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* Posts by Ledswinger

2385 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

Nokia to launch low-cost Android phone this month – report

Ledswinger
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Re: Now, I'm really confused...

"Am I correct, or would lawyers be slavering in the wings?"

Depends whether there's a non-compete clause in the agreement, or whether MS have exclusive rights to any Nokia owned IP (ie it is possible that Nokia grant MS an exclusive licence, and that excludes Nokia themselves.

But there's a bigger reason why Nokia won't go back into phones. Having made the most awful mess in phones, and allowed themselves to be backed into a corner where they had to practically give the business to Microsoft, why would shareholders allow the board to go back into the same business again? People currently holding Nokia shares are doing so despite the alternative opportunity to invest in Apple, Google, Samsung, HTC etc etc (ooh, and Microsoft).

Changing the strategy of a big company is like steering a very large ship - you can only do it very slowly, and its best for everybody involved if the intentions are clearly signalled, and the course plotted according to the capabilities of crew, vessel and local conditions. The Nokia board did a Schettino with the mobile business; they were very lucky that it didn't drag the rest of the company down as well.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Perhaps

"It would not surprise me if he left within a year or so."

Well he's just been passed over for the big chair. So either (a) he hangs around resentful, unco-operative and bitter, (b) Nadella shows him the door, more or less gracefully, or (c) he storms off in a strop. I've seen all three at close hand due to the nature of the job I do.

The one thing I've not seen is failed CEO candidates do is knuckle down, work hard to support the winner, and accept that they are still on a cushy number. Even if they were willing, the new CEO will be paranoid that the other guy is a threat to their leadership, and will work against them. You don't get to be CEO by being reasonable, normal, well balanced, or even intelligent.

It isn't like he's going to be short of offers. There's plenty of VC/PE houses would love any former MS C-level bum to "share their wisdom" on tech projects, or other non-tech companies in the market for a rent-a-non-exec director.

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UK claims 'significant lead' in drones after Taranis test flight

Ledswinger
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Re: Taranis

"Taranis also suffers from a communications problem, like all drones can be spoofed and disrupted by interfering with its GPS signals(widespread with a Russian system Avtobaza), and wide frequency jamming.... "

Looking at all the wars of recent decades, they've not involved super-power on super-power. It's either p1ss pot renegade states, newly started civil wars, or super power proxy battles involving thug nations not clever enough to see what's happening (or not caring).

With any form of deterrence and nukes on call, the main powers won't go to war with each other, so the wars of the future are likely to be the sort of things we see today - wars of choice against third rate states or irregular actors, usually over large areas and geographically hostile terrain. These missions won't see any worthwhile ECM. And you don't need an F35 for these missions, you just need a drone, even if the F35 is still considered necessary purely as a linking cog in the machine of deterrence.

There's plenty of other roles as well for drones where no ECM is likely to be offered (piracy prevention, drug interdiction, mandate enforcement). As ECM becomes cheaper and more readily available, the drones will use alternative approaches for communication that get round the crude systems they might face - but ultimately you could use them as effectively for simple strike missions based purely on inertial and optical positioning.

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Ledswinger
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Re: It only exists to let BAe be a player

"It only exists to let BAe be a player"

Well, given the way things are moving, manned aircraft seem rather redundant for many roles in a combat zone, limiting the performance and the endurance of the craft. But BAe (and most other Euopean nations) have been very late to the UAV party, having let the Yanks and Israelis build up some strong capabilities. BAe have to pony up something fairly good to be considered, and what better than promising both stealth and supersonic as well as the all important "unmanned".

In BAe's place what would you do to make up for the lost ground?

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Think wearables are the next tech boom? Cisco's numbers beg to differ

Ledswinger
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" It's not completely implausible that health insurance companies might take the place of the Telcos by subsidising heart rate loggers, for example"

Up to a point. But consider the mix of interests of a big financial services business. The only part of the business that wants you to live longer is the life assurance arm (and they only want you to last to the end date on your policy). The pensions division want you to live right up to the date your pension comes into force, and then to die quickly (ideally the same day). The health insurance and earnings protection businesses don't mind you continuing to live, but it suits them that when you die, you do so promptly, with little notice and little or no hospitalisation. In net terms, the ideal financial services customer is a fat smoker, likely to die early and quickly, as they typically have conditions that lend themselves to sudden death and reduced treatment opportunities.

My guess is the only interest the wider financial services industry would have in wearable health monitors would be to write down the liabilities of the balance sheet in real time, and move the policy surpluses straight to the P&L. Who said wearable technology didn't have a use?

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Baby's got the bends: LG's D958 G Flex Android smartie

Ledswinger
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Re: How well does it impact durability?

" It would be nice if the bendy components go some way towards addressing that vulnerability."

It would. But I can't help wondering if LG and their supplier will be pioneers in extending our understanding of glass fatigue. I look forward to other people testing the innovation on my behalf.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Does it come in a range of bendiness?

"And will there be multiple versions in store that we can hold to our arse until we find one that matches ones natural curvitude?"

Don't be silly. You buy the phone (which as a fairly large curve radius) and just eat until your arse fits the phone. At a guess LG have done their research and the curvature is in the sweet spot for a standard Merkin hambeast, so Brits may need to pile on a few more pounds, unless they already have the desired shape.

