* Posts by Adam 1

923 posts • joined 7 May 2012

SHOCK! Robot cars do CRASH. Because other cars have human drivers

Adam 1
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Re: caused by human error and inattention

Driving is more than yaw computations. Sorry, was that a packet of crisps that can be safely run over or a rock that must be avoided by an aggressive manoeuvre. No time to get a response from Watson in this crappy 4G zone.

It stands to reason that a mesh of autonomous cars can process more information and not do the stupid things is humanoids do from time to time. But! What would happen if you were overtaking this car at the moment it decided that the abovementioned crisp packet was to be aggressively avoided? This could easily create accident scenarios that are not so today.

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Ding-dong, the cloud calling: The Ring Video Doorbell

Adam 1
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Re: HD video?

No problems recording an HD stream for its security purposes, but as a doorbell I would much prefer a 1 second notification in poor WiFi range if it just meant a lower quality broadcast to my phone.

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Geneva boffins make light work of random numbers

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problem though

Once you perform the test the steam ceases to be random.

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App makers, you're STILL doing security wrong

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Bloody autocarrot

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I would argue that your GPS coordinates can be easily spoofed by anyone who can type "fake GPS" into the play store search window and as such its effectiveness as a fraud detection is rather limited.

You have to look at the perspective troy would be coming from. When you witness large multinational companies accidentally letting 150 million accounts be breached, you have to recognise that step 0 for security is to not collect the private information that isn't necessary to fulfill the transaction. Or to put it another way, how much do you think the home addresses of papal customers would be worth to identity fraudsters?

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Welcome, stranger: Inside Microsoft's command line shell

Adam 1
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Re: Piping and conditional logic

Many ps applications basically generate the appropriate cmdlet that achieves what you clicked. This lets you do it through the ui, then grab the script and do it in bulk.

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Re: Obscure knowledge got me a job ....

>Only time that happens in a batch file is if I try to get really fancy with a FOR command.

Or any other processing involving the system date; stuff like rename that zip file with the prefix 20150428 is a right PITA with batch files.

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Looking for laxatives, miss? Shoppers stalked via smartphone Wi-Fi

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Re: Am I the only person in the world

>Am I the only person in the world

who has both WiFi and Mobile Data turned *off* unless and until I want to use it?

Yep. It's how we know it's you wandering around.

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SUPERVOLCANIC MAGMA reservoir BUBBLING under Yellowstone Park

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Re: I can't quite get my head around that measurement.

I believe the correct unit of measure would be Olympic swimming pools.

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Windows 10 Device Guard: Microsoft's effort to keep malware off PCs

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Re: Identity badges don't guarantee good behaviour

Minimal access levels is a good idea because the attack surface is reduced and the bad things the malware can achieve is more limited. But I will point out that encrypting all the xlsx files under "My Documents" doesn't require any privileges beyond what such a user would have.

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Japan showcases really, really fast … whoa, WTF was that?!

Adam 1
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Re: ten centimeters

>I haven't heard ten centimeters referred to as "excessive" before, but I digress

From my understanding the force required follows an inverse cubed relationship. So it is 8 times less energy to pick 5cm or 64 times more energy than an inch.

I am sure that there is a good reason to elevate it so high, just curious.

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Adam 1
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If the goal is to reduce friction, 10cm seems a tad excessive. Surely it just needs to be not in physical contact with the track? Anyone know the reason?

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Lawyer: Cops dropped robbery case rather than detail FBI's StingRay phone snoop gizmo

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I suspect nothing is wrong with such a tool per se. They would've got a warrant first, right guys?

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Google broke own security with April fool gag

Adam 1
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Fixed within 90 days. What's the problem?

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Default admin password, weak Wi-Fi, open USB ports ... no wonder these electronic voting boxes are now BANNED

Adam 1
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Re: That design is a travesty

Identification and voting should not go through the same system. Also, you ideally need to share between identification systems whether a given voter has already cast a vote to prevent someone voting multiple times.

Also, ss numbers alone are probably insufficient for authentication because they are guessable.

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Want to go green like Apple, but don't have billions in the bank?

Adam 1
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Re: Go one better

Some back of the envelope calculations...

148 x 100W fluorescent lights would draw 14800.

Switching to LED would realistically drop them to 85W but let's pretend that the laboratory achieved lumens per watt could get us to 70W.

