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* Posts by Ledswinger

2143 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

iPad Air BARES ALL, reveals she's a high maintenance lady

Ledswinger
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Is there anybody who approves of this?

The apparent trend to permanently seal devices with glue and other PITA fastenings needs to be stopped. Regulars round here will know that I think tree-huggers should be burned as a renewable fuel, but on this one I suspect there's common cause between technofiles and the environmental lobby.

Whether for service or recycling, it is unforgiveable to see this sort of penny pinching that guarantees a one way trip to landfill, regardless of the label on the outside. Designers should be smart enough to know that more regulation won't help them, but things like simply invite it. Hint to law makers: Make sure you hit corporate margins, not end user prices, please.

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Milky Way 'POPS PILLS and SNORTS GAS', insist boffins

Ledswinger
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Re: Intergalactic blaster battle! @DAM

" I'm not into that Halloween crap"

Nobody is. Just an excuse for Tesco to sell pumpkins, and for kids to pester neighbours for sweets. Not that I would deliberately fill the bowl with aforementioned toxic sweets, nor particularly favour the blue ones that make kids buzz until they rattle. Or get rid of the out of date ones found festering at the back of cupboards. Admittedly last year's offering included a handful of joke shop soap sweets, but I'm sure they were appreciated by the recipients.

If I'm feeling very cruel next year, I may drop into Asda and buy some of that dog doo flavour Hersheys.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Intergalactic blaster battle! @DAM

The caffeine is strong with this one.

Or did you go trick and treating with the kids last night, and eat too many of those cheap Chinese sweets made of pure, unadulterated chemical colourings, flavourings, additives and industrial strength resins, polymers, benzoates and fluorinated coal tar distillates?

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Need an internet antidote? Try magic mushrooms

Ledswinger
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Re: Bigger risk than you think

"Mind you given NHS funding at the moment, maybe it would be worse."

I think your magic mushrooms have clouded your judgement, since the NHS Confederation report: "NHS net expenditure (resource plus capital, minus depreciation) has increased from £57.049 billion in 2002/03 to £105.254bn in 2012/13."

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Japanese boffins make a splash with bath-based touchscreen

Ledswinger
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Re: What about bath foam? @Graham Marsden

In the unforgettable words of Bill & Ben, "flubba lubble flub flub flubble"

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Murdoch: I'm a Jawbone fanboi - and it's going to help me live to 100!

Ledswinger
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Re: Obviously I don't wish @ Cliff

You softy.

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HP 100TB Memristor drives by 2018 – if you're lucky, admits tech titan

Ledswinger
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Re: Buy HP stock?

" What are the chances of HP coming to grief before it can capitalize on its Memristor know-how, or some eejit in HP management selling the immature technology for about a thousandth of what it will be worth long-term?"

The best shareholders can hope for is a demerger into two companies, so that they can choose what to do with the EDS disaster bit (incl PC making), or the real techy bits with potential and high risk. In fact that's part of HP's problem, that they claim to be a tech company, when in fact they are a conglomerate, doing all manner of non-complementary activities, and all the while hoping that some new acquisition will change their misfortunes.

But worth considering that for all its potential, memristors could turn out to be a billion dollar blind alley, in which case EDS could seem like a good business.

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Ledswinger
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Re: confidently

"at least they are not a startup trying to con money out of investors with their confident predictions"

Given HP's performance over recent years, their stockholders might feel the only difference is one of scale.

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Ledswinger
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Re: minor error

" we get those emails immediately to our desks, home machines and handhelds "

You can run, but you can't hide.

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Commies copying West again as Vietnam plans own Silicon Valley

Ledswinger
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"Vietnam will be the place to go"

Nightmare. Who will make my trainers if this plan comes off?

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Cameron pledges public access to list of who REALLY owns firms

Ledswinger
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Re: Evasion vs. Avoidance

"If the Inland Revenue decide that you buying your coffee beans from Switzerland at 10x market price is purely to make a tax loss - then it becomes illegal tax evasion."

No, as you said, it becomes illegal tax evasion when the courts decide. When HMRC decide it's tax evasion, they then need to prove that to the satisfaction of the courts, but HMRC have been remiss in building an effective case and taking it before the courts. So HMRC should have been after Starbucks years ago, and have had for three decades or more ample transfer pricing laws and precedents that they could have used, instead of ignoring big corporate tax dodgers and hounding UK tax payers under PAYE, SA or IR35.