The tighter and perter your arse, the more burgers you need to munch. Could be a cross-marketing opportunity for fast food restaurants.

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Woz he talking about? Apple co-founder wants iPhones to run Android

Ledswinger
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" I hold a Samsung phone in my hand and it feels like I'm holding a lump of plastic, not a premium device."

So don't buy a Sammy. If you're after premium feel phone running Android, why not the HTC One?

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fWHoaR! Trick-cyclists crack eternal mystery of WHAT WOMEN WANT in a man

Ledswinger
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Re: So that's the root of Call-me-Dave's popularity.

"So that's the root of Call-me-Dave's popularity. "

What popularity? Everybody I know hates him with a burning passion. Admittedly not quite as universally loathed as Clegg, but not far behind.

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Google will dodge EU MONSTER FINES by 'promoting' rival search services

Ledswinger
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Re: Why?

"Quite simple really - it's about abuse of monopoly. Seriously, the entire SEO industry is built around how a single company perceives websites - not a good place to be."

They don't have to use it. I can remember the years BG, when Alta Vista briefly ruled the search roost, before that Lycos. The current lack of competition (which affects the poor darlings of the advertising industry far more than it does users) exists not because of barriers to entry, because users are fickle (so are advertisers), but because the wannabe search engines, in particular Yahoo and Bing simply don't do it well enough, or in a manner that users want. Look at how, out of the pack, Windows 8 and IE default to the garish MSN/Bing home page, full of flatulent glittery rubbish that looks like a Geocities page from 1995, all full of movement and "news" that I don't give a shit about - four screen fulls of this ordure, desperately trying to appeal to anybody. Yahoo is even worse - vast flash banner adverts, crap like horoscopes, rubbish trending on twatter, etc etc, and even the UK Yahoo page is full of irrelevant small town US news. No wonder nobody uses Yahoo.

Google won't be around for ever. And even if nobody comes up with anything better, Google will probably engineer their own downfall anyway by over-reaching user privacy. And even then it won't be Yahoo or Bing that supplant Google.

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Save Ofcom! Telcos and consumer groups call for end to legal disputes

Ledswinger
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Re: A stitch in time

"Making OFCOM it's own arbiter could go very wrong, very quickly"

But that's where we are already, that regulation is toothless and beneficial to the telecoms industry.

As a general rule the civil service are not very open to bribery, so I don't see the "envelope" argument as a big challenge (they're brown, not white, by the way). And you could say that the current system is open to financial persuasion in excatly the same way, you simply bribe different people.

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Ledswinger
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Re: A stitch in time

"Scrapping them and splitting off their functions to other bodies should be a priority for the government!"

I work in a sector where the current regulator OFGEM is slated for closure and replacement by the probably inevitable next (Labour) government. In practice this means that we have a lame duck regulator who's going to do nothing for the next two years, and then a further two years (minimum) to design, legislate for the new regulator, and then recruit and get up to speed.

I believe OFCOM are a crummy and ineffectual regulator, but simply moving responsibilities to new bodies won't necessarily make those new bodies any better. Far better in my view to sack Tony Blair's placeman chief executive, and make the existing organisation work.

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Ledswinger
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Re: A stitch in time

"That would put the rules in place first and any challenge would only be effective if it was found to be valid by the courts"

A good start, but I think they should go further: Simply make OFCOM (in law) the arbiter of its own rules. So they set the rules, they decide what they mean, telcos that don't like it can go play in other markets they like better.

What's the point of a supposed regulator that can't set regulations without somebody else deciding what they mean? As OFCOM are appointed and overseen by government there's no big deal to allowing them to say how their own rules should be interpreted (in fact this is largely what happens in other regulated sectors).

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Indian press focuses on Satya Nadella's love of cricket

Ledswinger
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Trollface

Re: Batters?

"There are batters in rounders, but that's a childs' game and need not detain us."

The same may be said of baseball.

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Turkish president mulls $4.5bn Apple fondleslab school deal

Ledswinger
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Re: So thats about ...@Eradicate all BB entrants

" So you have eradicated all manual writing implements from your daily life?"

Don't be a twit. Nobody has mooted that people won't be taught to write in the forseeable future, the discussion is about the progression, and what is needed for educational purposes. Writing by hand is for most people slow and laborious - a few can write quickly and well, most cannot. My own handwriting is particularly poor. Perhaps you believe that learning by rote, and copying out long passages by hand is part of the learning process - I believe that slows down understanding and assimilation of knowledge.

"As for 100% reliant on technology? No one here is in a Wall-E inspired hover chair .... are you?"

Maybe you're posting from some remote village in Afghanistan, devoid of electricity, running water or modern communications, and wiping your @rse with a stone. If that's the case then you are certainly not dependent upon technology. But I doubt that's the case, and if you think we aren't 100% dependant upon technology simply because we don't have hover chairs, then you're a fool. The whole of Western society is utterly dependant upon technology, excepting a few crofters or smallholders. Without technology most of the readers of this forum would have no useful function in society other than manual labour. Our food supply chain, our financial system, our healthcare, our communications, our energy supply, and even a good proportion of our entertainment all are 100% dependant upon technology. There's tiny bits around the edges would still work, but when the electricity or communications links to the systems break down, then there's no manual back up other than at the peripheries. How do you think 70m people survive on an island that can only feed about half that number from its own resources? Because of international trade in services, and an advanced food supply chain that spans the globe, both only possible through technology.

