* Posts by Adam 1

1245 posts • joined 7 May 2012

Spare ship found to fix broken submarine cable slowing Oz internet

Adam 1
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Re: Ship visit

OK, first we have a ship going from Taiwan to Guam via Cairns, and now I find out that Wagga is in Cairns too....

My geography is seriously confused.

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Adam 1
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Now I don't have a map in front of me, but wouldn't the ship need to sail past Guam to reach Cairns?

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ADpocalypse NOW: Three raises the stakes

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Re: When I was a kid

She called her cat Koenigsegg?

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Adam 1
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Re: Hahahahahahaha

> then the site becomes solely responsible for it. If they start including malware in their content then they're going to have to face the legal consequences

Firstly, I fully appreciate what you are getting at here. Every single occasion that I have seen pwned advertising infect users via web ads, it has always been the fault of some nameless intermediary. Not the site. Not even the ad network. Yet the viewer is the one left carrying the can. Site's are happy to take the (tiny) revenue but not the responsibility. And I am talking literally every occasion from big name sites even security researchers.

The question is whether pushing it to the publisher themselves will fix this. I have my doubts. We have literally just seen a reasonably known OS vendor just ask everyone to reinstall the whole OS because their website got pwned and hosted a backdoored version. Oh yeah, someone else's fault (WP). Nice, but who is carrying the can.... Again.....

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Under-fire Apple backs down, crafts new iOS to kill security safeguard

Adam 1
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Re: i call CLICKBAIT

Oh come on. That was a by-line of the week.

/slow golf clap

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Shopping for PCs? This is what you'll be offered in 2016

Adam 1
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Re: "Nobody needs to load software from disc any more"

> I am living, travelling and working on my motorhome with my own network on board

It's possible that you may not be the target market of large OEMs line Dell or Lenovo. Dropping the DVD drive let's them bring the per unit costs down by £20. Less to screw in, less SATA cables, less power cables as well. They can then either drop the price or bump the CPU or RAM or a slightly larger monitor over their competition.

Then again, perhaps the strategy of chasing the motorhoming system administrator market may go someway in explainiy HP's profit figures?

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Adam 1
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Re: "Nobody needs to load software from disc any more"

I suspect the office will just have a USB DVD burner on the BOFH desk.

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How to build a plane that never needs to land

Adam 1
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Re: 2000 hour inspection cycle

My understanding about much of the fatigue was that it related to the expansion and contraction of the materials as the relative air pressures change (inside vs outside). Planes that do a lot of short hops have more stresses than one doing long distance for the same km.

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When asked 'What's a .CNT file?' there's a polite way to answer

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Re: Everyone's a User

And in other contexts too. I am sure that some of the questions that I have posed to health care professionals over the years could equally turn up on some narky comment on "theregistrar.co.uk".

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Adam 1
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> A story everyones heard a million times

Including in last week's column. Like the actual article, not just a comment either.

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Sick and tired of modern Windows? Upgrade to Windows 3.1 today – in your web browser

Adam 1
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Re: Nostalgic olde Fart

486 would run the original prince of Persia without blinking. I do remember having the boot disk on the 386DX to play either Doom or Simcity 2000.

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Hollywood gives up speculative invoicing attempt in Australia

Adam 1
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Re: Expect the decision to be overturned.

Expect the decision to be not overturned. It is the correct application* under Australian law**. It is not considered a criminal offence*** under Australian law and so damages payments should not be punitive. The pirate will be liable for the purchase price plus reasonable administration costs, so they don't "get away with it" as such. Those administration costs could reasonably be several 10s of dollars which makes it a rather expensive way of acquiring films but isn't going to push people into financial ruin either.

DBC didn't play ball here (in spite of the obvious benefit of recouping lost income) because they really just want to find some chickens to kill to frighten the monkeys.

*IANAL etc

**but agree if you are referring to some way that the TPP will roger our laws.

***at personal use levels. Becomes criminal if you do it for commercial gain.

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Australian astroboffins reveal hundreds of hidden galaxies

Adam 1
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All of which are attracted to my pancreas*

*with a force proportional to the product of our masses and inversely proportional to the distance between us.