That sorts out dodgy transfer pricing but it doesn't affect Google or Amazon saying their revenue arises here, but their profit magically arises elsewhere on electronic transactions. Parliament could do their share if the lazy, incompetent scrotes were to get off their well padded behinds, and draft some internet age laws about transactions placed over the internet. They could stop the likes of Google and Amazon dodging taxes by simply passing laws to define where a transaction takes place, rather than allowing companies to pretend that having a server in Kazakhstan means that the trade was executed and the profit made there, when the trade was placed and logistically executed in the UK, conducted in sterling and under the laws of the UK. You could still have free trade - but make those with Kazakh (or Luxembourg) "subsidiaries" undertake their business under the relevant foreign legislation and currency and fulfil from a foreign logistics centre. Amazon would have two choices - pay taxes where the revenue arises, or try and convince customers to have slower delivery, fewer consumer rights (under the jurisdiction of a foreign court in a language most customers won't speak), and persuade the customers to pay in euros or shekels.

For all the whining of the politicians, the situation is their fault. It can be solved by unilateral action. They simply don't have the spine or the common sense.

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Ledswinger
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Re: I just made this suggestion yesterday

"I agree with this, it's an important step towards tax fairness IF implemented well"

No it isn't. If I buy from Google (let's say a Nexus, not my "consumption" of adverts) then it's already clear who is the beneficial owner of whichever entity I contract with. It's the shareholder register of Google Inc. Will that stop the executives of Google undertaking apparently legal tax avoidance, as part of their fiduciary responsibilities to shareholders? Even if you traced every Google subidiary round the world on a who owns whom basis, would that alter things? No.

The problem isn't who is the beneficial owner, either in total or at each inter-company trade, it is how they own it, and Shiney Faced Dave isn't even clever enough to realise that he's talking rubbish. More pointless policy making on the hoof.

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TalkTalk to block nuisance calls with no help AT ALL from Huawei

Ledswinger
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Re: Will they block themselves?

"Is there a pre-filtering device that will sit between your phone and the wall socket, then pickup the call and quckly see if it is from a witheld number or from a list of numbers that you have provided it with, then end the call and not pass it on to your phone?"

Yes. Which? had a review of some a few months back. Generally speaking they worked well, but none are perfect (eg blocking "caller withheld" numbers could stop your doctors' from calling you, or new nuisance numbers need to be added manually). Expect to pay fifty to a hundred quid.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Mr

"I say hello etc, but I do not hear any sound. So, I guess that is someone with a grudge?"

Possibly, but unlikely. The usual cause is that outbound call centres doing legitimate (but usually unsolicited) selling use computer diallers that schedule the next call before there's a drone ready to handle the call (to keep the oiks noses against the grindstone, and improve productivity). If no drones are available when the call is answered then the dialler just drops the call. The use of recorded messages makes things a little more complex, but scammers make more use of recorded messages than cold sales callers - for a scammer, the recorded message acts as a filter that ensures the connected calls are to the stupid, for the sales callers they want human to human communication, so the last thing they want to use is a recorded message to cause people to ring off.

There's various reasons that the dialler and the drone availability get out of synch, such as all the drones clearing off to lunch, a team meeting, or operators taking longer to clear the previous call, or simply a crummy scheduler.

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Vietnam jails man for Facebook freedom campaign

Ledswinger
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Trollface

Re: I've been to Vietnam

"North Vietnam is cold, dark and grey. South Vietnam is warm, bright and sunny."

You could say the same about the UK, of course. And that bit about northerners who are suspicious & unfriendly and want to fleece you.

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Moto sets out plans for crafty snap-together PODULAR PHONES

Ledswinger
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Re: BAD idea @naw

" I'd rather have half a dozen components that need re-assembly than one big broken component that needs binning."

Why do you assume that the energy dissipated by hitting the floor fast will be solely expended in neat dis-assembly? There's a strong chance that however the phone is made the glass screen and digitiser will be ****ed by the P1 percussive forces from being dropped. And there's no reason to believe that the other modular components will be sufficiently strongly engineered to resist impact damage. In my experience things like locating lugs are more likely to break than to unclip gracefully when dropped, and it isn't the soldered on or SoC integrated components that get mangled by a fall anyway.

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Dark matter: Good news, everyone! We've found ... NOTHING AT ALL

Ledswinger
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Re: Seven tonnes of xenon?

" to make the largest flash tube, like, ever."

That's what quasars are. None of this black hole and mass accretion disc nonsense, just a bunch of puzzled alien primitves who've all stumbled on the same method of looking for dark matter, and the wondered how big a flash they could make.

