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* Posts by Adam 1

626 posts • joined 7 May 2012

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FREE PARTY for TEN lucky Australian Reg readers

Adam 1
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Re: Limericks

>we do have some interesting town names like

Additionally there are complex abbreviation rules. You can call Wagga Wagga Wagga; but you can't call Woy Woy Woy.

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CAPTCHA challenges you to copy pointillist painter Seurat's classic

Adam 1
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Re: Another Tech That Should Die

I completely agree with Jake.

/WTF JUST HAPPENED

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Famous 'Dish' radio telescope to be emptied in budget crisis: CSIRO

Adam 1
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Wow! That link is a freaky time warp back to the www of that era. All it needed was a blinking heading.

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IEEE gets to work on 25G Ethernet MAC standards

Adam 1
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obligatory

http://xkcd.com/927/

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DAYS from end of life as we know it: Boffins tell of solar storm near-miss

Adam 1
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Re: Water supplies?

I can't comment for everywhere but gravity fed is still preferred. In this way the pumps don't need to be strong enough to maintain full pressure during peak demand, just enough to replenish across the day/week. This permits smaller pumps and/or off peak power to be used.

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Adam 1
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Re: Pretty high risk

That is a false choice. Both are worth preparing for.

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Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid: The plug-in for plutocrats

Adam 1
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Re: kmpl? WTF?

> The rest of the planet uses acually, kilometers per liter.

No we don't. We measure L/100km and spell them litres and kilometres respectively. It is a far more meaningful way to express an efficiency figure to boot. Upgrading from a 18 MPG car to a 25 MPG car will save you roughly three times the amount of fuel/money/CO2 as upgrading from a 40MPG to a 50MPG car.

Expressed as L/100km, you are comparing 13L/100km -> 9.4L/100km (3.6L/100km saving) vs 5.9L/100km->4.7L/100km (1.2L/100km saving). Having a figure in MPG (or km/L) would only be useful if for some reason you had aquired exactly 1 gallon (or 1 L) of fuel and you wanted to know how many miles (or kms) you could possibly travel with different vehicles. Most of us have the inverted problem statement. I have a requirement to travel distance X miles/kms per week for work/school/fun/dads taxi. How much fuel do I need to buy/money do I need to spend/CO2 do I need to emit to do that with this car vs that one.

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Lower prices are BAD FOR CONSUMERS, says Turnbull

Adam 1
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Re: We need a new elReg Unit of Measure?

What about the Palmer-Gore scale?

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Data retention: ASIO says Web browsing habits would need a warrant

Adam 1
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My thought on this is that there is no free lunch. Someone has to pay for this data retention, for the spinning rust, the tape archives and the masses of servers sitting up top. Who is supposed to pay for that? The ISPs? Are you not attempting to transfer the true cost of the surveillance tools you believe are necessary to perform your job?

What about the security of the data? It is very expensive to ensure the data remains secure both during transfer and at rest. Who is going to pay for continual audits and penetration testing? Who is liable when a user's privacy is violated?

No. If it would blow your budget in a week and not turn up the quantity of useful leads where you can justify it against your own budget then that probably tells you something about its value. Just pushing the cost to someone else doesn't make it any cheaper. It just makes our internet bills higher rather than our tax rates. Forgive my lack of excitement over that "saving".

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Say goodbye to landfill Android: Top 10 cheap 'n' cheerful smartphones

Adam 1
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>Oh, and before you all take to the comments page, each device performed perfectly well telephonically

Much appreciated :D

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Whoah! How many Google Play apps want to read your texts?

Adam 1
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Re: How do you make sure of this?

"Except that if you can revoke permissions at any time, those functions would have to be called every time anything is done in the app ever. Making it ridiculously slow."

Firstly, I did not describe a model where users could revoke permissions at any time. I suggested that they could choose which optional tokens they accept.

Secondly, the permissions are held in a manifest, and the OS could quite easily maintain a hashmap of application/permission. Even on modest phone hardware this would be capable of several hundred thousand containsKey calls per second. I am really racking my brains to imagine what sort of overheads you are imagining. I would be unsurprised if the OS does this behind each API call anyway.

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Adam 1
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Re: How do you make sure of this?

>How do you deal with the inevitable moron that denies net access to their mail app?

You allow the developer to specify whether the token is mandatory or optional and you let them formally declare why they want it so the user can see it on the play store. The user can't reject a mandatory token but can reject an optional token.

