* Posts by BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

294 posts • joined 11 May 2012

Page:

Google doesn’t care who makes Android phones. Or who it pisses off

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

CM *absolutely* is a way to get a newer version of Android on your phone

Last phone : 2011 Xperia Pro, shipped with Gingerbread, updated to a mostly complete ICS. CM support - up to Marshmallow.

Current phone - 2012 Motorola Photon Q with SIM card mod. Shipped with ICS. Now on Marshmallow.

Without CM both phones would be bricks without up to date security patches. Not all phones have as much support, but many do.

7
0

Smartwatches: I hate to say ‘I told you so’. But I told you so.

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

PDAs used to sell rather well in the days of the Palmpilot and Psion. Windows CE devices, a bit less so.

Of course what we were all using them for were functions supplied by any half decent smart phone these days. Basic calendaring functions, note taking, documents, e-mail, games, and the ability to create vertical applications. The alternative was a bulky filofax or a huge laptop.

Once phones functionality started increasing, it was obvious the days of PDAs were numbered.

Another ten years and you'll probably be laughed at for having a desktop. You'll either slot your 'phone' into a dock, or more likely it'll all be wireless. All that will be on a desk will be a monitor, keyboard, and mouse because a decent form factor does matter. Everything will travel with you, in addition to being stored online.

12
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

I'd have to agree

I was going to say a shock and waterproof Android fitness watch would be worth a punt, but I've just had a quick search on Amazon and found that decent running watches are much cheaper than last time I looked. fifty to seventy quid upwards, 8-10 hour battery life (GPS) or weeks (non GPS).

Can't see the point going for an Android or Apple option unless it's the same price, and integrates well with other devices.

Now, if you'll excuse me, I think I need a replacement for my Timex Indiglo runner's watch.

4
0

Brits don't want their homes to be 'tech-tastic'

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: It is NOT paranoia if they really are tracking you and listening to your conversations...

Buy yourself a daylight CFL, they're generally instant on and incredibly bright. The ones I used to buy were Androv Medical, but it looks like there's a whole host of reasonably priced alternatives now.

2
0

You don't need no STEEENKING GPU, says Intel

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Excellent

This has been an obvious development for ages, VDI makes a lot of sense.

Know what makes more sense? AMD doing the same with their technology, they're perfectly placed to do so and can offer more performance per watt than Intel. Despite every opportunity they don't, what a waste.

Intel eat them for lunch, again, and are the only virtualisation game in town.

2
0

Beleaguered 123-reg customers spot price hike

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Vidahost here - they'll also offer a 'dns only' free deal (no hosting package) if you want to do that, but you have to e-mail and ask so they can twiddle the appropriate things.

2
0

Wayne Rooney razzles in X-Men: Apocalypse plug

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

The film isn't that brilliant

..so I can't say I'm fussed by any Rooney attempts to make it worse. It's not dire by any stretch, but it hardly sparkles.

Also, some of the cgi in the opening sequence and a few other occasions is shockingly unconvincing.

1
0

How Nokia is (and isn't) back in the phone business today

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: It isn't even slightly difficult to differentiate

Upgrade the screen in the E7, and obviously completely different internals, but in terms of form factor - doesn't look bad.

Surprised no-one is commenting on your desktop being your phone, it is very obviously the way things will go.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

It isn't even slightly difficult to differentiate

1) removable battery

2) landscape hardware keyboard

3) open source hardware as far as possible from day one

4) commitment to provide fixes for a period of <n> years, that don't depend on the carrier

5) HDMI port, *multiple* OTA micro USB ports

6) Android desktop computing support (plug in monitor, keyboard, mouse - there's your environment). Ship phone with a mini HDMI to DVI cable, and two micro USB to USB cables.

6a) optional expansion of desktop computing support - better mail client, file synchronisation, yadda, yadda.

7) Car standard GPS support (i.e. Google maps with a bit of area pre-loading, display of speed, and speed cameras)

No-one offers all of that at the moment, and my personal obsession with hardware keyboards aside, it would probably sell.

4
2

They take to it later, but when women FLOSS, they mean it

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Conclusion : children are bad for open source

Can't say I'm surprised - time heavy activities are the first thing to disappear once offspring arrive, and the age isn't shocking either, as responsibilities, friends, relationships, and exercise impinge on your free time even if children aren't around.

