* Posts by BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

218 posts • joined 11 May 2012

Page:

Argos offers 'buy now pay in 3 months' deal

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

I quite like Argos

Provided you research the item, they sell some decent items, and they don't censor the reviews - so it's entirely your fault if you buy a piece of Elizabeth Duke jewelry with thirty one star reviews..

Order and pay online. Walk in. Give reference number. Walk out with item. Total time spent : a minute.

I recently had an issue with a solid wood self assembly bookcase - it looked ok, the price was right, and it needed to be a particular size to hold game consoles. The reviews said that it was ok, but that the components could be cut more accurately. I took a punt on it anyway, and found just as I was finishing making it that one spar was more a parallelogram instead of a rectangle!

Rang up support, and they agreed that I could go to my local store with only the faulty part. Checked the new item with a tape measure, swapped for the faulty one, and completed the bookcase. I'm very happy with it; it's cheaper and better built than an Ikea offering. Their website also contains all the manuals, so it's possible to see precise dimensions before purchase.

Probably going to buy some vac bags from there tomorrow, and they're handy for printer ink too.

0
0

When asked 'What's a .CNT file?' there's a polite way to answer

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

you're using Linux, aren't you?

Try BSD instead, the help is actually usable.

6
0

Women devs – want your pull requests accepted? Just don't tell anyone you're a girl

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Motorola Droid 4, off ebay, or if you're willing to either get out the soldering iron or bung some people in Bulgaria, Spain or Korea cash to modify/supply a Motorola Photon Q to have a SIM slot added. That's the latest Android landscape keyboard phone, though.

0
0

Bank fail: Ready or not, here's our new software

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: It's not that nobody wants...

Bullshit. That may be true if you're producing something unimportant like Facebook, but for things like banking there is absolutely enough time if enough personnel and money are thrown at the problem. Computer platform changes have long lead times, so that can be planned. Regulatory changes? Usually signposted well in advance. New browsers? Released in beta months before official release. Mobile access? Browsers are a known quantity, as are the mobile platforms.

There is time, it's just that people don't want the loss of revenue by releasing their software later.

It may be that some older software suffers by not being developed with a view to unit testing, but that seems a little better than more modern software which is constantly a least a bit shit, looks like it has never been properly unit tested, and has definitely never had more than a cursory user test.

0
0

Ducks, Lord of the Rings, movies and maths: The GCHQ Xmas puzzle solutions revealed

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Get on with your job.

They did in fact create the puzzle on their own time - this was reported on Radio 4, and probably other places.

0
0

You've seen things people wouldn't believe – so tell us your programming horrors

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Limited languages.. this was fun to diagnose!

Possibly my first professional coding temporary job (wasn't even at University) was to input and analyse NHS staff workplace injury reasons, plot graphs and suchlike for one particular trust.

The correct way (this was very early 90s) would be to either program it properly, or use Excel. This was the NHS, however, so there was no budget. I had a Compaq DOS PC (486?) - this included GWBASIC, which I probably should have used, but instead it was strongly suggested I use an epidemiological analysis program.

On the face of it, this was a good idea - it was actually quite functional, with input forms, graphing, and a complex interpreted scripting language. I set to coding, and it worked - up until a certain point, when it crashed. It crashed executing a return statement, and analysing the source showed no errors.

The reason I couldn't see an error, was because there wasn't one. The interpreter had a limited stack of statements - as each new line was loaded from the script, the oldest line dropped off the top.. (this was not really documented) The error occurred when the return statement tried to return to a line that was no longer in the stack. Additionally, when the limit of the stack was pushed, it did some slightly odd things.

I ended up using it within that limitation, calling it via menus written in GWBASIC. It was at least in use for a few solid years before it started to hang on a different machine. I was asked back in as a favour, and found that if run under Windows in a DOS Window, and switched from full screen and back again, it stopped hanging and continued. I have no idea why.

Not perfect, but give me a break, it was a summer job whilst I was still at college, and my course was engineering rather than coding.

