* Posts by fung0

156 posts • joined 29 May 2012

Page:

In this Facebook and Google-owned world, it's time to rethink privacy

fung0

Nobody has mentioned the obvious alternative to Facebook, which has been advocated by Max Schrems: forcing Zuckerberg & company to open their data formats, allowing compatible competing services to interoperate with Facebook.

Open standards are the solution we've favored historically - with most of our mass media (telephone, radio, TV), and even with many physical systems (snail-mail, railroads, air traffic control). In the case of social media, MyBook.com could offer a paid service that would maintain privacy, yet allow posts to interoperate with those on Facebook (subject to whatever degree of granular user control). CheapBook could offer less privacy, at lower cost. FancyBook could offer a nicer UI. Etc. GoogleBook could even allow Google to compete, something they've been unable to do so far.

Facebook is not the leader because it's so utterly fabulous; it's the leader because it's been allowed to turn a useful public service into a de facto monopoly, with ironclad user lock-in. That's not Facebook's choice to make - it's ours. And we can change our mind any time we like.

0
0

Microsoft: Yes, we are going to kill off Enterprise Agreements

fung0

Re: Does this mean no Windows installations will be free from forced updates?

Chika: "Microsoft are in the business to make money. Nothing more than that, nothing less."

Alas, if only that were true. Like most modern corporations, Microsoft is in business to maximize its quarterly stock valuation. Nothing more, nothing less - and nothing longer-term. This pretty much explains most of the company's disastrous policies going back to when Gates left.

4
0

Microsoft Windows: The Next 30 Years

fung0

Re: Half truths

"...windows is not the beginning or the end of operating systems, just the more popular commercial platform to run 3rd party software on personal computers."

You hit the nail on the head. Microsoft disparagingly refers to "legacy support," forgetting that this (Win32) legacy is the only thing that makes Windows dominant. On a purely technical basis, both Linux and Mac OS are at least as good.

2
0
fung0

Re: It isn't last 30/next 30. It's 15/15/15.

"... the basic PC market has matured to the point that most replace the OS when they replace hardware...

@a_yank_lurker - Microsoft certainly believes what you're saying, but it's a self-fulfilling view. People don't upgrade because they can't afford disruption, not because they don't want more functionality. Everyone I know would happily pay Microsoft $100 or more per year, to get nice, non-disruptive feature updates to Windows 7. (Everything worthwhile in Windows 10 could have easily been delivered that way.) Multiply that by over a billion users, and it's a pretty good business model. Release a 'lite' upgrade for Windows XP, and you can add hundreds of millions more.

Take all that revenue and invest it in newer growth markets, by all means - but don't f**k with the goose that lays platinum eggs. That was the key mistake that IBM made - the company thought it was smarter than the market. It forgot that the PC was strong not by virtue of technical superiority, by solely based on market momentum. Interrupt that momentum at your peril.

1
0
fung0

Re: Very interesting article.

The obvious solution for Microsoft would have been to evolve Windows CE/Windows Mobile, and adding a touch-friendly UI. That OS already had huge support - the library of third-party software was enormous, and my old iPAQ can still do things my Android devices can't. (I also don't recall it ever crashing... or spying on me.)

It took about 10 years of persistence to make Windows a success on the desktop; if Microsoft had stuck with WinCE that long, the mobile world today probably wouldn't belong to Apple and Google.

1
0
fung0

Re: @fung0

The comparison to the iPad is not mine, it's Microsoft's. And a lot of pundits are going with it. Even 'tablet' stats are now starting to include Windows 'convertibles.' (Quite wrongly, I would contend.)

I do agree that the Surface is a good laptop.

1
0
fung0

Re: Hammer that code

"The fact that they do not have to develop two UIs should mean that the phone gets any new feature or fix more promptly."

If Microsoft is only going to develop one UI, it should be the Windows UI, not some hastily-concocted tablet UI. The Windows UI has a 30-year legacy to support. Switching one or two billion users just to make a few phone users happy is insanity.

2
0
fung0

The strategy of stupid

Microsoft has repeatedly demonstrated the right way to move into the future: make the big paradigm shifts optional, and allow users to adopt them at their own pace.

They did it with the shift from command-line DOS to GUI Windows. The latter ran on top of the former (quite nicely) for a decade or more, allowing users to use both modes as they needed. Even when the DOS underpinning was removed, the DOS box maintained backward compatibility elegantly and conveniently.