4
0

Windows 10 build 14342: No more friendly Wi-Fi sharing

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: symlink support for Linux subsystem

I should clarify : NTFS has supported junctions for a long time.

They are used in Vista and later as part of the base install, can't remember them being used before then. i.e.

C:\Users>dir /ah

Volume in drive C has no label.

Volume Serial Number is EE29-AD12

Directory of C:\Users

22/08/2013 15:45 <SYMLINKD> All Users [C:\ProgramData]

06/08/2015 20:52 <DIR> Default

22/08/2013 15:45 <JUNCTION> Default User [C:\Users\Default]

See https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/windows/desktop/aa365006(v=vs.85).aspx

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: symlink support for Linux subsystem

Not entirely true. Symlinks (junctions) have been in use from Vista onwards to make certain directories appear in multiple locations, and try and rationalise a less than ideal historic directory arrangement.

I use it occasionally, and it's quite useful for installations where the system drive is far too small, yet that's the one all the patches keep mounting up on..

10
1

Huge embarrassment over fisting site data breach

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Definite brown trousers when they find the person responsible, butt plug the holes and this sort of leakage won't happen again.

9
0

'Dirty Page Logs' coming to future vSphere release

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Looks like it's worth having

Xen -current turned it on by default in November (so, should be in 4.7 in July)

http://lists.xen.org/archives/html/xen-devel/2015-11/msg03138.html

Up to 10% performance improvement in some operations

0
0

Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware storms live TV weather forecast

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Oh, yeah...

There was in the days when a GUI only displayed images, now a GPU is a useful calculation device it's frankly a little shortsighted not to include it in many of the Xeons.

2
2

HTC 10: Is this the Droid you're looking for?

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

No real detail about longevity, then

Does it have a removable battery? (Presumably not)

What is the manufacturer's patching policy?

How many releases of Android do the phones usually get?

What is the state of their year old phone? Have they dropped it now New Shiny is out?

Are their phones unlockable, rootable, and is enough information supplied to use a third party ROM?

Without that, potential landfill in two years, judging from the article about four hundred million unpatched Android phones, live on thereg at the same time as this article.

If you don't make changes, nothing will change, and 'hey, new shiny' does not match with yet another obvious article about how Android phones aren't being patched.

3
0

Utah declares 'war on smut'

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Sex Education

That's why you need sex education, so that condoms and other effective birth control are used, rather than folklore that does not work.

12
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Foolishness

What do you mean 'during puberty' ? Puberty is a *long* way in my past, and whilst I make slightly more sensible decisions on who to get involved with, I'm pretty certain relationships, sex, and porn still hold a lot of attraction.

Do these people never get laid?

16
0

Four hundred MILLION vulnerable Androids are out there

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Yawn

Yet another article stating the astoundingly obvious. No motivation for anyone to change their behaviour. No censuring of manufacturers who poorly support their devices in reviews.

Want to do something useful? Point users at third party ROMs. My 2012 phone is running Marshmallow, and I have no plans to upgrade as manufacturers refuse to release landscape physical keyboard Android phones that are easy to root, and have a removable battery..

3
0

Spinning rust fans reckon we'll have 18TB disk drives in two years

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: How much space do consumers need these days?

No, I'm not mixing them up, as per my original post

'Games are the only storage consumer these days for the average user, surely '

MP3s? Surely most people are using Spotify, Apple Music, or whatever. Same as they're using Netflix, Amazon Instant Video, iPlayer, etc.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: How much space do consumers need these days?

I'm sure you do, but you're not the average user. Five or more years ago I attended a talk by Team17 at Replay Expo Blackpool, and as an aside they asked who still bought CDs. In a room full of around fifty people, myself and one other person stuck their hand up...

The migration to streamed media has only increased since then.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

How much space do consumers need these days?

I'm guessing it's 1TB or less, and that many people could get away with 512GB - which is already hovering at the magic 100 quid price point.

Games are the only storage consumer these days for the average user, surely - everything else is streamed. Pictures don't take up that much room, I wouldn't think everyone is shooting video all the time, even on their phones.

My main system's boot drive is an 840 Pro; 60GB is allocated to Windows 8.1 boot, ~190GB for its apps partition. The main storage is going to be provided by SSD cached RAID10 (4x1TB), I've only just got around to sorting it out, and really haven't needed the space - I'm up to about 180 GB (Windows 8, Windows 8 apps, and data from Windows, Linux, and FreeBSD) with a little stored on an external 2TB drive, the storage from my prior system.

