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* Posts by Brenda McViking

142 posts • joined 28 May 2012

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Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE

Brenda McViking

Re: "Advanced training"

You jolly well can teach someone to multitask - it involves making neural connections to the point that things are done automatically without requiring a slow cognitive decision. E.G. manipulating the clutch whilst negotiating a busy hill junction with traffic lights. You get someone who has never driven a car before and they physically will be unable to manage it, because they haven't learnt how to multitask.

Same with aircraft. Flying a circuit (takeoff, go around the airfield once and land) - requires an intensive amount of multitasking. You have to be aware of your own aircraft, it's speeds, setup, altitude, engine setting and position in 3 dimensions, whilst negotiating with air traffic control via a radio and being aware of everything other aircraft in the pattern with you. Some of which will be going a lot faster (or slower) than you. If you haven't been taught how to multitask, you cannot do this properly, which is why you have to be trained to be a pilot.

This is why we have licences for these things - it certifies that you have the appropriate neural connections to be able to multitask properly.

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Forget bonking, have ONE OFF THE WRIST with Barclaycard's bPay

Brenda McViking

Re: I would prefer this

But why not a smartphone?

I see this opinion a lot on here, but don't fully understand why - I'm genuinely interested. If you told me that I could ditch the wallet/purse entirely, and just needed to carry a smartphone, I'd be fine with that. I don't get why in 2014 I still need to carry around keys, metal coins, a wallet full of plastic loyalty cards and the odd paper note when the technology exists to just put it into my communication device, which I alreay take everywhere, and then control it via an app.

Is it the fact that mobiles run out of battery?

Is it the fact that it's an internet enabled device and entrusting bank details to it is asking for trouble?

Do you think it makes it more of a target than it already is to an opportunistic thief?

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Half a BILLION in the making: Bungie's Destiny reviewed

Brenda McViking

RE:Loot system

They have fixed it, yes - to the point where only you can pick up your weapon drops. However, it's completely random as to who drops what - certainly not a case of kill a boss to get a good piece of kit - "stuff" is just as likely to be dropped by a tiny minion which you can accidently kill with an unaimed spray of bullets, rather than a Tank which will take 600 seconds of sustained machine gun fire from 3 players to down.

I must admit I was hoping for more of a Skyrim length main quest as opposed to an average shooter like, say, Far Cry, Halo, Half Life, but it's a fair story, if a little short.

I've not played Player versus Player yet - certainly it was a lot less fun in the Beta than it is in Titanfall, but the game is good fun if you have 2 other friends to play it with, in the "single-ish" player mode.

Overall, I'd give it 7/10, so far. There is a lot more they can (and hopefully will) do with it to bump it up to 8. (and to give you an idea of my ratings, I'd give Skyrim 8/10,. HL2 ep2 9/10, Max Payne 3 4/10, Halo 7/10)

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BBC Trust candidate defends licence fee, says evaders are CRIMINALS

Brenda McViking

Re: Not bad value really

Sorry Lionel, it's you who are wrong.

If you watch ANY television programmes as they're being broadcast even without an aerial, if you don't pay the BBC telly tax, you're breaking the law.

That includes internet streaming, sky programmes via satellite dish, periscope into the neighbours living room - any equipment which can recieve a broadcast (an aerial is just one type of such equipment, your dish is another), and it doesn't have to be a BBC broadcast either - which is why it is so ridiculous.

Personally, if you watch sky through a dish, I'd buy a TV licence if you don't want a fine. And next time, don't pander to their inane requests - there is only one reason for them, and that is to use against you in court - they serve no other purpose whatsoever.

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Scared of brute force password attacks? Just 'GIVE UP' says Microsoft

Brenda McViking

Re: Some valid points ...

Because if you reuse a slightly stronger password than remembering 18 simpler ones, your overall security is often still better. And be honest - what is easier? Everything needs a login nowadays. If recall is more than 1 second for the user then you're wasting more time and raising their stress level unnecessarily.

