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* Posts by BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

47 posts • joined 11 May 2012

Ofcom will not probe lesbian lizard snog in new Dr Who series

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: Priorities

Practically none. If you kiss your pet the same way you kiss a human you fancy then I worry about a) your pet or b) your unsatisfied partner

Personally I thought they're one of the best things to happen in Who in ages. At least they're comprehensively getting rid of screaming girlies, so common in classic Who

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LibreSSL crypto library leaps from OpenBSD to Linux, OS X, more

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: Pity they dropped Windows support

Windows support is coming - they're currently working on it

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AMD tops processor evolution with new mobile Kaveri chippery

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Yawn, again

I'm sure it might be ok at the low end, and honestly like AMD's concept of a combined CPU/APU to speed up tasks - if implemented correctly it could indeed by fast.

Problem is, where is the code? There's at least one bit of custom code that speeds up part of one application but that's about it. To deliver on AMD's promises there needs to be pervasive, tangible speedups baked into operating systems rather than being vaguely comparable with Intel.

There's nothing available for Windows or Linux as far as I can see. AMD does well at cryptography and gaming but lags at almost everything else.

That's not necessarily a bad thing, if this is a reasonably performing low end chipset. Unfortunately AMD is trying to position this as a new architecture. Until they deliver on HSA code it's just marketing fluff.

Typical AMD : it's a good idea on paper, but execution is lacking.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: It seems to me...

Show me the benchmarks demonstrating the FX processors destroying Intel's chips.

Believe me, I'd quite like to run an FX processor, especially as it supports ECC RAM. I've looked at a lot of benchmarks and AMD almost always loses. It doesn't really have 8 decent cores and is embarrassingly slower at compilation compared to the i7 whilst running hotter.

That's not to mention that the support chipsets are substandard too. Very few motherboards support PCI-e 3.0 now and as far as I can make out, all the exciting virtualization progress is being made by Intel (don't argue 'PCI-e 3.0 isn't needed', systems should last for years and future proofing is important as is bandwidth on <= 4x physical cards)

AMD hasn't been competitive for years, except at the low end, where their built in GPU is much better than the Intel offering.

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OpenBSD founder wants to bin buggy OpenSSL library, launches fork

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: Madness is doing the same thing and expecting a different outcome

The advantage of C is portability. C++ compiler quality is *still* variable on different platforms and there's the name decoration issue. Yes, it's possible to work around it, but C is a tad simpler.

Additionally pretty much all existing operating systems are written in C (although there are exceptions such as L4, and certain components written in C++. Windows is written in C, but some parts are realistically only usable from C++ or .NET).

For most libraries and non low level operating system code I would use C++, but in the specific case of libraries such as OpenSSL that may be running on embedded systems with fairly severe resource restrictions this may not be realistic.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Not a good idea. I don't know Bronek's coding skills, but hacking cryptography should be left to the very small number of people that are good at both coding and cryptography.

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Running OpenSSL? Patch now to fix CRITICAL bug

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Change freeze hit in February. Note there's already an ICMP errata from March. Media are covenient but in reality you'll need to update via. STABLE build . You should be checking the errata page often

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Wii got it WRONG: How do you solve a problem like Nintendo?

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Don't know what you're talking about, Nintendo have a great current gen console

It's visually impressive, fast enough, innovative, uses social features well and has a great back catalogue.

What, Wii U? Hell no, I'm talking about the 3DS XL! Fantastic handheld and the 3D is used well on many occasions. Also loving indie games in the marketplace.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

You can with a link cable, yes. It is most excellent in Pacman Vs. Also there's Zelda : Four Swords where you can team up with three other GBA players!

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Apple Mac Pro: It's a death star, not a nappy bin, OK?

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

ingenious, but also rather lacking a point

I can't help but agree with others and think the machine would look an awful lot better with a transparent cover and a couple of lights (despite the fact I don't generally go for lighting and my dad snarkily asked 'why do computers need lights? Are they scared of the dark?')