They did it again with the shift from the Win 9x codebase to the far more sophisticated NT codebase. The two versions of Windows coexisted happily for nearly a decade. (We've recently discovered that Windows 3.x is still doing its job out in the field, in some pretty major applications. That kind of longevity is a good thing, except maybe to corporate bean-counters.)

But Ballmer and Nadella forgot those brilliant examples. They decided, quite wrongly, that the way to embrace mobile was to mutate the core OS and bludgeon users into coming along. Even Apple wasn't that arrogant. This strategy will fail, not because users hate it (which they do), but because it's not technically feasible. It's one of those software feats that looks workable, but in practice breaks down for a million small reasons.

For example, Microsoft may be able to squeeze Windows 10 onto mobile devices, but those devices will never be as mobile as those running a dedicated mobile OS. It's like Achilles and the Tortoise: by the time the Surface is as thin as an iPad, the iPad will be as thin as a sheet of paper. An awkward hybrid, Windows 10.x is guaranteed to always be second-best. Not to mention buggy, unusable and un-maintainable. (Linux is already vastly easier to install and service, and the gap is widening, not shrinking.)

Microsoft has become IBM. It seemed inconceivable in the early 1990s that there could ever be a microcomputer world without IBM as a significant force in it. But all it took was a few bad strategic choices - choices that were probably not as dumb as those Microsoft is making today.

38
6

Samsung Gear VR is good. So good 2016 could be year virtual reality finally makes it

fung0

Re: Film makers?

"I have to confess to being a bit skeptic regarding immersive VR films as an art medium (and I use that term in the broad Hollywood sense)."

VR will be a great medium for storytelling, but it will be an entirely new medium, that will need to evolve new ways of telling those stories. Comparisons to film are misleading at best.

Having spent some time in various VR systems, I suspect that we don't really have a clue what the ultimate mix of applications will be. Just as when HDTV came out, all the talk was about movies. But what really changed were talk shows, concerts and above all nature documentaries. There are now whole channels consisting of people pointing a camera (often from a helicopter) at something interesting. HD enabled a whole new 'window on the world' type of entertainment. VR is a bigger paradigm shift, and it will bring bigger surprises.

0
0
fung0

Re: VR makes me want to hurl

"There will still be the discontinuity between what my body/inner ear is doing and what my eyes see."

A lot of this is circumstantial. My first try with an Oculus Rift, I immediately started to get queasy. Then I realized I was spinning around like a Dervish, doing things I'd never do in the real world. Once you adjust your behavior to be more 'normal' - making more deliberate movements - most of the problem goes away.

Content developers will also need to take this into account, of course. They can control the experience in various ways, to minimize problems. Also, what we loosely call 'VR' encompasses a huge range of experiences. I suspect there will be some that anyone can enjoy, and others that will be more... challenging.

0
0

Mozilla annual report shows risky Google dependency now risky Yahoo! dependency

fung0

Re: The problem

"FF42 is using 1.3G and it gets worse and worse as you keep browsing."

I just checked Process Explorer, and what do you know - 1.1GB. That sounds pretty bad, but bear in mind I have 2 Firefox windows open with several hundred tabs (though only a small subset are loaded). I wonder if Mozilla is trying to boost performance by using more RAM?

"It's almost like the modern versions of FF act like old Windows 98, using all all available RAM and getting slower and slower until you have to restart it to get it running fast again."

Using all 'available' RAM is not in itself a bad strategy - empty RAM is wasted RAM. Also, RAM gets cheaper all the time. I have 16GB in my current system, so if Firefox could run like the blazes by using 1, 2 or 3GB, that might be a pretty good deal.

But the real question is efficiency, of both code execution and memory use. Unfortunately, I suspect Firefox (like most browsers, including Edge) is being optimized to deliver blistering benchmarks when loading a single page. There's probably room for huge improvements in handling multiple tabs and multiple extensions.

2
0
fung0

Re: The problem

When as functional as Firefox Edge becomes, run as fast it will not.

4
1

Why Microsoft yanked its latest Windows 10 update download: It hijacked privacy settings

fung0

Re: people's unique advertising ID numbers

If everyone could be expected to turn it off, would Microsoft have bothered building it in? (Instead of, say, using those development resources to create features that people might actually want...)

13
1

UN privacy head slams 'worse than scary' UK surveillance bill

fung0

Re: The UK surveillance bill...

"Taking part in any democratic process requires the option of anonymity."

Excellent point! Without the secret ballot, democracy cannot exist. And the odd thing about democracy is that it actually does work - when it's truly allowed to.

