* Posts by Adam 1

782 posts • joined 7 May 2012

Branson on Virgin Galactic fatal crash: 'Space is hard – but worth it'

Adam 1
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@Emmanuel

I wouldn't trust Google then. I count 14 from just two shuttle disasters (challenger + Columbia)

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Google’s dot-com forget-me-not bomb: EU court still aiming at giant

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Re: Google goes into Kevin the Teenager Mode

Here's the thing.

The search result is already correct.

Correctness of a search engine relates to the ability to locate URLs that relate to the phrase you are searching for. They do not offer an opinion on the fitness for purpose or correctness of that information. If you search for a review of a car, the results may contain links to reviews by people who clearly have no clue, are biased towards or against a particular model or get specifications or prices wrong. That is where adults are expected to engage their brain and evaluate for themselves. If the information on this site is so bad that poor little Europe couldn't be trusted with it, then block it at the site itself.

Censoring of search results is the realm of Beijing or Moscow rather than somewhere that values free media.

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Adam 1
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@Spartacus

Reread my comment. I did not suggest that they could avoid compliance by blocking their IP range. There is no inherent contradiction between compliance with the law and choosing who wish to offer your services to.

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Adam 1
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Re: Geo-location?

No offence but I would much prefer them to spend those few milliseconds figuring out the most applicable links that correlate to my search query, not figuring out locations of IP addresses to crosscheck umpteen blacklists and to exclude such results.

If I was Google I would drop all connections from ECJ offices in protest. Or pummel them with random massive streams of data through JavaScript to fill their pipe.

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Samsung says teaming up with mobe-maker Microsoft could violate antitrust law

Adam 1
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I think Samsung may be drawing a bit of a long bow here by going after this argument. That said, I also believe for the most part Microsoft don't have most of these claimed patents, although they probably have some real ones now they bought Nokia...

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Free government-penned crypto can swipe identities

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it gets worse

Their web portal has a password policy that restricts citizens to just 8 characters/digits.

Why does it matter about the maximum password length ; they all SHA256 down to the same size irrespective of length right guys? Er, guys, you aren't storing those passwords in plain text or reversible encryption are you?

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This is why we CAN have nice things: Samsung Galaxy Alpha

Adam 1
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@45rpm

So how are you enjoying your new job in the soap factory?

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Adam 1
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Re: Comparing to Fisher-Price

My thoughts exactly. If the only side effect of throwing it into the tiles is that it starts playing the ABC song until you reboot it then I'm sold.

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Tim Cook: The classic iPod HAD TO DIE, and this is WHY

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Re: Apple killed the competition then deliberately dumped the market...

OK, so I have checked.

The first generation iPod (now called classic) had 5GB storage. Even most of the 3rd gen were 20GB.

The money of one of these "classics" could just about buy you two XPerias (not the Zs obviously), but even the cheap ones have a microSD slot. A 32GB card can easily be had for under US$20. Same with Samsungs. Amazingly, some manufacturers have discovered a way that users can swap out both storage and batteries. They figured out that if you don't glue them to the board, you can just take one out when it is flat and put another in. Likewise, they discovered these cards which can be removed and replaced with either higher capacities or just additional media. It is not quite as innovative as rounded edges but not bad eh?

The battery life of your smart phone is mostly your screen. If you are using it as a media player, your screen is off and it will easily last a day.

Sorry, what was I supposed to discover?

Most people can live with just 16 - 32GB of music with them at a time. Those that cant do not form a big enough market to make the product line profitable. The writing is on the wall for them as microSD cost/GB drops and 4G makes streaming services technically possible. If the exorbitant costs for data over 4G drop over the next few years, then many will need even less storage on the phone itself. Apple don't want to be selling the iPod, they want to invent and sell iSpotify (or Beats or whatever they branded it).

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Adam 1
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Sounds like another reason to steer clear of the gym.

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Adam 1
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Re: Apple killed the competition then deliberately dumped the market...

No. Sales dwindled because you now carry a portable computer the same size that can play music, movies, ebooks, apps and games, browse the net and take photos which often have similar capacities to the original iPod classic. It dwindled for the same reason as compact digital cameras have; there is no need to get two things when one thing does everything you need with only compromises you find acceptable.

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Shellshock over SMTP attacks mean you can now ignore your email

Adam 1
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Helo

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Voyager 1 now EIGHTEEN LIGHT HOURS from home

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This weeks what if seems quite appropriate:

http://what-if.xkcd.com/117/

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Adam 1
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>Sure, it's not got a huge propulsion, but it makes you wonder how you intend to keep something powered and propulsive for decades or even centuries.