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Many mistakes, probably

I'll own up to two, but coding is not my main activity, so it could be worse

1) Never, ever, *ever* do your own date calculations

Years ago I wrote a web log file processor in Python, to track visitors, and do everything webalyser did (except for using cookies) at much less cost, plus various custom stuff. To check log files it took the current date, processed a file, then added 24 hours to the time and looked for that file.

This worked fine for about four months, and then it all stopped working. Co-incidentally, this was the Monday after the clocks went back.. Add 24 hours, still Saturday! Add 24 hours, still Saturday...! Add fix to add 25.5 hours, and use the date functions properly to go to the next day in future.

Don't get me started on people who think they can handle time zones without a library : clue, you probably can't, and yes some places have half hour time zones.

2) Don't believe the specification

Doing nameless things with MAPI and Exchange, my code worked for months and then bombed. Various debugging revealed that it was failing to find a field, hit the exception handler, and fell over because this case wasn't correctly handled. It wasn't handled because the SDK (written by Microsoft), communicating with Exchange (written by Microsoft) informed me that this parameter was 'mandatory' and would always be there. Which it was, until suddenly it wasn't. (I think it was PR_something_RTF - rich text is supposed to be included, but only plain text was in rare instances - a handful of messages out of thousands).

I'd handled errors on every other field - except that one, because it would 'always be there'

1
0

Samsung: Is gadget lust still a thing in 2016? Nope

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: It's their own fault

As to swapping batteries : I have two spares. My 2011 phone has never needed more than three batteries a day under very heavy usage (light usage is less than one battery), and a swap out takes less than twenty seconds.

A lot of the battery and CPU appears to be eaten by running K9 Mail using push e-mail; I may have to investigate other offerings.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: It's their own fault

Obviously I am just 'someone on an Internet message board' but the lack of a micro SD card slot and a removable battery are major factors against buying certain phones, unless the battery is truly, staggeringly huge (practically none are).

I really want a landscape Android phone with a keyboard (don't like the Priv : too expensive, not landscape, no removable battery, not rootable. Considered the Blackberry Passport, but BBOS10 is dead, and I want to absolutely control what each app can access). This will replace my 2011 Android landscape keyboard phone, and I'd pay a reasonable amount (300-400 quid) for it.

It doesn't exist. So, I'm importing a 2012 landscape Android phone from the US, then going to either whip out the soldering iron, or send it to someone in mainland Europe to mod a SIM card slot into it, then I'm going to mod it to support a removable battery, and flash a third party Marshmallow ROM plus XPrivacy on to it.

This is a huge pain in the arse, but I don't like keyboardless phones. Swype just isn't as good, although it's technically impressive.

I don't want Apple's vision of computing, and there's not the same range of apps in other non Android platforms. Tried flashing Sailfish onto an Android phone - useless, as it has no Android app support unless it's an official Jolla phone. I really, really, wanted to like Blackberry, but it's obvious it's a dead platform. If they put Android on the Passport, and made it rootable I'd consider it - the battery is so huge it should last an entire day, even under truly heavy use.

0
0

New Xen maintenance release ends active version 4.4 development

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Xen's day is past

Can't say I agree - I much prefer Xen's architecture to the cobbled together nature of KVM, although it's better at hardware passthrough than Xen. Also, they've been targeting ARM longer than KVM if I remember correctly (I've not used any ARM based virtualisation personally)

I've never really had a problem with creating a Dom0 capable kernel - I've had much greater problems taking the latest kernel source and expecting it to 'just work' on a given Linux distribution, without explicitly using the config from the current running kernel, and then modifying that.

3
0

VMware to 'axe 900 jobs'

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Truly, I'm shocked mcShockington..

Time was when VMware was unique and revolutionary - no longer. There was no reasonably priced way of learning their software last time I looked, the free versions have become progressively more cut down, and competitors have caught up.

It's nice that they have features such as copying Workstation VMs up to an ESX cloud, and that i.e. DirectX/OpenGL support has improved, but there's been no return of the VM debugging feature that sort of let you debug backwards in time, that got dropped as it was 'too hard' to get it working properly.