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Digital radio may replace FM altogether - even though nobody wants it

Ledswinger
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Re: Keep grinding that ax Andrew

"But that's because they spent years telling us analogue was going away. Without that, there would have been lots more people still buying analogue TVs."

Actually that's just not true. The TV switchover took place at a fortunate point in history when the prices of LCD TV's were coming down fast, and the quality (and size) of almost all flat screen TVs was so immeasurably better than CRTs that wholesale replacement was being undertaken, and people were looking for better source material and more of it. If CRT's were still the norm, then people wouldn't have had much incentive to buy set top boxes, because the quality and convenience aspects would have meant little when wired into a crappy 28 inch CRT. Then they'd never have been able to get the viewing figures up beyond the 15% that will always be hoodwinked by government propaganda.

The TV switchover worked well, but it worked well only by a happy chance confluence of different and unforeseen technology and market changes. The original business case for analogue switch off was typical government bollocks, where a huge and unjustifiable cost is offset by a made up number, in that case the "value" of extra choice. As far as I can see, the extra channels have diluted quality programming, so that should have been a negative number, but in practice it has turned out rather well. Unfortunately there's nothing on the horizon that looks like making DAB an attractive or economic proposition.

And that's why DAB wallows in a trough of public apathy - there's no compelling reason to adopt it. The sound quality is no better, often worse. Any PLL tuner (or whatever they use these days) will auto tune and offer push button selection. Any RDS set will pick up the names. Why would I want to pay good money to replace a perfectly functional FM radio something that's more expensive and offers me no other useful benefits?

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Ledswinger
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Go for it Ed

"one of the least popular decisions anyone in the Ministry of Fun can make"

Well, other departments have coped OK going with stupid, ill advised, expensive, and unpopular decisions (like pushing HS2, ordering aircraft carriers for which there are no aircraft, mandating £30bn of crappy windmills in lieu of good, cheap, effective coal or gas plants, stoking a housing bubble by guaranteeing private borrower's loans etc etc).

Never forget that the people paying for whatever decision is made, and suffering the unintended consequences will be (along with all logic) completely ignored in the decion making process. That process is called "government", and involves (under any of the main parties) Oxbridge toffs with no relevant experience (nor any education in science or technology) being handed ministerial posts, wherein they can make bad judgement calls in response to free lunches and pressure from vested interests.

What's not to like?

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Samsung is officially the WORLD'S BIGGEST smartphone maker

Ledswinger
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Re: How many of these are nasty Galaxy mini landfill phones?

"What I don't tend to see is much loyalty with buyers of their phones and their practices regarding updates and the recent region locking issues don't endear them."

That's correct, but there's nobody white than white in this regard. Given other buying considerations (OS preference, removable batteries, SD slot, screen size preference, app availability and functionality, maps/voice/camera add ons etc) it's very difficult to say that updates and region lock issues would tip the balance for many users.

I have a near vanilla Android works phone, and a personal SGS2, and I actually think that the Sammy overlay is rather good (although I don't care for their bundled software that overlaps default Android inclusions) so they'll please as many as they offend. And probably the majority of buyers simply won't care about any of the anorak factors you and I consider, they'll buy on brand or what's hip in their peer group.

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GOV.UK swells organ donor signups by 10,000 a month

Ledswinger
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Re: Join the public sector and make it great.

"It pisses me off that I've been clear for well over 10 years but I can't donate anything and that includes even my corneas."

Findus will put anything in lasagne, so I'm sure you can donate your whole body to them.

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You've spent $1,500 on Glass. Now Google wants you to sell more specs

Ledswinger
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Re: Glass Explorers or...

"I wonder how many gSheeple will be signing up to boombustblog.com in the hope of getting an invitation from Reggie Middleton?"

Far fewer than if the offer were an invitation from Pippa Middleton.

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Brit bloke busted over backdoor blagging of US troops' data

Ledswinger
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Re: Quite Ironic

"I'm sure Chancellor Merkel would like to prosecute Obama in a German court."

Only if she's terminally naieve and believes in a world where your calls aren't subject to routine interception. Given that she's an Ossi, I doubt both of those, and suspect that she believed all along the Yanks were and still are doing this. All the European reaction to Snowden's revelations is mere diplomatic pantomime, such as summoning the US ambassador to register a stern protest, when all concerned know that it's business as usual away from the TV cameras.

And if you accept that but for the Cold War and NATO, the USSR would have over-run Western Europe, it really doesn't matter that the Yanks may have over-reached themselves with their latest spying, because we still owe them for defending a weak and unwilling Europe, including spying on the Russkies.