1
0
fung0

Re: The more I think about all this

"How can you square away the need for privacy with the need to protect the State from all threats?"

It would be idiotic to even try. Any civilized society must accept a certain minimal level of personal risk. By far the most effective way to minimize that risk, to "prevent crime," is to remove the root causes - feed the poor, heal the sick, shelter the homeless, educate the ignorant. And above all, stop making vicious, needless war, raining death down on entire nations in some insane effort to punish a tiny minority of radicals.

0
0
fung0

"Where do you think all the intelligence used for targeting missile strikes at specific people comes from?"

It's been well-established that US drone targeting info comes mainly from cell phone metadata. It's a big reason these "surgical" strikes create so much collateral damage.

1
0
fung0

Re: For-profit privacy invasion

"Who does Vince Cerf work for now?"

Cerf's 'logic' shapes itself rather well to his own convenience. In fact, Google proves conclusively that privacy is a thing, and that it's extremely valuable. Otherwise, how could this huge corporation build a vastly profitable business model on the idea of selling it?

2
0

Windows 10 is an antique (and you might be too) says Google man

fung0

Re: Awful

The fact that application installation in Windows is a Byzantine procedure hardly seems like a strong defense of Windows.

7
0
fung0

Re: FTFY

GNU/Linux is vastly important for reasons other than numerical adoption rates. It is, in fact, our only hope of keeping commercial OS vendors even marginally honest. Putting it down is thus only cutting your own throat, regardless of which OS you're rooting for.

Linux also happens to be a nicer OS right now than any of the commercial OSes, in most ways. That has to count for something, even if the great mass of users remains shackled to commercial OSes - chiefly as a consequence of those OSes' massive software applications support, not their technical superiority.

4
1
fung0

Re: Sherlock

I got a Surface Pro exactly because I didn't want to buy both a tablet and a laptop, nor bring around both. And run anyway the same software with no limitations.

"No limitations"...? A device that's both a tablet and a laptop is like a Swiss Army Knife. Most people, most of the time, would rather have a proper knife, fork and screwdriver. Nobody eats supper with a spork unless they absolutely have to.

6
5
fung0

Re: Revisionist

It's true that XP did have a goofy look out of the box. But the Fisher Price dressing was entirely optional, and fully configurable. In 'Classic' mode, XP looked just like W2K, and a lot like Win9x. More importantly, in any view XP worked much the same as Win9x - all the controls were instantly familiar. You could even open up an Explorer window to work like Program Manager - the transition was painless.

Improvements in XP were not immediately obvious. I initially switched from W2K because there was really no reason NOT to. But XP totally won me over within a month or two, as I found one nagging problem after another that had been fixed, one task after another that had been streamlined. XP was like a refined version of W2K - subtly better in many ways, worse in NONE.

6
0

Sysadmins can forget PC management skills, says Microsoft

fung0

MS are trying to kill the traditional idea of desktops and managing and deploying applications, not because that paradigm is broken but because they would rather sell a different style of service.

You've nailed it beautifully.

Call me ungrateful, but I'm reluctant to define my future according to Microsoft's self-interest.

8
0

Five things that doomed the big and brilliant BlackBerry 10

fung0

Agreed. I have a Z10 that I wouldn't give up for the world. By FAR the nicest UI of any mobile device I've used - slicker and more logical than either Android or iOS. As far as apps, I've never found BB10 to be lacking. It still has better apps in most categories than WinPhone does.

What killed BlackBerry 10 was not the quality of the OS - it was simple loss of market momentum. RIM waited too long to advance it's platform. They eventually did a great job, but it was too late to catch up.

4
0

Lawrence Lessig's White House tilt hits crowdfunding goal

fung0

Re: So let me get this straight.

You're missing the fact that Lessig's money came from individual voters, not from huge corporations, large banks and arrogant oligarchs.

Also the fact that $1 million from a huge number of donors barely qualifies as "money," in a campaign to which just two individual donors (the Koch brothers) have pledged $1 billion.

3
0

Return of the Pocket PC: Acer shows off Jade Primo PC Phone

fung0

In Praise of Pocket PC

Some Pocket PC devices featured a clamshell design with a keyboard. Despite these attractions, the limited capabilities and general usability failings of these devices means they are remembered with little affection.

I get really tired of this retroactive dissing of Pocket PC (a.k.a. Windows Mobile). I owned several Pocket PCs, including the early HP Jornada and the later iPAQ. For their time, these were absolutely fantastic devices. Yes, the UI was a little clunky, but the open Windows-like OS was perfectly amenable to add-ons akin to today's Classic Desktop.