This would save 4440W.

If we assume an average draw of 850W per server, that is about the same power reduction as switching off 5.5 servers. In the scheme of things, that won't be a measurable blip on the building power usage.

The only way I can see the savings becoming significant is that LEDs are dimmer friendly, so you could far more easily control the lighting to follow you as you walk around the building and be at very minimal levels elsewhere.

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It's 2015 and a RICH TEXT FILE or a HTTP request can own your Windows machine

Adam 1
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Re: Flash Player - or a Prayer?

Also, you may want to rethink your choice of PDF viewer now they bundle open candy malware.

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Bloke hits armadillo AND mother-in-law with single 9mm round

Adam 1
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This kids is why we need the interwebs. How else would I learn important tidbits like that?

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Rand Paul puts Hillary Clinton's hard drive on sale

Adam 1
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Re: Is this SATAire?

I'm afRAID that I just can't compete with those.

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Google sticks anti-SQL injection vaccine into MySQL MariaDB fork

Adam 1
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Adam 1
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Doesn't set need to go before where?

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Adam 1
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So back to 80's coder's question. How have they mitigated SQL injection attacks? SQL injection works because the SQL language by nature interleaves instructions (select/delete/insert/where/etc) and data. Most DBMS have parameterized queries, where you specify the SQL query with placeholders and then pass the data as part of the parameter structure. The DBMS can then correctly escape strings that it is passed to avoid this problem (and reuse query plans which differ only by parameter value)

Without parameters, the developer has to remember to escape (and probably bound check) all the user enterable data before inclusion in the string. Humans forget things, or fail to understand that just because your JavaScript only accepts an integer, the data may be sent across a http post which a malicious user can easily modify.

So how have they stopped developer stupid?

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Aluminum bendy battery is boffins' answer to EXPLODING Li-ion menace

Adam 1
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Re: Bored of Battery "Breakthroughs"

No. Fusion is 10 years away.

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Crack security team finishes TrueCrypt audit – and the results are in

Adam 1
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uti nsa im cu si

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Wind turbine blown away by control system vulnerability

Adam 1
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Coat

This is what happens when you expose your wind turbines to the clouds.

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Dear departed Internet Explorer, how I will miss you ... NOT

Adam 1
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Re: Ahh CL

A (former) colleague was debugging some code and was caught out by a compiler bug which caused the debug symbols to not load unless you changed the source file. This meant that every time he tried to replicate the problem, the IDE would just jump straight through his breakpoint.

After much fist shaking, he figured out what was wrong and added a "suitably expressive pop-up window". The compiler then happily stopped on the breakpoint and the bug was quickly found and fixed. Just as quickly, the pop-up was forgotten and somehow was missed by testing. The MD found it with suitable displeasure announced to my then colleague.

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Adam 1
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>basing one of your strategic projects on open source code

I see. You mean something more like basing your own TCP IP stack on BSD.

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Adam 1
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Re: In a wonderful piece of irony...

Maybe this could be fixed with a site redesign?

:p

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Adam 1
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> I really doubt Microsoft would put their crown jewels in an open source project like that.

You're probably right. It's not like they've open sourced the .net runtime and hosted it in github.

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Adam 1
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Re: Bing thing?

127.0.0.1 bing.com

(Put it in your hosts)

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Adam 1
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Not quite my memory. Hard to believe but there was a time in the early days when ie was a more competent browser than Netscape. They then turned to dodgy tactics and then sat on their laurels until they were well and truly surpassed.

Tbh, I hope Spartan works out for them. I would rather we had another choice of browser out there rather than yet another rebadged WebKit.

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Apple: Those security holes we fixed last week? You're going to need to repatch

Adam 1
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Re: Damned if you do

I'd crack some joke about Apple taking some lessons from Microsoft updates of recent, but security is a hard problem. The defender needs to succeed in every occasion. The attacker needs only to succeed once.

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Noobs can pwn world's most popular BIOSes in two minutes

Adam 1
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Re: require only access to a PC

Let's play through that encrypted drive scenario and assume the server has no cold storage of the encryption key (a surprisingly hard problem). That means on boot that someone or something must provide the said key at startup, or the key must be derivable from data held locally. The problem with the latter is pretty self explanatory; if the server can calculate that, so can anyone with access to that data. If the former, and that server must request from another (presumably uncompromised) - did we just solve or move the problem? Next, the credentials for that other server must be available to the cold one. If on the other hand, someone has to physically type something at the console, then it is trivial to add a hardware key logger and capture it when it is typed.