I can understand the wisdom of an external breakout box but think it should be an AND, not an OR. I have a Power Mac G4; it's still substantially smaller than my main workstation capable of holding EATX motherboards and a load of storage. This is the top level product and shiny design should take a backseat to sheer all out power and storage.

Perhaps few people will want to have more than 12 cores, but it's nice to have the option and more cores necessarily means lower clock speeds to fit in Intel's 150W thermal envelope (they appear to be pushing things a bit with Ivy Bridge EX)

Previous Mac Pros were extremely expandable, fast, had the option to fit as yet unreleased processors (won't happen in this case) and were still maintainable and quite pretty.

Hell, if they insist on going to the smaller form factor why not go for 'borg cube'. Looks good on the desk, also arrange it so it fits in say 5U with the ability to mount more than one horizontally. It'd solve the absence of the XServe too.

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You’re NOT fired: The story of Amstrad’s amazing CPC 464

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

You're being sniffy over semantics. The database capability in Mallard BASIC was excellent and it was a particularly decent language to code in (I used the PCW version which was somewhat inferior at screen handling and any graphics required assembly(*), but allowed for much larger programs by loading code in and out of memory via the RAM drive)

Also, I rather suspect you're replying to Roland Perry.

. He knows a lot about this.

(*) I'm not counting GSX

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For Windows guest - KVM or XEN and which distro for host?

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

It does work, incidentally!

Just beware you'll have issues. On Windows Catalyst must be installed manually by selecting the driver, then installing the CCC MSI. Running the install always results in a blue screen.

It is fast enough to run games. You'll have to fiddle to get the best disk performance - use the virtio drivers. If anyone is trying to run older OS, be aware that KVM/Qemu creates a VM which is quite similar to a Q35 chipset, but with differences. With ancient OS you may need to use the Qemu 'pc' architecture (440LX). It may also be necessary to use a CPU type of qemu64 or qemu32 in some cases rather than 'host' or enabling KVM

Remember that the VFIO or pcistub driver is separate from KVM. Passthrough works without it. KVM only provides acceleration, which is usually (but not always) faster.

The virtual PC that KVM, Qemu and Xen create is similar to a real PC but it is not the same. OS/2, for instance, does Weird Shit(TM) on install (to be precise, non mainstream OS may tickle VMs in a way that's entirely valid on real hardware but freaks out the VM).

If I was doing this professionally, I'd use Xen and stick to a released version ideally without VGA passthrough. Xenserver is now free and a nice piece of kit.

What I really should have done is to buy a dual Xeon system, with a quadro and run Xen. What can I say, I'm waiting for Haswell-E before upgrading and spending lots of money. In the meantime I'm running an unusual Core2Quad system with a 6950 (pre Nehalem VTd works, but has no interrupt remapping).

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

KVM is your best option, if you insist on your requirements

Whilst I'd suggest Linux on Windows is your best option overall, if you insist on your requirements KVM is the best option.

Xen is a great piece of software, but in the region of VGA passthrough it is decidedly inferior to KVM. Yl not get any support if it does not work.

Xen supports only Quadro devices for reliable passthrough. KVM supports AMD and Intel, but you will need a very recent Linux kernel (3.12+) and patches, plus a recent, patched Qemu. Google 'vfio VGA reset'

Be very careful with your hardware choices and read around the subject first. Also, read the motherboard manual cover to cover before purchase. My motherboard, for instance, supports graphics cards at 4x PCIe speed in only one slot - all others are limited to 1x by the chipset.

Also be careful of USB passthrough. In Linux/Windows it mostly works. In BSD it does not - you have to do a VTd passthrough rather than a single device passthrough in Qemu. You cannot usually pass through a single port due to iommu groups. USB works through allocating a pool of resources to a certain number of ports. Again, on my motherboard I have five USB ports. These can be passed through in two iommu groups - so 2/3 or similar? Wrong! 1/4, or 4/1!

I'm doing this because I'm enjoying fiddling with low level Linux, virtualisation and I'm stubborn. It's still leading edge stuff and you can expect to encounter pain. Be very familiar with iommu groups, PCIe bridges, FLR, VT-d and if your cards support various types of reset before you buy any hardware.