The point is, you could do anything with a Pocket PC, just as you could with a desktop. It multitasked nicely when nothing else did, and had a great ecosystem of applications - not 'apps,' real applications. Including both excellent free stuff and high-quality commercial products.

Pocket PC was a brilliant attempt at putting a PC in your pocket. Win10 is a half-assed attempt at turning every desktop PC into a smartphone.

0
0
fung0

Re: Behave like a PC

Frankly, these attempts to confuse "Windows RT" with Windows are annoying to say the least. Windows RT is not a PC OS, dammit.

How do you make a phone that can run PC software? Easy: redefine "PC software" to mean "smartphone apps," then downgrade every PC in the world to that level.

0
0

Boffins laugh at Play Store bonehead security with instant app checker

fung0

I think this is missing the point. The study finds that the tide of quick-and-dirty malware is increasing to the point where a bulk-analysis approach becomes worthwhile, probably as an adjunct to conventional anti-malware techniques. The study doesn't show that Google is screwing up - more that the playing field has shifted, and Google needs to broaden its approach accordingly.

4
0
fung0

Read the PDF. The researchers have done quite a bit of analysis on this exact topic. I'm not qualified to evaluate their statistical math, but it looks pretty reasonable.

4
0

Win10 Insider build 10532: Avoid if you run Chrome 64-bit

fung0

Re: Trust

Well put, P. Lee.

Privacy violations are particularly egregious in the case of Windows. If I don't trust Facebook, I don't use Facebook. If I don't trust my smartphone, I use my PC. But if I can't trust my PC... where do i go? (Yes, Linux. But it's a painful transition, and not realistic for many of the billions of users who've relied on Windows for decades.)

Facebook has been Facebook right from the start. Suddenly altering the world's most ubiquitous OS from being (reasonably) trustworthy into a data-gobbling 'service' like Facebook is a sell-out of historic proportions.

0
1

Microsoft vacates moral high ground for the data slurpers' cesspit

fung0

Re: Mediocrity and poor secutiy are Windows middle names

Windows 7 is actually a pretty reasonable system. There are faults, but they're well-known and manageable. Most importantly, it has a library of software unmatched by any other platform. Including applications that many of us came to rely upon, decades before GNU/Linux came close to being a viable alternative. Sure, I'm working more and more in Linux Mint. But if Linux were a perfect solution, I'd have abandoned Windows even before Windows 10 descended upon us.

I do agree that Valve offers a ray of hope. Gabe Newell foresaw the coming win-pocalypse, and did the only thing he could: started to build a viable alternative. SteamOS could be a turning point. Microsoft continues to undervalue PC gaming. If a significant fraction of PC gamers moves to SteamOS, it will do more to validate Linux as a platform than anyone expects.

1
2
fung0

Re: Instructions on how to increase privacy in Windows 10

Nuke it from orbit - it's the only way to be sure.

0
0
fung0

Re: The more I read about 10 the less I want it.

Sooner or later I'll likely "upgrade" my secondary operating system, Windows 8.1 to 10; but it looks very much like it will remain my secondary OS behind Linux Mint.

I'm starting to feel the same way. Linux Mint is looking better all the time. Reminds me of what I used to like about Windows. The tragic thing is, I was a huge fan of Microsoft through the 1990s and early 2000s. Now, Microsoft is literally driving me away, as hard as they can.

The blame has to be shared by those nothing-to-hide sheeple who downloaded Windows 10 even before they knew if it was any good. And those who continued downloading it, even as it became apparent that it was the Spawn of Hell, a Trojan aimed at destroying the very concept of individual privacy. And especially those who, even now, continue to make apologies for what Windows 10 is doing, as if it was unimportant, inconsequential, nothing to be upset about. (In between gushing about how wonderful DirectX 12 is - despite the absence of any games that actually use it.)

It's astounding what some people value... and what they don't.

7
0
fung0

Re: Ka Blam! There goes the other foot.

And this data slurping "it's not your machine" stuff started a while back...

The first inkling I recall, that things were going bad, was when Microsoft infested Windows XP with Windows Genuine Advantage DRM via Windows Update. (I never trusted them again.) The next big milestone was video DRM baked-in to Vista. After that it's hard to pick out individual instances.

Clearly, the moral decay is accelerating on some kind of exponential curve.

4
1

If you installed Windows 10 and like privacy, you checked the defaults, right? Oh dear

fung0

Re: I wonder....