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Ledswinger
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Re: So thats about ...

"What happens when the battery has failed while the kids are in class"

The same argument that says "the autocar will never replace the horse and cabriolet, because the autocar is short in range and relies on petrol in a tank".

We are 100% reliant on technology, and readers of this site really ought to understand that.

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Ledswinger
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Re: So thats about ...

"Learning to write with a pen or pencil is part of the basics, as well as being able to read what you have written."

Funnily enough, when I drafted my response, it included a paragraph commenting on the dying need for handwriting. If handwriting were so important than there would still be a demand for novels written by monks in illuminated scripts. Funnily enough that's not evidenced.

The reason most (but not all of us) learned to write with a pen is because there wasn't any alternative. You will note how the quill got replaced with the pen, the pen by the ball point. The ball point is next to go.

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Ledswinger
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Re: So thats about ...

"I still think writing implements and books would help more"

So, the Commentariat on one of the world's premier (well, ish) tech news sites reckon that technology is inferior as a teaching aid to old fashioned paper and quill pens?

I disagree. A tablet (even if short lived) will give a kid access to a complete world of information that they'll never get in some dusty, out of date textbook. And whilst Youtube may not be the same as doing the experiment yourself, it's a zillion percent better than the probable alternative of not seeing the experiment on Youtube AND not seeing or doing it in the classroom. There's also some cool and free educational resources out there that give people access to alternative teachers (eg the Khan Academy) far better than they're likely to find in the village school. Or publicly open resources that can be mined to improve standards, such as the Centre for Innovation in Mathematics Teaching.

Some people have suggested Android because its cheaper. That's true, but there's the significant security gap between Apple and Android that makes Apple a better (admittedly not foolproof) bet to hand to kids. And the logical extension of the low cost path is the Indian government's Akash tablet debacle, where they're trying to push lacklustre low spec Android tablets to their schoolkids - which do you think will be a better learning experience: an iPad mini, or a 7 inch low spec slug running a forked version of Android tied to a non-Google app store?

And then we come to the "kids will only break it". Certainly spoilt Western kids manage that. But I'll wager that in poorer countries kids are more grateful and more careful, particularly as there's unlikely to be a free replacement paid for by the parents. Word will soon get around when Kemal breaks his tablet and has to share somebody else's, or use chalk and slate.

I'm all for this, I think the Turkish government are thinking in the right direction, and I think it can only benefit their kids. Meanwhile, those casting aspersions from UK shores should consider that the height of this country's attempts to combine IT and education amount to teaching our kids to produce lurid but fact-free presentations in Microsoft Office. Curiously enough, my eldest attends a very successful independent school, and they are moving to a digital learning programme based on guess which fruity tablet?

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Yet ANOTHER Brit MOBE tower BORG: Three and EE ink network-sharing deal

Ledswinger
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Re: only ... two network coverage footprints to choose from

"But the footprints will generally, and points above not withstanding, give better coverage"

Not by much, because the networks have all avoided areas of low mobile use, so the current situation is not mutually complementary coverage, but rather massively overlapping coverage. All the sharing does is some marginal reduction in operating costs that most certainly won't be passed on to you or I. O2's recent price hike shows their position on keeping costs down for customers.

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Ledswinger
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Re: different frequencies

IME that's fairly unusual - I've always found Orange and T Mobile reception moves in tandem (even before mast sharing), and likewise O2 and Vodafone. There's a few individual spots where that doesn't hang true, but they are the exception rather than the rule.

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It's Satya! Microsoft VP Nadella named CEO as Bill Gates steps down

Ledswinger
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Re: Welcome to Toyland!

"Big Ears Gates is stepping down...."

Only to a degree. He's still got an official status within the firm, and so his presence will linger on like a foul guff in a warm lift. You know the ones, hot, silent messengers of death, capable of turning the silvering of mirrors black, and guaranteeing that the lift will stop at the next floor for an attractive young colleague to get in the lift, and instantly give you the evil eye for crimes against humanity, before escaping to tell everybody what a beast you are (gentlemen, you've all been here).

And that's bad news for the new guy. Not only does he have a new chairman breathing down his collar, but he's got Gates hanging around, responsible for nothing, but telling him what he should do. I suppose it depends what shareholders want. If they want Microsoft to reinvent itself, Gates should go, Nadella shouldn't have been appointed, nor any other insider. If the shareholders just want MS to remain a cash generating cow hoping that nobody will take away the enterprise software market, then he should stay. But expecting not just one, but a gang of insiders to be revolutionaries is daft - all these people were complicit in the failure of Microsoft to evolve. And Nadella's got the toxic Elop hanging around, spurned for the top job, hoping Nadella will mess up, and that Elop can squeeze his backside into the sweat-stained leather throne. That's no recipe for success. A question then: Will Elop last long enough to watch Nadella crash and burn, or will Elop be pushed out, or even flounce off in a strop because he didn't get to be big cheese?