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HARD ONES: Three new PC games that are BLOODY DIFFICULT

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: Nethack

Nethack is only difficult when you don't have the experience, although it takes a lot of dying and/or reading the handbook to gain the experience. Slash 'EM or ADOM are more tricky. If you fancy a giggle, though, I recommend DoomRL - it's fun and reasonably complex without needing to memorise a lot..

I'd suggest Dwarf Fortress. Can be terribly tricky and there's a whole O'Reilly book about it.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

It's not the 80s, and things have moved on.

Think back to the 80s - Jet Set Willy 1 and 2. Bright, addictive, varied and punishingly difficult to complete. Once you died it was yet another 10-20 seconds to return to the first room and then a number of minutes to reach your last progress point and die. Again.

It didn't make it any more interesting that few people were able/bothered enough to complete it.

Now examine the modern equivalent, VVVVVV. Bright, addictive, varied and punishingly difficult to complete. Once you died you were placed straight back into the action. Your progress was not lost and this made it all the more interesting.

Once complete, it was interesting to complete again and unlocked further challenges.

Some of do actually play modern FPSes for the story, scenary and a bit of excitement which is why I'm a fan of Jedi Knight, Half Life etc and couldn't care much less about Quake 3 and all subsequent deathmatch variants.The fact a lot of saves are used and levels finished on single health points is not the issue. If the game was properly designed 'save scumming' would make little difference - poor tactics and repeated saves can get you through marginal battles. Make the battles *require* skill or tactics and the use of a savegame stops being an issue.

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AMD's 'Revolution' will be televised ... if its CPU-GPU frankenchip Kaveri is a hit

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: Dull and slow

For basic productivity : probably not. For browsing, quite possibly. For recent games, definitely (moot point, don't play much bang up to date).

For virtualisation and compiling, yes. I've looked at the benchmarks. AMD's performance vs Intel is embarassing in single threaded performance and it doesn't fare well in compilation benchmarks. The difference is most pronounced under Windows but there's still a noteable gap under Linux.

I'd quite like to buy an AMD system, but the facts don't support what I want to be the case. There's some blather on Gentoo forums about the improvement with the latest GCC etc ,but until I see verification I'm putting this down as someone wanting to brag about their system.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Dull and slow

It's still way slower than a 4770K unless you're using built in graphics and playing games. There's no AMD provided software to show the potential of this supposedly new architecture. Frankly it looks like another acknowledgement of the fact they can't match Intel in CPU power, even when they overclock their chips and peg them at 220W TDP.

I would like to give AMD a try, really, but unless the pricing is keen and the intention is a lower end gaming desktop I can't see the point. If you move to something like an FX8350, currently the only advantage is that it can support ECC somewhat cheaper than an Intel platform.

With an offering like this, Intel has no incentive to increase core counts or decrease prices for their chips, especially the consumer level ones.

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Anatomy of a 22-year-old X Window bug: Get root with newly uncovered flaw

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: Well on of my distributions had the fix in yesterday

That's not the same bug. The latest bug was patched 2.5 days ago - check the diff history for bdfread.c

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You're fired: Lord Sugar offloads faded PC builder Viglen to XMA

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: So that makes three computer businesses flushed...

Nonsense - he actually did rather well. The quality of his av kit may have been a bit variable but let the owners copy tapes cheaply, which is what they really wanted it for.

PC wise the 1512/1640 were a revelation at the time - working and undercutting everyone else. The PPC series had a horrid screen but again worked and was very cheap for the time. Amstrad's in house developed CPC, PCW series were lovely pieces of kit, as was the somewhat niche NC100.

I don't think many would deny he improved the Sinclair line somewhat, and had enough sense to dump the QL.

After the 80s Amstrad did somewhat go into decline, but during the 80s it really succeeded.

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No sign of Half-Life 3 but how about FOURTEEN Steam Machine makers?

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: @adniam

SteamOS works on 'regular Linux' provided that's only very recent Ubuntu. With anything else (Debian, for instance)l it's an arse to get running as it uses very recent versions of libc and other libraries.

SteamOS is not a regular OS. It's designed to be linked up to the TV and not tinkered with. Given the amount of fettling I do on my main system that does have its attractions.