It is moving at 17km/s. For perspective, that is London to Sydney in 16 minutes.

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Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET

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@werdsmith

Buying a physical CD also requires putting on pants then driving to a Westfield somewhere and flicking through the shelves hoping to find the one you are after. Good luck if it isn't on the top 50; all of that pant wearing could be for naught. Contrast this to digital sales, where if you know what you want then you can have it purchased and downloading within seconds; no calling around different stores to see who has it in stock.

ITunes (the software) is still an awful offence against humanity, but I can see how it is convenient to those locked into that ecosystem.

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Happy 2nd birthday, Windows 8 and Surface: Anatomy of a disaster

Adam 1
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Re: Charm menu ... grrr ...

@John H Woods

It is even less sensible when you have a second monitor on the right.

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32,000 Hungarians plan to take to the streets for 'internet tax' protest

Adam 1
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Re: Meh

That is unlikely. It would take 15 separate powers two agree on a base.

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Forget the $2499 5K iMac – today we reveal Apple's most expensive computer to date

Adam 1
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Re: Ahhh....

You're folding it wrong.

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Trips to Mars may be OFF: The SUN has changed in a way we've NEVER SEEN

Adam 1
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Re: Not the best wording

Out of curiosity, what do they do on one of these missions or even on the ISS in the event that one of the astronauts was to pass away from some unexpected natural cause?

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MARS NEEDS WOMEN, claims NASA pseudo 'naut: They eat less

Adam 1
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We know where the savings really are. At least they won't ask for a raise, right Nadella?

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STONER SHEEP get the MUNCHIES after feasting on £4k worth of cannabis plants

Adam 1
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Where's the green sheep?

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Australian spookhaus busted for warrantless tap of own phones

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clear solution available

It seems obvious to me that the best way to fix this sort of problem is to grant them more powers.

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Scientists skeptical of Lockheed Martin's truck-sized FUSION reactor breakthrough boast

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Re: Game changer

Never before has a comment been posted that so perfectly matches the handle of its poster.

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Adam 1
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Re: To the skeptics...

>No, but they do deception.

True, but fusion power 10 years away isn't exactly an unusual claim.

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Prehistoric swingbelly KANGAROOS were TOO FAT to jump – scientists

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Re: Something to be aware of...

>The other issue I have with this is that Australia was crawling with massive carnivores at the time, and getting away from them was (presumably) a priority for prey animals.

Possibly, but another possibility is if it was also a common ancestor to the common drop bear then perhaps it had no need to get away from anything. Would also explain how they got so fat.

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Kill off SSL 3.0 NOW: HTTPS savaged by vicious POODLE

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Re: Bad news for iPad

> will apps (like the BA app) inherit any fixes that may be supplied for iOS or Android or do the apps themselves need to be updated?

No need to worry. The security in the BA app is top notch.

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Son of Hudl: Tesco flogs new Atom-powered 8.3-inch Android tablet

Adam 1
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Re: Hmmmm

Stay classy Pete.

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Adam 1
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Re: There’s no official word from Tesco on the weight of the Hudl 2

>Don't you have the Scales app on your iPhone 6

Cool. Didn't know about that trick. Awesome. Off to weigh my Bagger 288.

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Android's Cyanogenmod open to MitM attacks

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Re: Single biggest bug source

Then how would you refactor your methods? It isn't like IDEs have built in features where you can extract code to new method. Clearly you have to copy the method, add your new loop and if statement and give it some obscure name.

Also, wouldn't it be great if build servers were able to reject check-ins if duplicate code was detected? Ah, pipe dreams.

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Re: And so...

Still waiting for them to properly fix their production code.

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Adam 1
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>He said the fix was fairly simple and said the exposure served as an academic exercise in the perils of code reuse

I would venture to suggest that code reuse is not the problem. No, I will go further than that. If you roll your own security code there is a better than average chance that what you come up with is much worse.

The problem here is that the developer used the code without understanding how it worked and failed to write test cases that included validation against an invalid certificate.

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Heistmeisters crack cost of safecrackers with $150 widget

Adam 1
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True, but probably not as quietly and most likely leaving it in a way that makes it obvious that something is amiss. It would allow the sort of attack where the safe is broken at a time when it is empty and so under minimal supervision. The safe can then be opened in seconds when it is of more interest.