This doesn't sound like a recipe for success to me, but maybe the people who made the appointment are right - taking a view Microsoft will never evolve to put customers first, so why take the risk, when you can just sit and count the gold for the next five to ten years.

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US feds want cars conversing by 2017

Ledswinger
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Re: Whats ...

".... the broadcast code for "Move aside. An El Reg reader is coming through.""

What about a flashing brown light?

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Ledswinger
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"muahaahah, that should wake up some slow left lane clowns"

Left lane is where the slow clowns should be. That's why it's register.co.uk

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UK libraries trial free access to scientific research

Ledswinger
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Re: "there's precious few able to understand the blinkered perspective of Tom 7

"Some of us paid attention at school and university. And still like to learn. And if we've paid for it already there's no reason why we should pay for it twice"

You arrogant twerp. I do have a science degree, and a masters to boot, but obviously I take my hat off to polymaths such as yourself, able to divine the true meaning and signficance of any research paper in any field, recalling every single thing you were taught in university. And of course, you're quite right to ignore the wider and less well-educated audiences than self-proclaimed experts such as yourself.

However, I must confess I did enjoy your post, which managed to be both pompous, and yet at the same time to be infused with a sad, bitter, lefty tone.

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Ledswinger
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"Every tax payer should have access to *any and all* research which is even partially funded by the tax payer"

At the moment I have to ask why? Most scientific research is readily accessible to the scientific community, and outside of it there's precious few able to understand the content of research papers. An interesting idea would be to require publicly funded papers to have (in addition to the normal scientific abstract) an "intelligent layman's summary". Some research scientists might find that writing for that audience is a bigger challenge than the research itself.

"As an extension to this, any patent or invention created as the direct result of public funding would also belong to the public (at least partially)"

An attractive, even populist move. But in the shorter term most universities do already seek to benefit from commercialisation of their research. Arguably they tend to see this too narrowly, and miss out on the benefits of prior research that (at the time) didn't have an obvious commercial application, or which do not give rise to a patent, but you can't patent the outcomes of all research.

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HP: Autonomy overstated 2010 profits, cuts them by 81 PER CENT

Ledswinger
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Re: Accountant wars

"Profit and loss in the 'old' days seem to be such simple concepts, but now they seem to exist in a parallel universe."

Rose tinted spectacles you're wearing there! Corporate accounting fraud goes back as far as we've had companies and accounts. Polly Peck, BCCI, Enron are only a handful of non-tech companies that went "pop" on the back of made up numbers. Going back much further, read the first few lines of the abstract of this:

http://homepages.transy.edu/~gwilliams/docs/FinancialCrime.pdf

Arguably the South Sea Bubble was accounting fraud, which takes us back to the early 1700's.

The origins of the UK audit firms goes back to the need to verify accounts and prevent fraud. This works only to a limited degree, and today is made substantially worse by the corporate nature of the audit industry, cosy and long term relationships between companies and auditors, and a greater incentive to rubber stamp a company's accounts than to uncover fraud.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Autonomy reported profits of £105.7m for fiscal year 2010, The real profit was just £19.6m

"Plus $105M profit on $175M turnover, how come no-one called BS on that?"

In the world of software and intellectual property that's possible. Whilst Autonomy's business was different, consider the case of a packaged office software suite, which the code owner sells to distributors at say $150. Once they've paid for the development up front, the marginal cost of producing each new sale is the cost of a cardboard box and an installation disk (if you're lucky).

In the consumer world you've got big marketing costs and fat overheads, in the B2B world they are generally far lower. I used to work for a B2B software house (not Autonomy) and our gross margins were huge, our corporate overheads minimal, our marketing budget tiny.

Curiously enough the firm I worked for's accounts were crooked, directors fraudulent, and the firm (with turnover in excess of £100m) managed to go bust on the back of debt fuelled acquisitions, despite being the largest UK company in its field, and one of the largest in the sector in the world, with a roster of blue-chip customers. Few large software companies develop their own code from scratch, they buy smaller more innovative companies, and that means a continual trail of more (or generally) less successful acquisitions, over-hyped, over-priced deals, shed loads of debt, and both sides of the deal trying to ramp up the importance of the acquired company and its product. That's the world of software, IMHO, and it's why big companies make bad deals, and often fail to deliver on the promise of the acqusition.

HP are guilty of both gross negligence in their due diligence, but also of failure of their duties to shareholders by overpaying so outrageously even on claimed profits. And strategically they are guilty of incompetence by having no realistic plan to deliver value from the acquired business, and of strategic malfeasance by their failure to learn from their own past mistakes, or those of others in the industry.

HP bought EDS, but the parasite has now taken over the host, and HP is not in my view a technology innovator, not a software house, just a lard-bottomed, poor quality outsourcer making big promises to customers that (to judge by the unhappy experience of my current globo-corp) HP cannot deliver on, despite high outturn prices. Given those opinions, I wouldn't expect them to make a success of M&A, but it's important to remember that M&A is the last refuge of scoundrel directors, seeking a smokescreen to hide their inability to run their existing business.