Having said that, the Linux catalogue is still too limited; even Valve's software is largely incomplete. One of the reasons I sorted a system that runs KVM/Xen with hardware passthrough to a graphics adapter was partly for fun and development and also because I could run Windows' Steam..

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'Weird' OBJECT, PROPELLED by its OWN JETS, spotted beyond Mars orbit by Hubble

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Noooo! It's a Vorticon invasion!

Fools - Yorp is not a group of people, it's a small green single eyed Martian alien! Mostly harmless, but there are aggressive examples. Beware of other species such as the technically advanced and warmongering Vorticons!

Ring the US and get Billy Blaze on the line, we need Commander Keen to save us all!

(I think the Yorps disappeared after the first couple of releases of Commander Keen - perhaps they're stranded on that asteroid)

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Microsoft warns of post-April zero day hack bonanza on Windows XP

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

OEM has always been about the motherboard

what XP will activate on or the Microsoft phone registration staff will give you a code for is irrelevant. OEM Windows is tied to the motherboard. If the motherboard dies it must be replaced by a comparable motherboard (same one or generation, not an upgrade).

the only differences between OEM and retail are the motherboard lock, lack of telephone support and the inability to resell the license (although selling the motherboard/PC with the license is ok). It's all in the license terms, it's just that most people choose to ignore them..

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PlayStation 4 is FreeBSD inside

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: *looks at Eadon and laughs*

yep, hotplug does work on *BSD although in some cases it's not out of the box.

BSD tends to be a lot more predictable and better documented than Linux, and the install programs are pretty solid (I've had a lot of grief with Linux distros trying to be too clever then failing badly when installing on something vaguely unusual)

driver support in Linux is better especially for brand new graphics cards. application support depends on the BSD variety - NetBSD is very portable but IIRC you're restricted to older versions of Skype and Firefox rather than Chromium. OpenBSD focuses on openness and security, so you won't be seeing ZFS any time soon.

For a Linux user FreeBSD is probably more familiar and friendlier than the other BSDs - you might find NetBSD shockingly bare bones. On the other hand if you look closer OpenBSD is remarkably coherent and well thought through.

for all occasional hassle I've had with *BSD there are equivalent issues with Debian, Arch, Ubuntu etc especially when you want to tell them to stop being 'clever' and do exactly what you want (insisting on the use of the network notification stuff, for instance, rather than 'here is my nic, here is my bridge, do not mess with them - that's the user's job')

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Review: Renault Zoe electric car

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: Range issue

More than you think, and for the hard of thinking : the recharge time is too long. 200 miles in one go is much rarer than a few 70 mile trips.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: 75 miles? hahahahahahahaha

We're clearly not going to agree, but I will concede that most journeys are under 75 miles - most of the ones I'm thinking of are.

The problem is the recharge time. If I take a typical Saturday's activities :

Route 1 - 13 miles each way. Travel time half an hour (car), 1:11 (bus).+25 minutes extra wasted waiting time

Route 2 - 23 miles each way. Travel time half an hour (car), 1:30 (average - train, walk, bus). Have to leave half an hour earlier than in car.

Total=72 miles. Total time wasted if public transport used : 3 hours, 45 minutes + leaving half an hour early.

Heaven forfend I actually fancy nipping to the shops as well! Alternatively, how about going to my parents (65 miles). You can get there, but not back...

No, I don't have time to waste half an hour recharging at a charging station, and the places I'm travelling to definitely don't have recharge facilities. I am not willing to concede that my expectations are in any way unrealistic - they can be easily met by the most basic non electric car available.

Five fat blokes in a VW Up with a sofa is not a common occurrence for most people. Four fat blokes without the sofa might be - if the VW Up couldn't fit four moderately sized people (perhaps with a degree of discomfort in the back) I'd criticise that too..

There are plenty of small city cars that are a little underpowered for the motorway - but they can manage it if necessary.