Well, other people have managed the less hard items now, so it's only the too hard stuff that's left. The 'too hard' items that would actually sell product.

3
0

Bounty hunters won't blink until you dangle US$1500 bug reward

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Broken window fallacy?

source control. It tells you who committed the change..

0
0

How to help a user who can't find the Start button or the keyboard?

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Stop being a smartarse who makes things worse

Yes you can do it, no it won't help when they go to use a different computer, or the next poor bastard has to diagnose an issue and doesn't know that the mouse buttons have been changed.

15
0

Star Wars: Episode VIII delayed by six months

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Excellent

Hadn't been keeping up with this, and didn't realise the next episode will be standalone - but I'm very pleased at the prospect.

VII was a decent Star Wars film, and not a bad film in its own right, but the next film continuing the storyline nears to match episode V in quality, and that's going to be difficult. A gap of two years to achieve this is ideal, even if the timing most probably is cynical.

A standalone storyline, if done well, offers lots of opportunity for expanding the film canon. The Star Wars universe is diverse and well written in parts, the films less so.

Imagine if the making of some of the wider universe non canon was merely a ruse, and they're placing Kyle Katarn/elements of the better Star Wars computer games back in the films..

1
0

Server retired after 18 years and ten months – beat that, readers!

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: I find this one a bit difficult to believe

Nope, it's used for a limited number of old ISA cards. If the ISA card is used in later motherboards that don't supply -5V, some/all of their functionality may not work. Serial ports still exist on modern kit, and there's no -5V on an ATX 2.x PSU.

It's still possible to buy PSUs with -5V on them if necessary.

0
0

Hot Swedish nurses in charity calendar rumpus

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

They should get a sense of humour

I'd consider buying it as is, especially if it has more pictures of inappropriate medical equipment usage

12
0

Nvidia GPUs give smut viewed incognito a second coming

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

..and if the application playing the pr0n dies with no exception handler, what happens then?

This is the OS and driver's responsibility. Whether it can do it given the current architecture is an interesting question.

5
1

UK energy minister rejects 'waste of money' smart meters claim

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

They can F right off

I know that some of my appliances are not efficient. All the white goods are fine. My film watching device is a CRT projector, taking up about 600W, but it's not used anywhere near as often as anyone with an efficient new telly, so overall I actually win.

My main computer has a number of monitors, including one CRT one at the moment, but the environmental cost of replacing this inefficient old CRT monitor, and less efficient GPUs with modern alternatives is higher than keeping it on. That doesn't resolve the power demand, of course, or help the economy, but it is kinder to the planet as a whole. Also, it's much better to my wallet...

3
1

Reverser laments crypto game protection, says wares dead after 2018

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: A month.

You don't - what was asked is how to add dongles to virtual machines, not how to migrate or do DR. VMWare is fancy enough that it'll attach a local USB device to a remote VM, which is certainly a neat trick. I've found Xen's USB support to be reasonably good, and KVM's to be a little less stable.

There are also remote USB over IP products, which could theoretically support fault tolerance. That's left as an exercise for the reader.

1
1
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: A month.

That's easy. Either insert the dongle in to the VM via the USB emulation facility - which generally works fine, or alternatively use hardware passthrough to expose the entire USB controller/subset of the ports to the VM. That will work reliably.

Note that if a passthrough is performed of the built in USB ports, or a multifunction adapter, rather than a single function adapter, the results may not be as expected.

Say there are six ports, and a PCI(-e) device list shows 00:1a.0, 00:1a.1, 00:1a.2, 00:1f.0,00:1f.1, and 00:1f.2 it might be expected that passing 00:1a to the VM will provide three ports. It doesn't necessarily work that way - it'll probably be either one or five ports, as each controller handles USB1,2 and 3+ all bundled up in the same set of resources.

6
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Demos

So? You weren't unhappy with the game, and at the time you bought it were satisfied with the transaction. That's the luck of the draw.