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Windows 8.1 becomes world's fourth-most-popular desktop OS

Ledswinger
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Re: 8.1 and 8 should be grouped together@ Test Man

"8.1 is not a service pack for 8, it's a totally separate OS, evident by the fact that you install it like a new OS, you get upgrade screens like a new OS, etc."

So in your world the definition of a unique operating system is the user experience of installing it?

Microsoft certainly dressed up 8.1 as more than a service pack, but comparing before and after I see virtually no difference, other than a function and use-free start button. If that defines a discrete OS, then you are very easily pleased.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Cash registers etc.

"They will be using XP Embedded and are NOT affected by the desktop EoL"

Not all, I'm afraid. There's plenty of EPOS systems running on desktop XP, particularly away from the big chains. And even if you're a big chain running XPE, how safe are you when the s0ddin' EPOS system is written in Java?

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Cameron: UK public is fine with domestic spying

Ledswinger
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Re: If there was any doubt@Mike Smith

"Now, I don't claim to be an expert in political analysis...."

Well you're setting out a stall for some form of analysis. I think your "rule 1" falls at a fairly early hurdle because a very large proportion of people don't vote because the three party system is so broken that they can't see the point. That's not going to change any time soon.

And looking at your parliamentary analysis, the outcome of your hoped for "50% of refuseniks to vote" would simply have been a Labour led coalition including the Liberals and a handful of other generally left wing parties. Would that have been any better? I doubt it. It would have been worse because all the damage that Blair and Brown inflicted would have gone ahead, and then you'd have "golden wish" gifts to the minority members. That sort of "golden wish" shit is why Germany is carping on at the rest of Europe over carbon even as it shuts down good quality, safe nuclear power plants, and tries to ignore industry screaming that it can't compete with the ludicrous energy prices.

So I come back to why UKIP makes sense. For both parties, they've ignored voters concerns about immigration and about Europe for too long, and they still won't do anything about either. Clearly the drippy conservative leadership are not listening this time, but maybe they will after a further five years on the house of commons cheap seats. The Labour party might want to also consider who they claim to represent, because they are in a similarly poor position, and currently look set to win the next election simply by not being the current government.

If in the meanwhile we have a bit of colour added to the otherwise drab, ineffectual house of commons, that has to be a good thing.

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Ledswinger
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Re: If there was any doubt@Mike Smith

"Nigel Farage will lead us out of the darkness! Viva il Duce!"

What options are there?

Not voting achieves nothing because there's no de minimis or quorum of voters that has to be achieved to elect MPs. The three main parties have all shown themselves incompetent and dishonest, with a happy enthusiasm for treating government as a trough at which they take turns, and there's precious little to choose between their policies when you stand back. Voting for that rubber faced champagne socialist Millitwat will leave us with the same policies as the current lot, just with some Canute style window dressing on energy bills, and the usual Labour enthusiasm for more laws, more red tape, and higher public spending. Liberals have shown themselves as only fit to be a minority opposition party. And there seems to be universal agreement that Cameron is an unelectable, out of touch arsehole. All three parties routinely make promises that they don't deliver on, all three are big-state enthusiasts who think mass surveillance is the best thing since their last pay rise.

Farage may be a loon, and I can't see UKIP winning many seats. But by voting UKIP I hope to (collectively) deny the Conservatives victory until they have policies I will be happy with, and a leader who isn't an arse.

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Ledswinger
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Re: If there was any doubt

""it is a dangerous world and there are bad people that want to do terrible things to us"!

"terrible things to me" was what the knob end meant. I suppose I am indeed one of the "bad people", but primarily on account of my intent to vote UKIP.

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Ledswinger
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Re: If there was any doubt

I don't know. My money's on stupid, because that's consistent with his obsession about foreign aid, and his persistent attacks on anything that might be termed core conservative values or voters. I suppose that's what you get by electing rich boy Oxbridge twats for you party leader,

I'd like the see the smug rich fucker burned at the stake.

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Eurocops want to build remote car-stopper, shared sensor network

Ledswinger
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Re: And so the "feature" creep begins

"WTF wants this in their car?"

Presumably anybody with a nice enough car to justify (or consider) paying £300-£800 for a Tracker installation. With Tracker you might get your car back, but only after the crims have thrashed and crashed it trying to escape the police. Remote stop works much better.

For the people (like me) driving old shit heaps or cheap everyday cars, there's less call for it. Regarding feature creep, consider what the police will think, when they can automatically disable cars if they aren't taxed, MOT'd or insured. Will that be a good thing or not?

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Bonk to enter: Starwood Hotels testing keyless check-in via mobe

Ledswinger
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Re: How secure is it?

And you haven't even mentioned the total lack of control in the process for writing new magnetic keys, issuing to customers, or dealing with room changes (and even avoiding double bookings). I've been issued with key cards for a room that the hotel have already given to somebody, where they've gone to the room, used their keys, are in residence, and are then very surprised when we walked in, using our key. In trying to sort this out, the hotel managed to invalidate their keys, book us into a new room which the keys they gave us didn't work, but the people we'd walked in on, their keys now worked for our room. A shambles (hello, Marriott), which proved that magnetic keys provide very little security even before criminals get involved.

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Snap! Nokia's gyro stabilised camera tech now on open market

Ledswinger
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Re: Linguistics

"Language isn't maths and doesn't work like maths".