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Is it barge? Is it a data center? Mystery FLOATING 'Google thing'

Ledswinger
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"I wonder if there's any tax benefits?"

Property taxes apply to buildings (or potentially land), and I can't see them being able to levy these on a vessel. Obviously there's port fees, but if you're moored offshore those will be minimal (or perhaps avoidable). There may also be some interesting exemptions from energy efficiency rules or taxes that would apply to a building, and for a data centre could help the financials. And in some areas there's restrictive planning laws that apply to buildings, meaning that the local government can mandate the location, appearance, construction of a bit barn, as well as demanding "planning gains" that are just a tax on the company that evnetually operate the site - typically no similar restrictions apply on floating assets.

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Ledswinger
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Re: They're going to do it!

"There is no ship number 5 registered so far. An I have tried to find a ship zero, a prototype vessel but so far no luck."

You have to wonder if the "not quite covert" approach is all part of the intention, keeping a bit of mystery to make the world think how clever they are? Had this been fitted in the holds of a ageing bulk carrier it would have been invisible. Likewise, wandering around wearing your Google badge can be a bit of a giveaway.

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Payday loan firms are the WORST. Ugh, my mobe's FILLED with filthy SPAM

Ledswinger
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Re: Gambling

"Interestingly though, it is possible to argue that gambling is a good strategy for the poor"

No, it isn't a good strategy, precisely because on the whole it makes the poor poorer. It wasn't even a good strategy for the few lucky winners, because the outcome was very unlikely, and a good strategy is not hoping for a one in a million chance outcome.

If they had a strategy for betting (then over and above "don't bother"), it would favour buying premium bonds, because the cash value of the bond isn't at risk, unlike a stake on the 3.30 at Kempton. That way they've still got exposure to the "snowball in hell" chance of a life changing win, but the costs of participation are the lost interest, of perhaps 1-2% annually of the stake, rather than 100% of the stake immediately.

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TECH WAR: Brummies say firms 'lose out' in London's Tech City

Ledswinger
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Re: Brums not so bad ...

" I live in SW Brum"

Come off it, Rubery, Frankley, Northfield etc - nobody's beating a path there, are they? Better than the sh*ttier parts of London, but otherwise not much to say for the place. As for transport, the Bristol and Alcester Roads aren't much cop at peak hours. I do quite like Brum and the Black Country, but for somebody fleeing London you'd go somehwere that offers reasonable communications, acceptable access to city faciltiies and links to the rest of the country, and most importantly a better quality of life. I don;'t think I'd be getting that last one in Highters Heath or Woodgate in Brum, or Dudley Port or Blakenhall in the Black Country.

So Cornwall's lovely, but a bit out in the sticks for when you do need to travel, and property prices can be an issue. Rural Yorkshire's likewise picturesque but a bit of a hike, and you have to like the cold. Scotland's out of the question because the natives still eat people. But places like Worcestershire, the further reaches of Dorset, East Anglia, the areas around Bristol, those would be more promising.

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Ledswinger
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I would like to point out...

...to ignorant cockney journos (1) that Birmingham is not the Black Country (which is Wolverhampton and towns to the south, including Sedgely, Coseley, Tipton, Dudley et al). Eeeh, happy memories of being a student, dodging lectures and catching the 126 bus along the Birmingham New Road to see what heavy rock could be acquired from the shops in Brum.

But regardless, if I were a tech company trying to avoid the dirty, expensive, overcrowded metrollops, then I'd be looking at using the (supposed) location independence of technology, and living somewhere a lot nicer than either Black Country, Birmingham, or London.

(1) You DO mind if I consider London as homogenous whole? Oh dear.

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Ofcom: By 2017, even BUMPKINS will have superfast broadband

Ledswinger
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Filling the colum inches with inanity?

"But in many rural areas, particularly those with high unemployment, anything which could handle a single video stream or a modern shopping website would be a welcome relief."

What will the highly unemployed be shopping for, and what will they pay with? I suppose streaming torrented grumble flicks might save money and pass the time, but the article isn't really building much a business case for either investors or the nation.

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AT&T bags 363,000 new customers ... where did THEY come from?

Ledswinger
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I'm all ears

"But AT&T has also got its wireless ARPU (Average Revenue Per User) up to $66.20, which is decent by American standards - about twice what we pay in the UK, as American's pay market rates for mobile data rather than having them subsidised by unsustainable voice revenue as we do."