7
1

The designer of the IBM ThinkPad has died

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

You mean thinkwiki.org?

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Currently have an X61 and various others, used to own a 701CS

The X61 is pretty decent and expandable, but the screen resolution is getting to me a little. The X220 can have a high resolution panel hacked into it using a controller board that combines the single link LVDS signal and one of the displayport lines..

The 701CS was lovely at the time - my first (personally purchased!) Thinkpad, but it wasn't as durable as some other Thinkpads, and the butterfly keyboard not as solid. Once the X series came along there wasn't much point. It ran OS/2 well, though.

It's also possible to make a credible portable retro gaming PC with a Thinkpad 600/760/765/770 and a SelectaDock - one or more full size ISA slots allow for a soundcard, and the Trident display chipset should be highly compatible with legacy (DOS) games.

1
0

Curiosity Rover eyes Mars' creeping dunes

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Bah!

odfo dear. There is a difference between legislating against something that might, in a blue moon, possibly affect a particularly unfortunate and stupid child, and something that is definitely extremely expensive, will certainly take money away from other spacecraft, and almost certainly won't allow the astronauts to return home.

I'd like more spacecraft on comets, planetary moons, solar exploration - it's gathered new and exciting science across many environments, rather than limiting it to Mars.

2
1
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Bah!

I'd rather we didn't, to be honest, unless there's a serious immediate benefit to doing so. It's very expensive to get there, it's basically going to be shots of a lot of rocks, and most importantly whoever is sent will die out there. Satellites and robots are increasingly cheaper and easier to land.

When there's a chance of the crew surviving, and not having decades knocked off their life expectancy it'll be a better idea.

5
13

2016 in mobile: Visit a components mall in China... 30 min later, you're a manufacturer

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Wearables come with inconvenience?

'But has no heart rate monitor, no maps / navigation, no support for email, messaging, no support for notifications from any app on your phone, no activity monitoring'

In the nicest possible way, I don't want that, because it makes you look like a complete anorak - and given that I'm not exactly fashionable and fettle a lot of geeky tech, that really is one large anorak. They're as nerdy as the game watch I had when I was ten, and I'm not ten any more.

The only way a smart watch will ever become successful is if it looks exactly like a proper fashion watch, constantly displays the time, has a multi week battery life, and performs a useful function that many people require. I'm not convinced such a function exists, given that a smart phone can be placed in your pocket.

Speaking personally, I might go for a high end running watch at some point, but those are never fashionable, as their design necessitates shock resistance, waterproofing, a backlight, and being strapped to a sweaty wrist. So, in that case I'm always going to have two watches.

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Wearables come with inconvenience?

Cash is less common these days, and you need a card to take the cash out.. I've no idea at the prevalence of cards vs cash in the US, in the UK there's still a lot of cash in use, but pop into mainland Europe (certainly Germany, the Scandinavian countries, and Iceland) and cards rule. Yes, you can pay in cash, but it's not the norm.

0
0

YouTube’s 10 years of hits: Global recognition at last for Rick Astley

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

PSY's latest is much better than Gangnam Style

Go and watch 'Daddy' - it's quite something, and horribly catchy.

0
0

Got a pricey gaming desktop from PC World for Xmas? Check the graphics specs

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: I know it's NYE and you all want to go home, but really..

HP are quite a large manufacturer, they'll have a consistent supplier for the PSUs made by a reputable OEM, to meet their requirements. More importantly it'll be tested under those configurations to have a low failure rate, as a high return rate will cost HP serious amounts of money.

What it won't have is much leeway beyond their list of supported configurations, as that costs HP money.

12 quid for a PSU from someone like Scan is not the same as the PSUs HP has specified, also because the buyers purchase a PSU with the expectation they might upgrade components in the future. Having a quick glance round, the lowest I'd spend is 26 quid on an Aerocool integrator (some of their PSUs are ok, and deliver the rated specification), and I'd rather buy at least a 500W EVGA (35 quid).