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Scary RAM-gobbling bug in SQL Server 2014 exposed by Visual Studio online outage

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Actually knowing your vendor will be upfront and wear their mea culpa in public rather than behind legalese (cough vtech) means that it is a culture of learning from your mistakes rather than shoving it under the blanket or finding some rogue engineers to blame (cough VW).

Now here is where I should feel smug for internally housing our SVN but I suspect that any outage we may suffer will be quickly blamed on some SAN or switch or someone else.

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Adam 1
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Re: Simple temporay fix

Simple problem is that customer A doesn't want their queries slowed because of a problem they don't face with their usage pattern. You don't need to be very imaginative to consider a big data analytics required by a small team of researchers for whom allocation of 10s of GB per user is an average day and no problem. They would be hit for 6 with such a change.

It isn't just the slowdown either. SQL server uses locking concurrency control* (usually). Even very small decreases in performance can exponentially increase problems with deadlocks.

* as opposed to MVCC / MGA etc

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Adam 1
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Maybe. The important bit is that the cardinality estimator thinks there is a lot and so (tries to) allocate it.

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Adam 1
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So your first suggestion to avoid buggy software is to use something by Oracle?

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Submarine cable cut lops Terabits off Australia's data bridge

Adam 1
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Re: yet another reason

Firstly the

obligatory.

To show the doubters out there, here are the first 7 hops with and without VPN (pia in this case) over tpg to NASA.gov . The exercise is left to the reader to work out how these are routed, but the participation of trunk links via Kenya and the involvement of Swiss ISPs should give you some hints.

VPN off

1. 192.168.0.1; www.routerlogin.com; 2.069, 4.426, 4.576

2. 10.20.xxx.xxx; 21.066, 23.260, 24.255

3. 202.7.xxx.xxx; 202-7-xxx-xxx.tpgi.com.au; 25.745, 28.481, 28.636

4. 203.219.35.67; syd-sot-ken-int1-be-20.tpgi.com.au; 30.506, 33.322, 34.271

5. 62.115.49.137; las-b3-link.telia.net; 208.953, 212.432, 212.689

6. 213.155.137.58; las-b21-link.telia.net; 211.422

6. 62.115.116.179; las-b21-link.telia.net; 211.839

6. 62.115.116.187; las-b21-link.telia.net; 210.804

7. 213.155.131.76; dls-b21-link.telia.net; 237.292

7. 62.115.139.6; dls-b21-link.telia.net; 222.407

7. 80.91.254.168; dls-b21-link.telia.net; 223.347

VPN on

1. 10.113.xxx.xxx; 21.241, 23.388, 24.962

2. *

3. 46.166.188.254; 326.402

3. 46.166.190.254; 313.348

3. 109.201.154.254; 314.520

4. 85.159.239.65; 326.518

4. 85.159.239.41; 317.522

4. 85.159.239.77; 317.991

5. 195.22.213.169; ae7.amster32.ams.seabone.net; 324.957, 337.009, 329.025

6. 195.22.216.227; xe-1-0-0.ashburn2.ash.seabone.net; 416.610

6. 195.22.206.2; xe-0-2-0.ashburn2.ash.seabone.net; 402.819

6. 195.22.206.1; xe-1-2-0.ashburn2.ash.seabone.net; 404.017

7. 195.22.206.51; amazon.ashburn2.ash.seabone.net; 474.928

7. 195.22.206.59; amazon.ashburn2.ash.seabone.net; 450.211

7. 195.22.206.51; amazon.ashburn2.ash.seabone.net; 454.509

So is this difference academic or are there real world implications? The answer of course is that it depends. For browsing it is pretty minor. Throughput is limited by my ADSL2 which is in about the worst possible place relative to the exchange. It is measurable but for the most part feels normal. I did a speedtest from a few places. The most noticeable difference was via Seoul where the VPN was nearly 100ms FASTER in the ping test than no VPN.