But if the UK market has a cross subsidy from voice to data, how does that affect the ARPU? The ARPU is essentially whatever the network operator finds their market will accept without undue customer losses.

If this argument were true, then either US MNO's have much higher costs or profits, or UK MNO's have much lower costs, or reduced profits. A comparison of the corporate results should give the answers, but I don't have time to do that today. Any other commentards got an hour on their hands to do this?

I'd be more inclined to believe that US mobile regulation is even worse, and its mobile market less competitive than our own. Given how ineffectual OFCOM is that's a frightening thought for US customers.

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Why Bletchley Park could never happen today

Ledswinger
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Re: Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

"I think the revelations of Snowden and Manning have answered that one pretty thoroughly. No one."

Yes and no. There are all manner of legal, constitutional, and regulatory checks on the agencies in question. The problem is that those charged with exercising those checks have failed to exercise due care, and what we see is an outcome of "regulatory capture". Those who should be holding the spies to account, and keeping their actions in check have instead rubber stamped anything they were asked to do, failed to be pro-active in investigating what the agencies are doing, and then failed to hold to account said agencies when inappropriate behaviours are apparent.

One thing to bear in mind is that almost anything the NSA can do, it would seem likely the Russians and Chinese can and are doing. Hobbling NSA and GCHQ won't stop that, but would mean that "our side" wouldn't know what "their side" know about us, and "our" secrets would still be exposed to countries that have every interest in exploiting that data. Unless somebody can come up with some real, unhackable security that works (which I'm struggling to see), maybe we do have to accept that there is very little privacy in the digital world?

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Euro Parliament axes data sharing with US – the NSA swiped the bytes anyway

Ledswinger
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Re: European Parliament seems to have started to grow some balls.

"Interesting times perhaps?"

Not at all. All they've said is "We're really, really cross about this". Had EU leaders grown some, they would have cancelled the forthcoming trade talks as a symbol of their anger, as a marker of unwillingess to be reated like sh**, and because any economic talks will be on an uneven playing field given the incessant political data scraping of the NSA.

The other thing they should have done would have been to have announced that Europe was open to, and would welcome Edward Snowden, with guarantees of immunity against prosecution, exrtadition, or rendition. Now THAT would be the way to show Washington that their behaviour won't be tolerated.

But that's all a bit radical for Europeans.

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Doctor Who's 50th year special: North American theater tix on sale Friday

Ledswinger
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"so hats off to the BBC"

Actually no.

The BBC's ambitions to make their output more palatable to the Yanks have repeatedly compromised the entertainment value of a number of programmes (Torchwood and Dr Who immediately come to mind as relevant examples, but there's others). Since I have no choice but to pay for the fairly paltry BBC output that I find entertaining, I'd rather they focused on UK audiences tastes, knowledge and interests. I don't care about the fantastical ambitions for BBC Worldwide - if they can sell what they make then that's fine, but not if they start changing the programme content to suit some global anglophone average.

Maybe the BBC just want to make a name for themselves in America, that's also fine by me, but in that case give me back my licence fee, surrender the UK public service broadcast obligation, and f*** off to the US of A.

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HAD IT with Planet Earth? There are 12 alien worlds left to try out

Ledswinger
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Re: Habitable?

"A single super-massive planet may even have several habitable moons"

Some may even be populated by Ewoks.

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Ledswinger
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Re: @Evil Auditor

"As I hinted earlier, I don't mind seeding dead planets"

What you do in your spare time is your concern, but it sounds like a long lonely journey, when a box of tissues and a copy of Razzle would suffice.

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Locked into fixed-term mobile contract with variable prices? Not on our watch – Ofcom

Ledswinger
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"What is the relation between the RPI and the costs incurred by the operators? "

Having previously lived in a world of differential price indices, I'd guess that RPI is not a bad index for the range of costs that network operators cover - certainly better than producer, consumer, construction price indices, or some yet more complex OFCOM-owned measure. The real problem that I think you're alluding to is that it is applied to the total bill. Not only (as others have commented) do the infrastructure costs not go up with inflation, but neither does the cost of the handset - a few fag packet calculations suggest that on a typical bill only one third of it would be variable opex upon which you could argue that an inflationary adjustment was valid.

However, the operators need to recover the costs of new customer incentives and acquisition, and bogus "inflation" rises was one way of doing this that was relatively painless.

