* Posts by richardcox13

141 posts • joined 19 May 2012

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Docker taps unikernel brains to emit OS X, Windows public betas

richardcox13

Re: Wondering how long...

> What *would* be extremely useful is running Windows software on Linux.

That is coming: http://www.hanselman.com/blog/DevelopersCanRunBashShellAndUsermodeUbuntuLinuxBinariesOnWindows10.aspx

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Champagne supernova in the sky: Shockwaves seen breaking star

richardcox13

Re: Supernova Fusion

> I think (but may be wrong) that stars normal fusion process can create atoms up to iron[…]

You're not wrong.

Fe-56 to be precise.

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Mozilla will emit 'first version' of Servo-based Rust browser in June

richardcox13

> Also, FWIW, Chrome for example ain't exactly svelte once you add up all the various processes' RAM use.

That will seriously over count on virtual memory based systems because on such systems there will be significant sharing.

On contemporary OSs memory usage is a not a simple topic, there is no simple way to count the memory usage of even a single process. For a start what do you mean by "memory usage": working set, commit, private allocation, address space allocation, or …?

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Tandy 102 proto-laptop still alive and beeping after 30 years, complete with AA batteries

richardcox13

> machine's much-better-than-a-ZX-Spectrum keyboard

There is damning with faint praise, and then there is this statement.

Is it possible to have a worse keyboard (outside of some ruggedised niche)?.

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Microsoft explanation for Visual Studio online outage leaves open questions

richardcox13

Re: SQL Server 2014 memory allocation

> It is not clear from the blog whether this is a custom version of SQL Server 2014

> used internally by Microsoft, or whether it is the production release.

No it isn't a custom internal version, but the SQL Server used in Azure is not the same as the version you would deploy locally. See Books Online reference for lots of differences. That said they are mostly the same.

> anyone running SQL Server 2014 in SQL Server 2014 compatibility

> mode is likely to suffer issues with massive over-allocation of memory to

> queries and stored procs.

"is likely": no, not likely. Otherwise current users of SQL Server 2014 (which has been around now for almost two years) would have noticed.

However you could hit the same bug: in which case raise a support issue to get early access to the fix.

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richardcox13

If you want some detail...

A much more detailed write up:

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/bharry/2016/02/05/vs-team-services-incidents-on-feb-3-4/

and

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/bharry/2016/02/06/a-bit-more-on-the-feb-3-and-4-incidents/

The latter includes some rather low level details...

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You've seen things people wouldn't believe – so tell us your programming horrors

richardcox13

Re: Lower to uppercase

> I appreciate that was probably very old code... but you do realise that changing case in ASCII is just a bitwise operation?

Only if it is truly ASCII: 7 bit encoding, nothing accented.

Once you need to deal with wider encodings or outside the USA then it breaks down.

Even if all the characters are unaccented it will not work (see Turkish I Problem).

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Watch: SpaceX Dragon capsule breathes fire during crucial hover test

richardcox13

Re: flash?

I don't know: give users HTML5 and then they'll also demand TLS for pages with a login.

And indeed we should have these things.

> 2015

Perhaps when you catch up with the rest of us in 2016? :-)

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El Reg mulls entering Robot Wars arena

richardcox13

Re: Well what worked best before?

> That's one of the very few XKCD strips that confuses me

http://www.explainxkcd.com/wiki/index.php/689:_FIRST_Design

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Happy 30th birthday, IETF: The engineers who made the 'net happen

richardcox13

> the internet grew faster than any technology has ever grown in the history of man and yet it never failed, faltered or fell over

It may never have failed but it has certainly faltered.

I can't be the only one who remembers the "Great Internet Worm" of 1988, when some 40% of the hosts online were taken out.

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Server retired after 18 years and ten months – beat that, readers!

richardcox13

Re: The drive's a Seagate...

> Does that mean that, due to relativity, there is a tangible time difference between the inside and outside of the disc?

Yes, since any velocity or space-time distortion will give a change. But I doubt it will be much.

Assuming the outer edge of the data area of the platters is 3", I get a linear speed of 21.6m/s.

Which gives a adjustment, of special relativity, of 0.0026%.

However, this is non-linear motion so general relativity applies. Which reverses the effect. But I've no idea by how much.

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Beyond iTunes: XML boffins target sheet music

richardcox13

Re: Eh?

> I'm 'writing' using a computer font, I'm stuck with a single set of characters

No you are not.

Look up "Font Stylistic Sets": a single (Open Type) font/typeface can include multiple variations of each glyph; which can then vary contextually (shape is influenced by surrounding characters).

Unicode supports this with Variation Selectors.