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Red Bull does NOT give you wings, $13.5m lawsuit says so

Adam 1
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I guess that would be irony as defined by the Allanis Morissette dictionary...

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SPLITTERS! Symantec cleft in twain

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Re: Veritas?

And Norton's?

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Right, suits off: Windows 10 preview Internet Explorer is here

Adam 1
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To reintroduce the <blink/> tag?

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Revealed: Malware that forces weak ATMs to spit out 'ALL THE CASH'

Adam 1
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Re: "32-bit Windows-powered ATM"

>"32-bit Windows-powered ATM"

> No further questions, your honour!

Lucky that there is no bash or openSSL in sight ;p

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Adam 1
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How is this any different to what Barnaby Jack demonstrated at blackhat in 2010?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barnaby_Jack

http://youtu.be/v-dS4UFomv0

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Aussie builds contactless card cloner app, shops at Woolies with fake card

Adam 1
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Are opal cards vulnerable to the same class of attacks?

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Adobe spies on reading habits over unencrypted web because your 'privacy is important'

Adam 1
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Re: Maybe incorrect assumption on my part..

No, the best way to fight this is given the failure to encrypt the phone home to randomly send millions of books read (to the point where they cannot differentiate which requests are real)

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Adam 1
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>Good thing I have no interest in reading e-books. This could've been a problem for me if I did

Oh thank heavens. I was about to ask whether anyone knew whether this would be a problem for Frank.

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Dear Reg readers. I want Metro tiles to replace ALL ICONS in Windows. Is this a good idea?

Adam 1
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Re: Statistical Observation

> was the script that deleted all his posts, in fact, run on a windows machine

From http://www.theregister.co.uk/about/company/website/

The site is built using a custom content management system which is written in Perl and filters its input through HTML Tidy. The pages are generated using the GNOME libxslt library. We make substantial use of the excellent DBIx-Class ORM.

The webservers are running Apache, with MySQL for the back-end database and the search engine. Our web applications (search, forums, Reg Whitepapers, Reg Events, etc) are all built on mod_perl. All the software runs on Debian GNU/Linux, chosen for its stability, reliability, flexibility, and especially for its superlative support of remote package management and upgrades.

So my guess is no.

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Adam 1
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Re: Statistical Observation

EPIC MEMORY FAIL!!!

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Marriott fined $600k for deliberate JAMMING of guests' Wi-Fi hotspots

Adam 1
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Re: True Intentions?

If you are talking about the physics involved, then yes, the 2.4 and 5GHz channels over which WiFi operates is a limited resource. Just like a road network, if everyone tries to drive at the same time then no-one will get anywhere quickly, but there are a couple of points that I take issue with:

1. Is it reasonable to expect that the density of WiFi communication is any higher in a hotel environment such as this than it is in a residential building in the CBD?

2. If there is a specific need for a specific set of rooms to be rf pure, then the solution is to build some sort of faraday cage around the room itself.

3. If such active DoS measures are unavoidable (which would be an absolute legal minefield if it reached off premise btw), then the hotel should be providing a ***free*** alternative (guest APs or wired connections), or a lack of availability of WiFi channels should be very clearly stipulated at the time of booking.

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Adam 1
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Re: A small step in the right direction

Fire with fire!

Find the sales office for these de auth tools and return fire.

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Top 10 SSDs: Price, performance and capacity

Adam 1
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Re: I don't get it

I, for one, welcome our meme correcting overlords.

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Adam 1
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Re: I don't get it

>I'd venture for most people, 500MBps is going to be plenty.

640MBps ought to be enough for anybody.

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Google ordered to tear down search results from its global dotcom by French court

Adam 1
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In your analogy, Google is not the importer. It is an index. Once you click to the link, the content is delivered from the source website. So the source website is the importer.

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Adam 1
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>Time to show the politicians (and in places like France, that includes the judges) the only language they all understand:

I thought they were using the language of retreat quite well.

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SURPRISE: Telstra STILL wants all its promised NBN booty

Adam 1
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Re: NBN=Rort

No. The rort was to privatise Telstra in the 90s without splitting their retail and wholesale arms.

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UK reforms on private copying and parody come into force

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Re: £58m lost revenues

They need to decide if they sell a product or a licence. If a product then you should be free to do as you like with it once purchased. If a licence, then as a licence holder you should be able to purchase a replacement media or exchange format at (or reasonably close to) cost price.

In simple terms, if you want to force someone to purchase another copy for a format shift, then you are starting that they have purchased something physical rather than a licence.

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