Course what I'm actually running at the moment is a high end ThermalTake unit, as my main system is stuffed to the gills with cards and hard drives.

2
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: I know it's NYE and you all want to go home, but really..

The extreme PSU calculator is supposed to cope for maximums, and add a bit of capacitor aging into the mix. Plus, if it's a decent PSU, it won't actually be 500W - it'll be able to cope with 500W continuous load, and spikes above that.

12
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

I know it's NYE and you all want to go home, but really..

First, as already mentioned the HP site says it's a 980 as an option for that product code, not a 980Ti. NVidia deliberately overstate requirements to deal with underspeced supplies.

Try checking out the Extreme power supply calculator http://outervision.com/power-supply-calculator

With the configuration given, it comes out at 491W - which is a little close to 500W, but still within boundaries. You'd hope it's a decent 500W supply, rather than something substandard.

With it configured as a 980 rather than a 980Ti (HP's listed configuration, so I'd be more inclined to believe them), it resolves to 407W/25A on the 12V rail. That's with the processor and GPU at 100% utilisation, so in reality it's unlikely to reach that limit very often.

8
0

I have you now! Star Wars stocking fillers from another age

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Rebelt Assault wasn't that bad at first

Yes, it's on rails, but the rails have a certain amount of leeway - particularly in the star destroyer assault where there's multiple goes if you miss on the initial pass.

The issue is that it's decent for a number of levels, then there's an almost impossible asteroid navigation scene.

In the list of Star Wars failures, there's much worse.

0
0

Software bug sets free thousands of US prisoners too early

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Fix it right

Not tautology - bodge, or work around an issue. The specific issue is 'fixed', the root cause isn't. Alternatively fix it in a way that does resolve the root issue, but makes such a mess of the system that the next time it needs to be enhanced, it's almost impossible.

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Idiocracy pretty much nailed it [to a cross?].

Not really, Idiocracy is pretty much a documentary created by a fearless time traveller who came back from the future to warn us what it could be like..

4
0

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Star Wars Special Editions

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

On the whole I don't mind the special editions - I thought I was a hardcore fan, but after taking all the effort to try the de-specialised editions, I found I did not actually care. The film stock cleanup in particular is outstanding.

If we take it as read that the more childish elements (the diplodocus like scene in Mos Eisley) shouldn't have been included, most of my objections are based on changing characters beyond what they should be (Han, Jabba). I thought the changes to Bespin were unrealistic for what Lando describes as a city 'too small' to attract mining guild attention, but on looking closer the city was just as large in the original - only lacking in exterior shots. I wonder on a similar vein, just how large Mos Eisley really should be..

Can't say I'm happy with replacing Jabba and Yoda puppeteering with CGI - wasn't needed in many cases. Likewise, when Vader dies his ghost should most definitely be David Prowse - Vader has to be at least thirty odd, not a teenager, when he dies.

The original death star and planet explosions were awful; I'm glad they were changed in the Special Edition. Biggs, however, should have been there from the start. It adds local context to the film, and it's not necessary to have his Tattoine leaving scene (not seen that, yet). Luke had already spoken about his desire to leave Tattooine, and that all his friends are doing so, so it isn't a shock to see him.

Oh yes, the polar monster in Empire should have been left as-is. It loses tension in the special edition.

Personally I hate the singing at the end of Jedi, but I suppose that's just my opinion that it's naff..

2
0

Press Backspace 28 times to own unlucky Grub-by Linux boxes

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Machine exploitable from console access shocker..

Can't say I'm too worried. Still using LILO though, as Salix is currently my distribution of choice.

2
0

Microsoft steps up Windows 10 nagging

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: FFS Microsoft (AKA F*** Microsoft)

No, it won't 'cover your needs' unless your needs fit exactly what Mint provides. Charles wants to run modern games. The best PC gaming platform is Windows, full stop, end of story. If you're happy running games that are over four years old, Linux may be a realistic option.