This is actually one of the few research papers that "get it" - realising that whilst the theory of entropy theoretically makes security stronger, adding in the meatbag actually MASSIVELY reduces entropy. If you're demanding a 6 character password with 4 types of characters, the entropy is orders of magnitude lower than a 6 character lowercase password, but the majority of people do not know that.

That and security is often completely unnecessary - who needs a password taking 550 years to bruteforce protecting the corporate "how to sit at your desk without becoming a paraplegic" Health and Safety intranet portal? even nuclear launch codes only really need a few months of brute force protection. (and indeed, 0000 0000 was the launch code for some types of nuclear weapons during the cold war. For 20 years. Why? because psychology trumps security where humans are involved.)

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Govt waves stick at pirate-friendly Google search

Brenda McViking

Re: "Copyright infringement is theft, pure and simple"

"Auto theft" as you describe it doesn't exist in the UK for the exact reason that it doesn't fit the definition of theft. In the UK legal system, you HAVE to know and understand definitions correctly, in advance. This is why we get so brassed off with Americans using our language improperly - because it breaks the meaning of what is being said and leads to stuff like this.

In the UK, if you "steal" a car, it is not theft. It is the criminal offence of "Taking without consent" or "Twocking" in the British Bobbys' common vernacular.

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Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE

Brenda McViking

Re: I have to wonder...

Your top of the range phones are actually very good at recording these things, in Full HD. In fact with their noise cancelling microphones they can actually pick up the sound very well too - and this wasn't the case 5 years ago.

Not that I agree with their use for such things. In fact the best gig I recently went to had a band that said "right. Everyone, record our next song. it's the one we're best known for, we'll be doing it again at the end, but after we've let you get it out of your system - put your phones/tablets/cameras and screens away and enjoy the gig. Anyone recording afterwards has my permission to get their head kicked in by fellow fans annoyed by your screen. There will be a professional recording on the website tomorrow that you can download free of charge, no catch, no restrictions, which will be much better quality than you guys can capture. Here we go"

Surprisingly, it had the desired effect, and we all agreed afterwards it was a very good way of doing it.

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New voting rules leave innocent Brits at risk of SPAM TSUNAMI

Brenda McViking

Mail order deliverers?

Since when do they ever ring the fracking doorbell?

They tiptoe up to the door, tap it with their finger twice, wait 5 seconds and then launch your new monitor over the fence and leave a "sorry you weren't in" note.

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Dolby Atmos is coming home and it sounds amazing

Brenda McViking
Pirate

I've seen a couple of films with Atmos

in the cinema, that is, and I must admit I was impressed - though there is a lot more that can be done from the filmakers side with setting up the soundstage - they'll learn though, in the same way they learnt that changing the focal point of the scenes too much in 3D gave everyone a massive headache.

Though naturally, the ticket office more than made up for the positives by slapping a £10.50 charge for the privilege of seing the film whilst being able to hear overhead (and that was with student discount!)

That's a ticket price increaseof 244% over 5 years, and people wonder why piracy is so rampant...

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Intel forced to shoot down viral 'Israeli boycott' whopper

Brenda McViking

Re: Anon Cluetard

Modern Israelis != Biblical Israelites.

Unless you're trying to submit that actually Europe belongs to the Rome, and America to the native Indians. Countries, empires, and borders are all man made creations and do not last.

Besides, I'm a descendant of Pangaea, so you can get the hell off my ancestors land!

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LOHAN acquires aircraft arboreal avoidance algorithm acronyms

Brenda McViking

SASS

Specialised Avoidance of Seductive Saplings.

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Nuts to your poncey hipster coffees, I want a TESLA ELECTRO-CAFE

Brenda McViking
Happy

Re: If you ask for soya 'milk'

Granted, soya milk may not be to everyones taste, but it has finally meant that I can go out for coffee with my lactose intolerant mum. As allergies and intolerances go, it's a rather rubbish one (though not the worst by far), as milk in the western world is in sooooo many products.

Soya's image is really not helped when hipsters jump on the band wagon for animal rights and saving the planet purposes (which neither I nor Mum give a monkeys about) - but soya milk actually means she is able to drink something other than water, and even if I wouldn't drink it, the option is appreciated.