There are things you can do to minimise risk, but armed guards at data centres are not just to prevent people flogging kit.

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OpenSSL preps fix for mystery high severity hole

Adam 1
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Re: The real question...

Waiting for the logo from the marketing team?

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Boffins brew up FIRST CUPPA in SPAAACE using wireless energy (well, sort of)

Adam 1
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Bah! Next you will be claiming that blue whales come in different sizes.

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Adam 1
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Re: What about misdirected microwave beams?

It's amazing how short our collective memory can be. I mean that documentary came out nearly 20 years ago.

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Adam 1
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The Olympic swimming pool IS a perfectly valid scientific unit of measure. Unfortunately for the author, it is a measure of volume or displacement, not distance. Come on el Reg. We expect a technology news site to understand the difference.

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Musk: 'Tesla's electric Model S cars will be less crap soon. I PROMISE'

Adam 1
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>Interestingly, electric cars become more efficient the slower you drive.

According to physics, that rather applies to anything moving through anything:

Fd=ρν^2ACd/2

The velocity above is squared, so you double your speed relative to the air, it quadruples the energy required to overcome air resistance.

Where your point makes (more) sense is that there is a minimum amount of fuel needed to keep the motor turning over at low speed or idle, and this fuel is not achieving useful distance as it would at cruising speed. Of course it requires you to ignore things like headlights, air conditioners, CD players, brake lights and all the other goodies whose fuel requirements are not necessarily a function of the speed you are travelling.

On the original point, a detour will require more energy than you planned. Range anxiety is not so much caused by the km per charge, but the time to recharge. If my petrol light comes on 50km from home, I will fill up even though I know I would probably make it. That is because we are talking about a 5 minute inconvenience. If it meant waiting another 30 minutes, I am far more likely to risk it.

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Microsoft RE-BORKS Windows 7 patch after reboot loop horror

Adam 1
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Re: Wailing and gnashing of some teeth

>It hasn't caused me any problem.

Oh thank God. El Reg had me worried sick.

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Apple slips out security patches while world goes gaga over watches

Adam 1
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Sadly even Google haven't patched chrome on lollipop (nexus 5) according to freakattack. At least you can run Firefox as a work around I suppose.

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Filthy – but sadly frothy – five door fun: Ford Focus 1.5 Zetec

Adam 1
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>"but it’s the kind of car you’d be perfectly happy with as a company car"

One of the best backhanded compliments that I have read in a while.

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Complicit Kiwis sniffed Pacific comms says Snowden

Adam 1
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Re: Are we surprised by this...

I, for one, an surprised by this. I mean why would they be worried about losing SIG INT when they plug the other end into Hawaii?

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Australia threatens to pull buckets of astronomy funding

Adam 1
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This is such a beat up. We know that Prime Minister Turnbull will sort this before June 30.

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Adam 1
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Re: Chris Pyne

To be fair, you friend was never a kid himself and so would never have personally benefited from it.

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FREAK show: Apple and Android SSL WIDE OPEN to snoopers

Adam 1
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Re: WTF?

I think the thing you miss is that for chrome and safari at least, they accept the fallback even if it wasn't initially offered. That is the client side issue.

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Adam 1
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Re: JUST FIX THE SERVERS!

Accept!

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Re: Stuck on old Android

I'm completely sure Google will have patched this 90 days after it was reported.

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Adam 1
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>FREAK (Factoring RSA Export Keys)

I'm just glad that we have a proper acronym for this vulnerability.

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£280k Kickstarter camera trigger campaign crashes and burns

Adam 1
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Re: Risk?

I would have thought so. Unless there is some suggestion of misrepresentation of the state of affairs when funding was sought or the funding was used improperly, that's just a risk of business.

Perhaps the bit about going back to the drawing board was improper or perhaps this isn't the whole story.

All that said, the investors retain the right to be pissed about the situation.

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Reckon YOU can write better headlines than us? Great – apply within

Adam 1
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Re: Don't! Forget!

There's a few more you have to know.

Apple was contacted but had not responded at time of publication should be added as a boot note to all fruity news.

All references to Google need to be translated as the chocolate factory.

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