I wonder what the unintended consequences of this move will be?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Customer Retention

" Insurance premiums on cars used to go down the longer you stayed with the insurer"

In actuarial terms, the "no claims bonus" was always flawed. The numbers simply don't support the logically sound idea that not claiming shows that you are a lower risk driver, and therefore less likely to make a claim in the next year. But a few companies offering it meant that everybody else had to, and to make the numbers balance they have to raise premiums for loyal customers. Elsewhere it's most unusual to even try and pretend that year on year prices will reduce.

There's introductory discounts on all manner of services - mobiles, fixed line, ISPs, insurance, gas, electricity, boiler servicing, film rental, music streaming etc, yet at the same time there's costs of customer acquisition and on-boarding that make year one customers unprofitable, and sometimes for several subsequent years. Somebody has to pay for that, because a company can't lose money on new customers, and then make it cheaper for them in future years. To eliminate the problem, you'd need to mandate that new customers must by law not be offered introductory discounts, and must pay the costs of customer acquisition. Doesn't take much thought to see how badly that would work out for consumers.

So by switching on the basis of price, you contribute to the problem that you are complaining about. Loyalty is rarely rewarded by companies - more often than not they want your nice regular payments, but regard your loyalty as merely an opportunity to cross-sell yet more big margin services that you could get elsehere for less. If you don't care about price (as some people don't) then don't switch. If you care about price, accept that you have to switch, and just be pleased that regulators have made the process relatively painless?

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Ledswinger
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"I would much rather have to buy my phone, then maybe the market would be a bit more competitive, as right now phone prices are ridiculous."

Cheaper than they've ever been, on a like for like basis. I suspect you're thinking of the range topping handsets from any company you care to name. But the manufacturing costs are what they are, as the BoM data will tell you, and the margins charged then reflect the norms for the market segment (ie i5S and SGS4 have big profit margins) and distribution chains (retailers won't stock and sell you a £400 phone for a 5% gross margin). So I very much doubt that a fully purchased handset market would offer materially different prices.

The Nexus devices are a bit unusual, in that they are largely partly "profit free" models sold at not much above manufacturing, distribution and warranty costs, but sold that way because they support Google's agenda, and that's the only way I can see that will reduce handset costs - where somebody forgoes normal commercial margins in order to make money from you a different way.

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Surface Pro 2: It's TOOL-PROOF and ultimately destined for LANDFILL

Ledswinger
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Re: Thanks El Reg

"Surely the importance of being able to repair it is inversely proportional to the reliability of the thing after two years?"

No. Warranty won't help you if you've got accidental damage. But there's something that El Reg didn't mention that is an equal part of this debate, and that's the cost and availability of parts. Anything that's sufficiently model specific usually costs an arm and a leg, and then it is uneconomic even if technically possible to repair it.

Try dropping a Nexus 7 tablet, and then compare the cost of the repair with a new one. Things might be different for an iPad, but only because there's so much margin baked in in the first place, given that the BoM costs (like for like) don't alter by much. Even in the case of a phone, the costs of a fitted replacement screen are usually a significant chunk of a new phone, possibly of a better spec, and with a year's warranty.

So whilst I agree that things should be serviceable, the very low costs of modern automated and integrated assembly (that makes the devices cheap) then ensures that they are very easily put beyond economic repair. Maybe we just need to accept that post-manufacturing rework always will be very costly, and that does mean that inexpensive devices are not worth repairing.

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Met Police vid: HIDE your mobes. Pavement BIKER cutpurses on the loose

Ledswinger
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Re: Locking people up @Loyal Commenter

"Tackling the social inequality that leads to criminal behaviour is probably a much more efficient way of sorting things out in the long run. After all, if the governemnt weren't hell bent on demonising the poor and forcing people into further poverty, we probably would see less opportunistic and petty crime committed by those with little alternative."

Bollocks, bollocks, and thrice bollocks. Crime is not "of necessity" in the age of the welfare state, it is a matter of choice, not to pay for food or housing, but to get stuff that the welfare state won't pay for (drugs, booze, and technology trinkets, primarily). I can't speak for your grandparents, but mine weren't well off, but they didn't steal, because they had a moral code and adhered to it; Most of the poor today don't steal either, for the same reason. If it were about food for survival, then there'd be a problem with shoplifting of vegetables: Funnily enough that's not the stuff that shops need to put alarms on.

But there's certainly a slice of the population who are criminals, often members of extended inbred criminal families (I know, my wife has to deal with these scum, and the "inbred" reference isn't an insult, it's a matter of fact), and regardless of how much money they have, they are still going to be criminals. Some of these people are still dealing drugs, abusing their kids and partners, and stealing even though they've somehow or other managed to get themselves a mortgage and five bedroomed detached house. The continued criminality worldwide of people who've got more money than they know what to do with (drug lords, serial fraudsters, oligarchs) likewise shows that being a criminal isn't cured by these bastards having money.