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Simian selfie stupidity: Macaque snap sparks Wikipedia copyright row

Brenda McViking
Pirate

Re: An arguable case for Public Domain

I'm with wikimedia on this one. the photographer set it up, but was not the author for copyright purposes. I'm not disputing the fact that it is unfair, unjust or that the photographer didn't put a significant amount of effort in to allow the photograph to be created, but if the monkey would have been the author (if they were human, for instance) and legally cannot be, then there is no author. We all know the law is an ass. This is a prime example.

If this photographer wanted the copyrights on these images then he should have taken the photographs. Classic catch 22 - as the percieved value in these images is that they were monkey selfies, and their actual value, because they are monkey selfies is 0. If he had taken the exact same images then they'd hold less percieved value, but more actual value. It's a technicality - but in law, technicalities matter.

Regardless, the photographer has finally got his front page and hence managed to get the full legal value of these images in terms of advertising. Watching him on the Beeb last night - I agree with him that copyright needs reform and is unfit for purpose in the 21st century. I hope he sells a lot more of his portfiolio due to this, sparks a proper debate on copyright and assists in inspiring others to get copyright reformed properly.

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London cops cuff 20-year-old man for unblocking blocked websites

Brenda McViking

Re: What law has been broken.

You could break into my desk and steal my patent papers - I think that might actually constitute "theft" of copyright,

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Flying United Airlines? If you could just scan your passport with your phone, that'd be great

Brenda McViking

Re: RFTM

It's no different from mobile boarding passes, from providing advance travel information like we do with budget airlines here in the UK to speed up check-in.

A typical international flight experience: Queue for check in. sometimes then separate queue for bag drop. Queue for departure police check (often not present in the UK). Queue for baggage scanning. Queue for full cavity search. Queue for overpriced food, no-tax-but-doubly-marked-up shopping or airport lounge if you're so lucky. Stand around (maybe even in a queue) looking at departure board wondering why it still hasn't opened the gate yet despite that fact you were due to take off 10 minutes ago. Queue at gate. Queue for boarding pass scan at gate. Queue for airport security/G4S guy who glares at you, glares at your passport, glares back at you and waves you on. Queue for the bus. Cram yourself into the the last available space. Queue to get off the bus. Queue at the aircraft steps. Queue on the aisle waiting for the lady in seat 3B to unpack and repack her 3 bags of hand luggage looking for her flight pillow. Sit down. Fly. Queue for the toilet. Fly. Queue to be let off. Queue for the bus. Queue for immigration. Queue for baggage that doesn't turn up. Queue for baggage handling services to provide details of lost baggage. Queue at customs. Queue for the only atm in the arrivals area. Queue for a taxi/ train/hire car to get out. Queue for Psychatrist to check you haven't gone completely mad.

So yeah. completing any international travel qualifies you for your level 6 queuing proficiency at "Expert" level. - absolutely anything that avoids any queuing for any length of time is something I'm interested in.

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EE rolls out London bus pay-by-bonk app – only fandoids need apply

Brenda McViking

It isn't linked to your bank account. it's linked to your phone bill.

I have wanted this for an age. My wallet is stuffed so full of RFID already that bonking a wallet no longer works. It can't tell whether it's my netherlands chipkaart, the oyster card, one of my debit cards or my work or student ID trying to communicate.

My phone goes with me everywhere and is separate. Paying with it would be useful - The way I see it, I have no need for a wallet - it's a place I use to store identification and payment methods, both of which can be done better by a phone. Yes, it's only a matter of saving 15 seconds, but why the hell not?

And yet, because my S4 isn't supplied by EE, it's fracking ineligable. And sod getting a monthly contract with them - that just means the liability is limitless. At least with PAYG it's limited to your account balance.

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Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network

Brenda McViking

Since both the justice system and law enforcement have proven themselves completely inept when it comes to technology, I move that neither be able to use any technology in their jobs until they get an el Reg approved internet licence.

In it should be questions like: Little Jonny downloads a movie. What is he guilty of?