I pay in privacy for the use of a service. Generally I think I am getting a good deal.

You may not have noticed, but (contrary to Microsoft's contention), Windows is not "a service." It's a desktop operating system. We accepted tracking on the Web. We accepted endless privacy shenanigans on Facebook. We accept that the use of debit cards and loyalty cards lets corporations and the government track our every move, our every thought. And on top of all that, we've seen governments and corporations starting to use that mass of data in truly despicable, totalitarian ways.

When, might I ask, were you planning to get worried?

Windows is on over a billion devices around the world. If it's allowed to be just as riddled with privacy holes as Facebook, then we have no refuge left. Our work, our most private thoughts and activities are no longer private. Essentially, there's no privacy left other than locking yourself in an unlit broom closet and hoping that there's no IR camera in there with you.

Windows 10 offers almost nothing of any value. A few miserable and badly-implemented new features. Is it excessive to suggest that maybe we could be just worried enough to resist giving up a huge chunk of our remaining privacy, in exchange for so little?

3
0
fung0

Re: I wonder....

I dont like the massive invasion of privacy, but there is little I can do, or really want to do tbh im too lazy

There is a lot you can do, and all it requires is that you be just a bit lazier than you already are. JUST DON'T INSTALL WINDOWS 10. Pretty simple, huh? Be just lazy enough to not jump when Microsoft tells you to, and a year from now, the world will be a better place.

0
0
fung0

Re: Some steps

Excellent list. Thanks!

However:

But with some adjustments, you can reclaim your own computer.

I'd say this statement is premature, unproven and astoundingly optimistic. At this point, we have no idea what may lurk in the closed source of Windows 10, nor how persistent Microsoft's (forced) auto-updates will be in (re)opening privacy holes.

What we do know is that by accepting Windows 10, in exchange for a few miserable new features, you are giving Microsoft carte blanche - you're happily volunteering to accept Redmond's electronic anal probe. The only real solution is to avoid installing this nightmare, and uninstall it immediately if you've already made a horrible mistake. JUST SAY NO to Windows 10. If you're not willing to tell Microsoft right now that its behavior is unacceptable, you are part of the problem, and you guarantee that things will continue to get worse.

6
0
fung0

Re: not so free

I'm no fan of the Mac UI, and I find iOS unusable. But you have to at least give Apple credit for creating a separate OS for its mobile toys. Mac OS X remains respectful of a UI tradition that goes back 30 years, and charges users up-front, instead of trying to surreptitiously 'monetize' them.

4
0
fung0

Re: Guess I'll stick to 7 until 2020...

I know a guy called Linus who did just that...

You're probably thinking of Richard Stallman. Linus wrote a kernel.

1
0

Windows 10: A SYSADMIN speaks his brains – and says MEH

fung0

Re: A must have upgrade for many

- launch speed

A trivial improvement. On an SSD, my Win7 system boots in 10-15 seconds. Which is irrelevant, because I only shut it down about once every 3 months.

- DirectX 12

Vulkan is the smart solution. Open standards are always preferable to proprietary lock-in. From the developer's point of view, Vulkan will open up more platforms. From the gamer's point of view... well, there are no DirectX 12 games at this point, so any 'advantage' is theoretical at best.

- better security (admittedly)

Any gains are more than offset by Microsoft's numerous privacy invasions.

None of this stuff adds up to a compelling case for the disruption of an upgrade, re-learning the UI for no gain in productivity, adding a whole new API and new type of 'app' so that Microsoft can further its agenda of gaining market share in mobile.

Of course, if you see Cortana as a big thing, you are indeed the target customer for Windows 10. Personally, if I were forced at gunpoint to use Windows 10, Cortana is the very first thing I'd want to disable (or better yet, rip out by the roots).

1
0
fung0

Re: Why not?

Microsoft has talked about creating a 'Modular Windows,' but its traditional approach has always been to produce monolithic products so it can "control the user experience" - i.e. create lock-in. The more bizarre and idiosyncratic the UI you can force people to use, the less able they are to migrate to some competing solution.

Yes, I know it doesn't make any sense, but it's true. Try to imagine someone saying it in a Redmond boardroom...

1
0
fung0

Re: overall I prefered the UI of XP

Why can MS not give customers what they want ?

They are. The problem is you're no longer the customer. As in Facebook, you are the product.

2
0
fung0

Re: Screw Windows 10!

CBMVic20 - all good points, with the exception of

Inevitable subscription model to "rent" the OS after a year? Check

If you're going to torpedo the point about paid subscriptions, you really should substitute this:

Pervasive advertising and privacy-destroying 'monetization' of the user? Check!!