A 200 mile range would be reasonable - all the local journeys would be covered, plus occasional day trips into the countryside. Holidays would be viable with overnight charging, too.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: 75 miles? hahahahahahahaha

Unfortunately not. Most of my commuting or travel is by public transport. The car (diesel, 50+ mpg) is used when public transport would take 2-3 times as long and usually also when I'm carrying plenty of equipment. Public transport is usually only decent in a hub and spoke arrangement and woe betide you when wishing to travel between spokes.

If I did two regular weekend trips via public transport it'd waste over four hours of one day. That's why cars are great, and also why this is a toy, not a car.

The Tesla is not an option until someone on the average salary can buy one.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

75 miles? hahahahahahahaha

75 miles is not by any stretch of the matter even remotely practical. That's a toy, not a car. City dwellers need to visit people outside cities too.

I can easily go 100 miles without thinking about it, and that's just fairly local (10-25 miles away) locations. Two trips in a day and the car is unusable.

Wake me up when the range is at least 200 miles. Preferably 300. It might then be viable assuming an overnight charge.

Also, more than 800 quid a year in battery rental? Surely they jest..

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The Lynx effect: The story of Camputers' mighty micro

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

inevitable really

The success of the PCW disproves the assertion a 3.58MHz Z80A is too slow for a CP/M machine. True, the PCW had a lot more RAM and some custom display hardware designed to show text and scroll the screen vertically very rapidly but it did rather well. I'd also agree with the software choice - get Wordstar ported!

With a weak BASIC, slow graphics hardware and a stupid choice in bank switching it's hardly a stellar choice.

(side note : the PCW can bank switch in 16kb chunks in a maximum address space of 2MB(!), including having different banks for reading and writing at the same location.)

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Foundering OCZ snatches megabuck lifeline in white-knuckled grip

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Thumb Down

Doomed

The Vector is overall not a lot better than the Samsung 840 Pro - better in a couple of areas, worse in others. It's more expensive and backed by a company that might fail.

There's a load of cheap refurbished OCZ drives out there, but that hardly inspires cinfidence either. Refurbished graphics cards (at worst) cause a BSOD on failure. A failed SSD loses all your data

Seriously, why would you buy OCZ? If you weren't price sensitive you'd buy the Intel DC S3700.

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Love in the time of the internet: A personal memoir

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Online dating is way better than offline

The selection of people is greater and crucially the ability to filter. I've had relationships develop in real life but it's a slow, unreliable process. This is especially the case if you have non negotiable requirements such as 'doesn't want kids'.

it's all very well saying shared interest groups are a better idea - and generally I agree - but the logical conclusion is joining a group or going to a club you don't actually want to just to find a date. If you're a man that fancies women, go join a dance class. the question is : do you actually want to join a dance class?

Even if you find an activity with plenty of women they have to be available, in a sensible age range and you need to fancy each other. Friendships are good though.

dating site's Achilles heel is relationship fixation; not that I'm great at them but I don't consider 'we will have a relationship' as a healthy starting point - better to establish mutual interest/attraction and have it develop.

I've had good results through OKCupid and some through plentyoffish (that's a crapshoot - so many awful profiles). I would agree with a friend that said 'generally the women on okc have coloured hair, whilst the ones on pof have orange skin'. fortunately there are exceptions.

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Linux kernel dumps 386 chip support

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Gone from Xen now too

Perhaps a co-incidence but i386 support has just been dropped from Xen -current source today!

Not sure I'd be masochistic enough to run Xen on that low a configuration, though..

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

it was still supported?!

Even NetBSD dropped 386 support over a year ago. I'm amazed Linux hasn't done it sooner.

Also, IIRC the 286 was a bit faster than the 386, at least in DOS. 16MB protected mode memory did start restricting it though.

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Register readers mostly too ashamed to cop to hideous hoard horrors

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: Must not throw old computer kit away...

I do have one here - Chinon FZ-506 Rev A.. Will have to see if it still works. Realistically I'll never use it again - I have lots of 3.5" disks but practically no 5.25". I also have one of these lovely pieces of kit : http://www.lotharek.pl/product.php?pid=42 - never have a floppy fail again..