  • a)Piracy
  • b)Copyright infringment
  • c)Theft
  • d)Nothing, yet. he is innocent unless proven guilty
  • e)Terrorism

and: In terms of connectivity, what does IP stand for?

  • a)Intellectual Property
  • b)Internet Protocol
  • c)Incompetant Policeman
  • d)Illegal Populace
  • e)Terrorism

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ISPs 'blindsided' by UK.gov's 'emergency' data retention and investigation powers law

Brenda McViking

Re: Tory-led government's Drip bill?

In the UK, not giving up your key is a criminal act.

Exhibit A, register article.

In the USA, not giving up unencrypted email is a criminal act.

Exhibit B, register article.

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Computing student jailed after failing to hand over crypto keys

Brenda McViking
Holmes

Re: Chris W @ Condiment

What is a magnet going to do to a flash based MicroSD card? To disturb electrons in silicon based NAND flash memory you'd need a magnet capable of sucking iron out of your blood cells.

Shoving it in a microwave, on the other hand...

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UK govt preps World War 2 energy rationing to keep the lights on

Brenda McViking

Re: I need to get some t-shirts made up...

"Why does the Grid need to quadruple STOR power?"

Because we're running far too close to the margins. STOR is a last ditch attempt to make up for the fact that we don't have enough capacity. It's the payday loan of the energy sector which prevents it from defaulting (blackout). Renewables like wind do indeed provide unpredictable and spiky power which increases the margin requirement.

"Why are gas plants not more attractive to run,"

Because they've been winding them down for ages, because historically gas prices have not been competitive with coal, and because you can't just un-mothball a plant economically unless you've got some guarantees that it's going to stay economical. And because the EU say you can't add more fossil to the grid once you've taken it off. For smaller plants, it's far better to keep a gas plant on STOR - it'll earn it's money that way, rather than trying to compete with nuclear, coal or subsidised wind.

"Why is it the politicians that shut down plants?"

Because they're in charge. They provide the laws and regulations relating to the countries infrastructure. Unless you want the French and the Germans to be in charge of our energy (which they pretty much are, as our politicians don't give a shit and it's come to crunch time.) Energy companies HAVE been screaming for new capacity, for an energy policy, for plants to be given the okay to go ahead. But no, the politicans block it to get short term green lobby votes. And it takes years to build stations. And the politicians sign us up to EU directives that state that fossil is bad m'kay, and we're LEGALLY obliged to shut it all off.

"the energy companies screwed up, not the politicians."

See above. Politics blocks the energy companies from doing what they want, and spend so long fumbling around not giving commitment or guarantees to financing or permission, or debating whether "profit" should be guaranteed for someone making a national investment. National infrastructure is not something the private sector want to pay for - the public sector holds all the cards here, and it comes with high risks with little reward. You can spend £20bn on a new plant for the next politician to come along and give it to your competitor. Why would any sane person take that risk?

"If they shut down too many plants without building new ones the energy companies screwed up"

Politicians agreed to laws stating fossil plant must be shut down. Politicians didn't agree legislation to allow new plants to be built, unless they were wind turbines, which are not fit for purpose when it comes to a stable and affordable energy supply.

"If the grid operators did not enter into enough long term contracts ... then it's operators fault."

You can't enter into a long term contract with a plant that a) is due to be shut by law or b) hasn't been built yet. What exactly are national grid supposed to do? other than explain to the politicians what a fundamental mess they're in and whose fault it is (and they've been doing that)

"In the end the consumer pays, or puts PV solar on his roof"

You can pay as much as you want - but you can't buy what doesn't exist. As for Solar PV, at this latitude - you can choose to run your microwave, or your fridge, but not both at the same time, and not at night. You'd be better off with a domestic diesel generator - but once the power cuts start, they might be commanding a nice premium.

It's a farce, a mess and a frankly stupid, entirely predictable state of affairs, and in my mind, amounts to high treason by the current and historical crop of politicians we've had. But still, even with blackouts coming as early as this year, we're STILL not building new capacity - which will in all likelyhood take until 2020 to be operational.