This is hardly surprising given the detour that the packets are taking. Unless the packets between your home an the VPN endpoint are traversing via Guam, or the backbone of your VPN provider is carried via tpgs private cable, then a break in that said cable isn't going to affect you. Tpg have two choices here. They can route around the fault by using their other cables (as they did in the traceroute above) or they can buy additional capacity from their competing northbound fibre links. No doubt they will be doing both at different times but a lot of that capacity (on competing links) would have been bulk purchased so it isn't always available and unlikely to be cheap.

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Adam 1
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Re: yet another reason

The problem is with the TPG owned cable. If you connect to a VPN endpoint in Australia (mine has Sydney or Melbourne options), your traffic that would ordinarily travel across that cable won't. It will go via the VPN provider infrastructure from that point onwards.

Won't help you in Tassie obviously.

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Adam 1
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yet another reason

to use a VPN service.

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Ducks, Lord of the Rings, movies and maths: The GCHQ Xmas puzzle solutions revealed

Adam 1
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Re: Get on with your job.

They decided that French "phrases of surrender" would be a bit too easy.

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Who would code a self-destruct feature into their own web browser? Oh, hello, Apple

Adam 1
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Re: Has Mr Dabbs got much better recently?

> hyperconverged agile cloud flash devoops

I just won buzzword bingo!

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Winning Underhand C Contest code silently tricks nuke inspectors

Adam 1
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Does a PDF with embedded fonts count?

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Microsoft's malware mitigator refreshed, but even Redmond says it's no longer needed

Adam 1
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> With Windows 10 we have implemented many features and mitigations that can make EMET unnecessary on devices running Windows 10

Oh great! Now even EMET Setup.msi installs Windows 10 for you.

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When customers try to be programmers: 'I want this CHANGED TO A ZERO ASAP'

Adam 1
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Re: Any chance of a solution?

Nothing sets the SUCCESS variable back to 0 so the while loop is infinite.

Hopefully getstatus method isn't too resource intensive...

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Windows 10 will now automatically download and install on PCs

Adam 1
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Re: Be like Nan

Was bingo played with the mystery KB numbers that reactivated that darned win10 upgrade?

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Adam 1
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I prefer to call it kicking the bullet.

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Adam 1
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Microsoft are mad

Where's that program to disable it?

(Don't get me wrong, I quite like it. That is why it is installed on the laptop I want it installed in. I don't want it installed on my media centre box because some Muppet decided to sunset arguably the most family proof PVR and replace it with a DVD player)

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No, George Brandis, telcos still don't want you taking the console in their networks

Adam 1
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Random ideas sought to improve cryptography

Adam 1
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Re: Way back when

@Frumious Bandersnatch

That is easy to fix. You are not susceptible to timing attacks if you use a random position within pi to specify the position within pi to read from ;p

Hint: pretty sure @maffski wasn't being serious.

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Adam 1
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Re: Way back when

> And data derived from a quantum mechanical process are no good, either, if there's any possibility that an attacker might be able to observe the same process or intercept the data

At a quantum level, the observer would collapse the state. They can't passively observe because cloning is impossible.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/No-cloning_theorem

Quantum == weird

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Adam 1
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That tells you that they are distributed rather than random though.

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Adam 1
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Fire a photon through a semi transparent mirror. Use two photon detectors to measure whether it was reflected or transmitted.

Physics says you will get a truly random sequence, but a malicious adversary could of course attack the photon detectors directly.

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Why a detachable cabin probably won’t save your life in a plane crash

Adam 1
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Re: Thunderbird 2?

> how did X get a patent for something they patently did not invent, merely copied from fiction?

You must be new to the way that the USPTO operates.

Step 1 - fiction

2001 A Space Odyssey

Step 2 - Copy and patent the idea

portable display device USD670286

Step 3 - profit

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Two-thirds of Android users vulnerable to web history sniff ransomware

Adam 1
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Re: Building their own coffin

> Google can't do anything about pushing updates to anything except its Nexus devices

I hate having to wait for Dell, Lenovo and HP to push out Windows updates after patch Tuesday.

If the system is modular enough, the OEMs can wreck their users'experience without compromising the OS's ability to be patched.

PS, smart move on the Nexus.