Even Word (recent versions) supports this. Select a suitable font (eg. Gabriola) and use the Advanced tab of Font settings to change the stylistic set. Compare sets 1 and 7 for obvious differences.

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Seagate wears dunce's cap in hi-cap disk ship slip

richardcox13

Re: Gah, that chart hurts my head!

> Also, the chart shows shipped capacity

Exactly.

Someone has a spin they want to push, and has designed a chart to help that spin.

Consider units would have the 8GB section an eighth the height and the 10GB section a tenth. The latter would essentially disappear.

That said, net revenue would perhaps be a more useful scale but unlikely any of the companies publish sufficiently detailed sales data.

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Amazon: Just to let you know, Oracle's cloud is so 2011. That's all

richardcox13

Re: Looks to me as if Oracle is rolling on the business as usual train

> Depends on what Microsoft includes in Cloud Revenue - these figures are quite easy to manipulate by any party.

Exactly. I seem to recall reading on these pages that MS includes Office 365 (to work Amazon has no equivalent).

However, like much in accounting, where the lines are drawn is completely arbitrary. If MS is using Office 365 to fund Azure development by making use of it, then so be it. In much the same way Amazon started AWS based on its own internal need for computing resources.

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German Govt mulls security standards for SOHOpeless routers

richardcox13

Re: So it begins..

> get messed up by patents and trade secrets

Patents: no, they're published anyway.

Trade Secrets: if the company goes bust then that's no loss; if they choose to end support then they have chosen to reveal those secrets.

Ie. it is still their choice.

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richardcox13

Re: So it begins..

> but there are two ways round this :

And the third, and well established in the business software world: escrow. If the vendor goes out of business customers get all the design and software information, including source code.

I would push for more: either the manufacturer must fix security issues in a timely manner (eg. 7 calendar days for remote code execution), or make the entire device – hardware and software – open source (including any tools required to maintain and update it).

So either update yourself or let others do it,

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Microsoft previews cloudy Active Directory Domain Services

richardcox13

Re: Interesting development in the cloud tug of war

> Have an upvote, but I would never allow my connection to AD to

> have the achilles heel such as needing an internet connection.

Hence the approach of running one AD tree in Azure and another in the office(s) with a trust relationship between them.

This is only worth it when you have enough resources in Azure that the centralised authentication, authorisation, and group policy justify the extra infrastructure (much less than previously) and cost (including someone to do the admin).

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Crypto cadre cloud-cracks SHA-1 with just $75k of compute cost

richardcox13
FAIL

> It would take more time to crack MD5 using current technology than[…]

No, it is done, and has been done, repeatedly. Creating a second document with the same MD5 hash requires small resources. This is old news.

Hence dropping support for MD5 in certificates across all crypto libraries.

I suggest you update your crypto knowledge from the 90's.

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AVG to flog your web browsing, search history from mid-October

richardcox13

Re: We wont pay for data slurping pesterware

> Eset, just get Eset nod32, not the cheapest but its worth it..

Please no. Thankfully getting rid of it here.

Lots of random "ESET needs attention" popups without any information about what triggered the pop-up. Log full of "Could not download updates" but no error message.

Its detection might by good, but its UI and error handling is crap.

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Symantec fires staff caught up in rogue Google SSL cert snafu

richardcox13

> issued for non-existent domains

Even better would be to use an internal CA that is not trusted (by default) by browsers.

Thus anyone else seeing the certificates would get an error.

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HMRC breaches job applicants' privacy in mass email spaff

richardcox13

Re: If only they'd hired a script kiddie

> Is it difficult or something to have Outlook say "this email has more addressees than your default allows. Are you really sure you want to send it?"

In 2013 it is the default (a warning certainly appears with a mailing list with 21 entries, so the limit is below that).

Equally in Exchange you can apply an ACL to mailing lists, so only selected users can send to the bigger lists (been true since at least Exchange 2003).

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Perhaps the AIpocalypse ISN'T imminent – if Google Translate is anything to go by, that is

richardcox13

Re: AI or MInd?

Probably one of those that have a deficiency in gravitas.

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Prognosticator, for one, welcomes our new robot work colleagues

richardcox13
Terminator

It could be worse, they might be nice to us.

Maybe the shoe event horizon won't be so bad?

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Adobe pays US$1.2M plus settlements to end 2013 breach class action

richardcox13
FAIL

Re: $6.77 billion in equity

> Oh my, a $1.2 million settlement!

Please read the article again.

$1.2m in /legal fess/. The settlement amount is not disclosed.

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Cloudflare hiccup nudges Stack Overflow and others offline

richardcox13

Re: Shame StackOverflow came back up

> most spiteful trolls

You really don't get out much do you.