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Look inside ELON MUSK'S CAR! Tesla S wundervehicle has voom

Brenda McViking

Re: Still waiting to see where the power's coming from

Well to accomodate a potential for an additional 1.25MW peak load on a typical domestic distribution substation, you'll need some major, and expensive upgrades.

Mean load for a house is around 1.25kW - peaks at maybe 10kW if you've got the kettle, oven, tumble dryer and immersion heater on. A single Tesla on a "supercharger" is the equivalent of shoving 10-12 homes worth of peak demand on the grid - and at the lower distribution level our grid wasn't designed for it. I've heard estimations that more than 3 electric cars on your average domestic street is liable to knock it out as the substation simply can't cope. And it isn't like substation manufacturing is a high volume activity which can knock one up for easy installation with a weeks notice. Our grid is only slightly newer than those new-fangled victorian railways we still have lying around. It'll take decades to upgrade.

The fact that at an increase of 0.2% consumption for an infrastructure of 200 charging points which will service, what, 14000 vehicles? (10 cars a day charging themselves once a week) - you'll need to build 59x 1MW wind turbines at a generous 33% utilisation factor for that 164GWh requirement you have. List price ~ £1m/MW installed (2012) = £59,000,000, so a not insignificant £4200 per vehicle. (and they'll need replacing every 10 years.) That's just the capacity, let alone distribution and the rest of the critical infrastructure Not exactly cheap to save the planet, is it? Conventional fossil fuel is probably a quarter of that price, but even so, a 0.2% increase in UK consumption for vehicles which can be owned by 0.0002% of the population is actually still a rather concerning figure, if these things are going to become popular. If only our electrical infrastructure wasn't already on it's knees...

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Silent, spacious and... well, insipid: Citroën's electric C-Zero car

Brenda McViking

Re: Nope

Yeah but when they're really small they're not that efficient, in thermal terms. They're also expensive to build and maintain, require expensive materials as the average temp at the back is soooo much higher and are still very thirsty. Not to mention it'll easily drown out the noisiest boy racer Corsa driver who has drilled a hole in his exhaust.

GTs are extremely power dense, and therefore fine for when you want an insane amount of power from something that doesn't take up much space or weigh very much - thus for land based vehicles they really don't make sense - you're much better off with a diesel running at it's optimum driving a generator, if you're after maximum efficiency with minimal losses... Unless of course you're trying for land speed records.

But don't let me stop you wanting a jet car. I do too!

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UK govt 'tearing up road laws' for Google's self-driving cars: THE TRUTH

Brenda McViking

They'll porbably go the same way as other outdated forms of transport - provide a mild annoyance for normal road users stuck behind one on the very rare occasion that they're on their way to a vintage rally, or be used in sporting events. Like horses, traction engines and classic cars are today.

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E-cigarettes help you quit – but may not keep you alive

Brenda McViking

Re: ....and less sick people choking up the NHS.

But that isn't the whole story, is it.

The medical community came up with many studies showing that smoke-related healthcare was actually costing more than the tax it bought in. Without that the smoking ban would never have happened - it wasn't for the good of the countries health, it was about money. It always is.

Now, you will probably get people lasting longer, from a statistical point of view across an entire population, but due to the fact that fewer people will need the more expensive treatments that smoking increases the likelyhood of them needing, then overall, caring for people for longer without requiring so much expensive specialist equipment (say ventilators, oxygen-equipped wheelchairs, lung transplants, chemotherapy or whatever) is cheaper.

Yes, this is a gross simplification.

Yes, they'll die of something else.

But a human dying of a heart attack is cheaper than being kept alive with lung problems for 20 years, and that, effectively is the crux of the matter, only simplified (a lot). If smoking killed you stone dead, really quickly, then it wouldn't cost more than the tax it bought in, and it wouldn't be such a public enemy, and we wouldn't have seen the smoking ban, which is pretty much being rolled out worldwide, at least in the west.

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Real, hovering SPEEDER BIKE can be YOURS for cheaper than a house

Brenda McViking

Re: Don't have 85k

What, this one?