Rubbish. That's like saying that two wrongs don't make a right, when they clearly do.

Given that pedantry is high art round these parts, I think the linguistic pragmatists are on a hiding to nothing, and should accept that "unique" is a concept that is absolute.

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NatWest 'spam' email cockup got me slapped with late payment fee, says angry Reg reader

Ledswinger
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Re: "Anybody who has anything to do with RBS or Natwest..."

Yo Jedit! We've a couple of downvotes apiece. Do you think our comments were too complex to be understood, or is it that there's a couple of banker-huggers around these parts?

If it's the latter we need a witch hunt to catch some bankers, and then treat them to original Spanish Inquisition treatments. Of course, it may be simply that RBS have taken a leaf out of the Young Liberals' Book of Lost Causes, and have got their social media team registering to down vote anti-RBS posts.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Anyone Surprised at NitWit Bank

"It might help if the staff were trained."

Don't forget Gnatwest are part of Royal Bank of Scotland, so the most likely training would just be three part group wide training in Greed, Dishonesty, and IT incompetence.

The latest set of RBS group writedowns show that they were still lying in the previous set of results about their dodgy lending, we know they were part of the cabal that rigged LIBOR, there's good reason to suspect their Global Restructuring Group is as bent as 3 bob note, they've just set aside ANOTHER £3bn to fund PPI mis-selling, there's half a billion of provisions for mis-selling interest rate swaps to SMEs, £100m for miselading US investors on sub-prime investment products. Then there's the mis-selling of identity theft insurance. Going back further we had the 1980's pension miselling, endowment mortgages....Philip Hampton has already said he'll be asking the shareholders (the poodles at UKFI, presumably) to rubber stamp 200% bonuses for some staff. A cynic might think the only question to ask is "What form of mis-selling or fraud is their bonus for?"

Anybody who has anything to do with RBS or Natwest is voting with their wallet for the crooks who run this operation to be rewarded. If they haven't investigated the new fast account switching service with a view to banking elsewhere then they deserve this kind of service.

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Mobe industry quails as Ofcom floats idea of QUADRUPLING 2G spectrum prices

Ledswinger
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Re: Of course costs multiply

"Crisps cost a multiple of what potatoes do"

They do insofar as total price is always a multiple of cost of sales, but I think you mean the sale price varies with what you think is the primary input. And in that respect you'd be wrong. Walkers use 800 tonnes of potatoes to produce 11m bags a day, if the average price they pay is £400 a tonne (which I doubt) then that's 3 pence per bag that goes on tatties.

Production process, distribution, marketing and packaging are where the costs are. Anything other than Stackers is expensive to transport (because you're paying to deliver a bag of air, and high ratios of packaging to product). Any brand spends a fortune on advertising (shop at Aldi, you know it makes sense). And anything in a nice packet will see far more spent on the quality plastic/foil and high grade printing than what goes inside.

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Behold the world's first full-colour 3D printer

Ledswinger
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"Take the headphones in the example, is there really any benefit in printing 3 the hard plastic and rubbery plastic components at the same time instead of just printing multiple parts and assembling them?"

At the moment no benefit in prototyping, and not a cat in hels chance of being used for manufacturing. But thinking forward to a real world manufacturing situation you'd need to balance the reduced part count of a 3D printed object against the multiple supply chains and assembly steps to create the object as per normal. 3D printing is a technology in its absolute infancy, and costs should come down and capabilities increase, which will see it move to the norm for prototyping, and eventually to be a contender for manufacturing - perhaps not the full finished part, but certainly making inroads on the way things happen now.

There's also the fact that 3D printing can produce designs that cannot be made by normal machining or injection moulding. BAES are working to get 3D printed parts certified for aircraft application, and they can produce prototypes of suitable parts quicker than any competing approach, and then go from the prototyping machine that uses plastic to metal parts on a production machine. The resultant parts are lighter, stronger and although having (for example) two hinged halves and a hinge pin are still only a single component. That isn't evidenced in the sort of simple example shapes we see here, which reflect how things are made now. But take the headphone shell, and consider the headband, ear piece shells and cushions - why are they made up of so many different parts now? Simply because we struggle to do composite moulding of this complexity with materials that have the necessary and differnet properties.

3D printing will probably only remain one approach of many, but it has the potential to be the next revolution in manufacturing, as significant as CNC machining was thirty years ago.

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Fancy a little kinky sex? GCHQ+NSA will know - thanks to ANGRY BIRDS

Ledswinger
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Re: No issues on iPhone?

"Seems that this is only an issue for Google/Android users then?"

What do you think? But even if you weren't cynical you could ask Der Speigel, who had an article just before Christmas reporting that the NSA had the iPhone completely cracked back in 2008. Do a search on Speigel iPhone Appelbaum.

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Ledswinger
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@Billy Catringer

Bwahahahahhahahahahhaha! (As we used to say back in Usenet days).

The Twenty Eighth Amendment says: Now wash your hands.

Have you not noticed, the rules don't apply to the government? Out of curiosity (being on the right hand side of the Atlantic) how is all this being received by the wider populace of the US? You have a government and its agencies drunk on their own unaccountability, and on the new opportunities for monitoring the masses, and the only two practical choices you have at the ballot box think this situation is just dandy. Is there mogadon in the drinking water, or something?