In more than a few years of downloading lots of data, the 2TB drive was only half full. Unless I start ripping all my DVDs and blurays I don't see it filling up. I couldn't justify 4x2TB when buying my local RAID setup (although if I build an external file server, I'll be putting in lots of storage, just because).

0
0

Grab your Hammer pants – it's the '90s again: Facebook brings Virtual Reality back

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

1995 3D graphics

'Back in 1995, the public had no exposure to 3D computer graphics, except in the cinema'

Well, except for the real 3D virtuality systems.

..and games such as Ultima Underworld on the PC

..or DOOM in 1993

..and 3D Construction Kit on everything from 8 bit micros upwards

..and a 3D Maze in Excel 95

..or say, the Playstation 1, which I believe was quite popular, and released in 1994.

I'll grant that PC 3D accelerators were rare until 1998 when the 3dfx Voodoo2 came out.

6
0

The future of Firefox is … Chrome

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

I'll go with it if they can keep adblock working on Android..

My main browser is Chrome, on Android it's Firefox because of Adblock. Frankly it sucks, Chrome is more stable, faster, more functional for gmail and facebook - but it doesn't block ads.

However, Firefox is considerably more cross platform than Chrome

0
0

BlackBerry boss mulls mid-range Androids

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: I certainly won't be buying a new BB, unless it's in a 'fire' sale.

Yeah, that's not 'the right price'. I agonised long and hard before spending a reasonable amount of effort to get a Photon Q and mod it to accept accept a SIM slot. The Passport form factor and keyboard look great, I like the idea of the hub and Blackberry Blend.

However : no removable battery, sub par app store, plus inadequate Android compatibility and inability to control Android app permissions.

If they released a Blackberry Passport Android edition, which could be unlocked, I'd be pretty happy. I don't want a Priv - it's too expensive, and I want a landscape keyboard phone. Also, because it can't be unlocked, it's ever more likely to turn into a doorstep in another year.

1
0

Picture this: An exabyte of cat pix in the space of a sugar cube of DNA

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: A writeable CD left on window sill

There's m-disc, if a sunlight resistant archival medium is required. Not all drives successfully read them, but sufficient numbers do..

3
0

That naked picture on my PC? Not mine. The IT guy put it there

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Another reason...

Did you actually read the article?

Downloading porn at work is usually a misconduct offense. The older chap did the employee a favour by warning him not to do it again, and a sensible person would accept that and move on - strictly speaking the correct procedure is to immediately report it to their manager.

Instead, claiming that 'IT did it' is trying to get the IT guy sacked. Planting data to get someone sacked is probably a criminal offence, too. At that point, would you do anything other than immediately escalate the incident as high as you could? If I was feeling extremely nice I might offer the person in question a final chance to reconsider, but if they persisted - escalation *and* if I ever ran into them at another firm, you can bet I'd recommend a scan of their IT equipment. Try to get someone sacked for something they didn't do? You can rot in hell for that one.

75
0

FreeBSD 10.3 lands

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: I keep meaning to try a Linux but still can't pick one.

Arch is quite good, although it does use systemd (there are non systemd options too). It is *remarkably* bare bones : there's your root prompt, fix/install everything else you need now..

Gentoo - don't go overboard with it, whilst there may be *some* minor advantage for compiling builds more specific to your processor, fiddling with other compiler flags rarely helps much.

I would definitely recommend Salix over Slackware. Dependency management is such a huge pain, even if the number of packages in use are small.

The one large difference with Salix/Slackware (apart from them being systemv init hold outs) is the boot manager is LILO, which doesn't support an initrd. This has two important implications, although it doesn't matter during installation :

1) If compiling a new kernel, make very certain it has support for the filesystem used by the root partition compiled into the kernel, rather than as a module, otherwise your system will not boot.. Also, never start from a clean kernel config file, always base it off the current kernel config (do a zcat of /proc/config.gz, normally).

2) Systems that need an initrd to start up (i.e. Xen) need another solution. That solution is mbootpack, which I actually prefer over fiddling with initrd, even if what it does to make it all work is a little gnarly.

3
1
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Who uses FreeBSD in preference to Linux and why?

XFS is not really any substitute for ZFS, even though I'm using it myself. It can be combined by all the Linux RAID and caching options to create a reasonable system, but it's still not as good as ZFS. If I had enough memory to use ZFS and the FreeBSD Xen dom0 was more usable, I'd be using that..

