should have paid months ago. A £500 invoice is pretty likely to be paid without question when the berks are probably already being chased for hundreds of thousands if not millions by the main advertisers and PR consultancies who the drones have forgotten to pay.

If there's one part of the business that invites and deserves spurious invoices, it's PR and marketing. I did think some months back that a false invoice scam targeting these people would be a nice little earner, but I've been beaten to it. Moral of the story: Never sit on a good idea, just get out there and fill your pockets.

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Brain surgery? Would sir care for a CHOC-ICE with that?

Ledswinger
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Re: Stalemate

"It'd need a Europe-wide investment to fix this stalemate."

Why do you believe that? The professionally mobile are already professionally mobile (Charlie Clark, where are you?) Do you assume that the stay-at-homes who don't have the skills/motivation suddenly become more mobile if you give them the skills?

There is however a more pressing problem with IT training, and that is that the trade and employers persistently bemoan the quality. There's lots of IT training going on now, but round El Reg it is clear that school IT is regarded as nothing more than Office for Dummies, and a BSc in Computer Science is held in the same regard as a sheet of medicated Izal.

Let's put aside grand ideas about pan-European solutions, and consider what exactly should be being done in the UK. What would make a skills difference to tech companies? And to what extent should that be fixed directly by government, or by changes in law (eg indentured and enforceable training contracts, perhaps having the risks underwritten by one of the government skills agencies)?

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So long, 'invincible dreamers': Google+ daddy Gundotra resigns

Ledswinger
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Re: What do you do at a party ?

"Like in real life if you don't have anything interesting to say or share then people won't be interested in listening."

Luckily the Reg forums were opened to cater for people like us.

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Ledswinger
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Re: The problem with G+

"Some of them even think facebook *is* the internet"

Can you buy gift subscriptions for Dignitas?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Oh goody.@ vlbaindoor

"The moment someone uses foul language can mean one or more of the following three :"

Alternatively it can mean that the they have a colourful vocabulary and they feel strongly about the matter. But I daresay you'll agree that those who complain about other people's uncouth language in this forum are:

1. Lacking in moral fibre

2. Barking up the wrong tree

3. Rather intolerant, unless the language is actually directed at them.

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Minecraft players can now download Denmark – all of it – in 1:1 scale

Ledswinger
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Re: As a 29 year old who doesn't quite 'get' MC...

"Even if the Danish taxpayer paid a hundred thousand to a developer for this, that's a small company (hopefully) who will stay in business for another year to grow their economy."

That's a good model. Maybe we should try it. Government could pick winners, and hand them public money to do things that they wouldn't be able to do commercially, and the whole economy will be richer as a result.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Wait! The GOVERNMENT did this?

"I want to know why...."

That's easy, madam (1).

Look at any table of either tax take or government spending as a proportion of GDP. Whichever way you cut it, Denmark always comes out top, exempting a handful of basket case countries like East Timor and Cuba.

When your government is spending almost 60% of GDP, and has done so for years, then it soon runs out of useful things to spend money on, but you can be sure as eggs is eggs that it isn't going to decide that maybe the citizens should be allowed to keep more of their money to spend as they see fit. And spending 60% of GDP in a wealthy country must be a real challenge when you don't have a huge military-tech-government combine and an interventionist foreign policy. Interestingly the French are only marginally behind Denmark in terms of economic socialism, and as far as I can see they've given the world nothing, so I presume that all the money in France is spent on mistresses and such like.

Note 1. Madam - or sir, or whatever may be appropriate for your gender and species. This is a general problem for most of us Pseudonymists. Speaking for myself I'm an ursine male, and it isn't just the woods I s*** up.

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Sony Xperia Z2: 4K vid, great audio, waterproof ... Oh, and you can make a phone call

Ledswinger
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Re: "Very nice piece of kit." I have in fact just ordered the aforementioned........

"Very nice piece of kit." I have in fact just ordered the aforementioned...............and La Senora is well pleased. "

Wow. Geek bird, you lucky chap. If I bought my wife a phone for her birthday she'd give me a good slap. Although telling your lady wife that she's a "geek bird" might earn you a slap, if you're feeling that's a missed opportunity..

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Ledswinger
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Re: 128GB??

"(Take the next left onto a one thousand and seventy nine .... spoken by someone using a phonetic translation device)."

Don't think that's much to do with Samsung - just Google Maps and their crappy synthesised voice. The Google maps voice did improve for a while, but they now seem to have gone back to the old clipped and mis-pronounced version. If you're using a locally stored navigation app (eg the free Navmii app) then the sound quality is fine with an S3, and you don't have to rely on poor data connections taking ages to load.

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EU: Let's cost financial traders $400m a day, because EVIL BANKERS. Right?

Ledswinger
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Re: Utter crap

"Yes, the bubbles and crashes (from the tulip bubble onwards) have been so much fun."

Schumpeter, mate.

Are you arguing that we should have called off the industrial revolution, and continued a poverty stricken crofting existence, with infant mortality of one in three live births, life expectancy of mid 30s? If you want that you can still have it by moving to Wales.

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Ledswinger
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Re: algo trading@ Truth4u

" If you can sell facebook stock then why go to the trouble of inventing facebook in the first place?"

You miss the point of the secondary equity market by so much that I'm surprised you can even operate a keyboard.

Stock markets exist because those who funded companies in the first place may (quite reasonably) not want to have their cash tied up in the same business forever, and because other companies/people may equally reasonably wish to buy an interest in listed companies in order to share in future profits, or simply because they think they can buy something cheap and sell it later at a higher price.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Conservation of value..

"It's called trading because it doesn't create anything new, unlike growing or making stuff. All cash money 'made' by the city and the finance 'industry' is taken directly from someone elses pocket."

So by that definition, services have no value? Rather a pity, then, that "making" is simply a service applied to primary commodities. And where does the money "made" by a farmer come from? Did the fivers grow in his field, or has that money merely come out of his customer's pocket?

VP: You don't think we're wasting our time here on Daily Mirror readers?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Here is an idea

"The state will collect tax and use it to pay pensions to the normal people who can't afford to take risks."

On what model? The existing pure Ponzi scheme where the state pension schemes have no real long term assets, only liabilities backed by future tax payers?

The welfare state started off with a National Insurance fund that was supposedly separate from general taxation, but that hypothecation has always been illusory because surpluses are loaned back to government, and because it isn't a fund at all, simply a current account. State pensions are a politician's promise, and as retirement goes up and benefits are eroded people might start to understand that government do not work for them, and such a scheme only works as the working population expands, just as a Ponzi scheme needs new "marks" to put cash in.

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95 floors in 43 SECONDS: Hitachi's new ultra-high-speed lift

Ledswinger
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Re: Theoretically...

"So, the more morbid part of my mind is trying to work out whether it would be best to work at the top, middle or bottom when one of these super high buildings collapses under the weight of its own hubris?"

Everybody inside will be dogmeat because even at the highest floors there's usually several hundred metres of non-occupied structure as the designer struggle to match the client demand for record heights with locations where there's not really the demand for that volume of space. But in the case of excessive hubris, I would guess you'd have an implosion, and a circular event horizon some way out from the building itself, and so the most important thing is to be a long, long way from the building, full stop.

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