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Lloyds Group probes server crash behind ATM, cash card outage

Ledswinger
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Re: Dear Banks@ Pen-y-gors

"I don't entirely agree - a large proportion of personal customers in the UK don't actually pay for a current account (okay, charges for overdrafts etc) but basic banking is free. Once this was funded by the fact that they didn't pay interest on current accounts, but with interest rates at zero they don't have any income to pay for the services."

Let's stop for a moment and consider why interest rates are so low. Would it be the fault of the self same banks bleating they've no money, whose reckless lending meant the state had to bail the thieving scum out in the first place, accompanied by QE and near zero interest rates?

If they have to provide "free" current accounts at a loss for a few years, simply because their collective greed, incompetence and dishonesty wrecked the whole system, then I say tough luck. If they don't want to do retail banking, then let them close or sell their high street branches.

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Achtung NIMBYs! BT splurges extra £50m on fibre broadband rollout

Ledswinger
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Re: Why renationalise BT? @Tom 7

"But ignoring the fact that BT threw our future out with the bathwater can you tell me one of the big utility privatisations that has actually reduced bills for the customer?"

Having worked for the water industry during the 1990s and managed a multi-hundred million investment programme, and now working in the power sector I can help you out on both topics:

The dynamics are different by industry. Water privatisation occurred because (a) the operations and investment arms of the regional water authorities were incompetent and hugely inefficient, (b) the same public sector organisations had allowed the network infrastructure to rot, such that renewal was happening slower than the network fell to bits, and (c) government didn't want to foot the huge bill for (largely justified) EU water quality improvements. Your bill certainly went up, but operating costs (like for like) came down massively, we got to a point where network decay and renewal moved into rough balance, and the government didn't have to borrow the billions I was busy spending on water and sewage assets.

In the case of power, the inefficiency existed, and was addressed over a decade of redundancies (we're back in that part of the cycle now in response to all the ill informed whining about the cost of energy). There was a need for some asset renewal (replacement of the older less efficient coal plant by CCGT, the original "dash for gas". And your costs did come down, year on year from 1991 through to 2003, when government got bitten by the "green" bug, which led to prolonged, continuing and accelerating pressures on your energy bill to pay for windmills, carbon taxes, rebates for the poor and elderly, insulation on the homes, sometimes on real bill payers homes, but largely targeted at the Labour voting poor.,

See chart 2.1.2 in the link below for the evidence on cost.

But that unfortunately coincided with the start of the mid noughties boom, and the emergence of China as a force to affect world commodity prices, so that on top of green meddling there was real sustained increase in the price of gas and coal (see chart 3.2.2)

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CDsQFjAA&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.gov.uk%2Fgovernment%2Fuploads%2Fsystem%2Fuploads%2Fattachment_data%2Ffile%2F65940%2F7341-quarterly-energy-prices-december-2012.pdf&ei=y6fiUoWCGtKjhgfoioGIBg&usg=AFQjCNGXBuWIH9KxRsR7xWfIWZBzqedNyw&bvm=bv.59930103,d.ZG4&cad=rja

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Ledswinger
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@Chris Miller

"it's not true that we don't have a credible aerospace sector - Rolls-Royce and a very significant share of Airbus manufacturing, plus the largest manufacturer of satellites outside the US. And that's just the civil stuff."

You're right. Well, insofar as we make the wings for AIrbus. As Airbus is effectively French state controlled (with a nod to the Germans) the continued wing construction at Broughton has to be considered as not a safe long term bet - I work for a European owned company, and (unlike British managed companies) they are remarkably parochial. They'll never adopt a best in class solution if there's a third rate one on offer in their home country, and if something good is being done in a foreign part of the business they'll replicate it (often badly) at home, and then centralise, closing the efficient and innovative part of the business down, because they couldn't bear to do it the other way round.

Rolls Royce I'd take my hat off to. Satellite building - good stuff, but actual job numbers and income will be small relative to the rest of the economy.

But that does lead us onto defence and BAES. They seem unable to put an aircraft of their own in the sky other than as vast Euro-boondoggle programmes with huge cost over-runs and delays. The best they can do is the three country money pit that as the Eurofighter Typhoon, meanwhile Sweden (with a population barely larger than Greater London) put the Gripen into the air without having to involve every other major European economy, and with far smaller cost overrun issues.

I'd like it to be different, and for our fantastic industrial and aviation heritage to be evidenced today, but I see no sign of it. If BAES weren't such a lard arse state-suckling mess, they might have thought about the need for a competent strike fighter in time for when the Tornadoes, Jags and Harriers were retired, and built the prototype at their own cost and without the incompetent bungling of the MoD to muck it up.

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Ledswinger
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"Why not just nationalise the bloody thing again and get on with it."

You're obviously too young to remember what a success nationalisation was. It's a major part of the reasons why we don't a British owned volume car maker, why we don't have a credible aerospace sector, why the railways have barely gone beyond the network built by private Victorian companies, and indeed why Britain was for so many years the dirty man of Europe due to poor management of the publicly owned water authorities through the 70s and 80s. And when the energy sector was publicly owned, it became a huge make work scheme to keep miners employed digging out coal at much higher cost than could be bought on the world market. The miners and public sector management wouldn't modernise, and eventually we were left with no coal industry, thanks to berks like Scargill (not to mention the power station workers forcing the economy onto a three day week in the 1970s. I remember eating tea by candlelight in the socialist utopia of 1970's Britain.