4
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: "user friendly"

NetBSD runs on a lot of platforms, some of them quite old, and it's definitely the most bare bones and least user friendly of the BSDs. I'd recommend OpenBSD if you want to try a tight, focused operating system.

It does have some interesting variants (which work to varying degrees of success), and there's some projects to use it in embedded scenarios/be virtualised with a kernel that only performs a limited selection of tasks.

Whilst NetBSD can be, and is, used for real work, it does rather feel like a research project at times. Some parts work perfectly (most of the base), others are interesting, and work, but could be more completely implemented (NetBSD Xen). Some components (i.e. ZFS on NetBSD) are really not in a state where you'd trust your data. It has the best support of early Mac PowerPC hardware and SGI O2 framebuffers amongst the BSDs if you're bothered.

There are very different project aims too. The Bluetooth stack is a good example : it's reasonably solid on FreeBSD, rotting a bit on NetBSD, and completely non-existent on OpenBSD - the code wasn't in a modern usable state there, so the team just removed it. Lynx was removed from OpenBSD base a while back because of security issues. FreeBSD offers decent compatibility. NetBSD is more laissez faire, OpenBSD is utterly focused on security and openness - its project is written for the developers, not user convenience.

8
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Who uses FreeBSD in preference to Linux and why?

FreeBSD is better supported by binary drivers, but also has a consistent user space, great documentation, a decent disk back end, easy to understand firewall, and a reasonable init system. It's the most Linux like BSD there is, although less hardcore users may wish to use the desktop oriented PCBSD, which makes getting X up and running a little easier.

My favourite BSD is OpenBSD, a very carefully thought through system. NetBSD is a little more anarchic, and the most barebones of the BSDs. It's ability to easily cross compile is excellent, though.

It's also true that the packages/ports system is very similar on all the BSDs, and knowledge gained on one BSD is transferable to another. It is more than a little irritating that the BSDs have successfully used ifconfig for configuring every type of interface for years, whilst Linux distributions use a variety of different commands.

I'm fairly pragmatic about operating systems. My base operating system is Linux Salix, because I run everything on a Xen dom0, Slackware is too painful even for me (package dependencies, please!), and a NetBSD/Solaris dom0 is just not as functional, for graphics card hardware passthrough to VMs.

On top of Xen runs Windows (for app support, development, and some light gaming) and FreeBSD - because it's supported by NVidia, and the open source graphics drivers, whilst just about adequate, don't work well in VMs (a VM only looks like a real PC if you squint at it - typically it's a 440BX (pentium 2/3 era) or a Q45 (penryn era) chipset, with a more recent CPU than ever ran on those platforms, plus an odd BIOS, an ACPI table that looks like nothing else, and a few other oddities).

A couple of notes about BSDs : typically you can run with a generic kernel, and don't need to recompile. On OpenBSD you should definitely run with the stock kernel, it is unusual to try anything different, and error reports will be rejected. Also note that whilst it is generally quite safe to run OpenBSD -current snapshots as a day to day environment, this is not the case for NetBSD and FreeBSD - if you need them to work, use their stable environments.

9
0

BlackBerry's still losing millions – but hit its revenue target, finally

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

No surprise

I see they have finally announced Marshmallow for the Priv, on the very last day they could do so according to their schedule. That's a genuine surprise; I expected more excuses.

No shock about the old phone business being no help. I thought long and hard before deciding not to buy a passport, but as BB clearly did not care enough to update various bundled apps, the Android runtime, or fix their market place, why should I bother?

1
0

BMW complies with GPL by handing over i3 car code

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Failed English comprehension

I don't really care, as personally my Unix of choice is BSD, but I'm going to apply Occam's razor here.

Who do I think is right?

a) someone being loud on the Internet

b) A company that

i) explicitly lists LGPL 2.1 software (that's 'L') being used in their publicly available product

ii) has an e-mail for further information

iii) ..and is described as being in open source support

I'm going to hazard a guess they've thought about this already and know the difference between GPLv2, LGPLv2, GPLv3 and other OSS licences.

12
0

Oculus Rift review-gasm round-up: The QT on VR

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Hardly a surprise, but a little unfair to be that snarky

The price point alone always meant it would be in the category of something you hoped your neighbour would buy.

I'm assessing it to be similar in many ways to 3D monitors. I have a passive 3D monitor I occasionally use, and for the right game and video, it's superb. For other games, it adds nothing extra.