1
0
fung0

Re: only reason I upgrade

I still have Windows XP on a couple of systems. It's really pretty nice, for a certain subset of tasks. Doesn't feel particularly antiquated, or restrictive. Of course, Windows 7 does give me advantages for my heavier chores. But by comparison, WIndows 10 offers me absolutely nothing I really need (and a crapload of stuff I don't want.)

1
0
fung0

I'm glad you brought up Steam. What will it be like, in the middle of an online multiplayer death match, when Win10 decides it's time to restart? Is the OS really just allowed to restart whenever it takes a notion to? If so, I wonder how well the collective howl of Steam users will be heard in Redmond.

No problem: if Microsoft has its way, and game developers switch from the Win32 API to UWP, then Steam will be out of business. (The Windows business, anyway. A lot of us will probably support SteamOS, as opposed to living in Microsoft's walled garden... with the sniper towers and razor wire.)

0
0
fung0

Re: 4000 browser tabs

For every article I am currently researching and/or writing there is a browser window open with potentially huge numbers of tabs. I don't have to track all tabs; only what each window in the stack's "topic" is.

I'm in much the same situation. I'm working on several articles, plus several other longer-term projects, plus a bunch of personal stuff. At a quick count, I have 4 Cyberfox windows open, with a total of 791 tabs in 72 tab groups. Many of those tabs are in an 'unloaded' state, but just clicking on them in-place is a whole lot faster and more natural than pulling up a bookmark. I have 37 add-ons installed, to help me manage all this stuff (and, of course, keep me reasonably secure). In particular, I use Session Manager to save inactive project windows, and there are maybe a half-dozen of these that I might pull up on any given day.

Obviously, I'm still far short of your 4,000 mark! But it's a big Internet out there. Browsers that work best with about 4 tabs (like IE and Edge) are great for my 97-year-old Mom. People who work with information need more power and more features than any browser offers at present.

2
0
fung0

Re: What about 8.1?

I find the 'Modern' (sic) interface an unalduterated POS. That's my personal opinion. This is probably because I'm an old codger with only 42 years of experience in the IT Industry.

The really serious problem with Modern/Metro/TIFKAM is that it's not just a UI - it's essentially a new mobile OS that's been stapled onto desktop Windows. A new and very scary OS called UWP (formerly WinRT), which tries to turn Windows into an iOS-like 'walled garden,' limiting what 'apps' can do, and limiting where you can buy them to just one place: Microsoft's own Windows Store. If UWP catches on, it would also accomplish something that Microsoft has wanted for years: making WinXP and Win7 (as well as Win8x) truly obsolete. Win32 support is not only an annoying expense, it no longer fits the Microsoft corporate agenda.

UWP should have been a separate OS, launched to sink or swim on its own merits. Microsoft is trying to leverage the vast Windows user base to give it an undeserved leg-up.

Microsoft's stock response to any criticism of UWP is: "Don't worry, you can still run Win32 software." True... for now. But, meanwhile, Microsoft's relentless message to developers is "UWP is the future of Windows development!" All the bundled apps in Windows 10 have been converted to UWP equivalents - even IE has been replaced by Edge. This is a one-way street I'm not willing to go down. Win32 is old and creaky, perhaps, but it's the only reason most of us still use Windows.

1
0
fung0

Most of my customers are Local Authorities, Universities, NHS and the like. Most of them, Local Authorities and NHS in particular, have only just finished (or are STILL) migrating to Win7 from XP.

An important point. Microsoft still makes more money off its enterprise business than from individual users. So Win7 (not to mention XP) support will have to continue to some extent.

By the way, I noticed the other day on the NASA channel that Mission Control still uses Windows XP. (Some joke about this not being 'rocket science' would be appropriate here, but none occurs to me.)

Anyone running an enterprise with a lot of Win7 boxes should be looking *very* seriously now about how, not when, they are going to migrate them.

Right now, Microsoft seems to be trying very hard to make sure my next OS migration is to Linux. If I were an enterprise, I'd have switched some time ago.

2
0
fung0

Re: "You'll get used to it"

Me too. But I found Win8 raised that to about once per minute.

0
0
fung0

Re: As another sysadmin...

* A far better task manager.

Much better still: Process Explorer - ironically, an independent project by someone who is now a Microsoft employee. And it doesn't even require a complete OS update. Amazing.

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx

3
0

Page:

Forums