If you want to see how your proposal might work out, look at the energy sector today. Although the capital is nominally privately owned, you've actually got a stealthily nationalised decision making process: Incompetent public sector processes and bureaucrats decide what assets you can build where and when, whether you have a licence to operate in the "market", the rules of the "market" for power, where and what the subsidies and taxes are (all in the name of the FoE energy "policy" of the present and last bunch of twats in Parliament). Even as people struggle with the concept of a "capacity gap" that might lead to blackouts at periods of peak demand, consumers are bleating at high energy prices, yet the generating companies are taking thermal capacity out of service because it is losing money now that DECC have buggered up the system to channel all the money into wind farms and the like.

BT is grim, anti-competitive, and towards the very back of the list of organisations I'd give my custom to, but a nationalised telecoms industry would be even further back in that queue.

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Snowden speaks: NSA spies create 'databases of ruin' on innocent folks

Ledswinger
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Re: Mass Surveillance

"so what would you do?"

Well I'd have been realistic. Failure of existing systems enabled 9/11. That should be fixed, but instituting a new, vast automated system wasn't a fix, and never will be. Mass surveillance couldn't even stop the amateurs behind the Boston bombings (despite the Ruskies waving a red flag at the US authorities to alert them). The Times Square bomber, the shoe and underpant bombers were all foiled in their intentions by their own incompetence, not by the expensive and ineffectual NSA+GCHQ. A broadly similar situation exists in the UK over terror attacks and attempts here that the mass surveillance loved by bureaucrats has stopped nothing, and ordinary policing, luck,or incompetence of the attackers has been the main ways they've been stopped.

Unfortunately, Obama and Congress (and the British parliament) have shown their true colours. They like mass surveillance, they won't condemn it, they won't stop it, and they don't care what the public think. Unfortunately, mass surveillance will evolve as some clever but misguided fool decides that he can code a system that will predict who becomes a terrorist. Two years ago if I'd mentioned Minority Report in this context I'd have been classed as a tin foil hatter. Knowing what we know about the NSA, and its links to the tech industry, and watching how the likes of Google track everything you do to predict what you'll buy, it seems pretty obvious that soon (if not already) innocent people will be labelled by an algorithm that brings together their opinions from online activity, emails, their contacts via email, Linkedin, Facebook, their purchase and travel history, what they read, their choice of news articles they looked at on the internet. And equally, people who are guilty as sin will be overlooked because such a system is flawed.

To put it simply, mass surveillance is a means of repression. There is no evidence of its successful use for real, democratic security, and plenty of evidence of scope creep and use by the wrong people for the wrong reasons. We expect this sort of behaviour from the Chinese and Russian governments, and we expect it to be used against the people.

The NSA have done untold damage to the international reputation of the USA, and fiddling around with "oversight" of their activities (which would still be done by the 1%, behind closed doors) doesn't deliver. So what would I do? I'd abolish the NSA as it now exists, and hunt down those allowed or who planned for it to become a data scooping Stasi, and I'd punish them. Oh, and I'd grant an unconditional pardon to Snowden and Manning, and award both the Presidential Medal of Freedom. As things stand that gong is probably being awarded to the highly paid, unaccountable bloke running the NSA. Is that what America stands for today?

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HP Chromebook 11 quietly slips back on Google Play shelves... but where's the FIRE?

Ledswinger
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Re: Interestingly

"The play store lists neither the screen res or the cpu speed."

You could go to a library, and look them up in a copy of PC Pro? Or ask a knowledgeable friend to look it up on the internet for you?

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El Reg preps relaunch of Cash’n’Carrion online merchandise emporium

Ledswinger
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Re: Tees and mugs?

"these would of course have "Something for the weekend, Sir?" written on them."

On the inside, in that transfer ink used for temporary tattoos. That'd look magnificent along the length of my boner. Although on second thoughts, maybe "Something for the weekend, Madam?" might be better, to avoid creating the wrong sort of impression with the wife.

Maybe offer both terms, all in the interests of pandering to the "diversity" fad?

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Margaret Hodge, PAC are scaring off new biz: Treasury source

Ledswinger
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Re: "without contributing to its upkeep"

" I think you'll find they do contribute by providing jobs"

And business rates. In broad brush terms a third of corporate taxes come from each of corporation tax, employer's NI, and from rates. The proportion raised by corporation tax declines still further if you choose to take the view that the employees' taxes are only created by virtue of the company's existence and activity. You could water that down further by including VAT, but I think that would still accrue from other spending choices if (say) Amazon weren't in business.

As ever, the problem is one of arsehole MPs doing some grandstanding for a bit of cheap publicity, when they are the root cause ot the problem (if one even exists). What Podge is forever whining on about can be summed up as "Big clever companies are adhering to the laws my party made, and the 1,000 odd pages of the companies act we rubber stamped without reading, and in doing so they're not paying what I think they ought to".

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