I briefly used a DK1 at Replay:Expo 2013 where a developer was showing off their dungeon demo, and it was lots of fun. Yes, it was low res, there was an odd movement disconnect because of the vision/inner ear disparity, and it involves a bulky headset, but the point is that it's a genuine new experience that isn't available elsewhere.

I think the question is more 'wait to see how the first gen pans out, and choose the best one' rather than 'wait for a revolutionary second gen'. The second gen will no doubt be improved over the first, but the limiting factor is GPU gunt; whilst the generation of GPUs turning up this autumn are looking like a sizable improvement over the current generation, the generation after that won't be capable of such a leap.

The next step beyond the current gen, would be 4K split between both eyes (1920x2160x2). At the moment, it's not feasible to do 4K at 90fps with recent games, using any available graphics card.

I'm definitely considering one, but that's partly because I'm well overdue an upgrade to my aging systems, and I'm a sucker for new and interesting ways of interacting with systems.

1
0

Samsung Galaxy S7: Big brand Android flagship champ

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: No removable battery sucks

Yeah, I really want a landscape keyboard. I've seen a friend's Priv and it does look quite cool.

However, it does need to be rootable, and Blackberry's security centre is useless - it will warn, but not block, attempts to access your data. Also, the Priv's battery is non removable, even if it is quite high capacity..

I also note that Blackberry promised to tell its Priv userbase when Marshmallow was arriving, in 1Q 2016. They've got seven days left.

I don't trust Blackberry to keep their devices up to date, although I was wrong that they'd never update BBOS10 Facebook to support comment replies - they have, just in time for support for it to be dropped by Facebook.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

No removable battery sucks

So does a lack of a physical keyboard in landscape, but there are no Android options for current phones, on that one.

3KmAH isn't that bad, but it is never guaranteed the phone will survive an entire day, or - shock! you may wish to be away from power for a couple of days/forget to plug it in overnight. External battery packs suck. It's vastly less convenient than using spare batteries, together with an external battery charger.

On my 'new' phone, a Motorola Photon Q (2012 Android keyboard phone), it doesn't have a removable battery either (I had no choice, it's the latest *landscape* Android keyboard phone there is). This means I'm going to be modding it to accept a removable, larger battery. Words cannot describe the joy I have at the risk of ruining the phone/battery with a slip of a soldering iron/glue, or the hassle of creating a piece of plastic with appropriate metal prongs to adjust the phone to accept an unmodified LG battery.

2
2

Computers shouldn't smoke. Cigarettes aren't healthy for anyone

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Keyboard hell (@Binky)

It's definitely Fake Friday. I misread 0163 as 163. You're quite right, 0163 is fine.

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Keyboard hell

No it isn't, it's Alt 156?

0
0

Only 0.1% of you are doing web server security right

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

It's not exactly ideal

Unsupported by IE, might lock your customers out for an extended period. Yep, I can see that being terribly popular from a business angle. Useful for a banking site, but for everything else?

6
0

BT: We're killing the dabs brand. Oh and can customers re-register to buy on our site?

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Never had much problem with Scan, about the worst is some of the daily special stuff, which occasionally appears to have escaped from a job lot of cheap surplus in China somewhere.

For some more obscure graphics cards, sometimes they'll refund the cost of the card 'minus wear and tear' some time down the line. This is less than optimal if you bought an expensive graphics card two years ago, it fails, and the proposed cost isn't enough to buy a replacement.

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Scan are good, I'd also recommend cclcomputers (cclonline) - especially if you want to buy a monitor, with their monitor checking service, and occasionally overclockers. Beyond those it's into specialist shops.

0
0

Stagefright flaw still a nightmare: '850 million' Androids face hijack risk

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

What is the point of this article, other than as advertising?

It's stating the obvious. It hasn't changed. It's not going to change without legislation.

Let's do something useful on mobile phone review scoring out of 10. Take the overall score.

No commitment for at least three years of patching and Android upgrades (if the phone hardware can handle it) : cost in £100s/divided by £100 multiplied by minus two (£100=-2, £400=-8)

No unlockable bootloader and rooting capability : -11

No commitment to provide drivers/developer documentation so third party ROMs can be created for the latest released Android version (after a reasonable timescale) : -11

Manufacturer has form of lying about upgrades that are perfectly possible, technically : -4

No removable battery : -3

Note that doesn't mean they're obliged to enable upgrades to later versions for third parties - provided the latest supported version of Android for that phone can be patched, they get a pass.