Huvr board

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Microsoft throws Kinect under a bus, slashes Xbox One to $399

Brenda McViking

Re: Meh.

And yet, having both consoles and not really biased either way, it is clear at least to me that the Xbox is the more polished experience of the two. The PS4 was not *quite* ready when released and it shows.

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LA air traffic meltdown: System simply 'RAN OUT OF MEMORY'

Brenda McViking

Re: I think the time has come

This disaster resulted in the entire aviation community agreeing that TCAS advisories are to be given priority over controller instructions. As a result, if a TCAS resolution advisory is telling you one thing, and the meatbag another, you follow TCAS - because it is provenly safer to do so.

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Thanks for nothing, Apple, say forensic security chaps

Brenda McViking
Black Helicopters

This Story

Bought to you by the NSA, who actually can break in easily but they want you to think it's secure so that you get rid of the blackberry which has them stumped.

Next week: The dangers of letting terrorists into your computer by using TOR

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Apple stuns world with rare SEVEN-way split: What does that mean?

Brenda McViking

What is much more likely is the average "mom and pop" investor will not update their stop-loss orders and get stopped out of the market.

The other thing is that employee share plans are pretty difficult to do with a 3 digit share price.

But in the markets there are plenty of people (even rich ones) who don't really know how stocks work and will not have bought Apple because it "was too expensive."

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Shocking new low for SanDisk – 15nm flash chips rolling out its fabs

Brenda McViking

Excellent

Nice to see that there is still hard technical innovation going on in this industry. Not just petty patent squabbles over the way something looks.

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Got Windows 8.1 Update yet? Get ready for YET ANOTHER ONE – rumor

Brenda McViking

Re: Another day, another anti-Windows 8 story on The Register

I'll have you know we here commentards are fair and balanced in our opinions

We hate Microsoft on here, and we hate Apple even more. But the one thing that really irks us the most is when Microsoft try and be like Apple - like they did in Vista, and like they're doing in Windows 8. And 8.1

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Dell charges £5 to switch on power-saving for new PCs (it takes 5 clicks)

Brenda McViking

Re: OH NOES THINK OF THE CHILDREN

Problem is, 6 months later, they'll come back to you because you made the printer stop working. And the internet is slow. And the anti-virus expired 5 months ago.

And it's all your fault because you were the last person to "fiddle" with it

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Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich

Brenda McViking

Re: @localzuk

It was an US design back in the 50s for the first generation, but they have since been upgraded several times over, without any help or know-how from the US.

Unless you're arguing the same analogy that all motorcars are heavily supported with US know how from the model T as well, in which case, fair enough, but it's not really all that relevant in the capabilities of today's world.

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Brenda McViking

Re: @Don Jefe

Funny,

I'll just tell the 8,000 enginers in the UK at Rolls-Royce that they don't manufacture anything complex, let alone half the engines for the worlds widebody jetliner fleet shall I, or the thousands employed at Bombardier, manufacturing rail stock, or how about Coventry, where Jaguar Land Rover are recruiting THOUSANDS of new engineers to assist with their R&D and manufacturing plants (seen any Range Rover Evokes around the states recently? Indian Owned but British Made in Liverpool). Aston Martin, Rolls-Royce - British made. JCB industrial and construction equipment - you may have heard of them. Head up to Scotland and you'll find all manner of marine, oil and gas activity - none of which is known for requiring simple manufacturing.

F1 technology and motorsport- an awful lot manufactured in UK, gearboxes, energy recovery systems, engine development, brakes - Prodrive (UK R&D and Manufacturing) quite literally were the only name in the world rally championship a few years back, supplying technology for virtually all the teams. BAe Systems you've mentioned - in decline at the moment due to the global defence cuts, but defence is a fringe case because as you've mentioned, sovereignty comes into it - so anything made for a country will have it's IP and final construction completed there. Which is why we don't buy US military hardware, just as you don't buy UK (except where we share risk - F35 is a classic example - US do not have the capability for STOVL variant, UK does, designed using UK IP, manufactured in US)