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Google's new parent Alphabet owns abc.xyz – and, yup, there's already an abc.wtf

richardcox13

> abc.wtf was registered by Microsoft themselves

Probably not.

While the IP points to an MS server (try visiting http://abc.wtf), the registrant is a registrant protection service (ie. proxy to avoid putting you personal details into the whois database).

The reverse DNS just reflects the resolution of the domain.

Its nameservers are also not MS (primary on Rackspace).

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Boffins beat Amazon Web Services at its own storage game

richardcox13
Thumb Down

For crimes…

against typography this should be immediately ignored.

That horror in the diagram.

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Intel emits Skylake CPUs for gamers, overclockers (Psst, you'll need new RAM and a new mobo)

richardcox13

Re: Cooling is going to be fun with 95W!

> 95W

Given i7-9xx (1st gen i7's) had a TDP of 130W, and current generation AMD CPUs also go well over 100W how to dissipate that much heat is nothing new.

(Looking at Sky-Lakes to replacement of my ageing i7-920: but will wait on the mainstream variants, however is does look like 2x16GB for memory is viable price wise.)

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Exploding 'laptop batt' IN SPAAACE! Speeding lithium spaffed by nova

richardcox13

Re: So....

> Nope the explosion creates Lithium

No, the explosion spreads the lithium, Lithium is a normal product of late life star fusion.

As a stars hydrogen is consumed it is not enough to sustain the star, gravitational collapse leads to high core pressure and temperature allowing higher order fusion to take place. If the star is massive enough this can go as far as creating iron. (The latter stages of this happen in the final minutes before the star explodes as only stars massive enough to end as supernovae take fusion that far.)

Fusion into heavier elements is endothermic so cannot sustain the star, these elements are only created in a supernova explosion itself.

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Are smart safes secure? Not after we've USB'd them, say infosec bods

richardcox13

Re: @ The Original Steve

> I know no modern OS that still have this huge stupidity set by default: auto-executing of removable storage. Apart from Windows.

Windows does not either. Unless you are running XP, *and* have not done the simple configuration change. XP always supported that configuration setting so its existence is old (more than a decade) news.

I suspect other commenters here are right: the diagnostics tool is just a thumb drive and relies on the OS to execute it, rather than having a secure mechanism,

But then its not like the safe and lock industry have a history of security by obscurity is it.

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Microsoft to Windows 10 consumers: You'll get updates LIKE IT or NOT

richardcox13

Re: This is another reason...

> they have more control over the updates, and can pick and choose.

More than "complete and total"? WSUS gives central control for all (supported) versions of Windows: server or not.

If you want control run Pro edition and use the tools provided. If you want an easy life leave it on automatic. I would rather have all those potential botnet nodes, sorry, home users, up to date thank you.

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Ex-MIT prof jailed for 'making experimental film' about bank robbery. In a bank. Without saying it was a film

richardcox13

Re: Ah yes....

> but wanted his company to do an audit.

The bosses had asked him to check things: makes a big difference having permissions even if the local branch staff do not know.

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Tour de France leader's cycling data may have been hacked by doping critics

richardcox13

Re: curious

The teams operate all around the world: uploading data from those events rather than snail mailing a memory stick?

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PLUTO FLYBY: Here's your IT angle, all you stargazing pedants

richardcox13

LOHAN

I'm assuming this is all part of the process of preparation for LOHAN.

Isn't a proper mission control part of any (near) space mission?

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Why the BBC is stuffing free Micro:bit computers into schoolkids' satchels

richardcox13

Re: Year 7 = 11 years old

> It has a 5x5 LED display. That's an ideal form of output. Anything more sophisticated and they'll play Minecraft on it instead of doing their ICT homework.

Minecraft could easily /be/ their ICT homework: http://services.minecraftedu.com/wiki/ComputerCraftEdu

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Ford recalls 433,000 cars: Software bug breaks engine off-switch

richardcox13

Re: My solution:

> Ground-up restos are spendy, true, but it's still far cheaper than purchasing a new car.

Does that include accounting for your own time at a decent rate?

I doubt it.

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Apple's Swift creeps up dev language survey – but it's bad news for VB

richardcox13

Re: VB

> Strustrupp didn't want C++ to C backward compatibility.

Evidence?

He certainly didn't say that in "Design & Evolution of C++" which goes through the early stages of C++'s evolution from C via "C with Classes".

> Why are people still writing ordinary C

Because they are targeting platforms without C++, or in case where it is (at least perceived that) C++ is unsuitable (too much dynamic memory, polymorphism, ...: too hard to predict exactly what happens). Eg. consider code for a low power embedded system running on a PIC controller with memory measured in hundreds of bytes (or less). And then there is inertia.