So, to summarise:

Being poor doesn't force you to be a crim

Crims aren't stealing out of necessity

Being rich doesn't cure crims

We'd all agree that rich criminals are the minority, but your pathetic suggestion that the government force people into criminality by being insufficiently generous is the most appalling, wilfully misguided shite I've seen posted here in a long time.

Just for fun, let's turn things on their head for a moment, and decide that you're right, and the problem is destitution and government oppression. Given that the IFS expect government to spend £214 billion quid a year on "welfare" next year, or £7k per year per average tax payer, exactly how much more would you think that we should contribute to buy the criminals out of their habits, and where will the extra money come from?

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HTC chief exec to focus on designing new mobes, sticks Wang in sales etc

Ledswinger
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Bizarre

Seems odd to me that the bloke should hand over some of his duties as the company's chief executive officer, in order to fiddlea round in designing handsets (or telling those already paid to do so how to do their job).

That's not leadership, that's a company in crisis, which could explain their dismal corporate performance and struggles to make any money, along with recent management departures. The HTC One gets great write ups, so why is the CEO messing around in that area? It's sales and marketing that are the problem, and clearly his "value added input" has messed that up, so perhaps he'll do the same for design.

Oi! Chou! Stop being an idiot. Employ the right people, set clear, achievable targets, and hold them to account without interfering.

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Volvo: Need a new car battery? Replace the doors and roof

Ledswinger
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Re: Facts and figures?

"You can bet your bottom dollar that if a car made with composites rather than steel would be cheaper to make, we'd already be seeing them in mass-production."

Not the case at all. You've got many bright ideas yet to see the light of day, because (for example) of the need to recover existing investments, because of concerns about market acceptance, over and above those ideas that nobody's thought to try yet.

To continue the aviation analogies, if sense had anything to do with it, flying wing configurations would be the norm for airline transport, but there's never been much market acceptance by customers of anything radical in aviation (perhaps for obvious reasons)

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Ledswinger
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Re: Facts and figures?

"Also, if it's that good, why not replace the entire battery with a lump made form this 'super capacitor' material? ."

Because if you can make panels you already need for structural and aerodynamic reasons into power storage, then you don't need a separate battery, reducing the overall component count, assembly complexity, and total weight. You may also have other disadvantages of assembling as a single "battery", such as heat losses in charging and discharge that aren't a problem with a large surface area. Indeed, if your energy is more widely distributed, then any point failures would not be as exciting as a point failure on a single energy storage brick.

If you think about how (for all the challenges) the 787 is revolutionary for aviation in terms of construction and performance, through the use of CF and different approaches to electrical systems, and consider how that might change car making. Does it really make sense to make car bodies out of metal at all, with the all the necessary rolling, bending, punching, welding, corrosion protection? And if you're asking such fundamental questions then you'd question why you have so many different components, which can be eliminted, integrated into other parts, or made differently through smart tech. Could you ultimately 3D print a car body? I'd have though so, and a better, lighter car than we currently make with steel origami. Could you print the car round the drive train, or pre-assembled interior? Maybe. Could the panels combine solar charging with energy storage? Certainly, though it wouldn't help us much here in the UK.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Bang the car, short the battery

"I'd be worried that one damaged cell could overheat and then it cascades and CFRP is known to burn rather easily,..."

To judge by what I see on the roads, most existing cars burn rather well, and require only modest provocation to do so. However, we have generally managed to an adequate standard the risks associated with the use of petrol, so I'd suggest that the fire risks of super capacitor panels would be easily managed. The use of lithium batteries looks to be much more troubling, both from the likelihood of fire starting, and from its intensity and difficulty of extinguishing it.

Also worth bearing in mind that composite aircraft have lightening resistant CF panels, so several aspects of the problem have probably already been solved.

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MacBook Air fanbois! Your flash drive may be a data-nuking TIME BOMB

Ledswinger
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Re: Not possible.

"It's worth pointing out that the Dell XPS range was a pro-sumer product aimed at the gaming market . Dell even managed to ship these around the time of Windows Vista's release without working graphics drivers."

And in addition to the graphics card overheating and early death (in part a card build problem, in part a case/airflow issue AFAICS), Dell shipped them with own brand X Fi sound cards that never had working drivers under Vista. You could (with some diligence) track down a suitable driver on the Creative web site, but it was a pretty poor experience, but Dell's offshore "support" was laughable. I was absolutely delighted to get back to non-proprietary components, and away from Dell.