Manufacturing simple things with skinny margins in the UK? not a chance, not at any scale anyway - there is no way you can compete with Asia. We make highly complex equipment that they cannot, due to a lack of adequately qualified personnel and established R&D resources, infrastructure and protection which the east cannot offer (except maybe Sinagpore or South Korea). That does mean that the blue-collar manufacturing on production lines that people "fondly" remember back in the 60s and 70s has largely disappeared, as minimum wages here mean automation/offshoring is cheaper. But to say we don't manufacture anything complex is simply wrong. If anything, it's the only thing we still do. ARM electronics, Imagination technologies - plenty of the IP in your smartphone belongs to British companies, despite what Apple would like you to believe.

I think I've made my point that Britain does do complex manufacturing, and lots of it. I should know as I work in it.

Getting back to topic: putting a manufacturing centre in London, where space is at a significant premium and commands extorsionate rents, is not an idea anyone would seriously entertain. If you have lots of people making lots of money in high rise offices (banksters, insurers, financial services etc) then locating in London makes sense. If you have need of low density (by which I mean warehouses, factories with a few stories) manufacturing needs, you'd be bankrupt within a year if you put it in London. Just like putting an automotive factory in downtown Manhattan - it's a stupid idea.

So there was no way it was ever going to win the top tech city award - it's too expensive to manufacture anything there.

2
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Lavabit loses contempt of court appeal over protecting Snowden, customers

Brenda McViking

Re: "turned down Levison's appeal against the contempt charge"

So let me get this straight. He was asked to provide the keys so that the g-men could snoop on the data they were "entitled to" and refused. They take a court order out to force him to, and he stands fast for 2 days before relenting and challenging the legality of the request, in the meanwhile axing the service - and that is contemptuous because he should have taken them to court the first time they asked?

What planet does this judge live on?

If a copper came around my house and asked for my keys "because terrorism", I'll tell him to leave and slam the door in his face, not take him to court for asking. If he then persists, bringing back a court order, then that is the appropriate time to take it to court, surely. That is surely how escalation works.

Otherwise you'll be in contempt next time you don't take a policeman to court should they pull you over for speeding when you weren't (faulty speed gun, for instance). Rather than fighting it once you have the ticket, like any sane, normal member of society would.

Or have I got the wrong end of the stick here?

10
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MIT boffins moot tsunami-proof floating nuke power plants

Brenda McViking

Re: Containment Solution?

Just sink it. Radioactivity from fuel rods isn't dangerous to humans when it's below 3m of water (which is why we have spent fuel ponds at most reactor sites where the spent fuel cools off.)

Yeah, greenpeace will be shouting "won't somebody think of the fish" but compared to an atmospheric release, it's a no brainer.

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Borked Bitcoin bunker MtGox in administration: Lawyer seizes control

Brenda McViking

Re: Mighty quiet ....

By its definitition, Bitcoin is not FIAT. It doesn't derive its value from any government or legislation, and relies instead on its scarcity (due to it theoretically being finite) to attain value.

Of course, once trust in a currency is gone, it becomes worthless anyway - MtGox is certainly the most trust-damaging event to date, but bitcoins are still trading.

2
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Amazon wires up email-to-Kindle to its gigantic online hard drive

Brenda McViking

Obligatory xkcd

http://xkcd.com/949/

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Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast

Brenda McViking

Re: 500mA power draw

I don't know - you try holding a 64MB MicroSD card that has just completed a few 10GB file transfers at 50MB/s - it actually gets very hot - too hot to apply any kind of pressure to with your fingers, anyway.

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Did you know Twitter has a 'consumer product division'? Ex-Google Maps boss now runs it

Brenda McViking

That's interesting

I assume "product" in this case is the adjective referring to the consumer.

3
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Look out, bankers! It's Lily Cole and her (Brit taxpayer-funded) WISH-PRINTING ATM

Brenda McViking
Mushroom

Re: Just for this...

Two. Hundred. Thousand. Pounds.

£200,000.

For this?

WITH TAXPAYERS MONEY?!