> Yes the survey is inaccurate

Of course it is. As every such survey (whether COBOL marketing from MicroFocus or a survey of job advertisements to name two that regularly generate headlines) it is massively biased because of its selection of data sources.

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Firefox preps processor revamp under Project Electrolysis

richardcox13

Re: Memory usage going up?

> Chrome seems to grab one or two[fixed] 50MB process per tab.

"Seems" is the right term. There is a lot of shared working set across those processes (and others).

Here, one Chrome worker process has a working set of some 55MB, but of that almost 22MB is shared.

Just adding up the working set of processes will always end up double counting memory usage in Windows.

TL;DR: Memory in virtual memory systems is complicated. Almost every measure is not what you think it is.

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Hubble spots Pluto's moons are a chaotic mess of tumbling rock

richardcox13
FAIL

> "We are learning that chaos may be a common trait of binary systems,"

Someone needs to go back to school. The Three Body Problem has been known as long as gravity: Newton covered it in Principia…

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There's a Moose loose aboot this hoose: Linux worm hijacks Twitter feeds for spam slinging

richardcox13

Re: Bit of a challenge

> How the hell are we going to get the consumer market[…]

We're not.

That is far too complicated. (And by "far" I mean: distance to the edge of the observable universe far, not round the corner to the chemist.)

Any solution needs to be easy enough that no user interaction is needed, and cheap enough that it becomes the default.

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Analogue modems allow UNSTOPPABLE Android attack ... at 13bps

richardcox13

Re: Ive got a side channel attack.

> Can I be famous now please?

If you were original then maybe. But you are not: https://xkcd.com/538/ hence no.

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Fed-up Colorado man takes 9mm PISTOL to vexing Dell PC

richardcox13

Re: taking ordnance to pc parts...

> mythbusters [...] fast machine gun to cut something solid in half

Cut down a tree is the usual aim.

Been done in other programmes as well.

Not cost efficient or time efficient. But does show why one does not want to be in front of such weapons.

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Google makes life easier for mixed-content sysadmins

richardcox13

> why are these sites not using[…]

Content separated from structure (eg. CMS) could well mean no one person controls all the markup.

(And there is always content relative links, eg. //code.jquery.com/jquery-1.11.2.min.js, for content from other domains.)

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Boost your attachment size with this one weird trick

richardcox13

Re: No, never increase attachment size limits

> Business knowledge is lost in email. It must be properly filed on a network location, and email only serving links to the latest version.

And now your sales team wants to send a quotation to that potentially very lucrative customer.

Not everyone is connected to the local network ...

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Finally, Mozilla looks at moving away from 'insecure' HTTP. Maybe

richardcox13

Re: Bad idea

And note even IE6 (XP SP3/2003 SP2 and above) supports SNI. (Not in the original versions of those OSs, but it was added later.)

If you have clients from before those relics then it is quite possible even assuming HTTP 1.1 will be a problem, so you have to have a unique address even when unsecure.

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richardcox13

Certificate providers are appearing with ever cheaper (some promising free) certificates.

(This is covered in the linked discussion thread.)

While they won't be EV certificates, as the underlying drafts do consider levels of security, that aspect is covered.

So your "About Me" site gets a free certificate, but as you are not selling anything you are only looking at providing end to end integrity rather than significant identify validation.

At the other end of the scale a medical site or retailer does need to spend some money on their identity. But if they are not willing, how secure is anything they do?

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NASA to put the stars in your hands with coming-soon-now API portal

richardcox13
Go

Compared to an anoying Canadian

> It's also about a thousand times smarter and more interesting.

Talk about damning with faint praise…

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National Grid's new designer pylon is 'too white and boring' – Pylon Appreciation Society

richardcox13

Re: Low IQ Alternative

There is already a standard for it: RFC 3251 "Electricity over IP", but your a couple of weeks out for that.

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ICANN urges US, Canada: Help us stop the 'predatory' monster we created ... dot-sucks!

richardcox13

Or perhaps, hoist by their own petard.

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Extensive 3D NAND drives very expensive to make

richardcox13
Unhappy

Cost of manufacture isn't just CapEx

> Each year flash costs between 162X and 53X more to make per TB than disk

The graph clearly says cap-ex. But the cost of manufacture is op-ex (eg. staffing), materials and a /proportion/ of cap-ex.

It will be more expensive, but nothing close to the cap-ex multiplier because the other costs will not be anything like as proportionately as big (otherwise flash would already be far more expensive than it is reative to spinning rust).

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