The laugh was that (as you say) the XPS machines were targeted at the high end SOHO/gaming user, but the cheapo Inspirons of the same vintage were far better, having working drivers, ATX standard parts, and better cooling, and they were far easier to clean and maintain than the hulking great BTX cases, and didn't come with the high risk, low value frippery of RAID 0 that many XPS machines shipped with.

In my experience Dell provide an object lesson in how to lose a customer for life. It's good that Apple seem to have learned that lesson, but there's plenty of other computer makers who seem determined to stick their fingers in their ears to avoid hearing this (like HP).

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Google shares surf ad-destroying mobile tsunami to RECORD HIGH

Ledswinger
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Re: Is it worth it for the business

"I don't like Google but I will give them credit for being very very successfull. I can't even begin to imagine what it would take to knock them of their pedestal.."

In the mobile world I can. To generate ever increasing earnings that US investors believe are their birthright, Google needs to become ever more intrusive and pushy. At the moment most people are relaxed about the balance between Google's push adverts, and the benefits of a "free" and pretty good phone OS. But all that needs to happen to change the world is that (a) a new, free or near free OS comes along (not today, but maybe one day Sailfish, Ubuntu, Firefox or something from far, far away) and offers equivalent functionality at a lower "cost", and (b) Google needs to over cook the afverts or personal data use. Neither of those are guaranteed, but neither are far-fetched.

Taking that a bit further, if I am the product, then perhaps the world is slowly changing and a bit of free software will no longer be sufficient price. Google would then have to cash subsidise their software, maybe even pay people monthly to use it. Sounds a lot more far fetched, and maybe there's a compromise, where they make real content available for free. So instead of paywalls, Google users get free access to news content, but WinPho or Apple users are barred (or need to install Google spyware on their platform). Likewise MS or Apple owned content. In some respects this might complete the digital publishing revolution - in the days of print, we effectively paid the physical costs of the publications, and the intellectual costs and margin came from advertising sales. With marginal distribution costs now negligible, the advertisers would give me the content for free in return for me receiving their adverts. A bit like the "free" commercial TV model, or Spotify "free". Not sure that their force fed commercials interrupting me are the future model (or I hope not), but I'd see more that Google would have the ability to feed me the ads much as they do now, but doing more for me (otherwise they offer an open goal to Firefox).

The other threat to Google is similar, but emerges as software agnostic phone makers. In which case the current crop of Android makers start to offer the same hardware with competing OS. Maybe you'd have to pay for an ad free OS, but there might well be a market. Google could threaten to withhold some aspects of Android despite it's nominal "open source", but the makers have the immediate option of WinPho.

Despite the pre-eminence of Android, there's no guarantee that they can exploit that customer base, given that the market is accustomed to changing handsets every two years.

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Extreme ultraviolet litho: Extremely late and can't even save Moore's Law

Ledswinger
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Re: Dropping off the exponential?

I wondered that. Maybe the decay constant was never 1.8, but it didn't show up until we'd got a lot more empirical data, and better ability to project?

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ITU to Europe: One charger for all mobes good. One to rule them ALL? Better

Ledswinger
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Re: Good news....

"are making things so much nicer"

Well, I agree that there's a big convenience benefit. Just a pity that the ITU and EU have only taken thirty years to get round to it, and only then on fairly spurious eco grounds.

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Windows 8.1: Read this BEFORE updating - especially you, IT admins

Ledswinger
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Re: Microsoft Partner Downloads

"The most that I have managed so far is 1.76 Gb.... download interupts, continue download...... download finishes but each time it finishes incomplete..."

Judgement upon those rushing to download the latest Windows crud. I suspect Richard Dawkins might struggle with a better scientific explanation.

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Ledswinger
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...but even so, the arseholes could have made our lives easier by offering it through Windows Update. But then again, why should Microsoft think what might be best for customers,given that they seem intent on persuading them to go away.

Which made me think, there's been a trend over recent years of tech CEO's behaving in ways that are only logically explained by the idea that they work for a different company to the one whose name appears on their business card. Nokia, Blackberry, HTC, HP and so on. Given that they can't even fix Windows 8 properly, nor make the half baked fix easy to install, this tends to suggest to me that Ballmer falls into the "working for the enemy" category.. If Google aren't paying him, shouldn't they at least donate a suitable sum to a charity of his choosing?

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