I suppose I should think of junking the 486DX2-66 with 20MB RAM too. It made a decent uTorrent box with NT4 and large IDE drivers, but the check time when transfers went wrong were excruciatingly long..

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

I can give up any time I want..

Actually things aren't too bad. I'm considering chucking the 5.25 inch drives and stopped buying anything that's old, slow, noisy and power hungry. I was tempted by some Sun Blade systems, but unless you buy a PGX card their graphics card isn't supported by anything useful including later versions of Solaris! The old sparcstation is up in the loft and the O2 boxes might join them if I can't find a way to quiten them down..

emulation is also great, and stops me buying original kit when the performance is good enough

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

clean house, boring life more like

after spending most of the day in corporate IT, I've got better things to do than spend all my time tidying

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Six of the best Nintendo Wii U games

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

a bit of a nitpick..

Mario chase is 'all but impossible' to replicate except on the Wii U? Perhaps, unless you count Pac-Man vs, released in 2003 for the Nintendo GameCube together with a Gameboy Advance and a GBA link cable..

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Assault on battery

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

buy extra batteries

I have little sympathy with anyone who insists on letting manufacturers continue with their silly sealed battery compartment devices unless the battery life is particularly long (a kindle). Buy a phone that has swappable batteries.

The big issue with wireless keyboards/mice though is either interference, or the battery reporting level. A phone will tell you how much battery is left, but some. of Logitech's earlier kit warned you only when it was about to die.

Apart from some fairly specialist cases (media PC, and that's better with a remote control) I don't see the point of wireless. Tried it, went back to wired, don't really miss it.

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Ten... PC games you may have missed

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

check out the gog.com sale, especially the Blackwell adventures

Check out the gog.com sale on till tomorrow - 5 games for $10. I'd suggest the Blackwell Bundle (excellent indie adventure games), machinarium, botanicula, trine and possibly Gemini rue.

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O2, GiffGaff network goes titsup for unlucky punters

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: Not surprised

I rather suspect there's more than a few people here who know what V.32bis is and at one point thought 14Kbps was fast..

Depends on the webpage. *some* pages are still usable at that speed, but with all the javascript, graphics and huge stylesheets it's very difficult to efficiently browse the modern web with anything under 256Kbp/s and about 800Mhz of processor.

I'd note that until very recently (I'm looking at places like you, National Rail) sites still used WAP, or WAP levels of bandwidth. It wasn't necessary to use any more bandwidth for looking up timetables, but oh no, they had to stick in graphics and suchlike and ruin the experience for old, slow phones. I bet traintimes.org.uk is still usable at 14Kbps.

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Facebook's ONLY failure: Expectations management

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: bigger problems

I rather suspect what cap'n actually means is not that facebook will disappear (it won't), but that it isn't sustainable at its current level.

Myspace was incredibly popular. It still exists and has apparently grown a little again post sale and re-branding, but it had to fall a very long way before that happened..

Ditto friendsreunited. Still alive, but look at the losses.

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MoneySavingExpert.com founder flogs website for £87m

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

MSE is useful, but..

money is not everything, and places like moneysupermarket have large flaws. It reminds me a little of Computer Shopper (never mind the quality, feel the width).

The overriding factor is always stated to be price, regardless of customer service. It's all well and good to be blasé about customer service if for example you're looking for a savings account, don't need to withdraw in a hurry and it's protected if something goes wrong, but if it's insurance or similar call me overly cautious but I'd rather spend somewhat more and obtain a policy that's likely to (eventually) pay out.

I also don't trust various comparison sites after selecting the 'do not contact me, just quote me' button and getting called regardless. In the end the only real solution was to read the policies, ring up individual companies, check reviews and make a decision - comparison websites were not particularly useful.

Saving is worthwhile, but only when it wouldn't be more effective to make money.

Don't get me wrong - it's a good site, but only within certain limits.

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Techies beg world to join the 1% on IPv6 launch day

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: all well and good

Uh-huh.. and A&A will charge through the nose for it, too.

It's 'only' about 20 quid more expensive than my already expensive top of the line Be Internet connection to get less service. Even if you compare another pricey business only broadband provider such as Zen for high data volumes, they're vastly cheaper than A&A.