If you're using a copy of Windows 7, then you do need Windows software, and the native solutions (even with a translation layer like WINE) are not enough. Resorting to Windows software is continuing to support that platform, and not moving Linux further forward.

I find it quite amusing that people are down voting posts for stating facts. This can't be argued with : Linux does not support DirectX 11 in any sensible fashion. Not in Crossover/WINE, not in VirtualBox, and not in VMWare. Battlefield 3, a four year old DirectX 11 game, appears not to run.

Also, you're out of date. Virtualbox looks like it's limited to DirectX 9. VMWare is up to DirectX 10. If all your games are DirectX 9 based, you're potentially only running games earlier than 2006 - seriously?

It's great that Linux game support is an awful lot better than it used to be, but until native games, or games that work 100% in crossover/WINE on release are the norm, Windows is going to be the better platform.

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: FFS Microsoft

If you mostly compute and play the odd game, SteamOS might suffice. If gaming is a more primary activity it's not even in contention.

Yes, the selection of games is better than it was, but it's nowhere near as good as Windows. Windows will also let you play GOG.com/humble bundle games without a hassle - SteamOS will not (yes, both of those have a smaller Linux range of software, too, but by default SteamOS is not set up to download third party software)

3
4

VDI comes to the Raspberry Pi

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Woot

I shouldn't feed the troll, but, Google is where anyone with sense looks first - provided you actually understand and learn from the result. It is a waste of everyone's time to re-invent something that's already been done. It also doesn't help that a lot of documentation/help indexing is so poor that Google is often the best way to search it, rather then rely on the help system..

As to multi monitors, I've used them for years, recently ranging from one 12" 1024x768 TFT on a laptop (obviously when I actually started, you were lucky to get 640x480), to two monitors at work, and five at home (one was really only a serial console). It's perfectly possible to work with one monitor, but there's a definite improvement in productivity with two - especially for comparing/referencing documentation, and programming/debugging.

Beyond two monitors the improvement is substantially less - it's necessary to actually plan how to use the extra monitors, rather than throw windows onto one without thinking about it. Monitoring/multiple VMs can be useful, specific development tasks, or media playback are areas that can benefit.

3
0

Microsoft beats Apple's tablet sales, apologises for Surface 4 flaws

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Mission impossible...

No-one - if it was a tablet, but it's not. It's really a high speed slim touchscreen/pen laptop where the keyboard is detachable. Speedwise the 'low end' 6300U model appears to be (on a single core basis) only 13% slower than the reasonably high spec three year old i5 desktop here (if the four vs two cores comes into play, then the desktop wins handsomely, of course). It's using an SSD, too, so the old days of slow hard drives doesn't apply either.

The screen resolution is huge, and whilst 12" isn't a huge screen, it's no worse than most X series Thinkpads.

11
3

Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: opps - Nope, Risk = Impact X Likelihood

Sure, and it's horrible for the people involved, but everyone needs to realise that government only cares about people on a general basis. If the impact costs substantially less than coping with truly exceptional weather, or being cynical, the cost of losing all the voters in the area, they're probably not going to see it as a realistic use of money. If you're absolutely, cast iron sure that this is truly exceptional unlikely to be repeated weather, then it isn't sensible to spend on it. The question is : are the projections accurate.

This is not the same as prior floods when either the money was not spent on defenses and failed precisely because of that, or worse, one particular council refused flood defense improvements as the residents didn't like the proposed visual impact : end result, the counties with improvements were fine, and the one without flooded. muppets..

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: opps - Nope, Risk = Impact X Likelihood

Well, no. I'd rather not defend politicians because most of them are oxygen thieves, but the real reasons are politics, and the realisation estimates might be wrong.

It's the same reason the UK has such poor infrastructure for dealing with snow, weather serious enough to cause problems is infrequent enough that spending money to defend against it costs substantially more than dealing with it at the time.

The planning in the Lake District was just fine - the flood defenses were improved, and they did not fail - they were overwhelmed in a few areas with exceptional weather. Again it comes down to the fact that improving defenses against an event that is that unlikely costs more than dealing with it at the time. The small number of years between the last flood is politically embarrassing but does not invalidate that point.