My head just exploded.

17
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Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?

Brenda McViking

Re: Economic WIN

Come off it. Futures markets exist because they take the gambling out of the equation for the consumer/provider, and give it to those who deal in and have experience in that area (the bankster).

It's primary advantage is that it allows a certain amount of certainty about the future, which very quickly diminishes risk for those all those involved, from investors, suppliers, consumers, and the entire chain in between them all - as described by posters above.

Cloud computing, aside from being ill-defined (but can probably be offered as CPU cycles, or storage), is no different. If trading it offers no advantage to building it yourself, as you suppose, then the market will dry up, and all the speculators will be left high and dry. Hell, Amazon AWS pretty much does all this already - you can buy cloud at spot prices or at pre-determined prices in the future, and they, together with their customers, are doing well.

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Report: Apple seeking to raise iPhone 6 price by a HUNDRED BUCKS

Brenda McViking

Re: What everyone needs is a £280 Nexus 5

And why is a shedload of megapixels a requirement for a phone camera? My old Sony DSLR has 10MP, and due to the physical size of the sensor and the quality of the glass in front of it, It'll still take a far better photo than the 41MP Nokia, EVERY SINGLE TIME.

I have an S4, with a 13MP camera. It still takes shite photos. My Nokia N95 with a 5MP camera had a much better lens and took much better pictures. I miss that phone...

Buying a phone camera based on megapixels is a game only the uninformed play (and don't salesmen know it!) - there are far far far more important things to consider, and anything above 5MP is only really useful if you happen to be printing images the size of motorway advertising billboards, head over to photography forums and they'll tell you all about it.

2
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Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE

Brenda McViking

Re: Does ANYBODY still believe this tripe?

A program I've heard of that overcomes the copying issue is teracopy www.codesector.com/teracopy

Of course this falls into the "microsoft messed it up and there is no way in hell that in a sane world this program should *need* to exist." But hey. It solves the problem because microsoft won't, so I'm leaving the link here in case anyone has need of it.

4
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Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report

Brenda McViking
Black Helicopters

Re: Wrist, meet slap

Well you know what they say about security agencies: the only time you're sure they're exploiting something is when they official deny it.

13
1

Anatomy of OpenSSL's Heartbleed: Just four bytes trigger horror bug

Brenda McViking
Joke

Well at least I won't have to change my reg password - as it doesnt even bother with https to protect the login >_<

11
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Windows XP is finally DEAD, right? Er, not quite. Here's what to do if you're stuck with it

Brenda McViking

Re: 85000 XP!

Yet I hear the "tax simplification" team for 2013 was made up of just 6 HMRC employees.

No wonder the countries finances are in such a state.

3
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Video games make you NASTY AND VIOLENT

Brenda McViking

Re: Sounds a lot like those...no, not really

Did you know THERE'S A MUTE BUTTON on the self service machines.

Check it out next time - before you hit start, at the bottom of your self service machine, there is a speaker icon. HIT IT, and IT SHUTS UP!

(except you then have the problem of when there is an unexpected item in the bagging area and the machine isn't shouting about it - confuses the hell out of the supervisors.)

2
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'Yahoo! Breaks! Every! Mailing! List! In! The! World!' says email guru

Brenda McViking

Re: @ Stuart Longland (was: What legit email admin ...)

I use one too jake. (a billion dollar advertising agency account that is)

For general spam. Internet shopping and facebook and linkedin notifications - in fact, as the vast majority of the email I recieve is neither confidential, particularly personal or even indeed useful, I'm quite happy for the likes of google/microsoft/yahoo to host it for me. It's not like they charge me, and they can sell it all to advertisers all they want - with adblock plus, i'll simply not see all the targeted ads that desperate agencies have paid for to put in front of me.

As for running my own email server, I don't. Just like I don't have a washing machine repair workshop in my garage despite owning a washing machine, or an vetinary operating table despite owning a cat. Both of those would be pragmatic, but unfortunately I have to work for a living, and as such don't have all the free time necessary to purchase, install, operate and maintain these "nice to haves." YMMV.

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