10GB/month during business hours by default? Don't make me laugh - throw a few databases around or a couple of operating system images and I can get through 3x that in a day for work purposes. Not every day, granted, but enough to make 10GB laughable. Home usage is a lot more reasonable, I don't torrent and all my traffic is legal - but nevertheless I don't fancy limiting myself if I fancy a heavy month of large Unix distributions, lots of Steam and Lovefilm and suchlike.

Things are moving slowly in the UK, but the only reason A&A have improved recently has been due to cheap(er) routers. They've had an IPV6 network for years.

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Ten... Star Wars videogame classics

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Definitely needs some Dark Forces 2 : Jedi Knight loving..

It's so good a game I've played it numerous times and installed the high resolution models and texture pack.

At the time Dark Forces was a great game and was one of the last Lucasarts games to feature iMuse (the musical score that adapted to the game action) but Jedi Knight's game design was awesome. It also had a light sabre which emitted light - Jedi Knight Outcast looked an awful lot better, but the engine couldn't support held light sources, and the level design wasn't as good (have never finished it, mind, I fail every time Luke Skywalker shows up).

KOTOR is also fantastic and should definitely have been included.

I'm not sure if it merits inclusion, but the Gamecube had a few decent Star Wars games. They're a bit hard though.

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Graphics shocker: Nvidia virtualizes Kepler GPUs

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: Corruption ?

You've got it the wrong way round - the issue would be with crap firmware in the GPU, not with the VM. The hardware access in this case will almost certainly be managed by Directed I/O (VT-d/IOMMU - managed hardware access by the memory controller) and SR-IOV (splitting a device into multiple virtual functions).

I don't know quite how much of a free for all a modern GPUs have on main system memory, though. The memory controller hub should keep the VMs safe from one another, but if the device firmware is broken and the GPU has a mapping to more memory than it should, then I suppose there could be a hole..

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Ten... freeware gems for new PCs

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

Re: Being pedantic here .....

You are blinded by your own philosophy and equating slavery to software licensing carries more than a whiff of Godwin, but I'll spell it out :

Yes, if software is issued under a completely free license it's entirely probable at some point it will be taken, monetized and enhanced without returning anything to the original authors. The GPL/LGPL is one way of enforcing an evolving software ecosystem, but not the only way.

A third party taking code and not releasing enhancements is not depriving the original author of 'freedom' - it is merely refusing to sign up to the same viewpoint on how software should be distributed.

Neither is a third party taking code, putting a fancy skin on it and selling it in closed source form to users depriving them of as much freedom as the GPL would assert. After all, the original free source is still there. The users are equally able to search that out. If the enhancements the third party make are trivial then it should be equally trivial for the authors of the majority of the source code base to create an open source alternative, whilst if the enhancements are major then frankly I don't think there's a real case to answer.

Enforcing how code has to be used is pushing a particular viewpoint on others. This is not freedom.

Now, it's entirely possible that by using other licences such as BSD, Apache etc, the growth of a software ecosystem is not as fast as GPL/LGPL proponents would prefer, but history proves that growth still does occur.

History also proves that the GPL/LGPL is an effective philosophy for creating a large base of software, but don't dress it up as freedom when it's merely pushing a particular viewpoint.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: Being pedantic here .....

If you want to play the pedantic game, you're wrong : 7-zip etc are freeware, and may also be Free software. They're not, though. 7Zip is LGPL. Freedom does not restrict what you are permitted to do, whilst the GPL and LGPL apply various conditions to their usage.

The principles you list are great, but the GPL/LGPL and various other licences don't satisfy all of the above principles - everything beyond the first paragraph isn't precisely true. Source code helps an awful lot, but is not what enables 1) and 3). Suggesting the use of the GPL over closed source merely exchanges one set of (commercial) interests for other forms of self interest.

That may align with your own personal philosophy, but it's still not freedom.

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Colour Kindle incoming says mole

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

PDFs..

The Kindle is fantastic, but limited for viewing PDFs. The greyscale rendering is suboptimal on many PDFs and below the quality of print for books like The Book Thief

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