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Adam 1
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Re: Bit unfair blaming Google

> Much of the Google infrastructure, including WebView, is built as apps and updated from the Play Store - to anybody.

Only since lollipop...

And how about that fix for stagefright. Did you get that through play store? Didn't think so.

Look, they are moving the right way but it is a long road.

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Adam 1
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Re: Not really an security exploit

> Let me guess, is the only way to make sure you're protected to buy a Symantec security product for your mobile?

To be fair, this is pretty bad malware. I would almost prefer to have Symantec installed.

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TalkTalk CuffCuffs 'ScamScam CrimCrims'

Adam 1
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See what happens when you let people copy/paste?

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Come on kids, let's go play in the abandoned nuclear power station

Adam 1
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Re: Fission expedition

Oh snap(per)!

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Five technologies you shouldn't bother looking out for in 2016

Adam 1
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Re: FaceWatch...

eyeWatch?

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Star Wars: Episode VIII delayed by six months

Adam 1
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˙punoɹɐ ʎɐʍ ʇɥƃᴉɹ ǝɥʇ ʎɐldsᴉp oʇ ʇxǝʇ pǝʇonb puɐ ǝlpuɐɥ ʎɯ ʇǝƃ oʇ ʍoɥ ʍouʞ ʇ,uop I ˙uɐǝɯ noʎ ʇɐɥʍ ǝǝs uɐɔ I

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Adam 1
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> turning summer 2017 into late December

ɹǝpunuʍop ɯoɹɟ ᴉɥ/

¡ǝɯᴉʇ ɹǝɯɯns sᴉ ʇɐɥʇ ʇnq

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UK can finally 'legalise home taping' without bringing in daft new tax

Adam 1
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> Why the hell should they get a penny ?

Actually that sounds like the perfect amount for the said pot.

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Snowden bag-carrier Miranda's detention was lawful – UK appeal court

Adam 1
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Re: isInAccordanceWithOfficialVersion(data) != true is Terrorism

That is sloppy code.

!isInAccordanceWithOfficialVersion(data)

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Microsoft: We’ve taken down the botnets. Europol: Would Sir like a kill switch, too?

Adam 1
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On a technical level, it can't be done at the ISP unless the malware is stupid enough to communicate over HTTP or something. The c&c is probably behind some hidden tor service. The ISP can't see that. They just see random 1s and 0s going to the tor exit node.

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Adam 1
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Re: Windows 10 EULA

Nothing new here. Windows 7 does it too. Just take a look at the "do not download windows 10" setting for example.

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LastPass in 2FA lock down after 'fessing up to phishing attack

Adam 1
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Re: KeePass Cross Platform Synching

> going back to the bad old days of recording passwords in notebooks/address books/on the backs of envelopes

To be honest, that wouldn't overly bother me, assuming the said notebooks/address books/etc are not in some share house or on airbnb or something. The more likely regression I can imagine is the bad days of using the same credentials for all their online services, meaning the moment that one of these does a talk talk, all your accounts are compromised.

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Microsoft herds biz users to Windows 10 by denying support for Win 7 and 8 on new CPUs

Adam 1
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> does that mean it won't boot old Linux either?

No, Intel will just release 2 versions of their new CPU range. A Windows 10 edition and a wink wink nudge nudge alternative older operating systems version like Linux or perhaps something else.

I can already guess which series will have the higher run in the fab.

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Adam 1
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Yeah. Can't see Intel sitting around and copping that one. If they mean that they won't extend the kernel to access new features on the newer silicon, that is fair enough, but if they cripple the kernel so it refuses to run on those CPUs, good luck to them. It won't end up where they expect it too.

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You've heard of Rollercoaster Tycoon – but we can't wait for Server Tycoon

Adam 1
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very specific

$109,242 is a very specific amount.

Dev 1: How much you reckon we need?

Dev 2: bout 110 grand should do it.

Dev 1: 110? Why not just ask for a million billion squazillion. Come on mate, I need a sensible figure.

Dev 2: OK, OK. $109,250.

Dev 1: Well at least we are in the right ballpark, but I can't see us getting more than $109,242.

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