The developer can then access a method to return whether token xyz is available. If not, they can hide the relevant button on the ui and offer a cut down experience of their app.

For backwards compatibility you could even assume all permissions of existing apps are mandatory. Over time, competitive forces should make developers think twice about the permissions that they demand. Google could even allow you to compare the permissions matrix between a group of apps selected by the user and add a filter to allow users to exclude apps with specific permissions.

Simples!

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FBI: We found US MILITARY AIRCRAFT INTEL during raid on alleged Chinese hacker

Adam 1
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Re: I am amazed

>If this data is supposed to be so secret, what is it doing on internet connected servers in the first place?

Totally agree. If the military wanted to connect their IT assets together into some distributed interconnected network they should invent one.

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Microsoft's Lumia 930... a real HANDFUL

Adam 1
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Re: Something wrong

Never fear. The long running tradition has been continued where phone reviews don't mention the capability (or otherwise) of "making a telephone call".

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Another 'NSA-proof' webmail biz popped by JavaScript injection bug

Adam 1
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Re: Why 128 bit AES not 256 bit?

>How about a non-American government generated encryption method instead?

How about one invented by a few Belgium blokes? There is a good one called AES....

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Secret Senate software stoush: Greens intervene

Adam 1
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Congratulations Lee Rhiannon. You have done your country a service.

/can't believe what I just wrote

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Revealed: SECRET DNA TEST SCANDAL at UN IP agency

Adam 1
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Re: on a technical note...

>THE SKY IS BLUE!

In the UK that WOULD be news!

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Insecure AVG search tool shoved down users' throats, says US CERT

Adam 1
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Re: @Stuart Longland

>you seem to want something for free when it actually costs something to build

Who held a gun to their head and asked them to release it for free? You are conveniently ignoring their bait and switch of claiming it is free but the cost is hidden by a EULA so long that no normal person could possibly comprehend it. Or another way to think of it is would the free* software have gained such market share if they charged for it all along? Did their decision to give it away make competitive products unprofitable?

*Free as in you can have this beer if you let me look through your fridge and note everything in there and then offer you advertisements based upon people with similar tastes)

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Adam 1
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Re: Foxit

It's not just foxit that installs open candy. Do a Google search and you will find a who's who of applications I used to recommend. It is really sad that so many otherwise brilliant applications stoop to installing this spyware.

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Google de-listing of BBC article 'broke UK and Euro public interest laws' - So WHY do it?

Adam 1
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>Your talking nonsense

You're

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Voteware source code requester labelled 'vexatious'

Adam 1
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I don't understand the AECs angle even if this guy is vexatious. Surely it would build confidence in our elected officials if we prove that the systems behind elections, from counting to preferences allocation to the random number generators behind the order that candidates are listed.

What could be more democratic than a crowd funded source code audit of the software we rely on for choosing our governments?

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NIST shows off one-way photon-passing metamaterial

Adam 1
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Re: A remarkable achievement

...taken lightly

IC what you did there.

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Windows 7, XP and even Vista GAIN market share again

Adam 1
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I don't mind the new start screen. But I have a touch screen so it makes sense. I have however also tried it with a mouse. The adjective turd comes to mind...

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Xiaomi: Hidden Android dragon is growing fast, despite being unknown in the West

Adam 1
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And if they do, perhaps a sentence on their relative competency or otherwise with the unusual use case of "making a telephone call" wouldn't go astray.

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Conformist Google: Android devices must LOOK, WORK ALIKE

Adam 1
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Re: Isn't Android open source in the first place?

Yes the OEM can whack their own craptastic android derived bloatfest and comply with the licence. They can't call it android or use the play store though which may be enough to prevent fragmentation of ui experiences.

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Microsoft compliance police to NHS: We want your money

Adam 1
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Re: It's time!

>hardball is what the big kids play, softball is for the girls - sorry, but I mean no disparagement to the more attractive half of the species, and I love playing both)

So hardball and girls?

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USB charger is prime suspect in death of Australian woman

Adam 1
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Would a RCD have prevented this?

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Appeal to again seek code for Australia's secret election software

Adam 1
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It is completely unacceptable that the code that decides who sits in the house of review is not public domain. I am making the same argument that we make when we deny the legitimacy of a secret court. It is not that a specific ruling is always going to be wrong. It is that you end up with a system that is open to abuse.

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Adam 1
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>360,000 lines of code to count votes?