If the score is below zero, the entire review is 'This phone got a score below zero. Only idiots buy phones with a score below zero. Are you an idiot?'

Of course the current situation, and the 'your non removable battery no longer holds a charge, better buy a new phone' attitude, keeps people on a two year phone upgrade treadmill.

Google (Nexus) do not get a pass on this one - they only patch phones up to about three years old.

Note that the Blackberry Priv, which Blackberry said would have news about a Marshmallow update 'in 1Q 2016' have seven days left to tell its users when an upgrade will be arriving..

Don't trust any mobile phone companies, don't buy an Android phone that can't be unlocked and rooted, and have Cyanongenmod applied to it. Going to update my 2012 phone to Marshmallow tonight, as it now has an SELinux enabled build, with official Cyanongenmod nightlies not far off. Without that I'd be stuck on insecure ICS.

1
0

How one developer just broke Node, Babel and thousands of projects in 11 lines of JavaScript

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Time Zones vs. Left Pad

No you wouldn't, if using a language other than javascript. Even if it's a fairly simple function, there's the possibility the library includes an optimised version - either using a method you've not thought of, or varying assembly paths.

2
0

Mystery Kindle update will block readers from books after Wednesday

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: I applied the big update to my Mk2 Paperwhite a couple of weeks ago.

Fine on my 3G keyboard, not that it helps with your loss of books..

0
0

Pornography, violence and JG Ballard: High Rise, the 1970s' internet

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Awful

Saw it on Saturday with a film group, and the general opinion was not positive.

It starts strongly, the visual style is striking, I particularly dig the 70s style, and there are some great scenes. However, it needs a severe editing - it drags, changes pace suddenly for no apparent reason, jarringly includes a music video, and is inconsistent about what is happening outside the high rise.

I'm sure that parts of it are highlighting various parts of society, social hierarchy, and social climbing. I don't care : it's not a good film. Worth watching once, but not more than that. It could be halved in length and improve over its current state.

Watch The Lobster instead, it's excellent.

0
0

Facebook, WhatsApp farewell BlackBerry

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Rubbish, basically

The Facebook app has been fairly useless on BB10 for at least six months as it doesn't support comment replies. Blackberry have done nothing about this. No sympathy - I seriously considered a BB Passport, but went in the end with a modded Android keyboard phone with XPrivacy on it, so once I've got round to configuring it, I can still run the FB app without it sucking all my data off the phone..

In the meantime there's Face10 for (paid) Facebook support on BB, but you're stuffed with Whatsapp..

1
0

'Millions' of Android mobes vulnerable to new Stagefright exploit

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Cyanogenmod time

Go to xda developers and read the thread for your particular phone, to find a ROM and see if it is both up to date and stable.

Pros : may get later code, possibly more secure

Cons : could be less stable, as CM does not necessarily have access to all documentation and resources the manufacturer has. May lack specialist functionality (i.e. my previous phone when moved to CM drops FM Radio, HDMI support, and the camera support is not as good. It was worth it considering the manufacturer ROM stops at ICS, whereas CM is currently up to Lollipop..)

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Slow clap

Oh well done chaps, reliably exploiting a months old vulnerability and making it easier for the really bad guys to wreak havoc. I suppose their argument would be that this forces the manufacturers to fix their ROMs, but really, does anyone believe they care?

It's just going to cause issues that might otherwise have taken longer to arise.

Not that it matters personally, as Cyanongenmod patched it months ago, of course there's now the new Snapdragon exploits to patch..

Sooner rather than later there will be a legal requirement to patch years old firmware, or being more realistic about capitalism, there will probably be a remote kill switch to brick non compliant hardware and force the purchase of new shiny hardware with different bugs.

2
6

NASA celebrates 50-year anniversary of first spaceship docking in orbit

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: And in three years ...

I'd still rather see lots and lots of probes rather than very expensive bases that probably won't provide as much science or pretty pictures, and will almost certainly lead to astronauts dying out on Mars (being unable to return) if they're sent at the moment.

I'm not saying a base on the Moon or Mars wouldn't be cool (it would), but I'd far sooner we landed on more comets, asteroids, and moons, plus instruments in space. I wonder if a rover on Venus will ever happen..

3
4

Page:

Forums