What will worry people is the possibility the estimates are wrong. The flood defenses were improved somewhat beyond the high watermark point at the last flood, and they did not break as far as I'm aware. If the estimates are right, people will grumble, get on with their lives, and it was correct not to spend substantially more on flood defenses. If this is a climate change issue affecting probabilities, the country is in trouble.

3
0

Mozilla backs away from mobile OS as Android looks invincible

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: OSdev is easy...

Note that Blackberry OS 10 *does* run Android apps (ok, 4.3 runtime, linked to Amazon app store by default, any apps using Google App Services needs hacking), and it's not setting the world on fire. Granted the phones aren't quite as cheap as the cheapo Android ones, and that's clearly why Microsoft are trying hard to target the low end as well as the high end.

0
0

Facebook wants a kinder, gentler end for SHA-1

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Yes and No

I specifically didn't say 'Nexus device' because the Galaxy Nexus and older appears not to have been patched for Stagefright. Course, at least it's rootable.

2
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Yes and No

Even with free operating systems, Apple can be sub par depending on which model is bought, although free upgrades is a recent development.

PC wise Vista SP1 (actually usable) was released February 2008, and is supported till 2017, so worst case is nine years of support. An older XP box would receive around 6.5-7 years of support (2007 to April 2014). If you're pedantic and insist Vista was usable out of the door (hoho), that's eleven years.

Looking at 2007 Macs, the August iMacs are still supported. However, anything else that year is stuck on Lion, so that's seven years of support (last patch date, about September 2014) and then the system is junk. Practically any Vista capable PC is capable of running later versions of Windows (yes, chargeable, but cheaper than a new computer).

Absolutely no argument with Android, the situation is disgraceful. If you buy an Android phone that isn't rootable, you are a fool, or should prepare to throw it away in 18 months. If you're lucky, the limit is four years, judging from the Google and Samsung stagefright patches.

3
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Muppets? You mean sensible companies. XP is completely unsupported for anything other than embedded users, and soon that will cease too.

XP was released in 2001 and people are complaining about support! The line has to be drawn somewhere. Whinge about Apple, instead, where the hardware is substantially more expensive than a PC, and the operating systems only supported for a few years.

5
2

Mozilla confirms its Firefox OS phones are dead

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: We don't need no steenking reading comprehension!

It's dead as a dead thing if it can't do catchup TV. OK, Youtube is usable in a browser, but it's a bit lacking otherwise for a smart TV.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Mad.

No, you've got it all wrong, see!

You'll never make lots of money from a mail client, but you might make squilllions from mobile because Nokia, Apple, and Google managed it!

Forget that nowadays a phone that just phones and browses is as dead as Netware. Forget that what people actually care about is how to stay in touch with their friends, which means partly text but mostly Facebook, Twitter, Whatsapp, Kik, Snapchat, Instagram, Viber and others. That really good maps is now not on users' 'optional' list.

Forget that the large social media players/communicators are so protective of their APIs that it's becoming anti competitive, and the only effective way to access their services is to pay them, and bend to their rules or try and make your own app, and note it will break every fortnight as you play a game of cat and mouse.

It's absolutely fine to take your eye off the ball and waste resources on an OS, when your core browser eats memory and hangs even worse than Chrome when one tab misbehaves.

2
0

ASCII @dventure game NetHack gets first upgrade in ten years

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Somewhat amused/bemused

Try it and see if it works; the source was originally designed to work under anything from '95 upwards. Course, they may be targeting a development platform that no longer supports '9x because it's so old.

The text support in NT is much better than 9x, so it's better to use that.

Alternatively, it may be better to use one of the DOS extenders that supports Win32 APIs including the console, than bother using 9x..

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Izchak

'You have died. Corrupted by chaos'. Nice game, but tricky to get started in due to the difficulty and bugs.

Is it ok these days? The last time I played it, it was on OS/2..

1
0

Page:

Forums