You say that but this is the Australian senate we are talking about. You need that many lines of code just to cover bring in the ten billion people listed on it.

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AMD details aggressive power-efficiency goal: 25X boost by 2020

Adam 1
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Re: power arbitration

I am sure when processor designers are short on ideas that the forums on el reg is one of the first stops.

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Vodafone AU frees data to atone for outage

Adam 1
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terrific

To make up for not providing the service you paid for we will force you to compete for the bandwidth you have already paid for with others who wouldn't normally use data.

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How farsighted is Microsoft's Azure RemoteApp?

Adam 1
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what's the difference

Between this and what you could do with remote apps in vanilla 2008r2?

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Tesla, Nissan, BMW mull all-for-plug, plug-for-all electrocar charger plan

Adam 1
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Re: Electric car batteries don't "swap"

Just a standard connector and interface for a petrol/diesel pusher trailer for the rare cases where you need to do a big trip would be great. Pop up places where you can rent them. Typical daily charge would be done at home.

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Adam 1
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Re: A standard plug but

Damn straight. In fact, they would sue round corners.

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IoT cup claims 'instant' identification of what's in it

Adam 1
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Re: Actually, this may have a use.

>This is only the beginning. A cup that could set off an alarm if you drink something your allergic to?

Fosters

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Oz refugee data leak a SNAFU, says KPMG report

Adam 1
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>104 unique IP addresses accessed the file 123 times.

Incorrect. The web server served the file 123 times. They have no way of determining whether any of these downloaders passed on the document by email, USB stick, sneaker net, paste bin.

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Greenpeace rejoices after getting huge renewable powerplant CANCELLED

Adam 1
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Re: Why...

Why a down vote for a reasonable question?

Often you have A/C grids in different cities which are not synchronised. This makes interconnects complex and can allow failures in one grid to take down the connected grid.

Coupled with the "you can transport more power without building bigger pylons to hold thicker wires" (read: cheaper) and you lose less power along the trip (read: increased range) makes it a bit of a no brainer.

The following link is pretty good.

http://electrical-engineering-portal.com/advantages-of-hvdc-over-hvac-transmission

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Google: Why should we pay tax when we make 'intangibles'?

Adam 1
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Re: Next Response from OZ Govt

Mandate adblock plus to all government computers and start mentioning the right to be forgotten.... You may just find that there is some tangible work that can be taxed after all.

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Adam 1
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Re: If I can't see it, it doesn't exist???

Notwithstanding the tangibility of said police officer and road, the tangibility or otherwise of the goods and services provided by Google have no bearing on whether they are taxable activities.

They really don't do their net neutrality arguments any favours by such asshaterie. Organisation A which throws lots of money at political parties to attempt to get a fast/slow lane made legal and organisation B who refuses to pay tax to the said governments whinges about it.*

* I get there is a difference between a party and the government, but even dumb governments recognise that a healthy tax base allows you the revenue to do your political leaning (cut taxes or increase government services) so even little government fans tend to hate tax shirkers.

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SLOW DOWN: Insecure-by-design software on road

Adam 1
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Re: On Hwy 121, between Sonoma & Napa ...

BADGER BADGER BADGER BADGER BADGER BADGER MUSHROOM MUSHROOM

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Adam 1
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Re: If there's got to be a default password...

Just make sure it can't be determined by looking at the publicly visible MAC address.

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TrueCrypt hooked to life support in Switzerland: 'It must not die' say pair

Adam 1
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Re: Swisscrypt?

Swiss army crypt?

Maybe not. They would have to extend it to convert files to PDF, play video files, edit spreadsheets, zip files and a browser to claim that one.

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Adam 1
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Re: New name of the program

A penguin staring at an apple tree with an odd bite mark in each fruit through a slightly warped window frame?

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Adam 1
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Re: "What difference..." @John P

>It seems reasonable that the team should want to take a course of action based on a) not suffering slights on the software due to problems in the underlying OS, b) not feeling obliged to build more and more plugs into the software due to holes in the host OS, and/or c) not needing to keep suitable-for-testing copies of XP around for longer than necessary

Sure thing.

* Add the following text to the website. "Due to Microsoft ceasing support of windows XP, Windows XP is no longer a supported by Truecrypt. We recommend you upgrade your operating system."

* A checkbox later in installshield will prevent its install on such operating system versions (or at least those who can work around that know the risks)

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Adam 1
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Re: CryptTrue

Gehrpelcg ??

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UBER UBER ALLES: Investors value ride app at $17 BEEELLION

Adam 1
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Pint

Which is the bubble?

If you look at the taxi industry here, they are basically a cartel that have organised via political favours an artificial limit in plates and therefore are creaming an absolute fortune in fares.

I feel for the drivers. They are paid utter pittance for the abuse they incur; to the point where they make more money driving for Uber than their day job. Many of the taxis are old having many hundred thousand kms.

So what do we want from a taxi industry. It really isn't hard to understand:

* Competent screened drivers who are paid a liveable wage. We get that this is not free.

* Well maintained, clean, comfortable vehicles with appropriate insurances.

* A way to book them where a driver actually turns up who drives you to your destination with courtesy. One of the last taxis I caught nearly killed us and several pedestrians going 80 through a 30 zone because we had the audacity to expect a ride to a place that was "too short"; By too short, far enough away from the airport to be impractical to walk but obviously too close for his liking.

* Reasonable fair structures, taxes and credit card surcharges.

A component of each fair must go towards each of these costs, yet the elephant in the room is the plates. Seriously it is over 10x the cost of the car itself. This means that they have to spend most of the fares they collect just to pay for the plates. Those not working for the man basically have their life savings paying off a piece of paper saying that they can carry passengers. Now I am sorry, but that is the real bubble here.

What Uber have brought to light is that the true cost of offering a taxi service is much lower than what we pay when we hop into one. I don't necessarily think Uber's cost model works out (many drivers haven't really thought through the true cost of wear and tear and depreciation on their vehicles from being involved in this), but it is definitely a step in the right direction. If the taxi industry were deliverying a service people were reasonably happy with, it would have gone nowhere.

As an occasional regular taxi customer, I expect them to realise that the fare equates to a not insignificant amount of my disposable income and well and truly covers the cost of their wage, fuel, insurances, wear and tear, car lease and a pretty handsome profit. The fact they get paid crap is because THEIR boss / industry body is screwing them, not their customers.

Icon; because bubbles can be good.

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Happy Birthday Tetris: It's flipping 30

Adam 1
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Bum baba bum baba bum baba bum baba bum baba bum ba bum bum bum

Bum ba bum baba ... now you got it in my head. Thanks a lot!

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Adam 1
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Re: The perfect game

Civ > all other games ever.

That is all

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How Bitcoin could become a super-sized Wayback Machine

Adam 1
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Pint

Curious

I have read the paper and I am still a little**1 confused about how it works.

First things first, I really dislike the inherent uselessness in the BTC computations. It serves no beneficial purpose other than as an overhead in ensuring scarecity. But it does this by using frightful amounts of energy and wasting computing resources that could otherwise be used in useful pursuits (Folding / Climate Modeling / etc). At best you could call it an overhead; a necessary evil but finding something useful to do with those computations should be a high priority. Otherwise, the only people who will be able to profit from it**2 are those who run massive distributed botnets or cryptolocker malware who therefore don't need to pay input costs.

So I really WANT to like this, but there is one glaring problem that I can't see addressed. Let us assume that I agree to store X Bytes of data which is valued at a given amount Y. I can prove that I have stored X by signing some random challenges with my private key. Now I can believe a few things about all this:

* That due to the random challenge I can not predict which subset of X will be challenged.

* That due to my private key being needed to sign the challenge, I would not want to pool it in the cloud.

Now after some time, I want to sell my Y currency to buy a good/service. I am assuming that the buyer has the necessary mechanisms to prove that I am indeed the owner of the coin and the transaction goes ahead.

Now that I am no longer the owner of the coin, where is my motivation to not just wipe the data I am currently holding to realise the X Bytes of storage (or to use those same X bytes to store some other coin)? If I was to do this, there would be a coin that was not backed by the promised stored data which goes counter to the purpose of this.

How does the proposed solution prevent me from doing this? Surely I don't need to upload all of the data associated with the coin to the recipient in order to transact? Otherwise, where is the benefit in trading vs just mining fresh coins.

**1 by a little, I mean a lot.

**2 talking about mining here, not speculation; I will leave that for others to "solve".

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CSIRO claims milestone in solar-powered steam turbines

Adam 1
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Re: What about the birds?

This is a good point. This thing looks potentially fatal to any passing bird, which is entirely unlike hydro electric dams and open cut coal mines which are completely safe to local fauna.

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